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27th Iowa Top Banner

Notes for the men of Company B, 27th Iowa.

This information is a compilation of information that I have found. I have not attempted to verify any of it. But if I find a discrepancy between sources, I have noted it. All information in this section should be validated with further research. Corrections are welcome.

I use various sources. I start with the Pension Records Index to see if I can determine the spouse's name. Then I check Census records, and Family Trees on Ancestry.com and familysearch.org. If I can determine what county/state he was in, I check the USGENWEB site for that particular county. I also use Find A Grave and Iowa Gravestones Photo Project websites. Last I do a general search of the internet.


Alcorn, Isaac: He was born Mar. 21, 1840 in Beaver, Clarion County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of George Alcorn and Matilda Elkhorn. He married Almeda Droullard (Shipton) on Aug. 3, 1865 in Potosi, Grant County, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of John Droullard and Rebecca Wilson. His sister, Matilda C. Alcorn, married William Bates, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census, Kiskiminetas, Armstrong, Pennsylvania. George Alcorn (age 39, farmer, born Penn.), Matilda Alcorn (age 39, born Penn), Martha J. Alcorn (age 14, born Penn), John Alcorn (age 12, born Penn), Isaac Alcorn (age 10, born Penn), Nathan Alcorn (age 8, born Penn. Elizabeth Alcorn (age 7, born Penn), Sarah M. Alcorn (age 5, born Penn), Matilda C. Alcorn (age 2, born Penn. and Mary E. Alcorn (age 1/12, born Penn).

This query is on the Grant County Wisconsin US Genweb site.

Garry Bryant Wed Mar 08 2000 4:27 am

Seeking data on the following families: Alcorn, Baker, Droullard, Harger, Slaght. George & Matilda Alcorn came to Grant Co. around 1860 from PA. John H. Baker and his eight daughters and some spouses came between 1850-1870 from NJ. John Droullard's huge family came from Quincy, IL and settled in Dubuque, IA in mid 1830s and came to Grant Co. in mid 1850s. Harger in early 1850s and John Slaght and his wife Julia Baker in the late 1840s.

Almeda Droullard, born June 21, 1837 in Dubuque Iowa, married first Jesse Shipton on May 24, 1854 in Dubuque, Iowa.

Jesse Shipton, born July, 1833 in Pulaski County, Alabama, USA

Enlisted in Civil War Aug. 11 1862 Union Army - Rank: Corp. - served Wisconsin Enlisted H Company 25th Infantry Regiment Wi. - claimed residence in Beetown, Wisconsin, USA

Died Dec. 3, 1863 at Paducah, McCracken County, Kentucky, USA (Description: Inflammation of the spinal cord )

Almeda Shipton filed for Widows Pension June 1864. J. H. Droullard was guardian. Jesse and Almeda Shipton had four children:

  1. William Henry Shipton, b. 02 May 1856, Shulsmonund, Iowa, USA; d. 06 May 1935, Grants Pass, Josephine County, Oregon.
  2. Rebecca V. Shipton, b. 31 March 1858, Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa; d. December 1886, Grant County, Wisconsin.
  3. Margaret M. Shipton, b. 07 December 1860, Potosi, Grant County, Wisconsin.
  4. Ellen A. Jessie Shipton b. 26 April 1863, Potosi, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA; d. December 1930, Boulder, Boulder County, Colorado.

Isaac Alcorn married Almeda Droullard (Shipton) on Aug 3, 1865 in Potosi, Grant, Wisconsin, USA

(Note by Elaine Johnson: When I initially researched this I found several family trees that had a marriage date for Isaac Alcorn and Almeda as August 3, 1859. Given the other evidence (date of death for Jesse Shipton and date Almeda filed the widows pension as Almeda Shipton, that just didn't make sense to me.

I found Jesse and Almeda Shipton with two children William and Rebecca on the 1860 census in Grant County, Wisconsin. So I am sure the 1859 date is wrong.

As I did more research on this I did find an alternate marriage date of Aug. 3, 1865 (on one online family tree), which makes sense with regard to the date of death for Jesse and filing the pension. Also The Wisconsin Pre 1907 Marriage Index http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/vitalrecords/ has a marriage date of Aug 3, 1865 in Grant County for Isaac Alcorn and Mrs. Almeda Shipton.

So now the discrepancy for me was two children (Margaret and Ellen). Most of the family trees on Ancestry.com listed William and Rebecca as the children of Jesse Shipton and listed Margaret and Ellen as the children of Isaac -- they also used the marriage date of 1859.

One family tree had a marriage date of August 3, 1865, and also had Margaret and Ellen listed as the children of Jesse Shipton. To me that makes logical sense. Jesse and Almeda had four children: William, Rebecca, Margaret and Ellen. Jesse died in 1863, Almeda filed widow's pension in 1864 and married Isaac Alcorn in 1865. The rest of the children belonged to Isaac and Almeda.

After I researched this, I contacted the provider of the Family Tree mentioned above. Mandy Nelson (a descendant of Almeda Droullard Shipton) has provided additional information regarding Almeda Droullard Shipton Alcorn and her parents, sibling and children. There is additional information available regarding this family if you are interested.

Isaac Alcorn enlisted in the 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry on Aug. 13, 1862. He was discharged at Cairo, Illinois Aug, 13, 1863 (note by ejj - Roster said discharged Feb. 10, 1863) because of diabetes incurred after enlistment. Beginning November 1880, he received a pension of $8.00 per month for disability of his heart due to measles.

1860 Census: Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: George Alcorn, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Matilda Alcorn (age 47, born Maryland), Isaac Alcorn (age 20, farmer, born Maryland), Ruth A. Alcorn (age 18, born Maryland), Sarah Alcorn (age 14, born Maryland), Matilda Alcorn (age 12, born Maryland), Mary Alcorn (age 10, born Maryland), Eliza Alcorn (age 18, born Maryland), George Alcorn (age 6, born Maryland) and James B. Alcorn (age 3, born Wisconsin.)

1870 Census., Waterloo, Grant County, Wisconsin: Isick Alcorn (age 30, farmer, born Penn), Almeda Alcorn (age 32, born Iowa), William Alcorn (age 14, born Iowa), Rebecca Alcorn (age 12, born Iowa), Margaret Alcorn (age 9, born Wisconsin), Ellen Alcorn (age 6, born Wisconsin), John Alcorn (age 4, born Wisconsin), George Alcorn (age 2, born Wisconsin) and Rebecca Droullard (age 69, born Pennsylvania). Living next door to them was George Alcorn (age 66, farmer, born Penn), Matilda Alcorn (age 56, born Maryland and George Alcorn (age 16, born Penn.).

1880 Census, Waterloo, Grant County, Wisconsin: Isaac Alcorn (age 40, farmer, born Penn), Wife Almeda Alcorn (age 41, born Iowa), daughter Margaret Alcorn (age 19, born Wisconsin), son John Alcorn (age 14, born Wisconsin), son George Alcorn (age 11, born Wisconsin), son Isaac Alcorn (age 8, born Wisconsin and son Henry Alcorn (age 1, born Wisconsin). Living next door to them was Matilda Alcorn (age 66, born Maryland) and George Alcorn (age 25, born Pennsylvania).

1890 Veterans Census: Cassville, Grant County, Wisconsin: Isaac Alcorn (Private, Company B. 27th Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862. Discharged Feb. 10, 1863. Length of Service: 5 months, 27 days. Post Office Address: Cassville, Wisconsin. Disability Incurred: Surgeons certificate of disability. (NOTE: He was indexed as Isaac Aloom).

Isaac Alcorn died Dec 4, 1891 in Grant County, Wisconsin (Wisconsin Pre 1907 Death Index). He is reported to be buried in Advent Cemetery (I could find no record of that particular cemetery-- but I did find Waterloo Seventh Day Adventist Cemetery, Waterloo Township, Wisconsin, ejj). Cause of Death: Dropsy.

His widow Almeda Alcorn filed for a pension on Apr. 11, 1891.

Almeda (Droullard) Alcorn (born June 21, 1837) died Jan 18, 1903 in Boulder Colorado. She is buried in Columbia (Pioneer) Cemetery, Boulder, Boulder County, Colorado. Cause of Death: Tuberculosis

When Almeda became ill with tuberculosis, her brother Alva who worked at Boulder Sanitarium in Colorado, thought she would be better if she moved there. After she has a light stroke her granddaughter, Jesse took care of her until it became too much for her. She then asked her father William Shipton (Almeda's son ) to come and get her. William built a little room on the side of his home for her to live in. She stayed there until she died.

(From Ethel Shipton Kolkow's notes)

Ethel Almeda Shipton would come to the door of her room and visit with her, but didn't go in because of the tuberculosis. She really loved her grandmother.

The following was written by Ethel Almeda Shipton Kolkow:

Almeda was my Grandmother and I have her name. Alva was the only other one I met. He was manager of the Boulder Colorado Sanitarium in 1900. Later he and Aunt Nell went to the South and organized a Sanitarium or something. If I can locate Miss Horning I'll get more details.

More About ALMEDA DROULLARD:

Burial: Columbia (Pioneer) Cemetery, Boulder, Boulder County, Colorado
Cause of Death: Tuberculosis

Children of Isaac Alcorn and Almeda Droullard

  1. John Warren Alcorn b: 9 JUN 1866 in Burton, Grant Co, WI
  2. George M. Alcorn b: 21 JUN 1868 in Waterloo Twp, Grant Co, WI
  3. Isaac Edward Alcorn b: FEB 1872 in Waterloo Twp, Grant County, WI
  4. Henry Alcorn b: 1879 in Waterloo Twp, Grant Co, WI

Alcorn, John: - He was born about 1838 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of George Alcorn and Matilda Elkhorn. He married Mary Melton on Mar. 15, 1860 in Crawford County, WI. She was the daughter of William Melton (Mar. 12, 1804 - July 6, 1863) and Mary Holloway (several family trees say Holly) (July 14, 1809 - July 29, 1869). Two of her brothers, George W. Melton and Benjamin Franklin Melton, also served in Company B, 27th Iowa. Her sister Luella Melton married Peter Adrian. Peter was rejected by the 27th Iowa due to his age. He was a brother of Michael Adrian (my great grandfather, who served in Company D, 27th Iowa. ejj) John's sister, Matilda C. Alcorn, married William Bates, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census, Kiskiminetas, Armstrong, Pennsylvania. George Alcorn (age 39, farmer, born Penn.), Matilda Alcorn (age 39, born Penn), Martha J. Alcorn (age 14, born Penn), John Alcorn (age 12, born Penn), Isaac Alcorn (age 10, born Penn), Nathan Alcorn (age 8, born Penn. Elizabeth Alcorn (age 7, born Penn), Sarah M. Alcorn (age 5, born Penn), Matilda C. Alcorn (age 2, born Penn. and Mary E. Alcorn (age 1/12, born Penn).

1860 Census: Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: John Alcorn (age 32, farmer, born Maryland), Mary Alcorn (age 22, born Ill.). NOTE. His age is wrong by about 10 years. But this has to be them. They are living next door to the family of George and Matilda Alcorn. Plus they listed the entire Alcorn family except for George as being born in Maryland.

1900 Census: Louisiana, Pike County, Missouri: John Alcorn (born Feb 1837, age 62, married 40 years, born Maryland, steamboat?), wife Mary Alcorn (born Mar. 1838, age 61, married 40 years, 4 children born, 3 still living, born Illinois), son John Alcorn (born Nov, 1863, age 36, born Wisconsin, Fisherman).

John Alcorn died Oct. 15, 1908. (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery, Bowling Green, Pike County, Missouri.

Pike County, Missouri Deaths 1878- 1917: John Alcorn. Death Date: Oct. 15, 1908.

His widow Mary Alcorn filed for a pension on Nov. 9, 1908 in Missouri.

1910 census, Cuvier, Pike County, Missouri: James Alcorn (age 36, married 1 time for 10 years, born Minnesota, father born Pennsylvania, mother born Illinois), wife Nancy Alcorn (age 27, married 1 time 10 years, 0 children born), Mother Mary Alcorn (age 73, widowed, born Illinois, 3 children born, 3 still living).

Mary (Melton) Alcorn (born Mar. 4, 1838) died June 4, 1917 in Cuivre, Pike County, Missouri. Cause of death was acute gastric ulcer. Per her online death certificate found here, place of burial was Mt. Pisgah. (Note, her death certificate says her date of birth was Mar. 4, 1836. But when you compute her age at death, it shows her year of birth would have been 1838). James Alcorn was the informant.

Pike County, Missouri Deaths, 1878 - 1917: Name: Mother James, John, and Robert Alcorn. Age or Birth Date: Mar. 4, 1836. Death Date: June 4, 1917. (This appears to name their three living children).


Anderson, Magnus He was born about 1846 in Voss, Norway. He married Nettie Baker, daughter of Johial and Frances Baker.

Based on mother-in-law Frances Baker in 1900, I found Nettie in 1870: Wheatland, Vernon county, Wisconsin: Johial Baker (age 44, grain dealer, born Mass.), Frances F. Baker (age 40, born Mass), Nettie Baker, age 19, born Rhode Island), Orin Baker (age 17, born Rhode Island, and John W. Baker (age 8, born Wisconsin).

There was a Magnus Anderson in Calmar, Winneshiek County, Iowa in 1870, but I am not 100% sure it is him.

1880 Census: Lynxville, Crawford County, Wisconsin: Magnes Anderson (age 32, born Norway, buying wheat), wife Nettie Anderson (age 29, born Rhode Island), son Walter Anderson (age 4, born Iowa), daughter Edith Anderson (age 2, born Iowa) and daughter Anna Anderson (age 7/12, born Nov., born Iowa).

1890 Veterans Census, Mayville, Trail County, North Dakota. Magnus Anderson (Private, Co. B 27th Iowa on Date of Enlistment: Oct. 13, 1864. Date of Discharge: Nov. 24, 1865. Length of Service, 1 year, 1 month, 11 days, Post Office Address: Mayville, N. Dakota. Disability incurred was rheumatism.

1900 Census: Mayville, Traill County, North Dakota: Magnus Anderson (born Oct. 1847, age 52, married 29 years, born Norway, immigrated 1851, in US 49 years, naturalized, farmer), wife Nettie Anderson (born Jun 1850, age 49, married 29 years, 6 children born, 4 still living, born Rhode Island), Walter Anderson (born July 1875, age 24, born Iowa), Edythe L. Anderson (born Feb. 1878, age 22, born Iowa), Daughter Annie F. Anderson (born Nov. 1879, age 20, born Iowa), son Albert M. Anderson (born June 1885, age 14, born North Dakota), and mother-in-law Frances Baker (born July 1829, age 70, widowed, born Massachusetts).

1910 Census: McHenry, Foster County, North Dakota: Magnus Anderson, (age 62, married 1 time, born Norway, immigrated 1845, naturalized, grain buyer), wife Antonette Anderson (age 58, married 1 time, born Rhode Island), son Walter Anderson (age 33, born Iowa), daughter Frances Anderson (age 27, born Iowa, School Teacher)

1920 Census: McHenry, Foster, North Dakota: Magnus Anderson (age 72, born Norway, immigrated 1852, naturalized) Wife Nettie Anderson (age 66, born Rhode Island).

Magnus Anderson died Feb. 11, 1928 at McHenry, Foster County, N. D. (pension records)

His widow Angenett Anderson filed for a pension on March 16, 1928.


Anderson, Ole - He was born Apr. 4, 1839 in Norway.

1880 Census - Clay County, North Dakota: Ole Anderson (age 40), Marrett (age 32) and children: Ann (13), Andrew (age 10), Inger (age 8), Carrie (age 6), Nettie (age 4) and Matilda (age 6/12)

1890 Veterans Census, Meckling and Spirit Mound, Clay County, South Dakota: Ole Anderson (private, Company B, 27th Iowa. Enlisted Aug. 10, 1862, Discharged August 7, 1865, Length of Service: 2 years, 11 months, 27 days, Post Office Address: Bolton, Clay County, South Dakota. disability incurred: "sore eyes". Remarks: Discharged from Service.

1900 Census - Spirit Mount, Clay County, South Dakota: Ole (born April 1839, age 61, married 34 years, immigrated in 1854 and was naturalized) Marrit (age 51, 9 children, 8 still living) and children: Ada (age 19), Albert, age 16, and Walter, age 11).

1910 Census - Spirit Mound, Clay County, South Dakota with his son: Andrew G Anderson (age 39 - Widowed), Ole Anderson (father - age 71 - married for 45 years). There was also an Albert Anderson (age 36) in the same household listed as a "hired man". While Ole did have a son named Albert, there should be a much great difference in age between him and Andrew. So I'm not sure if this is his son or not.

Ole Anderson died Sept. 21, 1919. He is buried in Clay Creek Cemetery, Vermillion, South Dakota.

His widow Marit Anderson filed for a pension on August 31, 1920 in South Dakota.


Anderson, Olef Gustaf. He was born July 12, 1832 in Norway. He was the son of Andrew Anderson. He married Brita Ericsdotter Eastman (Betsy) on August 10, 1867. She was the daughter of Eric Persson Ostman (Oct. 29, 1812 - Feb. 9, 1893) and Gertrud Mikelsdotter (Dec 28, 1817 - April 12, 1911).

Ole G. Anderson, P.O. Elon; farmer, sec. 29, brother of Andrew Anderson, born in Sweden, July 12, 1832. His mother died when he was but a boy, and in 1854 himself and father came to America and located in this township, where his father died in 1872. During the late rebellion he enlisted in Co. B, 27th Iowa Inf. in March 1864, the company being immediately taken to the front, where they participated in the battle of Nashville, Tenn., and Fort Blakely, Ala., they being about the closing up of the war. In the fall of 1865 he was transferred to the 12th Infantry, Co. B, and discharged in January 1866, at Davenport. He married Miss Betsy Eastman, August 10, 1867; they have but one son, David, having lost six children, five of whom died in the spring of 1882, from diphtheria, August I., Clara E., Amy E., Effie G., Bertie M., Huldah having died previously. Mr. Anderson owns a farm of 182 acres, worth $25 per acre. He is a member of the Baptist Church.

History of Allamakee County
W.E. Alexander, 1882, page 465-466

1860 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Andrew Anderson (age 35, farmer, born Sweden), Sophia Anderson (age 29, born Sweden), Andrew Anderson (age 63, born Sweden) and O. G. Anderson (age 27, born Sweden).

1870 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Ole G. Anderson (age 38, farmer, born Sweden), Betsey Anderson (age 25, born Sweden), August Anderson (age 1, born Iowa), Richard Anderson (age 6/12, born Iowa) and Andros Anderson (age 75, born Sweden.

1880 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Olf G. Anderson (age 47, farmer, born Sweden), Betsy Anderson (age 34, born Sweden), son August Anderson (age 11, born Iowa), son David Anderson (age 10, born Iowa), daughter Clara Anderson (age 6, born Iowa), daughter Amy Anderson (age 4, born Iowa), and daughter Effie Anderson (age 3, born Iowa)

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living In Iowa: 27th Iowa: Olaf G. Anderson, Private, Company B, Present Post Office Address: Elon.

1885 Iowa State Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Olaf G. Anderson (Township 98, Range 4, Section 28, S2 SE, age 52, farmer, born Sweden), Betsy Anderson (age 38, born Sweden), David R. Anderson (age 13, born Allamakee County, Iowa), and Abner Anderson (age 2, born Allamakee County, Iowa).

1895 Iowa State Census, Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Ole G. Anderson (age 62, born Sweden, farmer, Religious Belief: Baptist, Soldier in the War of the Rebellion: Company B, Regiment: 27th. State: Iowa, Arm of Service and Rank: Private), Betsy Anderson (age 48, born Sweden, Baptist), David R. Anderson (age 24, born Allamakee County, Iowa, farmer, Baptist), Abner Anderson (age 12, born Allamakee County, Iowa), and Elmer Anderson (age 9, born Allamakee County, Iowa).

1900 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Ole G. Anderson (born July 1832, age 67, married 33 years, born Sweden, immigrated 1854, in US 46 years, Naturalized, farmer), wife Betsy Anderson (born May 1846, age 54, married 33 years, 10 children born, 3 still living, born Sweden, Immigrated 1866), son Abner I. Anderson (born Aug. 1882, age 17, born Iowa), son Elmer G. Anderson (born Oct. 1886, age 13, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Olaf G. Anderson (age 77, married 1 time for 42 years, born Sweden, immigrated 1854, naturalized, farmer, general farm), wife Betsy Anderson (age 63, married 1 time for 42 years, 10 children born, 3 still living, born Sweden. Immigrated 1866), son Abner I. Anderson (age 27, born Iowa, farm laborer).

Betsy (Eastman) Anderson (born May 20, 1846), died July 30, 1910. She is buried in Center Baptist Cemetery, Center Township, Allamakee County, Iowa (Note: the cemetery listing did not include her name: it has ? Anderson with the dates. Given that the 1900 census said she was born May 1846, and Olaf was a widower in 1915, I feel certain this is her information).

1915 Iowa State Census, Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Olaf G. Anderson (age 82, widowed, County: Allamakee, Township: Center. Occupation: Retired. Extent of education: Common 1. can read and write. Birthplace Sweden. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry. State: Iowa, Regiment: 27 & 12, Company B. Church Affiliation: Baptist. Father's birthplace: Sweden. Mother's birthplace: Sweden. Years in US, 60. Years in Iowa: 38.

1920 Census: Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa: David R. Anderson (age 49, born Iowa), wife Hilda Anderson (age 52), son Earl C. Anderson (age 15), daughter Ruby Anderson (age 17), daughter Alice Anderson (age 12) and Father Olaf G. Anderson (age 87, widowed, immigrated 1854, naturalized, born Sweden)

Olaf G. Anderson died May 9, 1924 and is buried in Center Baptist Cemetery, Center Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

Children of Olaf G. Anderson and Betsy Eastman: (all dates below except for David, Elmer G. and Gustav Anderson came from the Center Baptist Cemetery Listing. -- family tree information showed different dates of birth for several of them.)

  1. August Isadore Anderson (born Dec. 7, 1868), died Apr. 5, 1882
  2. David Richard Anderson (born March 3, 1870), died Oct. 13, 1936.
  3. Hulda Elisabet Anderson (born Nov. 19, 1871), died Aug. 27,1872
  4. Clara Eugenia Anderson (born June 16, 1873), died Mar. 31, 1882
  5. Amy Elisabet Anderson (born July 1, 1874), died April 11, 1882
  6. Effie Gertrude Anderson (born Apr. 6, 1877), died April 1, 1882
  7. Birtie Mable Anderson (born Oct, 16, 1880), died Apr. 8, 1882
  8. Abner Isador Anderson (born Aug. 29, 1882), died June 5, 1910.
  9. Elmer Gedeon. Anderson (born Oct. 5 1886)
  10. Gustav Emanuel Anderson (born May 23, 1889)

Anderson, Thomas A. He was born about 1844 in Norway.

His father Andrew Tarvolson filed for a pension on June 16,1879.


Baender, Robert - Alternate name: Charles W. S. Baender. He was born about 1838 in Germany.

1880 Census: District 119, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois: Robert Bender (age 43, car conductor, born Germany) Wife Mary Bender (age 31, born Holstein), child Otto Bender (age 6, born Illinois), child Johanna C. Bender (age 4, born Illinois), child Lena B. Bender (age 3, born Illinois) and child Carl William Bender (age 1, born Illinois.) (NOTE, this Robert is the right age, right place of birth, right wife's name and right area, but I don't know for sure that it is him. )

Robert Baender died Jan. 9, 1897 and is buried in Forest Home Cemetery, Cook County, Il.

His widow Mary Baender filed for a pension on February 23, 1897 in Illinois.


Barnes, Doson - He was born about 1831 in Ohio. He was the son of Philamon and Sarah Barnes.

1850 Census: Salt Lick, Perry County, Ohio: Sarah Barnes (age 50, born PA), Dosan Barnes (age 19, laborer, born Ohio), Sarah Barnes (age 12, born Ohio), George Barnes (age 9, born Ohio), and Julia A. Barnes (age 8, born Ohio).

Per Pension records, he died January 27, 1863 at Mount City, Illinois. Cause of death: small pox.

His mother Sarah Barnes filed for a pension on July 22, 1863.

Declaration for Mother's Pension

State of Iowa
County of Allamakee

On this 13th day of July A D 1863 personally appeared before me, the Clerk of the District Court for the County and State aforesaid Sarah, a resident of Iowa Township in the county of Allamakee, and state of Iowa, aged 63 years, who being duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefits of the provisions made by the act of Congress, approved July 14, 1862; that she is the widow of Philamen Barnes and mother of Doson Barnes who was a private in Company B commanded by Captain S. W. Hemenway in the 27th regiment of Iowa Infantry Vols., commanded by Colonel James I. Gilbert, in the war of 1861, who died on the 27th day of January 1863 at Mound City Hospital in the County of Pulaski, State of Illinois. That his death was caused by small pox which disease was contracted while in the service of the Military Service of the United States and while in the line of his duty as a soldier aforesaid.

She further declares that her said son, upon whom she was dependent for support, having left no widow or minor child under sixteen years of age surviving, that is to say, he died unmarried, declarant makes this application for a pension under the above mentioned act, and refers to the evidence filed herewith and that in the proper department, to establish her claim.


Bates, Solomon W. - He was born Jan. 1828 in Vermont. He married Mary Ann Davis, daughter of Moses Davis and a previous wife (name unknown). Her half brother Tribue Moses Davis also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Salam W. Bats (age 31, born Vermont, blacksmith), Mary Ann Bats (age 26), Eliza Bats (age 1), Dora C. Bats (age 11/12), Martha Davis (age 59, born Tennessee), Elizabeth Davis (age 18, born Ill), and Moses T. Davis (age 16, born Ill.)

1870 Census: Rock Falls, Whiteside County, Illinois: Solomon Bates (age 43, blacksmith, born Vermont), Mary Bates (age 37, born Ill.), Ida Bates (age 12, born Iowa), Alicia Crawford (age 18, schoolteacher, born Ill), and Edwin Colven (age 30, Horse dealer, born New York).

Solomon Bates filed for a pension on May 21,1880.

1880 Census: Essex, Chittenden, Vermont: Solomon Bates (age 50, farm laborer, born Vermont), wife Mary Bates (age 46, born Ill.), daughter Ida M. Bates (age 20, born Iowa).

1890 Veteran's Census, Duxbury, Washington County, Vermont. Solomon W. Bates, Co. B., 27th Iowa, Enlisted Aug. 9, 1862, discharged Aug. 9, 1865 - 3 years served. Post Office Box was Duxbury.

1892 New York State Census, Hebron, Washington County, New York: S. W. Bates (age 69, Blacksmith), Mary Bates (age 55), Ida E. Bates (age 32),

1900 Census: Hebron, Washington County, New York: Solomon Bates (born Jan. 1828, age 72, widowed, married 37 years, blacksmith, born Vermont), daughter Ida E. Westover (born July 1859, age 40, married 6 years, 0 children born, born Iowa), Son-In-Law Rolland B. L. Westover (born Dec. 1838, age 61, married 6 years, born Vermont).

Solomon W. Bates died Mar. 5, 1901 and is buried in Morningside Cemetery, Hartford, Washington County, New York.

Update Dec. 2017 Submitted by Kim Davis:

Solomon W. Bates: All information is correct. His wife was Mary Ann Davis, daughter of Moses and his previous wife (name unknown) and step daughter of Martha, who raised her from infancy. The family appears on the 1860 census in Lansing, Allamakee Co., IA 206/202 under the names Salan W Bats. Living with Solomon is his step-mother in law Martha and her two youngest children Elizabeth Davis and Moses T.


Bates, William - He was born August 12, 1840 (or 41), in Apple River, Joe Daviess County, Illinois. He was the son of Jacob William Bates and Sarah. He married Matilda C. Alcorn on June 21, 1866 in Cassville, Grant County, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of George Alcorn and Matilda Elkhorn. Her brothers Isaac Alcorn and John Alcorn also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

1870 Census: Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: William Bates (age 28, born Illinois), Matilda Bates (age 21), James Bates (age 1), Ida Bates (age 1).

1880 Census: Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: William Bates (age 37, farmer, born Illinois), Matilda Bates (age 38, born Penn.), son James Bates (age 13, born Wisconsin), daughter Ida Bates (age 11, born Wisconsin) and son Albert Bates (age 5, born Wisconsin).

1895 Wisconsin State Census: Enumeration of Soldiers and Sailors of the Late War Residing in the Town of Freemont, County of Crawford, Wisconsin: William Bates, Private, Co. B. 27th Iowa

1900 Census: Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: William Bates (born Aug. 1841, age 58, married 34 years, born Illinois, fisherman), wife Matilda C. Bates (born Sept. 1847, age 52, married 34 years, 6 children born, 4 still living, born Pennsylvania), granddaughter Julia M. Bates (Born July 1894, age 5, born Wisconsin)

1920 Census: Wheatland, Vernon County, Wisconsin, William Bates (age 78, born Illinois), Matilda Bates (age 71, born Pennsylvania).

William Bates died July 19, 1924 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota. He was buried on July 22, 1924 in De Soto Cemetery, Hwy. 82, De Soto, Vernon County, WI.

His widow Matilda C. Bates filed for a pension on July 29, 1924 in Minnesota.

Matilda (Alcorn) Bates died Oct. 2, 1934 in Ft. Snelling, Minnesota.


Bennett, Elisha R. - He was born about 1836 in Ohio. He was the son of Darius Bennett (July 26, 1796 - Oct. 14, 1865) and Phebe (Feb. 13, 1804 - Dec. 7, 1877). He married first Jane Harrington on Dec. 9, 1860 in Allamakee County. He married Mary Jane Kelly. She was the daughter of William Kelly (1810 - Oct. 7, 1881) and Sarah Barry (1810 -1890)

1860 Census: Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: Derias Bennett (age 66, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Phebe Bennett (age 52, born New York), Almera Thurston (Age 4, born Iowa), William Bennett (age 25, farm laborer, born Ohio, Elisha Bennett (age 23, farm laborer, born Ohio), Gidian Milks (age 21, born Ohio), Louisa Milks (age 19, born Ohio), Nelson Milks (age 26, born Pennsylvania), and Anthony Gobel (age 26, farmer, born Saxony.

1880 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Elisha Bennett (age 44, boarder, married, works in saw mill, born Ohio). He was living with the Levi Horn family.

Index of 1885 Civil War Union Veterans in Kingsbury County, South Dakota -- Information: Kingsbury County, Elisha R. Bennett, Co. B 27th Iowa Infantry, Enlisted August 1862, at age 26, born Ohio, Served 3 years, Discharged August 1865. He was from Iowa and came to South Dakota in June 1882. He was not wounded, he was a pensioner, he was in 12 engagements. He bought 160 acres of land under the Homestead Act on June 17, 1887 (Township 111 N, Range 57 W, Section 12).

1890 Veteran's Census in De Smet, Kingsbury County, South Dakota: Census Information showed that he was a Private in Company B, 27th Iowa Inf., Enlisted Aug. 11, 1862, Discharged Aug. 8, 1865. Served 2 Years, 11 months, 29 days. Elisha R. Bennett died Oct. 13, 1893 and is buried in St. Thomas Catholic Cemetery, De Smet, Kingsbury County, South Dakota. (Lot 44, Grave 4)

Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans: Elisha R. Bennett, Private, Co. B. 27th Regt. Iowa Infantry. Cemetery at De Smet, South Dakota. Date of Death Oct. 13, 1893.

1900 Census: De Smet, Kingsbury, South Dakota: Mary Bennett (born July 1843, age 56, widowed, 12 children born, 4 still living, born Michigan), daughter Mable G. Bennett (born Dec. 1888, age 11, born South Dakota), Brother Owen Kelly (born January 1837, age 63, widowed, born Michigan), niece Anna Kelly (Born Sept. 1888, age 11, born Iowa).

Widow Mary Bennett filed for a pension on Feb. 3, 1911.

Mary (Kelly) Bennett died May 8, 1911. She is buried in St. Thomas Catholic Cemetery, De Smet, Kingsbury County, South Dakota. (Lot 44, Grave 4)

Children of Elisha Bennett and Mary Kelly: (Note: these were the only ones listed in the family trees. The 1900 census said she had 12 children. In 1900 only 4 were still living.

  1. Gertrude Bennett
  2. Lysha Bennett
  3. William Bennett
  4. Sarah Agnes Bennett
  5. Phoebe Elizabeth Benett
  6. Mary Jane Bennett
  7. Mabel G Bennett

Berdell, Gottleib - He was born about 1843 in Germany. He was the son of Sebastian and Maria Catherine Berdell.

Gottlieb Burdell died from diarrhea March 18, 1863, hospital, Jackson, Tenn

His mother Maria Berdell filed for a pension on Feb. 6, 1865.

Declaration for Mother's Pension

State of Iowa
County of Allamakee

On this 20th day of January A D 1865 personally appeared before me, the Clerk of the District Court for the County and State aforesaid Maria Catherine Berdell, a resident of Lansing in the county of Allamakee, and state of Iowa, aged forty nine years, who being duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefits of the provisions made by the act of Congress, approved July 14, 1862; that she is the widow of Sabastian Berdell and mother of Gottlib Berdell who was a private in Company B commanded by Captain S. W. Hemenway in the 27th regiment of Iowa Infantry Vols., commanded by Colonel James I. Gilbert, in the war of 1861, who died on the 15th day of March 1863, at Jackson in Gen. Hospital in the County of Madison State of Tennessee. that his death was caused by chronic diarrhea which disease was contracted while in the service of the Military Service of the United States and while in the line of duty as a soldier thereof.

She further declares that her said son, upon whom she was dependent for support, having left no widow or minor child under sixteen years of age surviving, that is to say, he died unmarried, declarant makes this application for a pension under the above mentioned act, and refers to the evidence filed herewith and that in the proper department, to establish her claim.

Signed Marial Katherina Berdell

State of Iowa
Allamakee County

On this 29th day of July A.D. 1865 personally appeared before me J. G. Orr, clerk of the District Court within and for the county and state aforesaid Valentine Beisd and Joseph Startz, residents of the town of Lansing Allamakee County, Iowa who being first duly sworn according to law doth on their oath say: That they are well acquainted with Maria C. Burdell mother of Gottlieb Burdell deceased who was a private in Co. B commanded by Captain S. W. Hemenway in the 27th Regiment of Iowa Infantry Volunteers. That they were well acquainted with said Gottlieb Burdell dec. and have been acquainted with both of said parties for a number of years past. That Sebastian Burdell husband of said Maria C. Burdell & father of Gottlieb Burdell died on or about the 11th day of May 1848 in Germany. That the support of Maria Burdell was obtained by the labor of said Gottlieb Burdell for a number of years before his decease. That said Gottlieb Burdell hired the house in which Maria Burdell lived and paid the rent for the same and supported her by his labor. That when he went into the United States Military Service he left with his mother Maria C. Burdell his local Bounty which was fifty dollars and when he was paid by the United States he sent to said Maria C. Burdell nearly all he receive which was $25 bounty & one months pay. That the said Maria Burdell received from the U.S. Government the back pay and bounty due said Gottlieb Burdell at the time of his decease and that is all gone, that she has no means of support and has no property and she has now no means of support and that she was supported by said Gottlieb Burdell in his lifetime as aforesaid. That their knowledge is derived from personal acquaintance and knowledge with the family and that we have no interest in this claim.

Signed Valentine Beisd
Joseph Startz


Betsinger, Nicholas - Born 1837 in New York. He was the son of George A. Betsinger and Martha Sipe. He married Emily Bellows on Dec. 17, 1862.

1850 Census Lenox, Madison, New York George Betsinger (age 40, farmer, born NY), Martha Betsinger (age 37, born NY), Washington Betsinger (age 19, born NY), Hezekiah Betsinger (age 15, born NY), Nicholas Betsinger (age 13, born NY), John Betsinger (age 10, born NY), and Daniel Betsinger (age 11, born NY).

In 1860 his family was still listed in Lenox, Madison, New York, but he was not listed with them.

1870 Census - French Creek, Allamakee County, Iowa: N. Betsinger (age 35), Emily Betsinger (age 27), Alice Betsinger (age 7) and Clara Betsinger (age 3).

1880 Census - Greeley, Shelby County, Iowa: Nicholas Betsinger, age 43, Emily (age 38), Clara (age 12), George (age 10), Ward (age 8), Amy (age 4) and Ruben (9 months).

1885 Iowa State Census in Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: Nicholas Betsinger, (age 46, Township 100, Range 4, Section 11), Emily (age 40), Clara (age 16), George (age 14), Ward (age 13), Amy (age 11), Hattie, (age 10), Minni (age 7), Reuben (age 5), Edwin (age 4) and Melvin (age 1).

Nicholas Betsinger died May 7, 1892 and is buried in New Albin Cemetery, Iowa Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His Widow Emily M. Betsinger filed for a pension on May 21, 1892.


Botsford, Harrison - He was born March 1841 in Iowa. He was the son of Henry Botsford ( 1796- Dec. 25, 1869) and Margaret (1814 - Feb. 7, 1881).

1850 Census: Bellevue, Jackson County, Iowa: Henry Botchford (age 53, farmer, born New York), Margaret Botchford (age 36, born New York), George Botchford (age 14, born Pennsylvania), Maria Botchford (age 12, born Pennsylvania), Harrison Botchford (age 10, born Iowa), Aaron Herrington (age 47, born Vermont)

1856 Iowa State Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Henry Botsford (age 56, born New York, lumberman), Margaret Botsford (age 41, born Pennsylvania), George W. Botsford (age 19, born Pennsylvania), Wm. H. H. Botsford (age 14, born Iowa), Nathan Botsford (age 12, born Iowa), Melvin Botsford (age 8, born Iowa), Jane Ellen Botsford (age 8, born Iowa), Matthew M. Botsford (age 6, born Iowa), Jasper Botsford (age 2, born Iowa), Sarah Anne Rue (age 24, born Pennsylvania, widowed), Scott Rue (age 4, born Iowa).

1860 Census: Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: Henry Botsford (age 63, farmer, born New York), Margaret Botsford (age 44, born Pennsylvania), Harrison Botsford (age 19, farm laborer, born Iowa), James M. Botsford (age 13, born Iowa), Elen Botsford (age 13, born Iowa), Mathew Botsford (age 11, born Iowa), Scott Botsford (age 9, born Iowa), Jasper Botsford (age 7, born Iowa), Jane Harrington (age 19, born Pennsylvania) and Mary I. Harrington (age 9/12, born Iowa). (This is the second census record that a Harrington has been in the household. I wonder if that could be a clue as to Margaret's maiden name?)

1870 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: H. H. Botsford (age 129, Painter, born Iowa), J. J. Botsford (age 19, born PA), C. M. Botsford (age 6/12, female, born Iowa)

1880 Census - New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa: W. Harrison Botsford (age 39 - painter and glazier), wife Jerusha J, (age 28), Daughter Candes M, (age 10), Son George H, (age 7), Son, Harrison F, (age 4) and daughter Sadie J, (age 1).

It appears that his first wife died during childbirth. In New Albin City Cemetery is buried Mrs. Harrison Botsford and child of Mrs. Harrison Botsford -- both died Nov. 25, 1881 -- The child was born the same day.

1885 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Jefferson, Houston County, Minnesota: Harrison Botsford (age 44, born Iowa), Cathrina Botsford (age 40, born Indiana), Candes Botsford (age 15, born Iowa), George Botsford (age 13, born Iowa), Sarah Botsford (age 9, born Iowa), William Botsford (age 4, born Iowa) and Sophronia Botsford (age 78, born New York.).

1900 Census - New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa.: Harrison W. Botsford (Born March 1841, age 59, married 18 years), Kate R. (born Sept. 1842, age 57, 0 children born), Son, George H. (age 27), Daughter, Sarah J, (age 21) and Son, William (age 19 - Note at first I thought he might be a twin to the child that died in Nov. 1881 - but the census records shows he was born in January 1881).

Harrison Botsford died Oct. 14, 1905 and is buried in New Albin City Cemetery, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His widow Kate Botsford filed for a pension on Oct. 26, 1905.


Brodtbeck, Otto - He was born April 6, 1845, in Switzerland. He was the son of Samuel (1819 - Jan. 21, 1897) and Susette Brodtbeck. He married Emily Weinheimer, on March 18, 1873 in St Louis, Missouri. She was the daughter of Henry Weinheimer and Anna Franz.

OTTO BRODTBECK.

Measured by the ordinary standards, the life of Mr. Brodtbeck was not long, but measured by the results of his remarkable career its duration was sufficient for the accomplishments of great purposes. In the fifty years that were given him on earth, he had lived so wisely and efficiently that the ideals of youth were achieved, the hopes of boyhood were brought into fruition and the aspirations of mature manhood for a career of service to his chosen community had their realization in helpful citizenship. The half century that formed his life-span divided itself into three periods of unequal duration. The first period was covered by eight years in Switzerland, where he was born April 6, 1845, and where his father, Maj. Samuel Brodtbeck, member of an ancient Swiss family, had received thorough military training in the army of the republic.

The second period was covered by residence in Iowa and Illinois from 1853 until 1883 and by service of a few years during that time in the Union army during the Civil war. The family was living in Dubuque at the opening of the war, and father and son, the latter then a youth of sixteen, offered their services in behalf of their adopted country, espousing the cause of the Union with an ardor that subsequent hardships and privations in camp and on the battlefield failed to diminish. Throughout the war the younger man remained in the ranks, but the father, with a knowledge of military tactics that from the first made him a power in the service, rose to be major, continuing in that rank until the expiration of the war.

The third period in the life of Mr. Brodtbeck was his residence in California, where he lived one year in San Diego and spent the remainder of his life from 1884 until his death, April 24, 1895, in Los Angeles. This period was in many respects the most vital and forceful part of his career. Certainly it was the most interesting to him and the most productive of permanent results. Having had charge of several large estates in the east and having proved masterly in organization, thorough in detail and efficient in the oversight of great financial interests, he was prepared to enter into the material upbuilding of Los Angeles with intelligence and keen discrimination. In the handling of real estate he exhibited rare judgment. Seldom was his opinion concerning property reversed by subsequent developments and in his judgment as to values he displayed a sagacity that seemed intuitive. The realty interests of the city suffered a serious loss in his passing, for he had continued in the very forefront of property development until the end. A deep devotion to the welfare of Los Angeles was manifest in all his acts and he was scarcely less devoted to other parts of Southern California, whose great orange groves and peaceful farms, pleasant villages where sunshine always prevails, and unchanging atmosphere of prosperity appealed to his business instinct no less than to his artistic tastes. To a man of his temperament politics gave no appeal, and, aside from voting the Democratic ticket in national elections, he took no part in party affairs. A believer in the philanthropic principles of Masonry, having attained the thirty-second degree, he maintained an association with some of its branches until his death. He was also a believer in the uplifting influence of the churches and was a frequent attendant at the services of the Presbyterian Church as well as a generous contributor to its missionary societies. He was a member of the state legislature of Illinois, representing Madison county, for a number of years. In St. Louis, Mo., March 18, 1873, he married Miss Emily Weinheimer, a native of Highland, Illinois., and a daughter of Henry and Anna (Franz) Weinheimer, the former a merchant at Highland for many years. Four children were born of the union, but two of these died in infancy and Otto W. passed away at the age of twenty-six, at Phoenix, Ariz., where he was the city representative of R. L. Craig & Co. of Los Angeles. Of his family Mr. Brodtbeck is survived only by his wife and one child, Adele, now Mrs. Earl Cowan, both of Los Angeles

A History of California and an Extended History of Los Angeles and Environs
Biographical Volume II, Illustrated, Historic Record Company, Los Angeles, Cal, 1915, By James Miller Guinn

1856 Iowa State Census - Julian, Dubuque County, Iowa: Samuel Brodtbeck (age 37, born Swiss), Lisett Brodtbeck (age 35, born Swiss), Otto Brodtbeck (age 11, born Swiss), R Brodtbeck (age 9, female born Swiss) and M (age 4, female, born Illinois)

1860 Census - Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa: Samuel Brodtbeck (age 42, recorder, born Switzerland), Susette Brodtbeck (age 40, born Switzerland), Otto Brodtbeck (age 15, born Switzerland), Rosalie Brodtbeck (age 14, born Switzerland) and Matilda (age 8, born Illinois).

1870 Census: Township 3, Range 5, Madison County, Illinois: S. H. Brodtbeck (age 54, born Switzerland), Otto Brodtbeck (age 26, bookkeeper, born Switzerland), Matilda Brodtbeck (age 18, born Illinois), Susette Brodtbeck (age 50, born Switzerland), Joseph Koepflee (age 65, born Switzerland), Rosalie Koepfle (age 26, born Switzerland), Joseph Koepfle (age 4, born Illinois), Solomon Koepfle (age 17, born Illinois), Walter Pfaff (age 30, merchant, born Switzerland), Susan Meyer, age 17, housekeeper, born Switzerland). (Note: Post office address was Highland).

State of Missouri
County of St. Louis

This is to certify that on the 18th day of Mar AD. 1873, I united in the holy bonds of Matrimony by virtue of authority in me vested, Mr. Otto Brodtbeck and Miss Emilie Weinhemier both from Highland, Ills.

Witnesses W. P. Walters, Cornelia Weinheimer.

J. G. Eberhard, Pastor.
Filed and Recorded April 26, 1873. W. C. Kesmett, Recorder.

Missouri Marriage Records, 1805 - 2002

Note: Miscellaneous Churches of St. Louis 1872: Independent Evangelical Protestant Church of the Holy Ghost, 8th cor Walnut, Rev. J. G. Eberhard, pastor

Note: the witness W. P. Walters is most likely Walter Pfaff living with the Brodtbeck's in 1870. He also served in Company B, 27th Iowa. His alias was Walter P. Walters.

1880 Census, Highland, Madison County, Ill. Otto Bradtbeck (age 31, born Swiss.), Emily Bradtbeck (age 25, born Swiss.), Otto Bradtbeck (age 3, born Illinois) and Erwin Bradtbeck (age 1, born Illinois.)

California Voter Registers, 1873-1886 Los Angeles: Voter Number: 673. Name: Brodtbeck, Otto Age: 40 Country of Nativity. Switzerland Occupation: Broker. Local Residence, Los Angeles City. Naturalized: By naturalization of father. Date of Registration: Sept. 15, 1885.

California Voter Registers, 1888, 1890, Los Angeles: Voter Number: 1179. Name: Brodtbeck, Otto Age: 43 Country of Nativity. Switzerland Occupation: Real Estate. Local Residence, Los Angeles City. 909 W. Seventh Street. Naturalized: By naturalization of father. Date of Registration: Mar. 13, 1888. On the same page. California Voter Registers, 1888, 1890, Los Angeles: Voter Number: 1180, Name: Brodtbeck, Samuel. Age: 69. Country of Nativity. Switzerland. Occupation: Retired Local Residence, Los Angeles City: 5 Ingraham Street. Naturalized: May 6, '56, Dubuque, Iowa. Date of Registration: May 16, 1888.

California Voter Registration, 1892, 1894, Los Angeles: Voter No: 23797. Name: Brodtbeck, Otto. Age: 48. Height: 5 feet, 8 inches. Complexion: Dark. Color of Eyes: Brown. Color of Hair: Gray. Visible Marks or Scars, if any, and their Location: Two moles on right cheek, between eye and nose. Occupation: Broker; Country of Nativity: Switzerland. Ward: 3. Place or Residence: Los Angeles. Post Office Address: 1007 W. 7th Street. Naturalized: By naturalization of father. Date of Registration: July 30, 1892.

Otto Brodtbeck died April 24, 1895 and is buried in Angelus - Rosedale Cemetery, 1831 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA. (Note: His father Samuel and wife Emily are buried in the same cemetery.)

From the Los Angeles Times, April 25, 1895:

Otto Brodtbeck, one of Los Angeles' most prominent business men, died at 5 o'clock last evening at his home on West Seventh Street, after a brief illness. He was stricken with paralysis on Tuesday.

Emilie Brodtbeck (born 1854) died 1922 and is buried in Angelus Rosedale Cemetery, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California.


Burgess, George A. - He was born Aug. 16, 1842 in Waterville, Kennebec County, Maine. He was the son of Joseph Burgess (1809 - 1900) and Lavina M. Soule (1817 - 1914). Both parents are buried in Howard Cemetery, Elma, Howard County, Iowa. He married Susan Jane Burdick on Feb.. 14, 1867 in Howard County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Job. G. Burdick (Nov. 19, 1802 - June 8, 1893) and Polly Kenyon (Dec. 3, 1803 - June 7, 1846).

Member of GAR. Enlisted in 1862 in 27th Iowa Infantry serving until the end of the war. Afterwards he was a merchant, and later in the banking business. At one time he was postmaster at Bustic, Iowa.

1850 Census, Fairfield, Somerset, Maine: Joseph Burgess, Jr. (age 41, merchant, born Maine ), Lovina Burgess (age 32, born Maine), George A. Burgess (age 6, born Maine), Henry C. Burgess (age 4, born Maine), and Philander L, Burgess (age 2, born Maine).Henry C. Campbell (age 30, Physician, born Maine.) Note: Given the name Henry C. and close age to Lovina, is this a brother?

1860 Census - Waterville, Kennebec, Maine Alva Burgess (age 58, farmer, born Maine), Lovina Burgess (age 42, born Maine), George A. Burgess (age 17, farmer, born Maine), Henry C. Burgess (age 13, born Maine) and Philander L. Burgess (age 11, born Maine).

1870 Census - Howard, Howard County, Iowa: G. A. Burgess (age 27, farmer, born Maine), Susan Burgess (age 27, born NY) and Lizzie Burgess (age 2, born Iowa.).Listed on the same page in Howard County, Iowa was Joseph Burgess (age 61, farmer, born Maine), Lavina Burgess (age 53, born Maine), Philander S. Burgess (age 21, born Maine), Alvin Burgess (age 68, born Maine).

1876 Busti (Howard County) Postmaster: George A. Burgess.

1881 Busti (Howard County) Postmaster: George A. Burgess

Post offices in Howard County, Elam Area: BUSTI: About a mile north of Elma (SE/NE, NE/SE Sec. 36, Afton Twp, 98N, R14W). Established April 11, 1860. renamed Elma Sept. 22, 1886.

1880 Census - Howard, Howard county, Iowa: George A. Burgess (age 37, merchant, born Maine), wife Susie Burgess (age 38, born New York), daughter Lizzie Burgess (age 11,, born Iowa) and Nina Burgess ( age 7, born Iowa).

George A. Burgess filed for a pension on July 10, 1882 in Iowa.

1885 Iowa State Census: Lime Springs, Howard County, Iowa: George Burgess (Township, 98, Range 13, Section 80, SW SW, age 44, farmer, born Maine), Susie Burgess (age 41, born NY), Lisie Burgess (age 16, born Howard County, Iowa), and Nina Burgess (age 13, born Howard County, Iowa).

Farmers Bank: The building occupied by the Farmers Bank was built in 1896 by Diedrich (Dick) Weers. It was organized in 1889. An add shows G. A. Burgess as banker for Farmers Bank. It isn't know where the bank was located prior to the Weers Building.

(Elma Iowa Centennial 1886 -1986)


From Elma New Era of December 25, 1890: Merchants and businessmen of Elma at the time who carried ads were: G. A. Burgess, Banker, Bank of Elma.

1900 Census - Elma, Howard County, Iowa: George A. Burgess (born Aug. 1842 in Maine, Age 57, married 32 years, Banker) wife Susan Burgess, (born Dec. 1840, age 59, married 32 years, 2 children born, 2 living), daughter Elizabeth Burgess (born Feb. 1868, age 32, born Iowa, school teacher), and daughter Nina Burgess (born Aug. 1870, age 29, born Iowa, school teacher). Listed on the same page in Howard County Iowa was: Joseph Burgess (born Oct. 1809, age 91, married 57 years, born Maine), wife Lavina Burgess (born Nov. 1819, age 82, married 57 years, 4 children born, 3 still living, born Maine) and son Philander Burgess (born Mar. 1848, age 52, single, born Maine.)

Nina Burgess (Trunkey), born 1870, died 1902. She is buried in Howard Cemetery (Old section, lot 56), Elma, Howard County, Iowa.

1910 Census - Township 1, Santa Barbara County, California: George A (age 64, married 1 time for 42 years, born Maine, own income), wife Susan E. Burgess (age 67, married 42 years, 2 children, 1 still living, born New York), daughter Elizabeth (age 41, born Iowa, teacher, public school), and grandson Keith Trunkey, (age 8, born Iowa)

1920 Census - Ben Lomond, Santa Cruz, California: George A. Burgess, (age 76, born Maine, retired) wife Susan Burgess (age 77, born New York), daughter Elizabeth Burgess (age 50, born Iowa, ) and grandson Keith Burgess (age 17, born Iowa).

Susan Jane (Burdick) Burgess, (born Dec. 14, 1839), died Sept. 29, 1920 in Ben Lomond, California. She is buried in Pomona Cemetery and Mausoleum, Pomona, Los Angeles County, California.

George A. Burgess died Mar. 10, 1926 in Pomona, California (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Pomona Cemetery and Mausoleum, Pomona, Los Angeles County, California.

George A. Burgess, 82, died at his home at 543 E. Pasadena avenue at 5:30 yesterday afternoon. He came to California 25 years ago and for the past four years had lived in this city. He was a Civil War veteran, a member of Pilgrim Congregational church, the Masonic order and the G.A.R.

Two relatives survive, a daughter at home, Elizabeth, and a nephew Keith, a student at Stanford university.

Funeral arrangements have been made by Todd and Reeves, and will be held from the chapel at 10 a.m. tomorrow. Dr. Luther Freeman will officiate, and burial will be in Pomona cemetery, where the G.A.R will have charge.

Pomona Progress March 12, 1926


Burnham, William Henry. He was born about Jan, 1841 in Agenburg, St. Lawrence County, New York. He was the son of Joseph Burnham (Jan. 13, 1820 - Mar. 9, 1906) and Mariah Finley (April 13, 1824 - Mar. 23, 1909). He married Clara A. Annis. She was the daughter of Benjamin Franklin Annis (June 12, 1832 - Oct. 19, 19197) and Phila Ann Yale (1828 - May 1881).

Note: The roster has William C. Burnham. Pension Index records listed him as William H. Burnham. Find a Grave (and tombstone) says William H. Burnham. Family trees list him as William Henry Burnham.

1850 Census: Fowler, Saint Lawrence County, New York: Joseph Burnham (age 30, laborer, born Massachusetts), Maria Burnham (age 26, born Canada), William Burnham (age 8, born New York), Horace Burnham (age 6, born New York), Horatio Burnham (age 4, born New York) and Joseph Burnham (age 1, born New York.).

1885 Iowa State Census: Kingsley, Plymouth County, Iowa: William H. Burnham (age 48, laborer, born New York), Clara Burnham (age 29, born Wisconsin), Mary Burnham (age 2, born Fayette County, Iowa) and Joseph Burnham (age 3/12, born Plymouth county, Iowa).

1905 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Township 138, Cass County, Minnesota: William H. Burnham (age 65, born New York), Clara A. Burnham (age 51, born Wisconsin), Levi A. Burnham (age 15, born Iowa), Minola A. Burnham (age 13, born Iowa), Alvin Burnham (age 11, born Iowa), William F. Burnham (age 10, born Iowa)..

William Burnham died Dec. 28, 1909 (pension index records). He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Backus, Cass County, Minnesota. Family tree records show that he died at Backus, Cross County, Minnesota. I could not find a  Cross County in Minnesota. The family tree information appears to be incorrect.

His widow Clara Burnham filed for a pension on Jan. 17, 1910 in Minnesota. A pension was filed for a helpless child on June 13, 1916. Clara Burnham was Guardian.

Clara (Annis) Burnham (born Jan. 22, 1854) died Jan. 28, 1940 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.


Butler, Aretus Nathaniel. (Note: Family Tree information says Aretus Nathaniel Butler. Pension Index Records have his name as Aretus N. Butler. Roster and Tombstone say A. W. Butler). He was born May 20, 1827 in Cattaraugus County, New York. He was the son of Harlow E. Butler (Jan. 4, 1798 - Apr. 24, 1881) and Mary Hickox (Dec. 28, 1803 - Nov. 14, 1869). He married Laura Amanda French on Oct. 14, 1849 in Fulton County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Edmond P. French (Mar. 22, 1797 - Aug. 25, 1876) and Lydia Stevens (June 19, 1803 - Aug. 29, 1849).

1850 Census: Dover, Fulton County, Ohio: Aretus Butler (age 23, potter, born New York), Laura A. Butler (age 19, born New York).

1860 Census: Dover, Fulton County, Ohio: Laura A. Butler (age 29, born New York), Ida C. Butler (age 9, born Ohio), Ellis Butler (age 3, born Ohio) and Edith Butler (age 1, born Ohio). Aretus was not listed with them.

1880 Census: Taylor, Allamakee County, Iowa: Arretas Butler (age 53, farmer, born New York), wife Laura Butler (age 49, born New York).

Aretus N. Butler died May 28, 1900 in Ford City, Missouri. He is buried in Ford City Cemetery, Jackson Township, Gentry County, Missouri

His widow Laura A. Butler filed for a pension on June 8, 1900 in Missouri. The pension index record showed, Company B, 27th Iowa, Company B 12th Iowa, Company F. 17 Wisc. Infantry. F & S 17th Wisc. Inf.

I found this note in a family tree: NOTE: Drummer in the Civil War. Union army-- Wisc. Co. B- 17th infantry. Played for the Ohio state band. Named for the famous humorist Aretus Ward. Cheerful, kindly person.


Churchill, Edwin. He was April 27, 1846 in Brandon, Franklin County, New York. He was the son of John Churchill (Oct. 2, 1802 - Jun 25, 1864) and Olive Experience Hale (Jan 11, 1809 - Oct 13, 1878). He married Mary A. Phillips Oct. 1, 1869 in Waukon, Iowa.. Note: His father John Churchill also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

Edwin Churchill 1850 Census: Lancaster, Stephenson, Illinois: Jonathan Churchill (age 47, farmer, born VT), Experience Churchill (age 41, born VT), Luther B. Churchill (age 18, born VT), James Churchill (age 16, born VT), Emily Churchill (age 14, born VT), Sophronia Churchill (age 13, born VT), Franklin Churchill (age 10, born VT), Abigail Churchill (age 8, born NY) and Edwin Churchill (age 6, born NY).

1856 Iowa State Census; Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Living with a family named Griswold: Experience Churchill (age 48, married born Vermont, had been in Iowa less than a year), Harriet Churchill (age 25, born Vermont, had been in Iowa 2 years), Abigail Churchill (age 13, born NY had been in Iowa less than a year), and Edwin Churchill (age 9, born NY, had been in the state of Iowa less than 1 year).

1860 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Experience Churchill (age 52, born Vermont), Abigail Churchill (age 16, school teacher, born New York), Edwin Churchill (age 14, born New York, George Ny (age 28, farmer, born New York), Sophronia Ny (age 22, born Vermont) and Ida Ny (age 11/12, born Minnesota).

1870 Census; Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa: Edwin Churchill (age 23, farmer, born New York), Elizabeth Churchill (age 18, born Michigan), Experience Churchill (age 62, born Vermont), Sophronia Nye (age 31, born Vermont), Alice Hara (age 10, born Iowa), Alice Nye (age 10, born Minnesota), and Emma Nye (age 9, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Beaver, Lincoln County, Kansas: Edwin Churchill (age 33, farmer, born VT), wife Ella S. Churchill (age 27, born Michigan), son Jesse Churchill (Age 7, born Iowa), daughter Alma Churchill (age 5, born Iowa).

1885 Kansas State Census: Beaver, Lincoln County, Kansas: Edwin Churchill (age 37, farmer, born New York), Lizzie Churchill (age 37, born Michigan), J. E. Churchill (age 12, born Iowa), Alma Churchill (age 12, born Iowa), and Arthur E Churchill (age 4, born Kansas).

1889 Roster of Ex-Union Soldiers and Soldiers' Widows in Lincoln County: E. Churchill, Private, Co. B. 12 Iowa Infantry.

Mary A. (Phillips) Churchill died Dec. 8, 1894 in Lincoln, Lincoln County, Kansas. She is buried in Lincoln Cemetery, Lincoln, Lincoln County, Kansas.

E. J. Churchill of Lincoln and Mrs. Amanda Williford of Osawatomie, Kan., were married Dec. 21, 1898, at Harrisonville, Mo. Mr. and Mrs. Churchill are living upon Mr. Churchill's place half a mile north of Lincoln.

Lincoln Beacon, Jan 12, 1899.

1910 Census: Beaver, Lincoln County, Kansas: Ed Churchill (age 63, married 12 times currently for 12 years, born New York, rural mail carrier), wife Amanda Churchill (age 52, married 2 times, currently for 12 years, 3 children born 3 still living, born Virginia).

Edwin Churchill died Aug. 16, 1916 in Lincoln Kansas. He is buried in Lincoln Cemetery, Lincoln, Lincoln County, Kansas.

Obituary

Edwin Churchill was born at Brandon, Franklin County, New York, April 27, 1846. He departed this life August 16, 1916, age 70 years three months and nineteen days. He was united in marriage with Mary Ann Elizabeth Phillips of Makee Township, Allamakee County, Iowa Oct 3, 1869. To this union were born two sons and two daughters: Jessie Edwin and Arthur James, who died at the age of twenty-seven years; Marion Alma Booze of Lincoln, Kansas, and Maria Almira Lovin of Sharon Springs, Kansas. He came to Kansas in 1879 and located on a homestead two miles east of Lincoln Center, Kansas, and has resided in this vicinity ever since. He enlisted in the Civil war and served his country with honors in both the 12th and 27th Iowa Regiments. He has been a trusted and faithful servant as mail carrier on Route No. 3 out of Lincoln - completing his 14th year the 1st day of May past. He was a highly esteemed member of both the Odd Fellows and the Grand Army of the Republic Orders. The wife of his youth and mother of his children died December 8, 1894. On Dec. 21, 1898, he was united in marriage with Mrs. Amanda Willford. Sixteen years ago last April on the sixteen day, he united with the Methodist church here in Lincoln and perhaps the most enjoyable part of his life during the past years has been his church and Sunday school relations. He so much longed to get into the new church and was keenly disappointed when he found that the date of dedication had been changed. He had been a physical sufferer for the past few years but being a hopeful and cheerful disposition, he did not talk much of his pains and apprehensions. Last Wednesday in the morning he felt the same as usual, but did not go on his route because of the rain on the night before, and about noon he received a severe heart strain from old and well-seated diseases and passed away quietly, as he had desired to go when the call should come. He was an honored citizen and leaves behind many tokens of the high esteem in which he was held. He leaves a wife, and three children and many other relatives and friends to mourn his departure. Funeral services were held from the house at 4 p. m. August 18, 1916, by Rev. J. R. Thomas, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church, assisted by Rev. H. C. Bradbury, an old-time friend and minister of the Presbyterian....

His widow Amanda Churchill filed for a pension on Sept. 15, 1916 in Kansas.

Additional biographical information is contained in the notes for his father John Churchill (listed just below)


Churchill, John. He was born Oct. 2, 1802, in Stowe, Lamoille Co., VT. He was the son of William Churchill (Nov. 12, 1776 - 1830) and Eunice Badger (1781 - bef. 1819). He married Olive Experience Hale on Feb. 21, 1828 in Georgia, Franklin County, VT. She was the daughter of Elisha Hale (born Jan 9, 1782) and Lucy Hinckley (Apr. 14, 1782 - Oct. 19, 1867). John Churchill was the father of Edwin Churchill listed above.

John Churchill John Churchill was born in Lamoille County, Stowe, Vermont, on Oct. 2, 1802 to his parents William Churchill and Eunice Badger. Family history shows that John's grandfather was Sgt. Ichabod Churchill who was born in Middleboro, Mass. He had been a minuteman under Capt. Amos Wade during the Revolution. Ichabod left his home in Middleboro in 1776 and relocated to Windsor County, Woodstock, Vermont. There Ichabod raised a large family of 18 children between two wives. Our John Churchill must have known him as Ichabod did not die until Aug. 9, 1826, at Windsor, Vt. Ichabod was descended from the original settler of Plymouth, Mass. also who was known as John Churchill (1622-1662). This original settler married Hanna Pontus (1623-1690). The original John Churchill of Plymouth we believe came to America to escape the instability of England and the coming civil war there. We do not believe he himself was particularly religious but his wife's family certainly was. This John Churchill married well and prospered in the Plymouth Colony and became a freeman. They were given land in the original distribution and the later generations went to nearby land grants to Middleboro. These people survived terrible hardships and the second generation of settlers let relationships with the Indians go bad resulting in the King Phillip War. Many of the original settlers all married each other's families. This resulted in our John Churchill being related to at least 13 of the original passengers on the Mayflower to include Gov. William Bradford, William Brewster, Myles Standish and John Alden. Our John Churchill must have had quite an idea of his family history. I can find no particular wealth build by the family to this point and it appears they were moving west farming on small properties.

An 1850 census shows our John Churchill living in Stephenson Co., Lancaster, Ill. in 1850. It shows he was 47 years old and that his wife Experience (Hale) was with him. They show 7 children at that time who were Luther Bernard (my g grandfather) who served in the 12th Iowa in company B, James age 16 of which next to nothing is known, Emily who later married Edward Stone, Safronia who married George Nye and is believed to have been killed during the war, John Franklin, who died young in 1856, Abigail Williams who married Charles Allison, and lastly Edwin who was born in 1844. Records reflect that of this family my g grandfather (Luther Bernard) first joined the Northern Army in 1861, 12th Iowa- Company B. He probably was at the battle of Ft. Donaldson, Feb. 12-16, 1862. He was mustered out on April 4, 1862. We know that Luther had joined a Iowa regiment but later returned to Stephenson Co., Ill. after the war. His father's family was clearly in Waukon, Iowa, as we find our John Churchill and his youngest son Edwin, age 19, enlisting in the 27th Iowa-company B on Mar. 11, 1864 at Center, Iowa. He was to be paid a bounty of $300 of which I believe he received $60 up front and an advance of $12. His enlistment papers described him as gray haired, 5' 6" with blue eyes and of good character. He also notes that he was 42 years old. This was a clear lie as he was born in 1802. John and his son Edwin train as infantry and are shipped down river to participate against the rebellion. Military records reflect that John Churchill became very ill with chronic diarrhea. He was placed in the Adams Military Hospital in Memphis. There are three dates of death shown. The official date was July 4, 1864, but hospital records show he died either the 24 or 25th of June. My guess would be that he died the night of the 24th or early 25th of June. An assistant surgeon signs that he died on the 25 of June, 1864, although another record shows the 24th. John is buried in the Memphis National Cemetery (not Nashville as reflected wrongly in the Ancestry.Com site). His son Edwin continues to serve to the end on the war, although he transfers out of the 27th Iowa to his older brother's old unit the 12th Iowa. Edwin survives the war and we believe he became a postmaster in Leavenworth, Kansas. John's widow (Olive Experience Hale Churchill) applies for a pension, number 58833 and certificate number 58503. She dies on Oct. 13, 1878, in Waukon, Iowa. I can only wonder what she thought about her 61 year old husband going off to war. Luther Bernard Churchill married Mary Jane Hawkins on Feb. 15, 1853, at McConnels Grove, Ill. Luther and Mary Jane have five children who are Herbert DeForest, William T., Abigail Experience, John Lincoln, and my grandfather Frank Elmer. Luther and his wife Mary Jane in late life are living in Arizona. We believe he followed John Lincoln there and may have lived with a grandchild. We know for sure that Luther Bernard Churchill was in the Sawtelle Old Soldiers Home in Los Angeles, Calf. and he died there around 1910. We know for sure he was buried in the Masonic Cemetery with his wife Mary Jane in Sonora, Calf. It is known that John Lincoln married Betty Swaty. They had children and they became Mormons. My grandfather (Frank Elmer Churchill) left Ill. at a young age and we are told he rode into Indian Territory and was a cowboy in early life. He came to Jacksonville, Texas near the turn of the century and married my grandmother Maggie Bell Love. This was a good marriage for him as this brought some farming land. He later became a druggist and investor and had two sons, my father Frank Love Churchill and Winston. These two boys were known to be sons of a rich man. The stock market crash of the 1930s changed all of that and Frank Elmer soon died, nearly broke. This pretty much sums up the Yankee side of my family-indentured servant to rich man, rags to riches to rags and so forth in how many generations. An interesting point is that Frank Elmer married Maggie Bell Love, the daughter of a staunch Texas southerner who served against the northern army in the Red River Campaign.

Submitted by Frank Love Churchill, Jr.
June 16, 2007- San Antonio, Texas

1850 Census: Lancaster, Stephenson, Illinois: Jonathan Churchill (age 47, farmer, born VT), Experience Churchill (age 41, born VT), Luther B. Churchill (age 18, born VT), James Churchill (age 16, born VT), Emily Churchill (age 14, born VT), Sophronia Churchill (age 13, born VT), Franklin Churchill (age 10, born VT), Abigail Churchill (age 8, born NY) and Edwin Churchill (age 6, born NY).

John Churchill died June 25, 1864 and is buried in Memphis National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn. Section A, Site 2070.

His widow Experience Hale filed for a pension on July 26, 1864. Information from her pension application is extracted below:

She was a resident of Center Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

She was aged 55 years.

She was the widow of John Churchill, who was a private in Company B, Commanded by Captain S. W. Hemmenway, in the 27th Regiment of Iowa Infantry Volunteers.

John Churchill died June 25, 1864 at Adams General Hospital in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee.

His death was caused by Chronis Diarrhea.

She was married to John Churchill on Feb. 21, 1828 at Georgia, Franklin County, Vermont by Rev. Aloa Sabin, Clergyman.

She has no children under sixteen years of age.

Elisha Hale and Almira Griswold were witnesses.


Samuel W. Hemmenway made a statement on August 4, 1865 at Clinton, Iowa:

John Churchill, private, Co. B, 27th Iowa Infantry Vols contracted the disease of chronic diarrhea on the 1st day of May 1864 on board of U. S. Transport on Mississippi River while enroute from Cairo, Ills to mouth of Red River, LA. Which disease was contracted while said soldier was in the line of duty - that said soldier died in Adams U. S. Army General Hospital at Memphis Tenn, June 25, 1864.

My knowledge of the above facts is obtained from the following source: from personal knowledge and certificate of Surgeon of Hospital aforesaid.

Olive Experience (Hale) Churchill (born Jan 11, 1809), died Oct. 1878 and is buried in Old Waukon Cemetery, Waukon, Iowa.

Taken from "Ancestry and Descendants of Josiah Hale" Tuttle Company, Rutland VT 1909

Olive Experience (Hale) Churchill lived in succession at Stowe, Vermont, Brandon, NY 1843, Freeport, Illinois 1849, and Lansing, Iowa 1856. While visiting her sister, Almira (Hale) Griswold at Waukon, Iowa in Oct. 1878 she fell down the cellar stairs and was instantly killed. Mrs. Griswold refers to this sad accident as one of the most agonizing of all her sorrowful experiences. Three doors, all alike in appearance led from the room in which the evening had been spent, one into the parlor, one up stairs, and one down cellar. The good nights had been said and opening, as she supposed, the stair door, she took the fatal step. Her remains lie buried beside her mother Lucy (Hinkley) Hale in the old Waukon Cemetery, who it will be remembered, died at Mrs. Griswold's Oct 1867 while on a visit just eleven years before.

Children of John Churchill and Olive Experience Hale

  1. Lucy Hinckley Churchill b: 16 Dec 1828
  2. Harriett Emeline Churchill b: 12 Jul 1830
  3. Luther Barnard Churchill b: 12 Dec 1831
  4. Jane Hale Churchill b: 21 Nov 1833
  5. Emily Jeanette Churchill b: 23 Jul 1835
  6. Safronia Churchill b: 20 Dec 1837
  7. John Franklin Churchill b: 31 Aug 1841 in Stowe, Vermont
  8. Abigail Williams Churchill b: 30 Nov 1844
  9. Edwin Churchill b: 27 Apr 1847

Coppernoll, William Giles - He was born in 1842 in Hornby, Steuben County, New York. He was the son of Peter Coppernoll and Rhoda Strong.

From Jerry Scott, great grandson: His correct name was William G. Coppernoll. The spelling in the document (US Gravesites) you sent me is also misspelled as Coppernall rather than Coppernoll. It looks like his name had various spellings but the true one is as I have documented it. As for his participation in Hubbard, Minn. I have no idea except to say he was mustered out on Aug 8, 1865 according to his discharge papers I have and he boarded the Illinois Central RR somewhere to start his journey back to Clinton, Iowa. As he entered the service in 1862, I assume he went through all the campaigns up to his time of discharge. When he returned to Clinton he married Sarah McNamar, daughter of Irish immigrants, according to the family Bible he began when he got married, and the family eventually settled in Arkansas where my mother was born (his grand daughter). Cpl Coppernoll was born in New York state and was 20 years old when the war ended. He received his promotion to corporal after the battle of Abbeyville, Miss. in August of 1864. From the US Gravesite information it appears that he was 53 when he died.

Biographical Sketches of Settlers in the 1880's, Hubbard Co., MN

Surnames C - E

COFFREMALL

William F. Coffremall (Coppernoll?) enlisted in Company B of the 27th Iowa Infantry Regiment on August 8, 1862. He was discharged August 8, 1865, as a corporal, after sustaining a gunshot wound in his left arm. In June 1890 M. M. Loring enumerated him 94th, in house 90, in Hubbard

1870 Census - Burrell, Decatur, Iowa: William G. Coppernoll (age 27), Sarah Coppernoll (age 27) and Frank Coppernoll (age 2).

1880 Census - Davenport, Scott County, Iowa: William Copper2noll (age 38), Sarah (age 38), Frank (age 12), William (age 9), Mollie (age 6) and Archer (age 4).

1890 Veterans Census: Hubbard, Hubbard County, Minnesota: William G. Coppernoll, Corp, Co. P, 27th Iowa Inf. Enlisted August 8, 1862, Discharged August 8, 1865. Post Office Address: Hubbard, Hubbard County, Minnesota. Disability Incurred: Gun shot wound in left arm. (Note he was indexed as Coppemall)

On August 26, 1896 he bought 80 acres under the Homestead Act in Carroll County, Arkansas.

William G. Coppernoll died July 25, 1898 in Eureka Springs, Carroll County, Arkansas. He is buried in the Fort Smith National Cemetery.

His widow Sarah Coppernoll filed for a pension on May 25, 1899 in Arkansas.


Cornwall, George Lincoln He was born about 1844 in Iowa. Per Kim Davis, he was the son of George W. and Araminta (Crawford) Cornwall, and grandson of Martha Davis, who had Araminta by her previous marriage to a (fnu) Crawford. (See Tribue Moses Davis and Solomon W. Bates, who also served in Company B. 27th Iowa.) George L. Cornwall married Alice M. Crawford on June 25, 1879 in Rock Island, Illinois. (Illinois, Marriage Index, 1851-1900)

1880 Census, South Moline, Rock Island County, Illinois. George Cornwall (age 33) and Alice M., (age 28).

He filed for a pension on December 18, 1881(?) in Nebraska.

George Cornwall died July 2, 1890. He is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Moline, Rock Island County, Illinois.

His widow Alice M. Cornwall filed for a pension on July 26, 1890 in Illinois.

Alice M. (Crawford) Cornwall died March 6, 1921 in Moline, Rock Island, Illinois. It appears that there were no children. Her will left her property to one friend, the church and brothers and sisters of George L. Cornwall.


Corell, John. He was born Jan. 12, 1834 in Germany. He married Johanna.

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa; John Corell (age 26, carpenter, born Hesse-Kassel) He was living in a hotel.

1870 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Corell (age 35, cabinet manufacturer, born Hesse), Hannah Corell (age 28, born Prussia), E. M. Corell (age 3, born Iowa), George Corell (age 1, born Iowa), G. A. J. Corell (age 20, shoe maker, born Hesse).

FIRE DEPARTMENT (page 425-426)

A meeting was held at the office of Mayor Burford February 25, 1871, for the purpose of organizing a fire company. Mayor Burford presided, and S. P. Darling acted as secretary. Proper committees were appointed and the meeting adjourned to March 2d. This meeting and several others immediately following resulted in the organization, April 1, 1871, of Hope Fire Company No. 1, with the following officers: R. V. Shurley, foreman; P. H. Pierson, first assistant; S. W. Hemenway, second assistant; W. H. Burford, secretary; Herman Schierholz, treasurer; W. J. Bort, first pipeman; and Phil Dignan, second pipeman.


December 3, 1873, the company was reorganized under the present name of "Rescue Fire Company No. 1", and the following officers elected: Foreman, Capt. E. B. Bascom; first assistant, Jacob Schaach; second assistant, John Corell; secretary, T. C. Medary; treasurer, J. B. Thorp; steward, J. G. Orr.


In July, 1874, John Corell was elected foreman, retaining the position one year, when Jacob Schaach was chosen, and so continued until July, 1881, when John Dunlevy succeeded him.

(History of Lansing
Past & Present of Allamakee County,1913, page 425-426)


A. T. Andreas Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa 1875 Patrons of the Iowa State Atlas, Lansing Township: John Corell, Residence Lansing, Business Furniture Dealer, Nativity: Germany, Came to State: 1856, Post Office: Lansing.

1880 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa; John Corell (age 46, Furniture Dealer, born Hessen), wife Johanna Corell, (age 38, born Prussia), daughter Emma Corell (age 13, born Iowa), son George Corell (age 11, born Iowa), son John Corell (age 6, born Iowa) and son Edwin Corell (age 1, born Iowa).

1890 Veterans Census: Townships, 141, 142, 143 and 144, Stutsman County, North Dakota: John Corell, Sergeant Co. B, 27th Iowa Infantry, Enlisted Aug. 14, 1862, discharged Aug. 8, 1865, Length of Service: 3 years less 6 days, Post Office Address: Jamestown, Stutsman County, N. Dak: Disability Incurred; Chronic pneumonia, affecting speech

1900 Census: Buchanan, Eldridge & Toledo Township Schools, (Excl. Jamestown City), Stutsman County, North Dakota: John Corall (born Jan. 1834, age 66, married 34 years, born Germany, immigrated 1852, in US 48 years, naturalized, farmer), wife Johannah Corall (born Aug. 1841, age 58, married 34 years, 8 children born, 5 still living, born Germany, immigrated 1854, in US 46 years), son John H. Corall,( born Jan 1874, age 26, born Iowa, farmer), son Edwin B (born Feb. 1879, age 21, born Iowa) and daughter Clara G Corall (born Feb. 1883, age 16, born Iowa)

John Correll died Dec. 28, 1905 and is buried in Highland Home Cemetery, Jamestown, Stutsman County, North Dakota.

His widow Johanna Corell filed for a pension on Jan. 20, 1906 in North Dakota.

Johanna Corell (born Aug. 2, 1841), died June 26, 1915 and is buried in Highland Home Cemetery, Jamestown, Stutsman County, North Dakota.


Davis, Tribue Moses He was born about 1844 in Iowa. He was the son of Moses and Martha Davis. He married Mary Ophelia Kidder on Sept. 30, 1865. His half sister, Mary Ann Davis married Solomon Bates, who also served in Company B. 27th Iowa.

1850 Census - Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Moses Davis (age 47), Martha Davis (age 47), Joel (age 19), John (age 17), Mary (age 15), Sarah (age 12), Elizabeth (age 8), and Tribue (age 6).

1860 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County: Salam W. Bats (age 31, born Vermont, blacksmith), Mary Ann Bats (age 26), Eliza Bats (age 1), Dora C. Bats (age 11/12), Martha Davis (age 59, born Tennessee), Elizabeth Davis (age 18, born Ill), and Moses T. Davis (age 16, born Ill.)

1870 Census - Rock Falls, White Side County, Ill: Tribue Davis (age 26), Mary (age 27) and Agnes (age 3).

1880 Census - Santa Clara, California: Mary Davis (age 37)  Aggie Davis (age 12, born Ill.) and William Davis (age 10, born Ill.) were living with Nelson Kidder (age 70) and Matilda Kidder (age 69).  Mary Davis was listed as their daughter, the two children were listed as Grandchildren.

There was a Tribue Davis that died Jan. 8, 1881 in St. Louis. The Register of Deaths in the City of Saint Louis, January 1881 (Missouri Death Records 1834-1910) shows: No. 187, Date of Death: Jan. 8, 1881, Name: Tribue Davis, widowed, age 40, Nativity, IA; Place of Death: Sherman House NW cor. Broadway and Wash St. Ward 2: Occupation: Peddler; Disease: Phthisis Polmul; attending Physician: Jno C. Brusick. I am not certain that this is him. I do note that the record says his nativity was Iowa, but it also says he was widowed. IF he and his wife were separated, she may not have known he died, which could account for the lag time in filing for the pension. -- But that is only speculation on my part. I have added Tribue Davis to the Holy Ghost Cemetery in Find a Grave and requested a photo. I will see if that tells me anything.

I got a response from Find a Grave which said: "All burials from this cemetery were removed and presently there is a High School on this property. There are no headstones to photograph." An interesting description of the process can be found here: Based on this, I do not know if his body was moved to one of the other cemeteries OR if it is one of the "unidentified bodies" that did not get moved and is still buried under the existing High School. So I am not currently sure which cemetery he is buried in.

His Widow Mary Davis filed for a pension on Sept. 29, 1890 in California. She filed for a minor (Agnes H. Davis - Pulsifer) on Oct. 30, 1897 in California.

Update December 2017, Submitted by Kim Davis

Dear Elaine,
I noted with interest your information on the 27th Iowa....and all the work you've done on so many of the people. I thought you might like to know of some "connections" between the soldiers, particularly from one family, in Company B.

Moses Tribue (or Trabue) Davis: You have correctly identified his parents Moses and Martha. As you suspected, they (Tribue and Mary) were separated, although she did hear of his death in St. Louis (as you have identified) when the hotel owner sent her son his father's gold watch. I have read the pension file. Their daughter, Agnes Pulsifer, applied (late) for the minor's pension her mother never applied for at the instigation of her (Agnes') husband, Thomas PULSIFER.

Tribue (Moses Tribue) was buried in the Holy Ghost Cemetery as you have listed.  He probably never had a tombstone, as his wife and surviving children were in California, parents deceased, and siblings unlikely to be able to afford a stone.  Nor was there anyone to apply for a "free" government issue stone for his CW service. (I looked and did not find an application.)  I do not know if his remains were moved to another cemetery or if he was left in his original burial site.


Degnan, John - He was born Mar 6, 1840 in Ireland. He was most likely the son of Michael and Margaret Degnan. (note: even though the roster says his nativity was Iowa, every census record consistently says he was born in Ireland).

1870 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Dignan (age 46, plasterer, born Ireland), Anna Degnin (age 34, born Ireland) and James Dignan (age 10, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa , 27th Iowa: John Digman, Private, Company B, Post Office Address: Lansing.

1885 Iowa State Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Degnan (Waide Front Str., age 45, plasterer, born Ireland, Anna Degnan (age 38, born Florida), James Degnan (age 15, born Allamakee County, Iowa), and George Degnan (age 4, born Iowa).

Anna S. Degnan (born Feb. 2, 1846), died Dec. 16, 1894. She is buried in Gethsemane Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

1895 Iowa State Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Degnan (age 55, widowed, born Ireland, Religious Belief: Catholic, Soldier in the War of the Rebellion: Co. B, 27th Iowa Inf., "Deaths in 1894 is checked"). George Degnan (age 14, born Allamakee County, Iowa).

1900 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Digman (Born Mar. 1840, age 60, married 4 years) and Sarah (age 41, married 4 years, 1 child born, 0 living).

John Degnan died April 24, 1909 and is buried in Gethsemane Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His widow Sarah Degnan filed for a pension on May 24, 1909 in Iowa.


Dickens, John W. He was born March 4, 1843 in Mendon, Clayton County, Iowa. He was the son of Edward (Ned) Glover Dickens and Ann Drusilla Van Sickle. He married Alice Luce in Oct. 1872.

John Wesley Dickens The photo was submitted by Doug Dickens.

1850 Census: Mendon, Clayton county, Iowa: Edward Dickens (age 37, farmer, born Tenn. ), Drusilla Dickens (age 27, born Indi.), William M. Dickens (age 12), Lucius Dickens (age 10), John W. Dickens 9age 8), Edward Dickens (age 7), Sophronia Dickens (age 5) and Charles c. Dickens (age 1). All the children were born in Iowa.

1856 Iowa State Census: Mendon, Clayton County, Iowa: Edward Dickens (age 40, farmer, born Ten, had been in Iowa 21 years), Ann D. Dickens (age 34, born Ia, had been in Iowa 27 years), William Dickens (age 19), Lucius Dickens (age 16), John W. Dickens (age 13), Edward Dickens (age 12), Charles c. Dickens (age 6), Sophrona C. Dickens (age 9), Harriett Dickens (age 4) and Robert Dickens (age 2). All the children were born in Iowa.

1860 Census: Mendon, Clayton county, Iowa: E. D. Dickins (age 45, born Tennessee), A. Z. Dickins (age 38, born Indiana), Wm. Dickins (age 21), N. L. Dickins (age 19), John W. Dickins (age 16), Edward Dickins (age 15), Sophronia Dickins (age 13), Charles Dickins (age 10), Harriet Dickins (age 8), Robert Dickins (age 6), Mary Dickins 9age 3), Joseph Dickins (age 1/12), Mary Fitzgerald (age 26), and Felix G. Dickins (age 25).

1910 Census: Soldiers Home, Ada County, Idaho: John W. Dickens,( age 67, widowed, born Iowa)

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Hot Springs, Fall River, South Dakota, Battle Mountain Sanitarium: John W. Dickens: MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Each Enlistment: 7 March 1864, McGregor Iowa: Private, Co B., 27th Iowa Inf. time and Place of Discharge : July 13, 1865, Cause of Discharge: Transfer. Co B., Company and Regiment 12 Iowa Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: Jan. 20, 1866, Davenport Iowa. Cause of Discharge: Close of War. Disabilities when admitted to the Home: ununited Frac. left femur, ch. nasal catarrh, ch. art. rheumatism, Exopthalnise goiter. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Iowa. Age 66, Height: 6'2", fair complexion, blue eyes, gray hair, can read and write, Religion: Prot. Occupation: Farmer, Residence subsequent to Discharge: Boise Idaho, widowed, Name and address of nearest relative: Brother Chas. C. Dickens, Bruneian, Idaho. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: $12.00. Date of Admission: Ad. B.M.S, Jan 2, 1910. Discharged: 8/2/10, Cause of Discharge: O. R., Pension Certificate #1028262

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Sawtelle, Los Angeles, California, Pacific Branch: John W. Dickens: MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Each Enlistment: 7 March 1864, McGregor Iowa: Private, Co B., 27th Iowa Inf. time and Place of Discharge : July 13, 1865, Cause of Discharge: Transfer. Co B., Company and Regiment 12 Iowa Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: Jan. 20, 1866, Davenport Iowa. Cause of Discharge: Mustered out.. Disabilities when admitted to the Home :an ununited fracture of outer condgle of the left femur. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Iowa. Age 66, Height: 6'2", fair complexion, blue eyes, gray hair, can read and write, Religion: Prot. Occupation: Farmer, Residence subsequent to Discharge: Idaho, widowed, Name and address of nearest relative: Brother Chas. C. Dickens, Bruneian, Idaho. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: $30.00. Date of Admission: Ad. B.M.S, Jan 2, 1910. Discharged: 8/2/10, Cause of Discharge: O. R., Admitted P. B. Feb. 7, 1912. Discharged Jan. 3, 1917, own request. Readmit Feb. 3, 1921, discharged: 2/4/21, own request. Pension Certificate #1028262

John Wesley Dickens died July 28, 1921 at Boise, Idaho (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Morris Hill Cemetery, Boise, Ada County, Idaho.


Dickens, Lucius. He was born Jan. 8, 1841 in Mendon, Clayton county, Iowa. He was the son of Edward (Ned) Glover Dickens (July 14, `8`4 - Jan. 17, 1894) and Ann Drusilla Van Sickle Aug. 19, 1822 - Sept. 5, 1909). He married (1st) (Dec. 6, 1866) Eunice E. Mead (who died March 22, 1877), and (2nd) Kate Clark, on the 18th of June, 1878;

1850 Census: Mendon, Clayton county, Iowa: Edward Dickens (age 37, farmer, born Tenn. ), Drusilla Dickens (age 27, born Indi.), William M. Dickens (age 12), Lucius Dickens (age 10), John W. Dickens (age 8), Edward Dickens (age 7), Sophronia Dickens (age 5) and Charles C. Dickens (age 1). All the children were born in Iowa.

1856 Iowa State Census: Mendon, Clayton County, Iowa: Edward Dickens (age 40, farmer, born Ten, had been in Iowa 21 years), Ann D. Dickens (age 34, born Ia, had been in Iowa 27 years), William Dickens (age 19), Lucius Dickens (age 16), John W. Dickens (age 13), Edward Dickens (age 12), Charles c. Dickens (age 6), Sophrona C. Dickens (age 9), Harriett Dickens (age 4) and Robert Dickens (age 2). All the children were born in Iowa.

1860 Census: Mendon, Clayton county, Iowa: E. D. Dickins (age 45, born Tennessee), A. Z. Dickins (age 38, born Indiana), Wm. Dickins (age 21), N. L. Dickins (age 19), John W. Dickins (age 16), Edward Dickins (age 15), Sophronia Dickins (age 13), Charles Dickins (age 10), Harriet Dickins (age 8), Robert Dickins (age 6), Mary Dickins 9age 3), Joseph Dickins (age 1/12), Mary Fitzgerald (age 26), and Felix G. Dickins (age 25).

1870 Census: Pine Island, Goodhue County, Minnesota: Lucius Dickens (age 31, cooper, born Wisconsin) Eunice (age 25, born Pennsylvania), Blanche Dickens (age 3, born Iowa), Nettie Dickens (age 2, born Minnesota)

1880 Census: Fairview, Allamakee County, Iowa: Lucius N. Dickens (age 39, born Wisconsin), wife Katie Dickens (age 22, born Canada), daughter Blanche Dickens (age 13, born Iowa), daughter Nettie Dickens (age 11, born Minnesota) and son Charles Dickens (age 9, born Minnesota).

1890 Veterans Schedule: Robberson, Green County, Missouri: Lucius N. Dickens, Sergeant, Co. B. 27th Iowa In. Enlisted Aug. 8, 1862, Discharged Aug. 9, 1865, Length of Service: 3 years, 1 day, Post Office Address: Ebenezer, Missouri

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Leavenworth, Kansas, Western Branch: Lucius N. Dickens: MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 8, 1862, Lansing Iowa: Rank Corp. Company and Regiment: B, 27th Iowa Inf. Time and place of discharge: Aug. 9, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. Cause of Discharge: Expiration term of service. Kind and degree of disability: Chronic Diarrhea and lumbago. When and where contracted: Jan 1863, Memphis Tenn. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Wisconsin, Age 47, Height: 5' 9 1/2", dark complexion, gray eyes, brown hair, Occupation Cooper, Protestant, Residence Subsequent to Discharge: Kansas City, MO. widowed, P. O. Address of Nearest Relative: Edward Dickens, Father, North McGregor, Iowa. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: $8.00, Date of Admission and Re-Admission: July 11, 1890. Re-admitted May 23, 1895, W. B., Date of Discharge: Aug. 12, 1890, and Aug. 3, 1895. Cause of Discharge: Own request.

Lucius N. Dickens married Mary E. Burton on Nov. 10, 1890 at Leavenworth County, Kansas.  - He was age 48. She was age 25. ("Kansas, Marriages, 1840-1935," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FWLG-B5B : accessed 27 Jan 2013), Lucius N. Dickens and Mary E. Burton, 10 Nov 1890.

His widow Mary E. Dickens filed for a pension on May 4, 1896 in Kansas. A pension was filed for a minor in Kansas. The date had a blot on it. It might have been Dec. 29, 1903.  Mary E. Lyons was guardian

1900 Census, Leavenworth Ward 1, Leavenworth County, Kansas: Mary Dickens (born April, 1866 in New York, widowed, 6 children born, 4 still living), son Harry B. Dickens (born Oct. 1887, age 12, born Kansas), son Charles Dickens (born Dec. 1888, age 11, born Kansas), Daughter Margaret Dickens (born April 1894, age 6, born Oklahoma), and daughter Neoma Dickens, born Sept. 1896, age 3, born Kansas).


Dobbs, Stephen - He was born about 1831 in Illinois. This is information that I have found on the only Stephen Dobbs that I could find born 1831 in Illinois. This may or may not be him. Further research would be necessary on this soldier. But if this is correct: He was the son of William Dobbs and Mary (Polly) Helm. He married Barbara McMillian on Sept. 29, 1857. She was the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth McMillin.

I (ejj) found this query which seems to fit the only Stephen Dobbs (born 1831) that I can find. This one may or may not be the correct Stephen:

Query on Dobbs GenForum: "Stephen Dobbs the son of William and Mary (Polly) Helm Dobbs married Barbary (Barbara) McMillin 9-26-1857. She was the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth McMillin. Stephen and Barbara were the parents of a son John Franklin Dobbs born in Richland County, Wisconsin 11-26-1858. John married Emma Dickwisch 2-12-1883, they were the parents of Willard, Guy and Mabel. John Franklin died 4-2-1910 in Hancock County, IL. I believe Stephen Dobbs and Barbara were divorced because I found him on the 1870 census living with his brothers William and Lewis in Richland County, Wisconsin. Their sister Susan who married Michael McMillin was living next door to them. Barbara McMillin Dobbs married William Harrison 4-15-1867 she was his second wife. They lived in Hancock County, Illinois. This doesn't answer your question about the names of William and Mary's parents but it may give you some other leads."

1850 Census: Fayette, Lafayette County, Wisconsin: William Dobbs (age 42, farmer, born Tennessee), Mary Dobbs (age 40, born Tennessee), Stephen Dobbs (age 19, farmer, born Illinois), Sarah E. Dobbs (age 17, born Illinois), Mary A. Dobbs (age 14, born Illinois), John Dobbs (age 13, born Wisconsin), Susan Dobbs (age 10, born Wisconsin), Naomi C. Dobbs (age 8, born Wisconsin), William Dobbs (age 5, born Wisconsin), Alexander Dobbs (age 3, born Wisconsin), and Lewis J. Dobbs (age 3/12, born Wisconsin.

1860 Census: Clayton, Crawford County, Wisconsin: Stephen Dobbs (age 29, farm hand, born Illinois) Barbary Dobbs (age 23, born Ohio), and John F. Dobbs (age 1, born Wisconsin).

1870 Census: Akan, Richland County, Wisconsin: William Dobbs (age 24, farmer, born Wisconsin), Stephen Dobbs (age 39, farmer, born Illinois), and Lewis Dobbs (age 20, farm laborer, born Wisconsin). Michael and Susan McMillin were living next door.

1880 Census: Richwood, Richland County, Wisconsin: William Moshier (age 59, runs flouring mill, born NY), Lucy Moshier (age 49, born NY), Stephen Dobbs (age 49, laborer, born Illinois) and Mary Johnson (age 22, servant, born Norway).


Dodd, Calvin Riggs (Or Rufus) - He was born May 3, 1828 in Marion, Ohio. He was the son of Joseph Dodd (Nov. 26, 1804 - Apr. 3, 1873) and Phebe Leonard (1806 - about 1832). He married Sarah Ann Willever on Oct. 30, 1859 in Williford, Allamakee County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Robert Willever (1797-1857) and Catherine Elizabeth Size (1807 - 1889). Sarah was previously married to Jacob Rinehard, who died in 1852. Jacob and Sarah's children were: Almena, James, John. James, Emmaline, Mary Jane, and Jacob. Calvin's sister Mary Shedd Dodd married John Moyer, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census - Millville, Jo Davies County, Ill: Joseph Dodd (age 47, chair maker, born Pennsylvania), Mary Dodd (age 16, born Ohio), and Calvin Dodd (age 22, laborer, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Taylor, Allamakee County, Iowa: Joseph Dood (age 52), Calvin Dood (age 30), John Meyors (age 30), Mary Meyors (age 22), Joseph Meyors (age 4, born Wis.), Caroline Meyors (age 2, born Wisc), and Martha Meyors (age 1/2 born Iowa.) Joseph and Calvin Dodd had been in the state of Iowa for 5 years. John Moyer had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years. (Note: the name should have been Moyer. Mary S. Dodd married John Moyer).

1860 Census - Taylor, Allamakee County, Iowa: Joseph Dodd (age 58, chair maker, born Pennsylvania), Calvin (age 30, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah Dodd (age 36, born Pennsylvania). James Rinehart (age 14, born PA), Emeline Rinehart (age 12, born PA) and Jacob Rinehart (age 10, born Wisconsin).

1870 Census - Taylor, Allamakee County, Iowa: Calvin Dodd (age 43, furniture dealer, born Ohio), Sarah Dodd (age 47, born PA), Julia Dodd (age 9, born Iowa), Rufus Dodd, (age 3, born Iowa), Leonard Dodd (age 2, born Iowa), Joseph Dodd (age 67, chair maker, born PA), Jacob Rinehard (age 20, born Wisconsin) and Jean Rinehard (age 22, born Wisconsin).

1880 Census - Harlan, Washington County, Nebraska: Calvin Dodd (age 53, farmer, born Ohio), wife Sarah Dodd (age 56, born Pennsylvania), son Rufus Dodd (age 13, born Iowa), son Leonard Dodd (age 12, born Iowa) and son Wiley N. Dodd (age 9, born Iowa.).

1885 Nebraska State Census, Harlan, Hayes and Hitchcock: C. R. Dodd, age 68, farmer, born Ohio), wife S. A. Dodd (age 61, born Pennsylvania), son L. W. Dodd (age 16, born Iowa), son W. W. Dodd (age 14, born Iowa), and adopted daughter Alice Dodd, age 12, born Iowa).

Sarah Dodd died January 18, 1888 in Huntley, Harlan, Nebraska.

1890 Veterans Census - Washington, Harlan County, Nebraska: Calvin R. Dodd, Private, Co. B, 27 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Oct 18, 1862, Discharged Oct. 1865, served 3 years, Post Office Address Huntley, Harlan Co., Neb., Remarks: catarah and rheumatism 25 years.

1900 Census - Cleveland, Cherry County, Nebraska. Calvin R. Dodd, (born May 1827, age 73, widowed, born Ohio). He was living with his daughter Julia, her husband William Stratton and 11 children.

1910 Census - Deer Creek, Custer County, Oklahoma. Father Calvin Dodd. (age 83, widowed 2 times, born Ohio). He was living with his son Leonard Dodd (age 40) and Leonard's family: wife Clara Dodd and 4 children.

Calvin R. Dodd died Sept. 21, 1914 at Thomas, Oklahoma. (Pension Index Record and US Veterans Pension Payment Card)

There are at least 20 online family trees that say that Calvin Dodd died March 21, 1920 and is buried in Bainbridge Cemetery, Huntley, Harlan County, Nebraska Lot 110.

The cemetery is correct. However, I have no way of knowing for sure which date is correct. I would tend to believe the date in the Pension Index Recorda. I note that Find a Grave also says Sept. 21, 1914. I will use that date for the cemetery records, unless someone proves otherwise. All it takes is one person to be wrong and everyone copying the information for the date to be incorrect in the family trees. ejj


Dodson, James - He was born Dec. 2, 1844 in Cambria County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Samuel Dodson (July 7, 1819 - Feb. 4, 1908) and Margaret Ashcraft (Dec. 28, 1822 - Oct. 7, 1878).

1850 Census, Sasquehanna, Cambria, Pennsylvania: Samuel Dodson (age 31, farmer, born PA), Margaret Dodson (age 27, born PA), Elizabeth A. Dodson (age 7, born PA), James Dodson (age 5, born PA), Richard Dodson (age 3, born PA), Catherine Dodson (age 8/12, born PA), and Richard Ashcroft (age 33, born PA).

1860 Census, Mendon, Clayton County, Iowa: Samuel Dodson (age 33, laborer, born Pennsylvania), Marg Dodson (age 30, born Pennsylvania), Elizabeth Dodson (age 18, born Pennsylvania), James Dodson (age 16, born Pennsylvania), Richard Dodson (age 14, born Pennsylvania), Frank Dodson (age 10, born Pennsylvania), Mary Dodson (age 3, born Iowa).

James Dodson filed for a pension on Feb. 10, 1869.

James Dodson died Jan. 13, 1873 in Clearfield, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. He is buried in Clearfield Village Cemetery, Clearfield, Clearfield, Pennsylvania.

Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans: James Dodson, Pvt, Co. B, Regt. 27th Iowa Inf. Cemetery: Village; City or Town: Clearfield; County and State: Clearfield, PA. Died: Jan. 13, 1873. Headstone supplied by D. W. Whitney.

There is no "Village Cemetery" listed in Clearfield County, PA on Find A Grave. I found a "Clearfield" Cemetery listed on Find A Grave and thought he was probably buried there. 

UPDATED: I had requested a photo of the tombstone for James Dodson. But according to Find a Grave (Even though there is a Clearfield Cemetery listed on Find a Grave): There is no cemetery in Clearfield that is known as Clearfield cemetery. The cemeteries in Clearfield are: Old Clearfield Cemetery (which is abandoned), Hillcrest Cemetery, Centre Cemetery, Crown Crest Cemetery, Owens Cemetery, Old Saint Francis Church Cemetery (abandoned), and Calvary Cemetery.

There is a detailed explanation of this problem listed here. Based on this information he might be buried in Old Clearfield Cemetery.

His father Samuel Dodson filed for a pension on August 16, 1888 (the year is my best guess - it was blurred.)


Donner, Levi - He was born Nov. 22, 1821 in Jefferson County, Indiana. He was the son of John Donner (Apr. 9, 1790 - Aug. 21, 1879) and Sally Lame (Feb. 19, 1800 - Feb. 24, 1852)

Levi Donner died Nov. 11, 1863 in Madison, Dane County, Wisconsin. He is buried in Republic Cemetery, Bellevue, Jackson County, Iowa.

His widow Mary W. Donner filed for a pension on Nov. 27, 1863.


Dubay, William He was born Aug. 15, 1826 in Canada. He married Elizabeth (Betsy) Elder on June 12, 1852 in Lansing, Iowa. She was the daughter of James and Neoma Elder.

William Dubay1856 Iowa State Census: Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: William Duboy (age 25, born Canada) Betsy Duboy (age 22, born Penn), Melissa Duboy (age 3, born Iowa) and Augustus Duboy (age 1, born Iowa). James Elder (age 49, born Tenn.) and 5 children: Sarah, Jane, Mary, James and Emma was living next door.

1860 Census: Wheatland, Bad Ax County, Wisconsin: William Duboise (age 26, laborer, born Canada), Betzey Duboise (wife, age 26, born Pennsylvania), Metega Duboise (age 7, born Iowa), Augustus DuBoise (age 6, born Iowa) and William Duboise (age 2, born Iowa). James Elder (age 45, born Pennsylvania) and children James (age 13) and Emma (age 8), were living next door.

1870 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Wm. Dubay (age 40, laborer, born Canada), Betsey DuBay (age 39, born Pennsylvania), Melissa DuBay (age 17, domestic, born Iowa), August DuBay (age 15, laborer, born Iowa) William DuBay (age 13, laborer, born Iowa), Clara DuBay (age 4, born Iowa) and James DuBay (age 1, born Iowa).

William DuBay pension application affidavit

submitted by Diane DuBay

I, W. Dubay, a citizen of the City of Lansing in the County of Allamakee and State of Iowa do solemnly swear: that I am a Citizen of the United States of America, enlisted at Lansing in the 27th Iowa Volunteers and afterwards at Selma, Alabama connected myself with the 12th Iowa, Comp. B, Capt. W.R. Hanscomb for the purpose of serving out my time, from which latter Regiment I hold an honorable discharge dated at Mobile Ala 24 November 1865 and signed by

W. Royatell Johnston, 1st Lt. 34 N.J. Inf & A.C.M.
Saml G. Knee Maj 12 Iowa V.V.I

That at the Building of Fortifications at Nashville, Tennessee in the year 1864 while yet belonging to the 27th Iowa I ruptured myself -- that I did not mind the Matter untill after I came home when I was forced to call upon Dr. J. J. Taylor, who informed me what it was & by whose advice I procured a Truss and have worn it ever since. The Matter growing from bad to worse & finally this Summer I called upon my Capt. the Honbl Saml G. Hemmenway & asked him to intercede for me with the Government which he promised to do but failed on Account of being accidentally killed while laying Waterpipes for the Waterworks of the City of Lansing, Iowa, being buried by Rock & Sand in the Trench.

That I am born in Canada on the 16th day of May 1830; that I am married to Betsey Dubay, a Daughter of Jas. Elder of Penl who was born on the 1st April 1834, that we have the following children now alive

Melissa born 11 Mar 1853 at Lansing
William H " 22 Oct 1858 " do
Clara " 30 July 1861 " DeSoto, Wis.
James " 25 Sep 1868 " Lansing
Emma " 24 Dec 1871 " do

That I am unable to make a living by my labour & that therefore I beg the Honbl Commissioner for grant of Pension as in such case made & provided & this is what I will ever pray.

Lansing 21st November 1877
Wm Dubay

- source: William DuBay pension application

- submitter notes:
1. the date of birth and military organization for William DuBay that is at variance with Lansing burial records
2. the names of Hemmenway and Hanscom are a "best guess" of the handwriting on the original affidavit.
3. William DuBay's name in other records is also transposed as DuBois or Duboise.

- submitted by Diane DuBay

William Dubay died October 19, 1878 in Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa. He is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His widow Betsy Dubay filed for a pension on Jan. 1880.

The following information was found on the internet at:: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/4047/dubay1.html. (Note this link was broken. I could not find the original information. ejj).

*William DuBay (Dubois) Civil War Regiment was: Co. B, 27th Iowa Infantry. He was transferred to Co. B, 12th Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry at the close of the war in order to serve out his term of enlistment

EXTRACTED FROM AN E-MAIL SENT BY "DDUBAY"

After William died in Lansing in 1878, his wife, Betsy, and her minor children moved to Sac City. In Lansing, William had run into a horrible snafu over his Veteran's Pension and the family became quite destitute when he became too ill to work. (He'd been severely injured at the Battle of Nashville during the Civil War and was ill after he came home until he died). After he died, Betsy moved to Sac City with her 3 minor children -- at age 11, James had had to hire out as a field hand to help support the family because Betsy ran into the same snafu when she applied for a widow's pension. Betsy apparently became severely disabled by epilepsy at some point and her daughter Emma Hignett and sister, Emma Peacock, took care of her. The snafu over the widow's pension was straightened out finally, but not until very shortly before she died in Sac City. From reading through all of the pension appeals, it appears that William's army recruiter enlisted him as William DuBay and when he applied for his pension, he applied as "DuBois," and the pension was denied, despite a letter from the Mayor of Lansing and every city council member and depositions from soldiers who'd served with him and had seen him get injured. After he died, Betsy fired her attorney, got a new one in Sac City and began applying for a widow and dependent children's pension, apparently helped by Vesta (Victor) and Charles Deremo. This time, though, Betsy applied as Betsy "DuBay" and it looks to us as if that pension application was the one that finally got approved.

We wonder -- is that why we are DuBays? Would our name be DuBois if this hadn't happened?

Elizabeth (Elder) Dubay (born April 1, 1834) died May 29, 1901.

Children of William Dubay and Elizabeth Elder:

  1. Malissa Dubay, b.Mar. 11 1853, d Apr. 21 1898
  2. Augustus Dubay, b Jan. 26 1855, d Dec. 8 1870
  3. William Henry Dubay, b Oct. 22 1858 Lansing, Ia, d Feb.15 1924
  4. Clara Dubay, b Jul. 30 1861, d Aug. 14 1920
  5. James Alexander Dubay, b. Sept. 25, 1868 Lansing, Ia, d. Jan. 4, 1940 St. Paul, Mn.
  6. Emma Dubay, b Dec. 24 1871 Lansing. Ia, d Nov. 14 1951
  7. rumors of another son "Eric", b. abt 1872, d.1888 16 years of age Typhoid...no records

Eck, Augustus - He was born Aug. 27, 1846 in Wuerttembert, Germany. He was the son of Benedict "Barney" Eck (Feb. 13, 1816 - Aug. 27, 1905) and Walburga Kramer (Apr. 20, 1817 - cir 1852). He married Mary Elizabeth Stanton on Feb. 9, 1870 in Winneshiek County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934) She was the daughter of William Stanton (1824 - Dec. 24, 1864) and Mary Self (1826 - Jan. 29, 1894).

This biography was found on his Find a Grave Memorial #81279960

Augustus was a son from Benedict's first wife, Walburga Kramer. He immigrated with his parents from Germany to Iowa in 1852 when he was about nine years old. Walburga apparently died soon after their arrival.

He came of age in Waterloo TWP, Allamakee Co., Iowa where he married Mary Stanton in 1870. The couple made their home in Winneshiek Co, Iowa (immediately west of Allamakee Co.) until after 1800 (sic - ejj) when he moved to South Dakota with the rest of the Ecks and many of his relations in the Kumpf, Pieper, and Schwarzhoff families.

He farmed in an area northeast of Florence in Codington County of South Dakota until his death in 1915. He and Mary had at least four children, all born in Iowa: Benedict, William, Clarence, Mary.

The following biographical information was found here

Benedick (Benedictus ) Eck (Egg) was born on February 13, 1816, in Wurttemberg, Germany. He died on August 26, 1905, in Florence, Codington Co, South Dakota. He was first married to Walburga Kneer (aka Kramer) on February 6, 1844 in Wuerttemberg. Walburga probably died a short time after 1851 after their arrival in the US. Benedict's second marriage was to Mary Elizabeth Kumpf sometime around 1852-1854. Mary was born November 18, 1827 in Wurttemberg and died on December 06, 1904 in Florence, South Dakota.

The Wuerttemberg Emigration Index shows Benedikt Eck came to America in March 1851. He probably was accompanied by his younger brother, Anthony (Antone).

The 1860 census for Waterloo Township, Allamakee Co., Iowa shows Benedict with his wife and children. He is listed with the first name "Barney". In 1880 he and Mary were still living in Allamakee County, but by 1900 he had moved to Codington County in South Dakota. Land purchase records from the U.S. Land Patent Office show that Benedict and his sons, Augustus and Joseph, bought land in Clark and Codington Counties (South Dakota) on 23 January 1885. This purchase indicates the whole family left Iowa for South Dakota sometime in the mid 1880s. Benedict's interest in moving to South Dakota was probably increased by the fact that his daughter, Kathrine, was already living there (Codington County) with her husband, Joseph Theodore Schwarzhoff (Jr). Kathrine and Joseph were married in 1882 and had three children by 1886. Joseph's parents had moved to Codington County sometime around 1880.

The 1900 census shows Benedict and Mary living with sons Frederick, Nicholas, and Jacob in Dexter Township, Codington County. Frederick is designated as "head" of the family. Benedict was eighty-four in 1900. Benedict's oldest son, Augustus, who was shown living on a farm near his parents in Allamakee County (Iowa) on both the 1860 and 1880 censuses, must have moved with this father and brothers to South Dakota. He is shown on the 1900 census for Codington County living on his own farm which, again, was near his that of his parent's and brother's.

Benedict died in 1905. The 1910 census shows that Benedict's sons, Frederick and Jocob, were married and living on their own farms in Codington County. It turns out that these two brothers married two sisters, Hilda and Mamie Pieper. They were the daughters of Benjamin Pieper, a long-time family friend and distant relative through two marriages. Benjamin's sister Elizabeth was the mother of Kathrine Eck's husband, Theodore Schwarzhoff (Jr) .

Barney's burial place, Esterly Cem. near Florence, SD., is also known as St. Maurice Catholic Cem.

1870 Census Waterloo. Allamakee County, Iowa: Barney Eck (age 52, farmer, born Wurttemberg), Mary Eck (age 36, born Wurttembert), Augustus Eck (age 24, farmer born Wurttembert), Joseph Eck (age 6, born Iowa), Catherine Eck (age 9, born Iowa), Elizabeth Eck (age 7, born Iowa), Jacob Eck (age 2, born Iowa) and George Eck (age 3/12, born Iowa).

1870 Census, Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: Augustus Eck (age 25) and M. E. Eck (age 19), (Note the year is not a typo. Augustus Eck was on the 1870 census twice.)

1880 Census - Canoe, Winneshiek County, Iowa: Augustus Eck (age 33, farmer, born Germany), Mary E Eck (age 27, born Illinois), son Benedict Eck (age 10, born Iowa), son William Eck (age 8, born Iowa), son Clarence Eck (age 4, born Iowa) and daughter Mary Eck (age 2, born Iowa).

He is listed on the South Dakota Civil War Veterans in 1885. This listing shows that he came to South Dakota in July 1882.

On May 10, 1888, he bought approximately 160 acres in Codington County, South Dakota (cash sale).

1890 Veteran's Census, Fuller Town, Codington County, South Dakota: Augustus Eck, Private, Co. B, 27th Iowa. Enlisted 14 Aug. 1862. Discharged August 19, 1865. Served 3 years. Post Office was Halse, SD.

1900 Census - Dexter, Codington County, South Dakota: Augustus Eck (born August 1846, age 53, married 30 years), Mary E (born Jan 1851, age 49, married 30 years, 4 children, 4 still living), William (son, age 26), Clarence (son, age 24), and Mary A, (age 22). (Note a few families away from Augustus is this family: Fredrick Eck (born Feb. 1875 in Iowa, age 25), Father Benedict Eck (born Feb 1816 in Germany, age 84, married 45 years), Mother Mary Eck (born Feb 1833, age 67, married 45 years, 12 children with 6 still living), Brother Nikalai (born in Iowa July 1872, age 27) brother Jakob (born in Iowa, Oct. 1865, age 34). Given the information below, this appears to be the parents and younger brothers of Augustus.

1910 Census - Dexter, Codington County, South Dakota: Augustus Eck (Age 64, married 1 time for 40 years, Immigrated in 1852 and was naturalized), Mary E, Eck (age 56, married 1 time for 40 years, 4 children, 4 still living), William Eck (age 33).

Augustus Eck died April 9, 1915 and is buried in Dexter Cemetery, Codington County, South Dakota.

His widow Mary E. Eck filed a pension on April 19, 1915 in South Dakota.

Note: this information was found on the Dexter Cemetery, Codington County website: Augustus Eck: Death Record: Book 1, page 86, #1167; alternate birth year "1844", age 72y, 7m; Civil War, 8/19/1862 - 8/19/1865, Pvt. Co. B., 27th Iowa Infantry; born Germany; married Mary (Stanton); died Florence, South Dakota; Cause of death: cancer of prostate, parents: Benedict Eck and ?

There was also additional information regarding his wife Mary Elizabeth Stanton: Death Record: Book 3, page 137, #6172, BP# 372, age: 92y/10m/17d: aka "Elizabeth"; died Watertown, SD; COD: Chronic myocarditis, senility, arteriosclerosis; husband: Augustus, aka "August" "Gus" Eck; widowed; born Rockford, Il, parents William Stanton and Mary Self.


Ellsworth, Job - He was born about 1824 in New York. He married Pheobe Reynolds at Pulski, Oswego County, NY on Oct. 8, 1857.

Job Ellsworth died July 27, 1864, Memphis, Tenn. He is buried in Memphis National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn. Section A, Site 2102.

There was a pension filed for a minor on Nov. 28, 1864. John Reed was the guardian. Information from the Pension files is extracted below.

Marriage record in file shows that Job Ellsworth of Joshua, Fulton County, Illinois married Phoebe Reynolds of Richland, Oswego County New York on Oct. 8, 1857. They were married at Pulaski, Oswego County, NY by John B. Watson, Justice of the Peace.


John Reed made a statement on Nov. 10, 1865 at Allamakee County, Iowa:

He was the guardian of the minor children of Job Ellsworth: John W. Ellsworth, born August 31, 1858 and Matilda T. Ellsworth, born Sept. 1, 1862. They are the only heirs of Job Ellsworth.

Job Ellsworth, a private in Company B, commanded by Captain Samuel Hemmenway in the 27th Regiment of Iowa Infantry, died at Memphis, Tennessee on July 27, 1864. His death was caused by Chronic diarrhea contracted while in said service.

Their mother Phoebe Ellsworth died April 23, 1864.


Gardner, William E. He was born about 1831 in New York. He married Mary Unknown.

William E. Gardner William E. Gardner was born in New York and was a 33 year old resident of Lansing, Allamakee County, when he enlisted in the military. The Roster for the 21st Infantry lists him as an "unassigned recruit" and also references the 12th and 27th Infantries. The Roster for the 27th Infantry indicates he enlisted October 26, 1864 in Company B and was mustered in. On November 11, 1864 he was transferred to the 12th Infantry and served until he was mustered out November 11, 1865 at Montgomery, Alabama. This indicates he saw no service with the 21st Iowa and about 9 months service with the 27th Iowa.

Having enlisted in October 1864 he likely rendezvoused with the 27th Iowa at St. Louis where it arrived on November 18th. From there they went up the Cumberland River to Nashville. On the first day of the Battle of Nashville in which Union forces under Thomas met Confederate forces under Hood, Gardner's Company B was deployed as skirmishers and on the second day participated in the assault on the Confederate line that resulted in a Confederate surrender. In March and April 1865 they participated in the campaign against Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely in Alabama that led to the capture of the City of Mobile.

- source of data: Roster of Iowa Soldiers
- source of photo: Leland Thomas
- submitted by: Leland Thomas

Note: the census records below will need further evaluation. This is the only William E. Gardner that I found in Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa in 1860. The next two census years are definitely the same family. I just don't know for sure that it is the correct William E. Gardner. I could not find this family after 1880.

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: William E. Gardner (age 28, shoemaker born Canada), Mary Gardner (age 27, born Saxony), Ida L Gardner (age 3, born Iowa), Walter S. Gardner (age 1, born Iowa) and Sidneyham Gardner (age 18, shoe maker, born Canada).

1870 Census: Centralia, Wood County, Wisconsin: William Gardner (age 39, shoemaker, born New York), Mary Gardner (age 38, born Saxony), Ida Gardner (age 13, (born Iowa), Walter Gardner (age 11, born Iowa). Jonnie Gardner (age 5, born Iowa), Albirdie Gardner (age 3, female, born Wisconsin), and Minnie Gardner (age 2/ 12, born Wisconsin).

1880 Census: Centralia, Wood County, Wisconsin: William E. Gardner (age 48, boot and shoe maker, born New York), wife Mary Gardner (age 48, born Germany), daughter Ida M. Gardner (age 22, teacher, born Iowa), son Walter S. Gardner (age 20, born Iowa), daughter Jennie Gardner (age 14, born Iowa), daughter Albertie Gardner (age 13, born Iowa) and son William E. Gardner (age 7, born Iowa).


Ginther, John - He was born about 1824 in Germany. He married Dorotha "Dora" "Dorothy" Ruffner. Per her death record she was the daughter of Anthony Ruffner.

1880 Census: Buffalo, Buffalo, Wisconsin: John Ginther (Age 55, born Prussia), Wife, Dora Ginther, (age 40, born Swiss), son John Ginther (age 10, born Iowa), Daughter Mary Ginther (age 5, born Wisconsin)

He filed for a pension in Wisconsin in 1881.

1890 Veterans Census: Wilson, Winona County, Minnesota: John Guenther, Private Co. B, 27th Regt, Iowa. Enlisted Aug. 15, 1862, Discharged Aug 16, 1865, served 3 years. Post Office Address: Witoka, Minnesota; Disability Incurred: Chronic Rheumatism.

John Ginther died Mar. 4, 1895. (Minnesota, Deaths and Burials, 1835 - 1990) He is buried in Witoka Cemetery, Centerville, Winona County, Minnesota.

His widow Dorotha Ginther filed for a pension on March 15, 1895 in Minnesota.

1900 Census, Winona Ward 4, Winona County, Minnesota: Dorotha Ginther, (born Sept. 1842, age 57, born Switzerland, widowed, 2 children born, 2 still living, immigrated in 1848. Been in US 52 years) Son John with his family was in the same county.

Dorotha Ginther (born Sept. 1842) died Sept. 6, 1922. She is buried in Witoka Cemetery, Centerville, Winona County, Minnesota.


Goble, George Blue P. - He was born May 2, 1842 in Elizabeth, Jo Davies County, Illinois. He was the son of James Blue Goble (Aug. 12, 1813 -June 12, 1850) and Harriet Williams (Apr. 23, 1819 - after 1856). He married Helen C. Morris on Sept. 13, 1877 in Enon, Missouri. She was probably the daughter of Johnethan and Violet Morris (see notes in the 1880 Census).

1850 Census: Elizabeth, Jo Davies County, Illinois: Joseph Jacobs (age 73, born Mass), Harriet Goble (age 21, born Ohio), Phoebe E. Goble (age 13, born Illinois), George Goble (age 8, born Illinois), Louisa Goble (age 3, born Illinois), James Goble (age 4/12, born Illinois), Joseph Goble (age 63, born Penn.) and Mary Goble (age 10, born Illinois).

1880 Census - Burris Fork, Moniteau County, Missouri: George B. Goble, (age 38, stone mason, born Illinois), Helen C., (age 25, born Missouri), Cora A. (age 1, born Missouri), His widowed mother-in-law Violet Morris (age 66) was also in the household. There was a Morris family next door to them. (Note in Enon Cemetery, Moniteau County, Missouri, there is a Violetty Morris b. Nov. 28, 1813 - d. Nov. 7, 1890, wife of Johnethan)

1890 Veterans Census - Burris Fork, Moniteau County, Missouri. George B. Goble, Private, Company B, 27 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug 18, 1862. Discharged August 8, 1865, Served 2 years, 11 months, 25 days. Post Office was Enon. Disability Incurred was "wounded in left wrist."

1900 Census - Kellogg, Douglas County Oregon: George B. Goble (born May 1842 in Illinois, age 58, married 22 years), Hellen C, wife (born Mar. 1855 in Missouri, age 45, married 22 years, 8 children, 7 still living) Son, Claude D Goble (age 19, born Missouri), daughter Goldie Goble (age 17, born Missouri) son Walter E. Goble (age 15, born Missouri) son Glen L. Goble (age 13, born Missouri), son Fern S. Goble (age 11, born Missouri), Son Earl C. Goble (age 8, born Missouri) and son Ramie Goble (age 5, born Oregon).

George Goble died in Feb. 10, 1901 and is buried in Kellogg Grange Cemetery, Douglas County, Oregon.(Note I saw some online family trees that list his date of death as Feb. 10, 1910. I believe that is a typo of 1901. Based on when his widow filed for a pension and the tombstone information I am confidant the year 1901 is correct).

His widow Helen C. Goble filed for a pension on Mar 11, 1901 in Oregon.

Helen C (Morris) Goble died Mar. 24, 1934 in Portland, Oregon.

Children of George B. Goble and Harriet Williams.

  1. Cora Goble b: June 17,1878, d. June 21, 1881.
  2. Claude Derwood Goble b: Sept. 12,1880, d. Mar. 8, 1947
  3. Violet Goldie Goble b: Oct. 11, 1882, d. April 8, 1968.
  4. Walter E. Goble b: Dec. 5, 1884, d. Dec. 25, 1968.
  5. Glen Langdon Goble b: March 13, 1887, d. Mar. 9, 1944
  6. Fern Smith Goble b: May 3, 1889 , d. Dec. 2, 1962
  7. Earl C. Goble b: Aug. 19, 1891, d. Mar. 10, 1958
  8. Ramie F. Goble b: Sept. 16, 1894, d. July 2, 1968

Green, Joseph. He was born Apr. 20, 1846 in Bloomfield, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Alfred Greene (May 10, 1810 - April 20, 1890) and Hannah Winder (Oct. 5, 1815- Feb. 1883).

1850 Census: Bloomfield, Crawford County, Pennsylvania: Alfred Green (age 40, farmer, born NY), Hannah Green (age 34, born PA), Levi N. Green (age 7, born PA), Phebe Green (age 5, born PA), Joseph Green (age 4, born PA). Elisa A Green (age 3, born PA), Olive Green (age 1, born PA), and Alonso Waters (age 16, born PA).

1856 Iowa State Census: Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: Alfred Green (age 46, born New York, farmer), Hannah Green (age 40, born PA). Levi Green (age 13, born PA), Phebe Green (age 11, born PA), Joseph Green (age 9, born PA, Eliza A. Green (age 7, born PA), Olive Green (age 6, born PA), Mary Green (age 6, born PA), Harriett Green (age 4, born PA), and James Green (age 1, born Iowa). The family had been in the State of Iowa for 2 years.

1860 Census: Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: Alfred Green (age 50, farmer, born NY), Hanah Green (age 44, born PA), Levi Green (age 17, farmer, born PA), Joseph Green (age 14, born PA), Eliza Ann Green (age 12, born PA), Mary Green (age 8, born PA), Harriett Green (age 7, born PA), James Green (age 5, born Iowa) and Emily G. Green (age 3, born Iowa).

Joseph Green died Mar. 28, 1872 and is buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery, Union City Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.


Griffin, Peter. -He was born about 1842 in Ireland.

1880 Census - Hanover, Allamakee County, Iowa: Peter Griffin (age 33), wife Mary (age 27), daughter Johanna (age 4), son William (age 2), and son Patrick (age 8 months).

List of Pensioners on the Roll January 1, 1883, Iowa - Allamakee County : No. of Certificate: 203,864. Name of Pensioner: Peter Griffin. Post Office Address: Waukon. Cause for which pensioned: ch. rheum. Monthly Rate: $18.00, Date of Original Allowance: Mar. 1882.

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa: Peter Griffin Private, Company B. Present Post Office: Waukon.

1886 Patron's Directory, Hanover Township, Allamakee County: Peter Griffin, farmer, Section 35, PO: Waukon.

1900 Census - Germania Town, Kossuth County, Iowa: Peter Griffin (Born June 1844, age 55, married 34 years), wife Mary A (born Oct. 1852, age 47, married 24 years, 12 children with 9 still living), son Patrick, (age 23), son William, (age 20), son Frank (age 18), daughter Mary (age 16), son John (age 14), daughter Catherine (age 12), son Valentine (age 8) and son Peter (age 5).

1910 Census - Township 5, Meade County, South Dakota: Peter Griffin (age 64, married 1 time for 34 years), wife Mary A (age 57, married 1 time for 34 years, 12 children with 9 still living), son Valentine (age 18) and son Peter J (age 14). In the next three residences are: Patrick Griffin, (age 32), William Griffin (age 30) and John Griffin (age 24).

1920 Census -Cross, Meads County, South Dakota: Peter Griffin (age 75, immigrated in 1850. Naturalized), Wife Mary Ann (age 67), Son Peter (age 24, born Iowa), Son Valentine (age 27, born Iowa).

Peter Griffin died Feb. 21, 1924 at Haydraw, S. Dakota.(Pension Index Record). He is buried in Underwood Cemetery, New Underwood, Pennington County, South Dakota.

His widow Mary A. Griffin filed for a pension on June 24, 1924 in South Dakota.

Mary A. Griffin died Jan. 25, 1930 and is buried in Underwood Cemetery. New Underwood, Pennington County, South Dakota


Griffin, Richard. - He was born about 1840 in Ireland.

1870 Census: Union, Houston County, Minnesota: Richard Griffin: Acres of Land Developed: 10 Undeveloped: 10. This appeared to be an agricultural census. Unfortunately I could not read the headings on most of it.

1880 Census - Union, Houston County, Minnesota: Richard Griffin (age 39, farmer, born Ireland), wife Elizabeth Griffin (age 26, born Canada), daughter Emma Griffin (age 11, born Minnesota), daughter Jennie Griffin (age 10, born Minnesota), daughter Julia Griffin (age 3, born Minnesota) and daughter Edith Griffin (age 4/12, born Minnesota).

1885 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Union, Houston County, Minnesota: Richard Griffin (age 45, born Ireland), Elizabeth Griffin (age 37, born Canada), Emma Griffin (age 16, born Minnesota), Jane Griffin (age 14, born Minnesota), Mary Griffin (age 10, born Minnesota), Julia Griffin (age 8, born Minnesota), Perl Griffin (age 6, born Minnesota), and Bessy Griffin (age 1, born Minnesota).

1890 Veterans Census - Union, Houston County, Minnesota: Richard Griffin, Private, Company B, 27th Iowa Volunteer Inf. He enlisted July 13, 1862, discharged August 8, 1865. He served 3 years, 25 days. Post Office was Hokah, Minn. Disability Incurred: "Shot in his right shoulder".

1905 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Hokah, Houston County, Minnesota: Richard Griffin (age 64, born Ireland), Elizabeth Griffin (age 57, born Canada), Jule Griffin (age 27, born Minnesota), Pearl Griffin (age 25, born Minnesota) and Bessie Griffin (age 21, born Minnesota).

1910 Census - McNeely, Tripp County, South Dakota: Richard Griffin (age 67, married 1 time for 45 years, born Ireland, immigrated 1848, naturalized, no occupation), wife Elizabeth (age 61, born Canada, immigrated 1861, married 1 time for 45 years, 9 children with 6 still living).

Richard Griffin died Oct. 30,1915 in Hokah, Minnesota (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery, Grave K12, Hokah, Houston County, Minnesota

His widow Elizabeth Griffin filed for a pension on Dec. 2, 1915 in Minnesota.


Griswold, George W. - He was born Oct. 17, 1843 in Brandon, New York. He was the son of George Willard Griswold (1812 - Oct. 12, 1886) and Almira Hannah Hale (Feb. 2, 1817 - Jul 18, 1907).

1850 Census: Georgia, Franklin County, Vermont: George Griswold (age 38, laborer, born VT), Almira Griswold (age 32, born VT), George W. Griswold (age 6, born NY) and Francis H. Griswold (age 2, born NY).

1856 Iowa State Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: George Griswold (age 44, farmer, born Vermont, in Iowa 3 years), Almira Griswold (age 38, born Vermont, in Iowa 3 years), George Griswold (age 12, born NY, in Iowa 3 years), Francis Griswold (age 8, born NY, in Iowa 3 years), Lisa Griswold (age 0), Experience Churchill (age 48, married born Vermont, had been in Iowa less than a year), Harriet Churchill (age 25, born Vermont, had been in Iowa 2 years), Abigail Churchill (age 13, born NY had been in Iowa less than a year), and Edwin Churchill (age 9, born NY, had been in the state of Iowa less than 1 year). (Note Almira (Hale) Griswold was a sister of Olive Experience (Hale) Churchill who was married to John Churchill. George Griswold was the cousin of Edwin Churchill and the nephew of John Churchill (both of Company B., 27th Iowa).

1860 Census, Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: George Griswold (age 48, farmer, born Vermont), Almirah Griswold (age 35, born Vermont), Frances H. Griswold (age 12, born New York), Lucy J Griswold (age 4, born Iowa), Lucy Hale (age 77, born Vermont) and Elisha Hale (age 77, born Vermont. (Note there were several George Griswolds, born about 1844 in New York on this census. None were in Iowa and I could not determine for sure where he was. But this is his parents, siblings and maternal grandparents)

George Griswold died of small-pox Jan. 11, 1865, Keokuk, Iowa. He is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Keokuk, Iowa

His mother Almira Griswold filed for a pension on May 24, 1880.


Groezinger, Theodore - He was born Nov. 26, 1833 in Germany. He was the son of Gottlieb J. Grozinger and Christina Dorner. He married Louise Schultz on August 14, 1864 in Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa. His last name was listed as Grozenger. Hers was listed as Schiltz OR Schulz (Iowa County Marriages, 1838-1934)

Theo. Groezinger, was born in Germany, November 26, 1833. He first located in Ohio, thence in 1855 to Dubuque, In 1861 he enlisted in the United States service, serving four months; he re-enlisted in Company B, 27th Iowa, as first lieutenant, served one year and was discharged on account of physical disability. He then engaged in the hardware business in company with John Ruth, which he continued about two years. He again went to Dubuque, where he remained seven years, since which time he has been in Lansing, insuring and collecting. He married Louise Schultz; they have seven children, Theodore, Emma, Frederick, Herman, Nanny, Gustave and Elsie.

History of Winneshiek and Allamakee Counties, Iowa - 1882 Biographies, pg 494

1860 Census, Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa: Theodore Geizinger (age 27, clerk, born Wurttemberg). He was living with a large group of people, possibly a boarding house)

Maple Lodge, No. 35, Iowa Legion of Honor, was chartered August 14th, 1869, with the following members: H.F. Fellows, Theodore Nachtwey, G.A. Rockwell, Theodore Groezinger, M. McCormick, N.S. Craig, H.D. Spaulding, Jas. T. Metcalf, Dick Haney, L.M. Elmendorf, C.A. Gardner, L .E. Fellows, John C. Barclay, Geo. H. Markley, W. H. Burford, T.G. Orr, C.L. Muller, Michael Healey, F. W. Wagner, H. Beusch, Alfred A. Bock, E. K. Maryatt, C.D. Purdy, L. Fuiks, I.D. Fowler, Dr. B. Erb Brckhausen, Earl M. Woodward, T. P. Grant and Robert Hufschmidt. The lodge at present has forty members and meets twice in each month in Odd Fellow's hall.

(History of Winneshiek and Allamakee Counties Iowa, 1882, Chapter 2)

1870 Census, Dubuque Ward 5, Dubuque, Iowa, Theodore Groeteinger (age 36, bookkeeper, born Prussia), Louisa Groeteinger (age 27, born Mecklenburg), Theodore Groeteinger (age 5, born Iowa), Emma Groeteinger (age 4, born Iowa), and Frederick Groeteinger (age 9/12, born Iowa)

1880 Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Theodore Gretzinger (age 46, constable, born Germany), wife Louisa Gretzinger (age 37), daughter Emma Gretzinger (age 14), son Fred Gretzinger (age 9), son Hermon Gretzinger (age 4), daughter Nannie Gretzinger (age 2) and son Gustave Gretzinger (age 6m)

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa Infantry: Theodore Groezinger, Lieutenant, Co. B, Post Office: Lansing.

1885 Iowa State Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Theodore Groesinger (SW Cor Dodge & 5th Street, age 50, laborer, born Germany), Louisa Groszinger (age 41, born Germany), Theodore Groezinger (age 19, cabinet maker, Born Dubuque Iowa), Emma Groezinger (age 18, born Dubuque Iowa), Fredrick Groezinger (age 15, born Dubuque Iowa) Herman Groezinger (age 8, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Nannie Groezinger (age 6, born Allamakee county, Iowa), Gustav Groezinger (age 5, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Elsie Groezinger (age 3, born Allamakee County, Iowa) and Henry Schultz (age 76, born Germany)

1900 Census, La Cross City, La Cross County, Wisconsin: Theodore Groesinger (born Nov. 1836, age 63, married 33 years, immigrated in 1857), wife Louisa (born June 1845, age 54, married 33 years, 7 children born, 7 children living), daughter Elsie (born Feb 1881, age 19, born Iowa).

1910 Census: La Crosse, La Crosse County, Wisconsin: Peter Groezinger (age 77, married 1 time for 46 years, born Germany, immigrated 1854, own income), wife Louisa Groezinger (age 66, married 1 time for 46 years, 9 children born 7 still living, born Germany), daughter Elsie Groezinger (age 29, born Iowa). (I'm not sure why he is listed as Peter, but I am pretty sure this is the same family).

Theodore Groezinger died Aug. 16, 1920 at La Cross, Wisconsin (pension records). He is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Sec, C, Lot 75, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His widow Louisa filed for a pension on August 25, 1920 in Wisconsin.

Louisa (Shultz) Groezinger(born 1843) died Aug. 15, 1935 at Trempealeau, Wisconsin. She is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Section C, Lot 75, Lansing, Allamakee County Iowa.


Hector, (Hactor) Andrew - He was born April 26, 1844 in Sweden. He was the son of Peter Hactor Peterson and Anna Lena Anderson. He married Ida Caroline Nelson.

1880 Census - Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Andrew Hector (age 36), wife Caroline (age 34), daughter Ella (age 8), son Arthur (age 4) and son David (age 2).

1895 Iowa State Census - Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Andrew Hector, (age 50, born Sweden, farmer, Baptist, Soldier in War of the Rebellion: Co. B, 27th Iowa, Private), Ida C (age 48), Arthur (age 18), David (age 16), Ada (age 14), and Herman N, (age 12), All children were born in Allamakee County, Iowa.

Andrew Hector died Jan. 8, 1898 and is buried in Center Baptist Cemetery, Center Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His widow Ida Caroline Hector filed for a pension on March 31, 1898 in Iowa.

Ida Caroline Hector (born Dec. 18, 1846), died July 12, 1926. She is buried in Center Baptist Cemetery. (maiden name Nelson)


Hector, (Hactor) Peter

According to the "Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans", Peter Hector Private Co. B., 27th Iowa, died April 15, 1882 and is buried in Indian Lake Cemetery, Worthington, Nobles County, Minnesota.

I strongly suspect that Peter is a brother to Andrew listed  above. In researching Andrew I found that Andrew's parents were Peter Hactor Peterson and Anna Lena Anderson. Peter and Anna were on the 1880 census in Indian Lakes, Nobles County, Minnesota. The father (Peter) died in Nov. 26, 1886 in Indian Lakes, Minnesota. Anna died in January 31, 1899 in Indian Lakes, Minnesota. I also note that in this family is a Sven Peterson that was born Nov. 16, 1846 and died April 15, 1882. Is this Peter??

I requested a photo of Peter's tombstone through Find A Grave. I found that he shares a tombstone with his parents. This is the information on Find a Grave: Peter Hactor (1833-1886). Tombstone shares the names of Anna Hector on the left side and Peter Hector JR. on the right side with Peter Hector on the front side So I am certain that he was the son of Peter Hactor Peterson and Anna Lena Anderson. And a brother to Andrew Hector (above).


Hale, Francis Barnard - He was born August 26, 1822 in Georgia, Franklin County, Vermont. He was the son of Elisha Hale and Lucy Hinckley. He married Clarissa Kinney on Jan 1, 1845 in Georgia, Franklin County, Vermont. She died in 1849. He married Jane A. Smith on July 22, 1851 in Roscoe, Winnebago County, Illinois. She was the daughter of Thomas Armstrong Smith and Beulah Templeton. Her brother Samuel O. Smith also served in Company B., 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Lancaster, Stephenson County, Illinois: Elisha Hale (age 26, farmer, born Vermont), Eliza Hale (age 30, born Vermont), Albert Hale (age 1, born Illinois) and Francis B. Hale (age 27, farmer, born Vermont).

1856 Iowa State Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Francis B. Hale (age 33, farmer, born Vermont), Anne J. Hale (age 24, born VT), and Clarrissa Hale (age 1, born Iowa. They had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years.

1860 Census - Center, Allamakee county, Iowa: F. B. Hale (age 37), Jane A. Hale (age 27), Clary Hale (age 5).

There was a second child: Frank Lincoln Hale born Oct. 21, 1862.

Taken from "Ancestry and Descendants of Josiah Hale" Tuttle Company, Rutland VT 1909 - In 1848 he emigrated to Freeport, Stephenson County, Illinois. Moved to Allamakee County, Iowa (abt 1851) and bought a farm near Center where he lived until 1864 when he enlisted in Co. B, 27th Ia Vol Inf and died of brain fever in Adams Hospital, Memphis Tenn July 2, 1864.

His widow Jane A. Hale filed for a pension on Oct. 27, 1864. The information below is extracted from her pension records:

State of Illinois
Stephenson County.

I, C. S. Hill, Dep. Clerk of the County Court in and for said County, do hereby certify that F. B. Hale and Jane A. Smith were joined in marriage by John Ustick, minister on the 22nd day of July A. D. 1851 as appears from the Marriage Records now in my office.

Witness my Hand and the Seal of said Court this 17th day of Oct. A. D. 1865.

C. S. Hill, Dep. Clerk of said Court.


Jane Hale stated:

That the name and ages of her children under sixteen years of age at her husband's decease and the place of their residence, is a follows: Clara Jane Hale, age 10 years of age and Frank L. Hale aged two (2) years of age, that they both reside at Center in said county & state with the said Jane Anne Hale, their mother.

Signed Jane Ann Hale
Oct. 8, 1864.

I, Jane Ann Hale, widow of Francis B. Hale Private in Co. "B" 27th Regiment Iowa Infantry Vols. do hereby certify that Clara J. Hale was born on the 29th day of Oct. 1854 and Frank L. Hale was born on the 21st day of October 1862 and that they reside with me at my home in Center Township, Allamakee County State of Iowa. and did so reside at the time of the death of said Francis B. Hale. And that they are my children and the children of the late Francis B. Hale.

Dated Lansing Iowa, March 17, 1865
Jane Ann Hale.


Headquarters Co. B 27th Iowa Inf. Vols
Montgomery Alabama
May 25th, 1865

I, Samuel W. Hemenway, on honor, certify that Francis B. Hale, Private Co. B 27th Iowa Inf. Vols joined his Co. for duty June 13th 1864 at Memphis Tennessee. That on or about the 22nd day of June 64, he was sent to Genl Hospital at Memphis Tenn., where he died July 3rd 1864 of remittent fever contracted at Memphis Tenn. after he joined the Co. and in the line of his duty.

My knowledge of the above facts is obtained from the following source: Personal knowledge and official notice of his death from Surgeon in Charge Adams Genl Hospital Memphis.

Respectfully
Samuel W. Hemenway
Comdg Co. "B" 27th Iowa Inf. Vols.


Another statement dated Aug. 4, 1865.

I Samuel W. Hemenway, on honor certify that Francis B. Hale late a private of Company B of the 27th Regiment of Iowa Infantry Volunteers contracted the disease of cerebritis while in camp at Memphis Tenn on or about the 16th day of June 1864, which disease was contracted while in the line of duty as a Soldier. That said soldier [died - left out] at Adams U. S. Army General at Memphis Tenn on the 2nd day of July 1864.


Jane A. Hale

Check # 4245549 $90.00 dated July 4, 1922, returned by postmaster with information that the above-described pensioner died April 4, 1922 has been canceled.


Hall, Thomas B. - He was born about 1844 in Iowa. He was the son of Samuel Hall and Hester Ester Corbin.

1850 Census: Blanchard, Putnam, Ohio: Thomas B. Corbin (age 25, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah Corbin (age 24, born PA), Esther Hall (age 24, born PA), Thomas B. Hall (age 6, born Iowa), James Hall (age 3, born Iowa), William Shown (age 23, born Ohio) and Mary Ann Shown (age 19, born Ohio). Family tree information shows that Thomas, Sarah and Mary Ann were Ester's siblings. William Shown was a brother-in-law.

1870 Census: Yell, Boon County, Iowa: James Corbin (age 52, farmer, born Penn), Lucinda Corbin (age 52, born Tenn.) John W. Corbin (age 26, born Ills.), James M. Corbin (age 22, born Iowa), Makala Corbin (age 18, born Iowa), Hampson M. Corbin (age 17, born Iowa), Charlotte M. Corbin (age 14, born Iowa), Nettie Corbin (age 2, born Iowa), Thomas B. Hall, age 27, teaching school, born Ills.). (Note this may or may not be him. I listed him since he was living with a family named Corbin).

There is a discrepancy in the date of death for Thomas B. Hall that I have been unable to resolve. His mother Esther A. Wheeler filed for a pension on Nov. 13, 1890 in Kansas. So he undoubtedly died before then. But see the cemetery information that I found in two different places. They both appear to have errors.

There is a cemetery listing in Allamakee County that says that Thomas B. Hall died Sept. 21, 1879 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Allamakee County Iowa.. Remarks: GR Co B IA 27 Inf.

There is a photo of the tombstone on Find a Grave (with a GAR marker) that shows the date of death. The Allamakee Cemetery listing for Evergreen Cemetery shows a year of birth of 1822?

I initially started to accept this information, but the 1822 year of birth made me look a little further. He should have been born about 1844, and that was a pretty big discrepancy. Further research made me suspect this one may be incorrectly identified as the Thomas B. Hall that served with the 27th Iowa. When I clicked on the photo for Thomas B. Hall buried in Evergreen Cemetery, I found this note:

"Thomas Hall's stone is on the side of John and Clara Henderson stone. John and Clara are children of Samuel and Clara Henderson.".

Another tombstone memorial in Evergreen Cemetery identified her as Clara HALL Henderson. I researched Clara Hall married to Samuel Henderson and found that she was the daughter of Thomas B. Hall and Eleanor. Thomas B. Hall was born 1822 in England. Clara Hall was born 1844 in England.

So I am pretty sure this this NOT the Thomas B. Hall that was in the 27th Iowa. The Allamakee County webmaster has added a note to the cemetery listing regarding this.

However, to make this even more convoluted there is also a tombstone for T. B. Hall, Co. B. 27th Iowa Infantry in Lone Oak Cemetery, Stayton, Marion County, Oregon. Information on Find a Grave had this information:

Birth: Jan., 1828
Death: Feb. 11, 1904

This may be the Thomas B. Hall who was living in Long Creek Pct., Grant Co., OR when the 1900 U. S. Census was taken. He was 71 years of age, making his age about right for having served in the Civil War - which the inscription on his marker seems to indicate he did. Unfortunately, he was not located in the 1890 Special Census of Civil War Veterans which should have clarified whether he was the one who served in Co. B of the 27th Iowa Infantry.

T. B. Hall, a resident of Long Creek, Grant Co., OR died 11 Feb 1904 leaving two heirs: Irene Estella Hall and Thomas Bertram Hall, both of Long Creek and identified as his children. The 1900 U. S. Census shows the son Thomas Bertram to be 12 years of age. He was living with his mother & stepfather in Long Creek, as was his sister Irene. [Treasurer, Inheritance Div., Film 14/121 E-2, Oregon State Archives]

Possibly he died while on a trip.
info by Darleen Phillips Wade


NOTE by EJJ : Again the year of birth was not close and I also questioned the year of death (which should be before 1890) So I kept looking and I found a tombstone for another Thomas B. Hall (1827-1904) in Long Creek Cemetery, Long Creek, Grant County, Oregon. I suspect that the information above, belongs to this Thomas B. Hall.

I contacted a descendant of Thomas Bertram Hall (noted as being the son of Thomas B. Hall). She confirmed that Thomas B. Hall (father of Thomas Bertram and Irene Hall) was buried in Long Creek Cemetery.

I attempted to get Find a Grave to remove the incorrect information from T. B. Hall in Lone Oak Cemetery, but they are currently saying that they are going to leave it as is and just annotate that there may be some confusion on the dates.

The photo of the tombstone in Lone Oak Cemetery, shows that T. B. Hall was with Company B. 27th Iowa, so I do not question that he is buried in Lone Oak Cemetery. But I do not know his date of death. His mother Esther Wheeler filed for a pension on Nov. 13, 1890 in Kansas. So it would have been before that date. They are currently posting widows/mother's pension applications on Fold3. Maybe someday hers will be posted and then I will be able to determine the exact date of death.


Hanson, Hans He was born about 1842 in Norway. He was the son of Hans and Anna Hanson.

He died Dec. 2, 1862, of rubeola. (some reports say pneumonia).

His mother Anna Hanson filed for a pension. Information from the Pension file is extracted below:

Post Office address: Village Creek, Allamakee County, Iowa.

She was a widow. Her husband had died 18 years previously.

Statement by Niels Nilson and Trond Jacobson: That Anna Hanson was the widow of Hans Hanson and mother of Hans Hanson, that she was dependent on her said son for support; that he left no widow or minor children under sixteen years of age surviving, that the above named claimant is now a widow, and has not again married since the death of her son, the said Hans Hanson; that Hans Hanson, deceased paid the rent of the house occupied by Anna Hanson, his mother and labored by the month and supported Anna Hanson and a younger brother, aged 12 years of age.


Harrington, James Daniel He was born February 7, 1839 at Tionesta, Forest County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Daniel Harrington, Jr. and Hettie Elder. He married Sarah Margaret McCabe on June 18, 1867. She was the daughter of Patrick and Catherine McCabe.

Written by Daniel B. Harrington,
Son of James D. Harrington in 1927.
Submitted by Leslie Green

James Daniel Harrington, was born February 7, 1839 at Tionesta, Forest County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Daniel Harrington, Jr. His boyhood days were spent at, or near the home of his parents at Tionesta. About the year of 1860, he took a trip West to Iowa. Several members of his mother's family lived at Lansing, Allamakee County and Jackson County. Both located on the Miss. River. There was plenty of timber there at that time and traffic on the Mississippi River were very much the same as in Western Pennsylvania. On the 12th day of August, 1862, he enlisted at Lansing, Iowa, in Co. B. of the 27th, Iowa Reg. of Volunteer infantry, under Captain S. W. Hemingway, as a private, and he was discharged from the service on the 8th day of August, 1865.

His life in the army proved to be a very strenuous one for his Regiment happened to belong to a division (most of the time) under Major Smith, and was moved about to reinforce the other armies, hence they were all over the South. At one time, he was a member of Sherman's advance body guard. He was in the battle of Shiloh, Siege of Vicksburg, and in many battles of less importance. I have heard him say that the short battle of Pea Ridge, Mo., was the fastest, and the hottest place he was in during the war. He was always a crackshot with a rifle. I have heard him tell of an experience while their army was in Arkansas. He was doing guard duty stationed in a tower on the outskirts and it seems that a drove of cattle had been rounded up on a foraging expedition, brot in and were being butchered by the soldiers. They would shoot the critters, then stick them, and the boys were taking a turn about doing the shooting. The Col. happened to come along and watched this awhile then stepped forward, borrowed a gun from a private to shoot one himself. Father, on the outposts, was in the tower saw what was doing and in a spirit of deviltry when the Col. raised his rifle to shoot, Father drew a beam on the animal hastily and fired, the critter dropping in front of the Col. before he could shoot. He looked all about and could not locate where the shot came from, handed the gun back to the soldier, and walked away without saying a word to anyone. The fact that he was so far away and being in the tower, it was not discovered that he had fired this shot.

He was a fine violinist and Major Smith always saw to it that a violin was provided and when they would strike camp, about the first order from the Major was to send for Jim as he was called by everyone all of his life.

During the last year of the war, he was taken prisoner and confined at Andersonville for three months. I have heard him tell that it was customary to march the prisoners out every day to gather their own wood for the camp fires, cooking, etc., and it was to one of these excursions that he made his escape. After several days, he was recaptured while eating in a negro hut. While the guard held a gun on him, the negro was compelled to take the clothesline and tie him in a rocking chair, then loaded in a spring wagon and taken back to the prison. I have heard him say that conditions could not be worse under any circumstances that they were in that hell hole. Men by the thousands, sick starved, haggard and discouraged, they took offense at trifles. Comrades would get up fight if one had more than his share of anything they be sharing together and he said that any time you wanted to see a fight, all you had to do was just look around and you would be sure to see one or several fights in progress between unfortunates. They were rationed with one quart of corn meal each to the man, and they had to prepare it in some way for themselves so it could be ate.

At the time he was first captured and made a prisoner, it seems that he was with a detachment of the army sent out on a foraging expedition and after a tiresome march, they stopped at a plantation to rest. Soldier like, always hungry, he spied a smoke house and entering the smoke house he did not find anything there and he sat down on a bench to rest a little. All at once, he heard someone running by the smoke house like H--l, as he told it, and running to the door here was some Rebel cavalry rounding up the boys. He had left his gun in the smoke house and the Rebs, had seen him, thus he realized that he could not stop for that so he broke and ran with several horseman after him firing revolvers but that did not stop him and as luck would have it, he soon made a rail fence and vaulting over it, it stopped the horses, and getting behind a tree he had an old Navy revolver in his pocket, and when he turned that loose they got out of there, then he started to run following a winding path through brush and timber, and suddenly, on a turn, he ran into a bunch of Nebraska soldiers. He stopped and was raising his revolver when one of them said we have got the rest of your boys here and you might as well surrender and save your hide, and realizing the hopelessness of further resistance he threw down the gun and gave up.

He had some forty of fifty dollars in his pocket and they soon relieved him of that, and then made him strip off his Uniform and clothes--they furnished him some old worn out clothing to wear. At one time, while in the prison, he got hold of a very desirable kettle in some way, and he traded it to a guard for a peck of corn meal. But how were they to make the exchange. Neither cared to trust the other for delivery, so they finally agreed that the guard was to lower the corn meal, but after the guard got the kettle, he would not furnish the meal as he soon went off duty. When he came on the next day, Dad was ready for trouble and decided to get the guard if he was killed in the attempt. The quarrel started and he started for the dead line which was some 40 feet inside the wall, the guard warning him to keep back, but he kept going and the guard raising his gun to shoot was interrupted by another guard demanding to know the trouble and when told what it was about, the second guard told the first one that if he had agreed to give him a peck of meal to see that he delivered it or he would cause him trouble and the result was that he got his meal.

I have heard him say that men were dying all around them like flies at all times. He was finally released through an exchange of prisoners. When the men were exchanged, they were started for their lines in formation under Rebel guards, and this went all O.K. for a ways and then everything broke loose and finally many of the guards threw away their guns and joined the boys saying they were tired of it all and wanted to quit. On reaching their lines, most of them could not control their appetites and soon were deathly sick after eating. He secured a loaf of bread and nibbled at that slowly and gradually got back on feed without any bad results. He contracted a dysenteria that was more or less chronic and often bothered him for years afterward. This seemed to be the worst thing the prisoners had to deal with and there was no way of getting an relief in the prison. He was in the prison at the time the spring broke out, and he always held to the theory that providence done this for the suffering prisoners. Before that, there was nothing but swamp water to use and sanitation was unknown and conditions deplorable.

When in the army, he was considered the best man (physically) in his regiment and whenever a rival Regiment had a wrestler or a boxer send out challenges, it was always up to Jim Harrington to represent the Regiment in their contests, and they were quite common in that life. He stood a trifle less than six feet, weighed 185 lbs. was an all-round athlete and an expert swimmer. He did not know what fear was and though peaceably inclined, and always ready to avoid trouble, yet he would not take the slightest insult from anyone. To illustrate this, in early days, while making one of the Ohio River trips, they happened to stop at one of the larger towns where a lot of river men were assembled, and among them was a man named Tom Pelt. This man was acknowledged to be the champion and bully of the Ohio River. He was always abusing and picking on anyone he came in contact with at the slightest resentment he would knock them down, etc. The men were mostly seated around a large hall, and Pelt was going around slapping first one and then another in the face with his slouch hat. Finally, he tried this on Jim Harrington, with the result that he jumped and resented it. Pelt said maybe you consider yourself a man, and the reply was that he did not know about that but advised him not to repeat it, and to the surprise of everyone Pelt walked away, but later he came back, for this was the first time he had been know to walk away from a possibility of trouble, and walking up to Father, he said Harrington, I believe you said you were a man, and no one has ever said that to me and got away without proving it. He was not anxious to mix with Pelt for he knew he had a danger and super rival to deal with and tried to parley and talk him out of making trouble, but Pelt was insistent and the result was that he had to have it out or apologize to Pelt. They agreed to go out in the open and have it out. The word was hurriedly passed around that Harrington and Pelt were going to fight. A ring was formed by several hundred men present, and stripped they made for each other rather realizing that he must play for every advantage he could gain, and when they come together (being an expert wrestler) quick as lightening he clinched Pelt around the waist, raised him off his feet, they fell between two small logs or timbers, with Pelt on his back and Dad on top, and as soon as they struck the ground he caught Pelt in the face with his right, this he followed rapidly with blows to the face and head as he realized that now was his time while he had this advantage. Some of Pelt's friends rushed forward to interfere, but a young fellow who had been abused by Pelt, stepped forward with a gun, saying this man has been bullying everyone on the river for years and I will shoot the first man that interferes, let him get what he deserves. But in a few moments some of Dad's friends stepped forward and told him to quit as the man was helpless. He was carried away unconscious and it was weeks before he was able to get around. But he never was known to have another fight. A short time after this, some New York sports hearing of this affair came to Tionesta and tried to get him to train for the prize ring. But such things were distasteful to him and although they offered all kinds of inducements he would not consider it.

I remember when we first moved to Ida County, Iowa. I was a little fellow and accompanied Father to Ida Grove. There was a store, court house and few other buildings there then but it was several years before the railroad. Among the early settlers was a man by the name of John Kephart, who was a fine physical specimen and a sort of a bully, in in some way he picked a quarrel with dad in Tinkle's store. I was a little fellow standing by, and I remember that the two men were standing each with a right foot on a chair. Suddenly, he called Dad a dam liar and the words were hardly out of his mouth when he caught a right hander in the eye that sent him back against the counter. He grabbed a chair and held that in front of him while he backed down the store, Dad trying to get at him from both sides when a by-stander interfered and stopped it. A few days later, Kephart apologized and they became good friends. A few years later, an Uncle of mine happened to be in Ida Grove. He wandered down near the big corn cribs where a crew was shelling corn and they were fixing something about the and with others standing around they got to talking about sports, good men, etc., and several present stated who they thought was the best man, and that included several well known characters there, finally one man got up and said boys I am here to tell you that Jim Harrington, is the best man that ever walked these streets, and about that time the sheller started up, and my uncle being a stranger to all of them asked one man who that fellow was, and was told that it was John Kephart, and he knowing of the former incident remarked to himself that he thought Kephart had a license to know what he was talking about.

After the war, he returned to Pennsylvania where he remained for little over a year, then he returned to Iowa. And June 18, 1867, he was married to Margret McCabe (a native of that place at Galena, Ill.). Father Powers officiated and Bridge Burke was a witness. Six children were born to the union as follows: Daniel B., born June 17, 1868; Charles A.., born Sept., 20th 1869; James P., born Aug. 12, 1871; Andrew, born March 27, 1873; Arthur B., born Nov. 9th 1881 and Frances B., born January 20th, 1888. The four older boys were all born at Green Island, Iowa; Art in O'Brien County, Iowa and Frank at Wichita, Kansas. In 1873, they moved to Storm Lake, Iowa, and a year later they moved to Ida County and settled on a farm west of Ida Grove, in fall of '75 they returned to Green Island until spring of '76 they returned to Ida County again and settled north of Ida Grove. The railroad was built through Ida Grove during the summer of 1877, before that time settlers were compelled to go to Storm Lake or Denison to market produce necessities could be purchased at the store at Ida Grove. In the spring of 1883, they moved to O'Brien County on a farm near Southerland and a year later they moved to Wichita, Kansas. When 3 years later, they moved back to Ida County and settled on a farm near Correctionville, Iowa. Three years later, they moved back near Ida Grove and a year later they moved to Ida Grove. Father had a very good education, was well red and qualified to fill most any position in life. He was County Supervisor of Ida County for a number of years and Post Master at Ida Grove under the Cleveland administration (second term) after that he retired from active life. Living most of the time with his son Charles, and Arthur, while a part of the time he stayed at the soldier's home at Marshalltown, Iowa. On different occasions, he had visited Fort Leavenworth home in Kansas and Hot Springs, South Dakota for short stays. His health was always very good up to the last year of his life when he became quite feeble. The last year of his life he made his home with his son Andrew at Sioux City, Iowa.

He passed away on the 9th day of September, 1926, apparently without a struggle. He had been in his usual health and during the fore part of the evening previous he had seemed a little restless but did not complain and off and on the family went to his room to see how he was and entering the room about 1:30, they found him dead. There was no signs of a struggle and apparently he just went to sleep without any effort and passed out on his journey to that great beyond from whence borne no traveler ever returned. He was buried in Graceland Park Cemetery, Sioux City, Iowa. He was a member of Mason Fraternity and G.A.R.

Biographical History of Crawford, Ida and Sac Counties
Submitted by Leslie Green

J.D. Harrington, Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Ida County, Iowa, and an early settler of this county, is a native of the "Keystone" State.

Mr. Harrington was born in Forest county, Pennsylvania, February 7, 1839, son of Daniel and Hettie (Elder) Harrington, natives of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of Irish extraction. His father was a farmer and merchant and did an extensive country business. He is now a resident of Butler, Butler County, Pennsylvania, and has reached the advanced age of eighty-nine years. The mother is deceased. They had a family of eight children, namely: John, a member of the Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania, was killed at the battle of Bull Run; Mariah, deceased; Candar, a resident of Forest county, Pennsylvania; Hettie, deceased; George, deceased; Charles, Butler, Pennsylvania; Mary, wife of Lew Spears, Chautauqua county, New York; and J. D., the subject of our sketch.

At the age of twelve years Mr. Harrington ran away from home and from that time forward took care of himself. His youthful days were spent in various occupations. He educated himself after he had reached his majority, and is now competent to attend to any business that may devolve upon him. He remained in Pennsylvania until 1861, when he came to Iowa and located in Jackson county. Here in August the following year he enlisted in Company B., Twenty-seventh Volunteer Infantry, and served until August 8, 1864, when he was honorably discharged. He was slightly wounded at the battle of Pleasant Hill. January 5, 1865, he was taken prisoner in the eastern part of Tennessee and was held until May 12, 1865, at Andersonville. He was in the battles of Little Rock, Fort Derusia, Yellow Bayou, Pleasant Hill, Nashville and some others, and also a large number of skirmishes.

The war over, Mr. Harrington returned to Pennsylvania and remained there until the spring of 1867, when he came back to Iowa and settled down on a farm in Jackson county, remaining there until 1873. In June of that year he came to Ida county, and has since resided here, with the exception of three years, 1884 to 1887, which he spent in Kansas. Upon locating in this county he first settled on eighty acres of prairie land on Section 1, Maple township, and after living on this farm two years and improving it to some extent he sold it and purchased 160 acres in section 11, Logan township, it also being prairie land. Three years later he sold this property and bought 218 acres in section 6, Silver Creek township. This he improved, and also sold after keeping it three years. After his sojourn in Kansas he returned to Ida county and bought 160 acres in Douglas township, section 17, which he improved and on which he made his home three years. Then he sold out again and invested in a small farm in section 18, Silver Creek township, but only lived on it a year before selling out and moving to Ida Grove. He still lives.

Mr. Harrington was married June 18, 1867, to Miss Margaret McCabe, a native of Ireland, and a daughter of Patrick and Catherine McCabe. She was reared in Jackson county, this state. They have six children; Daniel, Charles, James, Andrew, Arthur and Frank, the last two being at home and the others engaged in farming.

Politically, Mr. Harrington affiliates with the Democratic party. He was elected County Supervisor in 1889, and as a member of that board of officers has rendered most efficient services, which have been highly appreciated by the people at large. At the time he went into office the county debt was about $70,000 and it has since been reduced to the neighborhood of $40,000. Mr. Harrington is a member of the G.A.R., Matthew Gray Post, and of the A.F. & A.M., Alpine Lodge No. 471.

Per Kevin Frye, Historian of Andersonville Prison. 13 men of the 27th Iowa were held as prisoners at Andersonville Prison. He sent me the documentation that he had on each of them. If the information has the remark: "Also held at Cahaba, Alabama" Kevin also provided this information:

"Some were sent to Cahaba Prison, Alabama first. A large number of prisoners who were held there eventually were transferred by rail to Andersonville. This may be the case with all those with the 27th at Andersonville." He also has a website for Andersonville Prison.

Code No: 53529
Grave No:
Last Name: Harrington
First Name: James D.
Rank: Corporal
Company: B
Regiment: 27
State: Iowa
Branch Of Service :Infantry
Date of Death:
Cause of Death:
Remarks* Returned to Regiment May 31, 1865; mustered out August 8, 1865 at Clinton, Iowa.
Reference: IA ADG RPT, VOL IV: 1165
Place Captured: Eastport, Mississippi
Date Captured: 1/10/1865
Alternate Names:
Status: Survived Andersonville
Muster date: 9/1/1862
Age at Muster: 23
More Information Available :NO

1870 Census: Washington, Jackson County, Iowa: James Harrington (age 30, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Margarett Harrington (age 25, born Ireland), Bernard Harrington (age 2, born Iowa), and Charles Harrington (age 1, born Iowa.

1880 Census: Silver Creek, Ida County, Iowa: James D. Harrington (age 41, farmer, born Pennsylvania), wife Margaret Harrington (age 35, born Ireland), son Daniel Harrington (age 13, born Iowa), son Charles Harrington (age 11, born Iowa), son James Harrington (age 9, born Iowa), son Andrew Harrington (age 8, born Iowa) and boarder Charles Johnson (age 30, farmer, born Norway).

1900 Census, Daily, Dixon County, Nebraska: James D. Harrington (born Feb. 1839, age 61, widowed, born Pennsylvania), son Charles Harrington (born Sept. 1869, age 30, married 4 years, born Iowa), daughter-in-law Ida Harrington (born Feb. 1871, age 29, married 4 years, 1 child born, 1 still living, born South Dakota), grandchild Reta Harrington (born Oct. 1892, age 7, born Iowa).

Margaret (McCabe) Harrington died Apr. 24, 1902.

Death of Mrs. Harrington

Thursday morning, April 24, at 9 o'clock, occurred the death of Mrs. Margaret Harrington, at Samaritan hospital, Sioux City. As announced last week, she went to have an operation performed for the removal of a cancer, which was accomplished and seemingly with success. The patient rallied and for several days every symptom pointed to her early recovery, but Friday, April 18, she had a sinking spell and from that time gradually grew weaker until worn out nature could no longer resist the demand of the angel of death. She died entirely free from pain, simply slept away into eternity, probably never realizing that the end was near. Mrs. Harrington has been for many years an honored and respected member of our community and it was with sincere regret that our people heard of her death.

Margaret McCabe was born in Ireland, Oct. 31, 1844, being the only girl among six children and came to America with her parents when a child. They located in Jackson county, Iowa, where her father died when she was twelve years old. On June 18, 1867, she was married to James D. Harrington and came to Ida County in 1872, where they lived until 1885 when they went to Kansas for three years. Returning to Ida county, Mrs. Harrington has lived here ever since. She belonged to the Catholic church and died as she had lived, a faithful member.

The funeral was held Saturday at 10 o'clock at the Sacred Heart church, conducted by Father O'Brien, and the body laid away beside that of her mother, Mrs. Ewers, who died about ten years ago.

There are left of the immediate family her six sons, Dan B., of Paulina; Charles of Washta; James, Andrew, Arthur and Frances, beside five brothers. All the sons except James were present at the funeral. Mrs. Harrington had faithfully performed the highest duty of woman, that of rearing a family, and she passed from this life full of faith and hope for a reward beyond the grave.

Ida Grove Era.

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Western Branch, Leavenworth, Kansas (AND Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Hot Springs, Fall River, South Dakota: James D. Harrington, MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 12, 1862, Lansing, Iowa: Rank: Private. Company and Regiment: B, 27th Iowa Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: Aug. 8, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. Private, 36 months. Cause of Discharge: G. O. #96, War Dept. Series 1865. Kind and Degree of Disability: Chr. Diarrhea and resulting piles, Chr. Rheumatism and defective vision. When and where contracted: Not stated. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Pennsylvania, age: 64, Height: 5-10, complexion: dark. Color of eyes: Gray. Color of Hair: Gray, can read and write. Religion: Prot. Occupation: Farmer. Residence subsequent to discharge: Ida Grove, Ida Co., Iowa. Widowed. Name and address of nearest relative: Son Charles Harrington, Montpelier, Iowa. HOME HISTORY: Admitted Feb. 13, 03, Amount of Pension: $6.00, Discharged Dec. 1, 1903. Admitted: Jan. 12, 05. Amount of Pension: $8.00, Discharged June 18, 1905. Admitted Sept. 17, 1912, discharged Oct. 2, 1912. Admitted Mar. 7, 1917, discharged Oct. 4, 1917.

1910 Census: Ida Grove Ward 3, Ida County, Iowa: Arthur Harrington (age 26, married 1 time for 4 years, born Iowa, compositor, printing office), wife Merl Harrington (age 24, married 1 time for 4 years, 0 children born, born Iowa), father-in-law (?) James D. Harrington (age 71, widowed, born Pennsylvania. (this census clearly said father-in-law, but it appears that it should be father).

1915 Iowa State Census: Marshall Town, Marshall County, Iowa: James D. Harrington (age 75, widowed, County: Marshall, Town: Marshalltown. Birth Place: PA. Military Service: Civil War, State: Iowa, Regiment: 27, Company B. Church Affiliation: Prot. Remarks: Soldier's Home.

1920 Census, Sioux City, Precinct 10, Woodbury County, Iowa: Charles A. Harrington (age 49, born Iowa, foreman bicycle dept. wholesale hardware), wife Ida L. Harrington (age 45, born South Dakota), daughter Reta Harrington (age 25, born Iowa), son Robert C. Harrington (age 2 8/12, born Iowa), father James D. Harrington (age 81, widowed, born Pennsylvania).

James D. Harrington died Sept. 9, 1926 and is buried in Graceland Park Cemetery, Sioux City, Iowa.

Pioneer Iowan Passes Away

Sioux City, Civil War Veteran, Lived in State 66 Years

A civil war veteran and a resident of Iowa for the past 66 years, James D. Harrington, who moved to Sioux City in 1910, died of infirmities brought on by old age at the home of his son, A. H. Harrington, 115 West Fifteen Street, Thursday Morning.

Mr. Harrington was 87 years old. He had lived in Iowa since 1860 when he moved to Green Island from Pionesta, PA, where he was born February 7, 1839. In 1871 Mrs. Harrington moved to Storm Lake, Ia., where he stayed three years before going to Ida Grove.

During the administration of President Cleveland he served as postmaster at Ida Grove and at one time served on the board of supervisors of Ida county, where he was well known.

Mr. Harrington enlisted in the army at Lansing, Ia, in 1861 and served throughout the war. He was made a prisoner and confined in the Andersonville prison until released in an exchange of prisoners. At the capture of Vicksburg by Gen. Grant, Mr. Harrington was present with Company B., of the Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry.

At the close of the war he returned to Green Island where he remained until 1871. In 1867 he married Sarah M. McCabe, at Maquoketa, Ia. The deceased was a member of the Masonic lodge at Ida Grove for 40 years. He had belonged to the G. A. R. for the past 23 years.

Surviving are five sons, D. B. Harrington, C. A. Harrington, A. H. Harrington, Arthur B. Harrington, and Frank H. Harrington, all of Sioux City. One brother, C. M. Harrington and a sister, Mrs. Mary Spear, both of Long Beach, CA, six grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held at Christy's funeral chapel Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

Old Soldiers and G. A. R. veterans have been asked by Commander Michael Hawk of Hancock post, to report at Christy's undertaking chapel to take part in the services.

The Sioux City Journal


WORKING ON THIS ONE

Harrington, Philander James - He was born Jan 7, 1834 in Chenango County, New York. He was the son of Elisha Harrington (1802 - 1858) and Lucy Goff (1806 - 1889). It appears that he first married Ellen B. Payne on Aug. 23, 1859 in Knox, Illinois (Illinois, County Marrieages, 1810 - 1940). He married Emma Louisa Poole on June 9, 1870 in Sparta, Monroe, Wisconsin (Wisconsin, County Marriages, 1836-1911). She was the daughter of Lemmon Poole and Wealthy Smith. It appears from statements about Emma's "stepdaughter, Nellie Harrington," that Philander J. Harrington was previously married (which is what made me look for a previous marriage). The initials E. B. Harrington on the 1860 census seem to support the idea of a marriage to Ellen B. Payne.

1860 Census: Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: P. J. Harrington (age 26, male, merchant, born New York), E. B. Harrington age 20, female, born Illinois), H. E. Harrington (age 20, male, born New York),

Per an online family tree Ellen Barber Payne died Jan 26, 1864 in Galesburg, Illinois.

Philander James Harrington died April 22, 1877. There is a bit of a discrepancy in his place of death. His death record says he died in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. Find a Grave and a newspaper (Date: Thursday, May 3, 1877 Paper: Detroit Advertiser and Tribune (Detroit, Michigan) Page: 7) says he died in Philadelphia, Pennsyvania. He is buried in Woodmere Cemetery, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.

HARRINGTON - Suddenly, in Philadephia, PA. on Sunday, 22d inst. Philander J. Harrington. Funeral from his late residence. No. 185 Twentieth, at (sic) on Thursday Afternoon, April 26, at 2 o'clock. (This clipping was on Find a Grave, but there was no name or date for the newspaper).

Date: Thursday, May 3, 1877 Paper: Detroit Advertiser and Tribune (Detroit, Michigan) Page: 7: J. P. Harrington, of Detroit, died suddenly in Philadelphia on the 22d inst. of heart disease.

There is a death record for Philander Harrington in Wayne County, Michigan. It says: date of death: Apr 22, 1877, name: Philander Harrington; male; white; married; age: 43y. 3m, 15 d.; place of death: Detroit; Cause of death: killed in explosion??: Birthplace: Detroit??: occupation: " (the one above it said "painter"); parents Elisha and Lucy Harrington. (NOTE: the cause of death is difficult to read, but it definitely does not say heart disease. This was a two page report -- maybe who ever wrote it got the cause of death on the wrong line. I just can't explain the discrepancies - ejj).

From Philander Harrington's Find a Grave Memorial #157793083

Philander was the son of Elisha Harrington and Lucy Goff. His maternal grandparents were Lott Harrington and Sylvia Sage. Philander married Emma L. Poole on 9 June 1870 in Sparta, Monroe County, Wisconsin.

In 1855 Philander was living in New Berlin, Chenango County, New York. He is listed in the State census as single and employed as a teacher.

According to Civil War Records, Philander was a resident of Iowa when he enlisted at the age of 28 on 7 August 1862. He enlisted as a Private. The Records further indicate that Philander was promoted to Full Sergeant Major on 3 October 1862. He was a member of Company B, Iowa 27th Infantry Regiment on 1 September 1862 and promoted to Full 1st Lieutenant on 25 April 1863. He mustered out on 10 March 1864.

Philander was commissioned an officer in Company B, United States Colored Troops, 57th Infantry Regiment on 10 March 1864 then promoted to Full Captain of the Fourth Arkansas Colored Infantry. He was promoted to Full Lt. Colonel on 1 May 1865. Philander mustered out on 24 August 1865, serving over 3 years in the United States Army.

The children of Philander J. Harrington and Emma Poole were:
1. Nellie L. Harrington (2 May 1862 at Galesburg, Illinois-
2. Charles Harvey Harrington (1872-1939)(Anne Williams)
3. Mabel E. Harrington (1873-1975) (William Coe Clark)
4. Phyllis A. Harrington (1876-1958)
5. Philander Harrington Jr. (1877-1877)

According to a written statement made by Emma Poole Harrington, in 1877 a minor child, Lucy Ellen age 15 years is residing with her. Philander Harrington Jr. was born 5 months after the death of his father and died at the age of about 2 months.

In the 1880 federal census for Detroit, Michigan, Nellie Harrington, age 18, is listed as the step daughter of Emma Harrington. Emma, her parents and children are residing at 185 4th Street, in Detroit.

Note by Elaine Johnson: (Note I found a delayed birth certificate for Nellie Harrington on FamilySearch.org. It said her name was Lucy Ellen Harrington. Parents were Philander Harrington and Ellen B. Payne. She was born May 2, 1862. The delayed birth certificate said she was born in Dorchester, Allamakee County, Iowa. I do not know if Illinois or Iowa is correct.

His widow Emma L. Harrington filed for a pension on Sept. 29, 1890 in Michigan.

It appears that he had additional military service. His pension index record is cross referenced with 57 Reg. USA Inf.

The pension index card for that regiment shows: Philander J. Harrington, L. C. F & S 57 Reg't USA Inf. It is cross referenced with B 27 Iowa Inf. Widow filed for pension on Sept. 29, 1890.

From her Find a Grave Memorial #154100668

Emma was the daughter of Lemmon Poole and Wealthy Smith. She married Philander J. Harrington.

In 1880 Emma is widowed and living in Detroit. Listed in the household is Emma's children, Charles, Mabel and Phyllis, her step daughter, Nelly Harrington and parents, Lemmon and Wealthy Poole.

In 1900 Emma was living with her son Charles at 678 Baker Street in Detroit.

In 1910 Emma, son Charles and daughter Phyllis are living in Detroit. Charles and Phyllis are single. Phyllis is a public school teacher.

In 1920 Emma is living with her daughter, Mabel and Mabel's husband, William Clark.

At the time of her death Emma resided at 4056 Seebaldt Avenue.

The children of Philander J. Harrington and Emma Poole were:
1. Charles Harvey Harrington (1872-1939)(Anne Williams)
2. Mabel E. Harrington (1873-1975) (William Coe Clark)
3. Phyllis A. Harrington (1876-1958)
4. Philander Harrington Jr. (1877-1877)

The daughter of Philander J. Harrington and step daughter of Emma Poole was:

5. Nelly Harrington (c.1862 Iowa (John H. Smith)

Emma Louisa (Poole) Harrington (born Feb 22, 1839), died August 2, 1928 in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. She is buried in Woodmere Cemetery, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.

From Find a Grave: HARRINGTON - August 2, 1928, at the residence of her daughter 4056 Seabaldt Ave., Emma L., widow of Philander J. Harrington, mother of Mrs. W. C. Clark, Phyllis A. and Charles H. Harrington and Mrs. John H. Smith of Steveville, Alberta; sister of Mrs. Laura B. Smith. Funeral service at house Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock.


Harrison, William Henry He was born Oct. 1842 in New York. He was the son of Richard Harrison and Sarah Bohall/Bohart. He married Louise D. Logan. She was the daughter of James Logan (1804 - Feb. 16, 1878) and Jane Dunlap/Dunlop (1802 - May 3, 1878). Her sister Agnes Logan was married to Frederick Pulaski Price, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

William Henry Harrison. A native of Steuben County, N. Y., Mr. Harrison was born in 1842 and is a son of Richard and Sarah (Bohall) Harrison, natives of the same county. The paternal grandfather was a farmer and a courageous soldier in the Revolutionary war. During his years of activity Richard Harrison was a lumber dealer, and prosecuted his occupation on the various rivers near where he lived. Until his son William was about fourteen years of age, the family lived in New York state, but around 1855 moved to Minnesota and settled in Lafayette, where the elder Harrison conducted a sawmill. They later went to Columbus, and then to Lansing, Iowa and while at the latter place the war broke out.

William Henry enlisted in the Civil War in Company B., Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, and served from 1863 until January 20, 1866. He participated in the battles of Banks River, Fort Donelson, Pleasant Hill, Old Oaks, Nashville, Mobile and Montgomery. Owing to the severe strain and vicissitudes of war, he suffered a great deal after his return home, and was afflicted with a chronic stomach trouble. He eventually recovered, however, and for some time engaged in farming in his native state.

In February of 1868 Mr. Harrison was united in marriage with Louise D. Logan of Scotch parentage, a daughter of James and Jane Logan of Lansing, Iowa. They are the parents of the following children: Frank, a railroad man; Loma, the wife of Mr. Simmons of Enid, by whom she has two children: Henry, Ira and Charles. The last two are at home. After his marriage, Mr. Harrison lived in Iowa and engaged in the plastering business, which he had previously learned at Lansing, Iowa. He also owned a farm which he conducted in connection with the plastering business and continued the combined interests for about eleven years. In 1870 he removed to Labette County, Kansas and there remained until May of 1894, when he filed his claim in the territory on the northeast quarter of section 3, township 19, range 5 east. The claim is well improved: the buildings are in good condition, and he recently erected a fine two-story residence, 17 X 29. There is a fine orchard and the place is well fenced.

In Politics Mr. Harrison is a Republican, and cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln. He has since invariably voted the Republican ticket. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic at Jennings, and is associated with the Baptist Church.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Oklahoma p. 56-57

1850 Census: Cameron, Steuben County, New York: Richard Harrison (age 36, lumberman, born Mass.), Sarah Harrison (age 31, born NY), Catharine Bohart (age 64, born NY), Phebe J. Harrison (age 10, born NY), William H. Harrison (age 7, born NY), Lucinda Harrison (age 3, born NY), Elizabeth Harrison (age 2, born NY), Catharine Harrison (age 11/12) and Ann Bohart (age 23, born NY)

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Richard Harrison (age 47, lath maker, born Connecticut), Sarah Harrison (age 45, born New York), William H. Harrison (age 17, born New York), Susan Harrison (age 15, born New York), Elizabeth Harrison (age 12, born New York), Catharine Harrison (age 10, born New York) and Lyman Merrill (age 24, sawyer, born New York).

1870 Census: Oswego, Labette County, Kansas: Walter Harrison (age 29, stone mason, born Michigan), Louisa Harrison (age 23, born New York), Richard Harrison (age 1, born Iowa) and Richard Harrison, (age 55, carpenter, born Michigan), (His name and place of birth is kind of strange, but I am pretty sure this is the right family)

1880 Census: Oswego, Labette, Kansas: Wm. Harrison (age 38, plasterer, born NY), wife Louisa Harrison (age 33, born NY), son Frank Harrison (age 11, born Iowa), daughter Lonie Harrison (age 6, born Kansas), Son Henry Harrison (age 4, born Kansas and son Ira Harrison (age 2, born Kansas).

1885 Kansas State Census: Oswego, Labette County, Kansas: William Harrison (age 33, plasterer, born New York, to Kansas from Iowa), Lewisa Harrison (age 40, born New York), Frank Harrison (age 16, born Iowa), Sloma Harrison (age 10, born Kansas), Henry Harrison (age 8, born Kansas), Ira Harrison (age 6, born Kansas), Charley Harrison (age 3, born Kansas), Richard Harrison (age 73, Carpenter, born New York), and Elizabeth Harrison (age 66, born Ohio).

1900 Census: Mound, Payne County, Oklahoma: W. H. Harrison (born Oct, 1842, age 57, married 29 years, farming), Wife Louisa Harrison (born Sept. 1845, age 54, married 29 years, 6 children born, 5 still living, born New York), son Henry Harrison (born Sept. 1876, age 23, born Kansas), Son O. W. Harrison (born Sept. 1878, age 21, born Kansas), Son? Saloma Harrison, born Sept. 1880 (age 19, born Kansas), son Charles Harrison (born Sept. 1882, age 17, born Kansas) (I'm curious as to whether all of them were really born in Sept. or if the census taker was just making a guess)

William Henry H. Harrison died Oct. 25, 1907. He is buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Pawnee County, Oklahoma.

His widow Louise Harrison filed for a pension on Nov. 4, 1908 in Oklahoma.


Hartshorn, George W. -He was born about 1832 in New York. He was the son of Harvey Rice Hartshorn (May 22, 1795 - 1853) and Mary A. Butterfield (1812 - ?) He married Mary Foster. (Index of Marriages of St. Joseph County, 1832 through 1887: George W. Hartshorn to Mary Foster (C-68)

1860 Census: Constantine, St. Joseph County, Michigan: George W. Hartshorn (age 29, farmer, born New York), Mary Hartshorn (age 22, born Ireland) and Carrie Hartshorn (age 2, born Indiana)

1870 Census: White Pigeon, St. Joseph, Michigan: George W. Hartshon (age 39, grocer, born NY), Mary Hartshon (age 32, born Ireland), Carrie Hartshon (age 12, born Indiana), Willis Hartshon (age 9, born Michigan), and James H. Hartshon (age 3, born Michigan.).

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Patents, 1790-1909 (filed June 2,1873)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, Wm. R. Gillett and Geo. W. Hartshorn, of White Pigeon, St. Joseph County, Michigan, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Butter-Preservers, of which the following is a specification:

The nature of our invention relates to an improvement in boxes for preserving butter and other articles; and it consists in lining the insides of the boxes in which the articles are packed for transportation with sheets of non-conducting material made from the pulp of poplar wood, as will be more fully set forth hereafter.

The accompanying drawings represent our invention.

c represents an ordinary box, of any shape or size, in which butter, tobacco, or other articles are packed for transportation. This box is lined inside with a sheet, c. of any desired thickness, made from the pulp of poplar wood; and these sheets, forming a non-conducting substance, preserve the butter and other articles packed in the box in the most effective manner from all changes of the surrounding atmosphere.

Where these sheets have been saturated with water, and the boxes then packed with butter, the butter is preserved from melting in the hottest weather.

We are aware that casks for the transportation of oil have been lined with paper-pulp and we disclaim such. Where the pulp is made from poplar wood it will absorb more or less water, and retain it almost indefinitely, and thus keep any article packed in the box moist and cool. Where the pulp is made from paper stock it is almost impermeable to water, and hence will not serve as a preserver to articles as above described.

We claim -- a box, for the preservation of butter and other articles, lined with wood-pulp, substantially as shown and described.

William R. Gillett
George W. Hartshorn

Witnesses: Marvin Cole & S.H. Walliz

1900 Census: White Pigeon, Saint Joseph County, Michigan: Carrie Kingsbury (born Dec. 1857, age 42, widowed, 0 children born, 0 still living, born Michigan), father George W. Hartson (born May 1832, age 70, married 47 years, born Ohio, retired), mother Mary Hartson (born June 1838, age 61, married 47 years, 4 children born, 3 still living. born Ireland) Nephew George L. Hartson

George W. Hartshorn died Oct. 11, 1909 (Pension Index Records). He is buried in White Pigeon Cemetery, White Pigeon, St. Joseph County, Michigan.

His widow Mary Hartshorn filed for a pension on Oct. 19, 1909 in Michigan.

1910 Census, White Pigeon, Saint Joseph County, Michigan: Carrie B. Kingsbury (age 53, born Michigan), mother Mary Hartshorn (age 71, widowed, born Ireland)


Hartshorn, Salem He was born March 6, 1829 in New York. He married first Harriet Elizabeth Spafford (bio below says Stafford) on July 3, 1849. She was the daughter of William Spafford and Olive Fish, born Apr. 22, 1833. She died Aug. 31, 1865, at Dundee, Mich. He married second Miss Emma Dyer on October 5, 1866. She died May 25 1869. He married third Louise Hinkle about 1870. She passed away June 23, 1910.

Children of Salem Hartshorn and Harriet E. Spafford:

  1. George Edward, b. 1850; died by accident on a railroad, in Fort Wayne, Ind., Oct. 29, 1872.
  2. Charles Melvin, b. 1851; d. 1853.
  3. Harriet Evaline, b. 1853; d. 1866, at Adrian, Mich.
  4. William H., b. 1856; res. Grand Junction, Col.
  5. Albert Juan, b. 1858; res. Grand Junction, Col.
  6. Flora A., b. 1860; m. Courtland P. Bliss, 1887; res. Grand Junction, Col.

1870 census - Adrian, Lenawee County, Michigan: Salem J. Hartshorn, age 41, hotel keeper), William Hartshorn, (age 14), Alice Hartshorn (age 3). In the same residence was Louisa Hinkle, (age 23, domestic servant). (Note: Alice Hartshorn is most likely the daughter of Salem and Emma Dyer).

Salem Hartshorn married Louisa Hinkle.

1880 census - Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana: Salem J. Hartshorn, (age 51, confectioner), Wife Louisia, (age 33), daughter Flora, (age 19), daughter Alice, (age 12), daughter Cora, (age 7), son Frank (age 5), son Edmond (age 1).

1900 Census - Wayne, Allen County, Indiana: Salem J. Hartshorn (age 71, born March 1829, married 51 years), wife Louisa, (age 53, born Oct. 1846, married 51 years, 5 children 2 living), daughter Alice Hartshorn (born July 1867, age 32, born Michigan), daughter Cora A Hartshorn (born Dec. 1872, age 27, born Michigan) and daughter Frances E. (born Dec. 1874, age 25, born Indiana). (Note: the census clearly says they were married 51 years, but that can't be, as she was only 53 years old).

1910 census - Ft. Wayne, Allen County, Indiana: Salem J. Hartshorn, (age 81, married 3 times, number of years in current marriage: 29), Wife Louisa, (age 63, married 1 time, currently for 29 years. 5 children born, 2 still living.)

Louisa (Hinkle) Hartshorn (born Oct. 24, 1846), died June 23, 1910.

Salem HartshornVETERAN OF THE CIVIL WAR OBSERVES HIS EIGHTY SEVENTH ANNIVERSARY

Salem J Hartshorn, one of Fort Wayne’s best-known citizens and a veteran of the Civil War, is today celebrating the eighty seventh anniversary of his birth at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Frances Bartel, 170 Columbia Ave. In spite of his advanced age, he is still well preserved and active, attending all of the post meetings of Sion S Bass Post, G. A. R., of which he is a member, and interested in the patriotic work of its auxiliary organizations.

S. J. Hartshorn was born in Seneca Falls, New York, March 6, 1829 and came from there with his parents to Tecumseh, Michigan. At the age of six years, the family removed from Tecumseh to Palymira, Michigan and later to Toledo, Ohio, where the young man went into business. His boyhood was spent in what was practically the wilderness of an unbroken frontier in which the war whoop of the savage and the cries of the wild beasts were frequently heard. Determining to locate further west, Mr. Hartshorn went to Lansing, Iowa, in 1852. He remained there until the breaking out of the Civil War sent him into the union Army in response to the call of Lincoln, as a soldier in company B, Twenty Seventh Iowa infantry in 1862. This regiment saw hard service in the western armies and was in some of the fiercest battles of the rebellion. During a portion of the service, Private Hartshorn was assigned to hospital corps and field service work. He served until the close of hostilities in 1865, then returned to Michigan and from there finally settled permanently at Fort Wayne. He conducted a fruit stand on Calhoun Street across from the Cathedral for a number of years. July 3, 1849 he was married to Harriet Stafford. She died August 31, 1865. Later he married Miss Emma Dyer on October 5, 1866. She died May 25 1869 and the following year Mr. Hartshorn was united in marriage to Miss Louise Hinkle. She passed away June 23, 1910. The aged veteran is well known in the city where for nearly half a century he has been a familiar figure.

The Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, March 6, 1916. The photo appeared in the next day's paper (March 7, 1916).

RECEIVES BORDER SERVICE SOUVENIR

J. C. Hartshorn, Civil War Veteran, Prizes a Gift of Mexican Carved Cane.

J. C. Hartshorn, of Columbia Avenue, has received a unique souvenir of Mexican border service in the shape of a grotesquely carved cane which was sent to him by his son-in-law first Sgt. Robert R Bartel, Company E, First Indiana Infantry, now on duty at Llano Grande Texas. The walking stick is of a heavy wood, and from top to bottom is covered with designs of Mexican character, interspersed with vines and tropical plants carved and colored by Mexican workmen. Two Mexicans in fantastic dress are represented in presenting some native fruit and near the top of the cane an eagle is holding a writhing snake in beak and talons. Mr. Hartshorn highly prizes the gift. He is a veteran of the Civil War and a member of Sion R Bass Post, No. 40, G. A. R. His Regiment, the Twenty Seventh Iowa infantry, in which he served in Company B, participated in the Minnesota campaign of 1862, when the Sioux Indians sacked the frontier, and later he served in the armies of the West in Kentucky and Tennessee until the end of the war. He will be eighty-eight years old on March 6 next.

Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, November 29, 1916

PERPETUATES JOKE ON RECRUITING OFFICER

"No. I can't enlist without my parents consent. I have to ask them first if I can go." These words were heard recently at the recruiting office of Battery B in the West quarter of the courthouse. The "non-com" in charge took a look at the speaker and gasped, but "Daddy" Hartshorn, as everybody knows him, never cracked a smile, although there was a twinkle in his eye which bespoke ill suppressed mirth. He would only be 90 years old on his next birthday, and served in the Civil War in company B, 27th Iowa infantry.

Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, July 19, 1917

This was an article about the ladies of the G. A. R. I'm only going to include the information about Salem J Hartshorn.

STIRK CIRCLE ADDS TO MEMBERSHIP ROLL

Deep regret was occasioned by the news that S. J. Hartshorn, beloved by everyone as "Daddy," and the oldest Civil War veteran of the city, was ill at his home on Columbia Avenue. Comrades and members of the circle were asked to go and see him.… Mr. Hartshorn served three years during the rebellion in Company B, 27th Iowa infantry, and in addition to fighting in the campaigns of the Western armies he participated in the conflicts with the Sioux Indians, who went on the warpath and devastated the frontiers of Minnesota and other states in 1862.

Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, November 24, 1917

Salem Hartshorn died Jan. 5, 1918 and is buried in Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana.

Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Jan. 5, 1918, pages 1 & 11

Taps Sound for Salem J. Hartshorn

Veteran of Civil War Dies at the Family Residence, Aged Eighty-Nine Years

Salem J. Hartshorn, one of Fort Wayne's oldest citizens, and veteran of the civil war, died shortly after 1 o'clock this morning at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. R. R. Bartel, 1701 Columbia Avenue, Lakeside after an illness of several weeks. Owing to his advanced years, but little hope had been entertained for the aged veteran's recovery. Mr. Hartshorn, who was a general favorite, and was known to a host of friends and comrades as "Daddy" would have celebrated his eighty-ninth birthday on March 6 next.

He was born at Seneca Falls, N.Y. in 1829 and going west in early manhood settled in Iowa. At the breaking out of the civil war, he promptly responded to the first call to arms by enlisting in Company B, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, a regiment which saw hard fighting in the campaigns against the Sioux Indians in the uprising on the Minnesota frontier in 1862. Later the command joined the Union armies in the southwest and participated in the battles which preceded the termination of hostilities. Discharged from the United States service in 1865, Mr. Hartshorn returned to Iowa, but later came to Fort Wayne and for many years was engaged in business on Calhoun street, being the proprietor of a fruit and confectionary store opposite where the Cathedral stands. He spent several years in the west in the early eighties, but returned to this city and has made Fort Wayne his home ever since. He was a member of Sion S. Bass Post No. 40, G. A. R. Those who survive are two daughters, Mrs. Cora Hartshorn of Grand Junction, Iowa and Mrs. R. R. Bartel of Fort Wayne and two sons, Albert Hartshorn of San Francisco, Cal., and William Hartshorn of Idaho.


I found a second obituary in the Fort Wayne Sentinel, dated January 5, 1918, page 14.

The information was virtually the same except for the last paragraph:

The funeral will be conducted Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the residence of the daughter at 1701 Columbia Avenue.

The children of Salem Hartshorn and Louisa Hinkle::

  1. Harriet Emeline b.18 May 1871 d. 9 Oct. 1878
  2. Cora b. 28 Dec. 1872
  3. Frances Elnor b. 16 Dec. 1874
  4. Allie Hartshorn
  5. Edna Adell b. 1 Oct. 1878
  6. Jennie May Rosella b. 31 Jan. 1885 d. 2 May 1890

I do note that the names of the children listed for Louisa and Salem do not include the two sons that are listed in the 1880 census. But I also note the similarities in the name Frances Elnor and Frank - similar age -- AND also Edna and Edmond - also a similar age. There could be some confusion as to their actual names.


Hawes, Joseph -He was born Feb. 1831 in Ireland. The 1880 census shows at least two brothers (John and Peter). He married Bridget Tracey on April 10, 1869 (?) in Lansing, Iowa.

Married. On the 10th inst., by Rev. Father McGowan, Mr. Joseph Haws, to Miss Bridget Tracy. Ah, now we know why all that fixing up over at your house was for. We always knew you was a sensible fellow, and now we have prima facie evidence of it. May the time soon come, my boy, when you can take the little ones on your knee and sing to them the songs you used to render to us in the army. Joy, wealth, peace, pleasure, long life and happiness to you and yours.

~Lansing Mirror, April 3, 1869 -
contributed by S. Ferrall

Note by ejj: one of these dates has to be incorrect. To say on the 10th inst. means they were married in the current month. However, the date of the paper is prior to that date. This date will require some addition research.

1880 Census: Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Haws (age 52, farmer, born Ireland), wife Julia Haws (age 52, born Ireland), son Joseph Haws (age 24, farmer, born Kentucky), son John Haws (age 20, help on the farm, born Iowa), daughter Maggie Haws (age 22, born Kentucky), daughter Josephine (age 17, born Iowa), brother Peter Haws (age 55, helps on the farm, deaf and dumb, born Ireland), brother Joseph Haws (age 47, widowed, born Ireland), niece Julia Haws (age 10, born Iowa).

He filed for a pension on July 21, 1880 in Iowa.

1900 Census, Central Branch, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Jefferson Township, Montgomery County, Ohio. Joseph Hawes, (born Feb. 1831, age 69, widowed, immigrated 1851, naturalized).

Register of National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers: #16263, Joseph Hawes; MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 20, 1862, Lansing Iowa; Rank: Pvt; Company and Regiment: B, 27th Iowa Inf.; Time and Place of Discharge: Aug. 8, 1865, Clinton, Iowa; Cause of Discharge: G. O. 96; Kind and Degree of Disability: Chronic Bronchitis and Heart Disease. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Ireland; Age: 58; Height: 5'6'; Complexion: Sandy; Occupation: Machinist; Residence Subsequent to Discharge: Harper's Ferry, Iowa; Married or Single: Single; P.O. Address of nearest relative: Daughter, Mrs. Julia Sill, Hasting, Adams County, Nebraska. HOME HISTORY: Date of Admission: Mar. 11, 1889, Southern, Discharged May 11, 1889, Tr(ansfer). to Central; Date of Admission: May 14, 1889, Central, Discharged July 21, 1895, Tr(ansfer) to Western Branch; Discharged: April 11, 1896, Tr(ansfer) to N. W. Branch; Admission: May 15, 1899, N. W. Branch, Discharged May 11, 1899 to No. Central. Date of Death: Aug. 26, 1901, Found dead on Home Farm, from pistol wound, self inflicted. Cause of Death: Suicide by pistol shot of chest. GENERAL REMARKS: Telegram sent to daughter Julia Sill August 26, 1901. Branch Treasure was directed to pay and turn over effects to Julia Sill, Hastings, Nebraska

Joseph Hawes died Aug. 26, 1901 and is buried in Dayton National Cemetery (Plot M, 15, 21), Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio.


Helpman, Simon He was born Nov. 11, 1831 in Fairfield County, Ohio. He married Ruth Hall on Dec. 1, 1845 (?) in Hancock County, Ohio.

HELPMAN, SIMON-Undertaker and mayor, Polk City. Is a native of Fairfield county, Ohio. Born on the 11th day of November, 1831, and when five years of age his parents emigrated to Hancock county, that State. At nineteen years of age he learned the carpenter's trade, and has made mechanism his principal vocation during life. As early as the fall of 1856 he came to this State and located in Allamakee county, where he remained for six years, and then removed to Kossuth county, remaining there up to the time of his coming to his present location, the July of 1870. He enlisted as a recruit in the late war in company B, Twenty-seventh Iowa infantry, in September, 1864, and served till its close. Was married in Ohio, December 21, 1854, to Miss Ruth Hall, a native of that State. They have by this union a family of one son living, J. B., and have lost one daughter, E. L. He is the present incumbent of the office of city mayor, and is also a justice of the peace, the latter he has held for seven years of the time that he has been a resident of this place. Mr. Helpman is a man always participating freely in such matters as will most benefit the community in which he lives. strongly upholding the right, and on the other hand vigorously opposing what he knows to be wrong.

"The History of Polk County, Iowa" published by the Union Historical Company, Birdsall, Williams & Co. 1880.
Submitted by Marion John Rice

1860 census - Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: Simon Helpman, (age 26), Ruth Helpman (age 23), John B. Helpman (age 4).

1870 Census - Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa: Simon Helpman (age 38, carpenter), Ruth Helpman, (age 35), John B. Helpman (age 14).

1880 Census - Madison, Polk County, Iowa: Simon Helpman, (age 48, undertaker), Wife Ruth Helpman, age 44), son J. B. Helpman, (age 24).

1885 Iowa State Census - Madison, Polk County: Simon Helpman, (age 53, undertaker), Ruth Helpman, (age 49).

Ruth Helpman was buried on April 14, 1893 in Oak Hill Cemetery, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan.

1900 census - in Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan: Simon Helpman (Born Nov. 1831, age 68, married).

Simon Helpman died June 17, 1908 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan. (no headstone is in the cemetery).

His widow Jane R. Helpman filed for a pension on June 27, 1908 in Michigan.

Jane R. Helpman was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan on Nov. 19, 1908. (There is no headstone).

On a personal note: even though he did not have a headstone, because I was researching this soldier I found my great great grandmother who is buried in the same cemetery. As I was looking for Simon Helpman, I spotted her name simply by accident. I was sure it really wasn't her. Her maiden name was Bragg. I knew when she had died and had written for a death certificate, but they did not find it. For years I have been looking for her with her married name of Moreland. Oddly enough, she had remarried to a guy whose last name was the same as her maiden name. So when I saw the name (Phoebe Bragg - with a burial date two days later than the date of death that I had), I was not sure it was her. But subsequent research (including her obituary, her death record and obituaries of her children) proved that it was. -- Prior to that point, I had her date of death, but no clues as to where she died or was buried -- and did not know that she had remarried. If she had remarried to someone with a different last name, I probably never would have found her. So you never know what will lead to a discovery!


Hemenway, Charles F. - He was born Nov. 1, 1846 in Grand Detour, Illinois. He was the son of Luke Edgar Hemenway (Aug. 7, 1816 - Apr. 27, 1903) and Jane Elizabeth Marsh (Jan 29, 1814 - Dec. 26, 1883) He married Mary E. Harrold on Nov. 4, 1869. She was the daughter of Henry D. Harrold and Nancy.

The Biographical Record of Rock Island County, Illinois
By S. J. Clarke Publishing Co, S.J. Clarke Publishing Company

Charles F. Hemenway, cashier of the Moline National Bank, came to Moline, Illinois, a lad of nine years, with his parents, Luke and Jane E. (Marsh) Hemenway. He was born in Grand Detour, Ogle County, Illinois, November 1, 1846, and there commenced his education in the common schools, which he also attended in Moline until he was fourteen years of age. He then left home and went to Lansing, Iowa, where he was employed in the post office until August 1862.

For more than sixteen months the war for the Union had now been in progress. In that time the northern army had suffered several severe defeats and to the minds of many it seemed as if the south would prevail and the grand American union would be dissolved. On both paternal and maternal sides young Hemenway came of good stock, both sides serving their country faithfully and well in the Revolutionary War. That union, cemented by the blood of his forefathers, must not be dissolved. Although less than sixteen years of age, he offered his services and was accepted as a private in Company B, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and, with his regiment, marched to the front, and was in the battle of Little Rock, resulting in the capture of that city.

Soon after his enlistment young Hemenway was detailed as clerk to General Hurlbert, of the Sixteenth Army Corps, at headquarters, where he had charge of the private correspondence. When the Sixteenth Army Corps was divided he was assigned as clerk at the headquarters of the department of the Mississippi. As such he served with satisfaction to his superior officers until the close of the war, when he was discharged, in May, 1864 at Vicksburg, Mississippi.

Returning to Moline, Mr. Hemenway at once secured employment as clerk and bookkeeper in the First National Bank, of which Judge J. M. Gould was then cashier. With this bank he remained until 1869, when he was elected assistant cashier of the Manufacturers' Bank, a state institution, then organized. In this capacity he served until 1872, when the bank was merged into the Moline National Bank, when the same position was offered him, and in which he served until 1875, when he was promoted cashier, a position which he has filled with honor and credit to himself and the company, and to the satisfaction of the patrons of the bank.

On the 4th of November, 1869, Mr. Hemenway was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Harold, a native of Rock Island county, and a daughter of Henry and Nancy Harold, who were numbered among the early settlers of 1840. At Moline she grew to womanhood and in its public schools received her education. By this union five children have been born, four of whom are living -- Martha J., Frances B., Harold and Joseph C. The deceased on one is Clara T., who died in infancy.

Mr. Hemenway is a member of the Unitarian church, while his wife and oldest daughter are members of the Congregational church. He contributes of his means to the support of both churches. Fraternally he is a member of R. H. Graham Post, No. 312, G. A. R. and is treasurer of the Moline Club and one of the directors of the Moline Art Association, in which he takes great interest.

As a business man, Mr. Hemenway ranks among the best in Rock Island county. On the organization of the Manufacturers' Bank, he became one of its stockholders, and has since increased his holdings, his interest, however, being transferred to the Moline National Bank. In the Moline State Savings Bank, he is also a large stockholder and has been its cashier from the start. He has also business interests outside of the bank, being secretary and treasurer of the Guffin Clay Manufacturing Co., manufacturers of brick and tile, and secretary and treasurer of the Christy Coal Company. He is also owner of the Opera House building, which is a credit to the city of Moline.

As might reasonably be expected Mr. Hemenway is a strong Republican, with which party he has been identified since attaining his majority. While taking a lively interest in politics, he never does it to the neglect of business, and the honors conferred by office holding he never seeks. As alderman of the city one term he discharged his duties faithfully, and as city treasurer several terms he handled its money carefully and conscientiously. For some years he was a member of the board of education of Moline and served on the finance committee. During the campaign of 1896 he favored sound money and was an advocate of the distinctive principles of the Republican party, protection and reciprocity. As a citizen he is highly esteemed by those who know him.

The following data is extracted from Biographical History of Rock Island Illinois.

A prominent and active figure in the business life of Moline, Illinois, has been, and still is, Mr. Charles F. Hemenway, the well known dealer in real estate and loans.

Mr. Hemenway was born November 1, 1846, at Grand de Tour, Illinois. His father's name was Luke E. Hemenway (to whom a special article is devoted in this book), who married Jane E. Marsh, at Grand de Tour, June 23, 1842. The Hemenways are direct descendants of Ralph Hemenway and Elizabeth Hewes, who were married at Roxbury, Massachusetts, July 5, 1634. Their grandson, Daniel Hemenway, was a delegate to the convention that framed the Constitution of Massachusetts. He was Treasurer for the Patentees of the Town of Shoreham, Vermont, in the year 1873. From him is descended the subject of this sketch.

Mr. Hemenway received a common school education in the Schools of Grand de Tour and Moline, finishing at the latter place at the age of fourteen.

He left home at the age of fifteen, to accept a position in the post office at Lansing, Iowa, November 15, 1861.

On August 13, 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, Volunteers, at the age of fifteen years, and was honorably discharged at Vicksburg, Mississippi, June 6, 1865, with the rank of Corporal. Mr. Hemenway served with his company during the campaign in Northern Mississippi, being present at the capture of Holly Springs, of that State. He was detailed as clerk at Headquarters of the Third Brigade, Sixteenth Army Corps, July 11, 1863; again as clerk in the Adjutant-General's Office, Sixteenth Army Corps, December 4, 1863, and as clerk at Headquarters of the Department of Mississippi, January 13, 1865, where he was on duty when discharged.

The war ended, Mr. Hemenway returned home from the service of his country, and on June 12, 1865, entered the First National Bank of Moline, as bookkeeper. In April, 1869, he was elected assistant cashier and active manager of the Manufacturers' Bank of Moline, and in the year 1871 cashier of the Moline National and Moline Savings Banks, which office he filled until 1900, when he resigned to engage in his present business-real estate and loans.

Mr. Hemenway served several terms as Treasurer of the City of Moline, and two terms as Alderman. He was appointed notary public when he was but twenty-one years of age, and has continued in that office up to the present time.

In politics he has been from the first a Republican. His religious connection is with the First Unitarian Church of Moline.

Mr. Hemenway is a member of Graham Post, Grand Army of the Republic.

He was married November 4, 1869, to Mary E. Harrold, daughter of Henry D. and Nancy Harrold, his wife having been born in Rock Island County, Illinois, February 1, 1848.

Five children were the issue of this union, four of whom are now living, namely: Martha J., wife of C. R. Hull, of Indianapolis, Indiana; Harrold, Francis B. and Joseph C., the three latter residing with their parents in Moline.

1850 Census, Grand Detour, Ogle County, Illinois: Luke E. Hemingway (age 34, agent, born Ct.), Jane E. Hemingway (age 33, born Ct), Francis C. Hemingway (age 7, born Ill), Eliza M. Hemingway (age 4, born Ill), Chas F. Hemingway (age 3, born Ill), Geo. H. Hemingway (age 5/12, born Ill.).

1870 Census: Moline, Rock Island County, Illinois: Chas. Hemanway (age 22, bank cashier, born Ill.), Mary Hemanway (age 21, born Ill. They were living next door to Nancy Harrold (age 41, born Penn) and John Harrold (age 28, born Ill.).

1880 Census - Moline, Rock Island, Illinois: C. F. Hemenway (age 33, occupation Banker), wife Mamie (age 32), daughter Francis (age 3), mother-in-law Nancy Harrold (age 60) and sister-in-law Rebecca Harrold (age 22).

1900 Census - Moline, Rock Island, Illinois: Charles F. Hemenway (age 53, born Nov. 1846, married 31 years), wife Mary (born Feb. 1848, age 52, married 31 years, 5 children, 4 living), daughter Francis (age 23), Son Harrold, (age 19), son Joseph (age 16), daughter Martha Hull, (age 28, married 3 years 0 children), son-in-law Charles Hull (age 29), father Luke Hemenway, (born Aug. 1816, age 83, widowed), mother-in-law Nancy Harrold, born Mar. 1820, age 80, widowed).

He filed for a pension on Nov. 9, 1908 in Washington.

1910 Census - Port Angeles Ward 5, Clallam County, Washington: Charles F. Hemenway (age 63, married and a boarder with another family.)

Charles Hemenway died Dec. 15, 1912 in Port Angeles, Washington. (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Moline, Rock Island County, Illinois.

Washington Deaths, 1883-1960: Name: Chas Francis Hemenway; Gender: Male; Birth Date: about 1845; Death Date: 15 Dec. 1912; Age at Death: 67; Death Location: Port Angeles, Clallam, Washington: Father: Luke E. Hemenway; Mother: Clara Marsh; Record Source: Washington State Death Records.

Per the Pension Records Index his widow Mary E. filed for a pension on Jan. 11, 1913 in Iowa. In 1920 she was still in Moline, Rock Island, Illinois, living with her daughter Martha Hull and family. Is Iowa a mistake??

Mary Elizabeth (Harold) Hemenway died in 1928 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Moline, Rock Island County, Illinois.

Children of Charles Hemenway and Mary E. Harrold

  1. Martha J. Hemenway, b. 8 JUL 1871
  2. Clara Turrill Hemenway, b: 27 JUN 1874
  3. Frances B. Hemenway, b: 16 APR 1877
  4. Harrold Hemenway, b: 15 SEP 1880
  5. Joseph C. Hemenway, b: 31 DEC 1883

Hemenway, Samuel W. He was born February 19, 1839 in Potsdam, St. Lawrence County, New York. He was the son of Vashni Hemenway (Nov. 28, 1788 - Aug. 18, 1878) and Eliza Goodnow (Jan. 27, 1801- Dec. 8, 1862). He married Martha T. Haney on Sept. 30, 1866 in Allamakee County, Iowa. She was the daughter of John Haney, Sr. and Francis Towle. Samuel's brother Herman C. Hemenway served in Company C, 27th Iowa.

Submitted by
Mary Trebelhorn
(Great Great Grand Niece)

Samuel W. Hemenway was born February 19, 1839 in Potsdam, NY in St. Lawrence County to Vashni and Eliza (Goodnow) Hemenway. His father, Vashni, was born in Massachusetts. My search has shown that he had one brother (H. H. Hemenway) and one younger sister (Marilla Hemenway). He married Martha T. Haney, daughter of John Haney, Sr. and Francis "Fannie" (Towle) Haney, on September 30, 1866 in Allamakee County, IA.(John Haney, Sr. is said to be "the Father of Lansing".)

They had 6 children:

  1. John H. Hemenway: DOB 8/10/1867; DOD 1868
  2. Francis "Fannie" Eliza Hemenway: DOB 10/16/1868; DOD 4/17/1955
  3. Marilla E. Hemenway: DOB 3/2/1871; DOD 1937
  4. Samuel W. Hemenway: DOB 7/1/1873; DOD 6/22/1953
  5. Susan B. Hemenway: DOB 5/19/1875; DOD 5/29/1968
  6. Martha Haney Hemenway: DOB 12/1/1877; DOD 7/8/1954

All 4 daughters were never married. All 6 children are buried with their parents in the Oak Hill Cemetery in Lansing, IA

When he returned from the War, he became Mayor of Lansing

1850 Census: Pewaukee, Waukesha county, Wisconsin: Vashi Hemenway (age 62, farmer, born Mass.), Eliza Hemenway (age 49, born Mass), Asa G. Hemenway (age 24, born NY), Marilla Hemenway (age 22, born NY), H. H. Hemenway (age 19, born NY), H. C. Hemenway (age 16, born NY), Huldah E. Hemenway (age 14, born NY) and Saml W. Hemenway (age 11, born NY).

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Samuel Hemingway (age 21, mechanic, born NY). (He was listed with a large group of people with unrelated names. Possibly a boarding house?)

Camp 27th Iowa Inf. Vols.
Jefferson Barracks, MO, Sept. 18, 1864

Dear Sister Emaline

Yours of Sept. 6, via Officer Hazle reached me yesterday. We left Cairo Wednesday noon and arrived here yesterday at 9 a.m. We are camped a little above the Barracks between the R. R. and River. My tent is not 15 feet from the track. This place is 12 miles below St. Louis and 6 from Carondelet. There is only the 3rd Div. here. The 1st Div. we have not heard from since they left Memphis on boats for White River. What the object (of our being here) is we do not know, but hope we may get a chance to rest. The health of our Regt is good. Mine is not - very but better than when I went to the Hosp. About the same as when I left. I think these cool fall breezes will bring me out however. Herman is well. We had a pleasant trip from Cairo. It is very much like the river to St. Paul only not as high Bluffs. Matters in the Regt. are much as usual. The same slack way of doing things prevails and favoritism is the rule. An honest man must never enter the service in a less grade then Lt. Gen'l. If he does he must be possessed of a great amount of philosophy and patience or endless tribulations on his ? I tell you I fear for our success. There is so much rascality in all depts. of the Army. I will not speak more for it makes me mad to think of it. I have no news to write and will stop for the wind blows so that I can scarcely keep my paper in one place.

Your aff. Bro.

Samuel

Letter was found here

1870 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: S. W. Hemmingway (age 31, agriculture implement maker, born New York), Martha Hemmingway (age 29, born Ill), and Fannie Hemmingway (age 1, born Iowa.

On Dec. 24, 1872, Samuel W. Hemenway filed a patent (134,202) for an Improvement in Railway Snow-Plows.


On Feb. 25, 1873, Samuel W. Hemenway filed a patent (136,242) for an Improvement in Railroad-Train Indicators.


On May 20, 1873, Samuel W. Hemenway filed a patent (136,006) for an improvement in Auger-Handles.


Samuel W. Hemenway was mayor of Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa from March, 1876, to time of his death, May 6th, 1877

Samuel W. Hemenway died May 6, 1877 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa.

Death of S. W. Hemenway

The Dubuque papers of yesterday contained the particulars of the death of Hon. S. W. Hemenway, Mayor of Lansing, and a brother of Hon. H. C. Hemenway of Cedar Falls. The accident which caused his death occurred on the third instant, and death resulted on Sunday. The Herald account gives the following particulars:

The cause of his lamentable death makes it more distressing, as he gave up his life while performing the duties of the office which he honored. The artesian well company were engaged in laying their pipe, under his superintendence, and on Thursday last he, accompanied by a laborer, went down into the trench, and while engaged in placing the pipes the bank caved in on them. When released he was unconscious, and his right leg was broken above and below the knee and his right arm terribly lacerated, besides receiving several minor bruises. On regaining consciousness he complained of his lungs, and of filling up inwardly. He continued to grow worse all the time up to his death, which occurred with intense agony on Sunday morning. He leaves a wife and four children to mourn the loss of an affectionate husband and father, and a city the loss of a faithful and efficient chief magistrate.

The Times says:

Mr. Hemenway was the mayor of Lansing at the time of his death, serving his second term. During the rebellion he served as captain of Company B, 27th Iowa infantry, and was a brave and capable officer. He was a man of fine intelligence and possessed rare qualities of heart. Everything in the way of public enterprise found in him a ready and zealous worker and thus head, heart and hand, conspired to endear him to all who knew him. The loss of so estimable a man is a public sorrow.

Iowa State Reporter: Waterloo, May 9 1877

SAMUEL W. HEMENWAY
Submitted by
Judge John Bauercamper
Allamakee County Courthouse
P.O. Box 248
Waukon, Iowa 52172-0248

This excerpt is taken from the "History of Winneshiek and Allamakee Counties, Iowa by W.E. Alexander, published in 1882, pages 708 to 711, regarding the History of Lansing, Iowa.

In the spring of 1871, through the persistent efforts of Capt. Samuel W. Hemenway, whose life was sacrificed in the enterprise, a stock company was organized in Lansing, for the purpose of securing a water supply for the city and its citizens.

Beyond question the artesian well has proved itself to be one of the most important enterprises ever attempted by the citizens of Lansing. Its usefulness cannot be overestimated. As stated, its gratifying results were almost wholly due to the individual efforts of Capt. Samuel W. Hemenway, who first suggested the drilling of an artesian well; who demonstrated by means of his superior skill and knowledge of such subjects, the certainty of success, and who, when success had been attained, and the people were rejoicing in the splendid result, lost his life while superintending the completion of the magnificent public work his ability, energy, and perseverance had produced. So intimately is his memory interwoven with the history of this public work, that it seems impossible to leave the subject without a brief review of his life and the painful circumstances attending his tragic death.

On the afternoon of Thursday, May 3, 1877, the Third street well being then an assured success, Capt. Hemenway entered a deep cut on Main street to personally superintend the joining of sections of the main water pipe to be employed in supplying water from the new well. While thus engaged the embankment on the north side gave way, and the unfortunate man was literally buried alive. Assistance was instantly at hand, but some little time was required to remove the large quantity of earth and rocks that had fallen upon him. When rescued from his perilous position it was found that one limb was broken in several places, and that he had probably sustained severe internal injuries. The gravest apprehension proved to be true, and, notwithstanding the best medical skill and kindest attention of friends and neighbors were bestowed upon him, with a community of united prayers for his recovery, he died on the following Sunday, May 6th, 1877.

His funeral, which occurred on Tuesday, May 8th, was attended by the municipal authorities, all the civic societies in the city, delegates from the neighboring Masonic organizations, and the largest concourse of people ever assembled in Lansing to perform the last sad rites for one of its citizens.

Mr. Hemenway was born the 19th day of February 1839, at Potsdam, St. Lawrence county, N. Y. His earlier years were spent in that vicinity. In 1855 he became a resident of Lansing, and was foreman of the agricultural implement factory of his brother, H.H. Hemenway, until the year 1862, when , when he entered the service of his country, as a member of Co. B, 27th Regt. Io. Vol. Inft. He was commissioned captain by Gov. Kirkwood, October 3, 1862. For faithful service he was promoted to the office of major, and was mustered out at Clinton, August 8th, 1865, having served three years without the loss of a single day by leave of absence. Mr. Hemenway was a republican in politics. As chairman of the republican county central committee in the campaign of 1876, he achieved a remarkable victory and had he lived would have received deserved recognition at the hands of his political associates. At the time of his death he was Mayor of the city, superintendent of the well company, a leading member of the Masonic organizations of the city, and in all respects the most active, enterprising and useful citizen of Lansing.

On May 30th, 1877, Decoration Day was for the first time formally observed by the people of Lansing. Coming as it did so soon after the fateful death of Mr. Hemenway, who had himself been a faithful soldier, and whose new grave was then especially entitled to receive an offering of flowers, the occasion was rendered peculiarly impressive. From the oration of Dick Harvey, Esq., who spoke with intense feeling upon the occasion, the following extract is subjoined:

"Of those upon whose graves will soon be strewn our floral offerings, I deem it adequate to say that when living they were soldiers, all of them brave boys, who, from time to time, have stacked their arms, done with life's relentless warfare, and now are peacefully reposing in the grand encampment of the dead.

'How sleep the brave who sink to rest
By all their country's wishes blest!
When spring with dewy fingers cold,
Returns to deck their hallowed mou'd;
She there shall dress a sweeter sod,
Than fancy's feet have ever trod.

By fairy hands their knell is rung;
By forms unseen their dirge is sung;
There honor comes a pilgrim gray,
To bless the turf that wraps their clay;
And freedom shall a while repair,
To dwell a weeping hermit there.'

With the memory of one among these noble dead, because of long and near acquaintance my heart prompts me to linger. One so lately gone the closing scene still haunts us like some hateful vision. One who had survived the perils of three long years on the tented field, but to reach the meridan of a peerless manhood and then to perish in an hour of peaceful toil, where the possibility of danger was undreamed. Oh, strange and cruel fate! Dumb, in the shadow of this dark mystery, I stand with lifted hands, and vainly strive to comprehend its meaning.

Even had I power to free my prisoned thoughts, language to reveal the sullen gloom which hangs over the troubled waters of my soul, it were better to be silent, for God knows I would not by the slightest imperfection of expression wound one poor aching heart within the hearing of my voice! Only this much then: He was my friend, strong in intellect and purpose, possessed of wondrous personal power and faultless courage, an impetuous unflinching soldier. Self-taught in the severe school of disappointment and adversity he had developed a bold, decisive character, and had stored a most comprehensive mind with practical knowledge and useful facts. A clear head, large heart and untiring industry combined to render him recognized and respected among all with whom he mingled. Struggling upward against obstacles which baffle ordinary men, the dawn of a brighter day seemed breaking, the earnest of a usefull and success crowned career, when alas the ill-fated hour! That treacherous bank must fall and crush out the life of him whose efforts had upreared it!

Oh what a noble heart was here undone
When science's self destroyed her favorite son.

Yes! She too much indulged thy fond pursuit
She sow'd the seed but death has reap'd the fruit,

'Twas thine own genius gave the final blow,
And help'd to plant the wound that laid thee low;

So the struck eagle, stretched upon the plain,
No more through rolling clouds to soar again.

Viewed his own feather on the fatal dart,
And winged the shaft which quivered in his heart;

Keen were his pangs, but keener far to feel.
He nursed the pinion which impelled the steel,

While the same plumage that had warmed his nest,
Drank the last life-drop of his bleeding breast!

Doubtless Samuel was not dearer to his friends than were the others to those who knew and loved them best. They were all soldiers, and in full round measure worthy of the offerings we bring them here to-day."

1880 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Martha Hemenway (age 39, widowed, born Ill), daughter Fannie Hemenway (age 12, born Iowa), daughter Marilla Hemenway (age 9, born Iowa), son Samuel W. Hemenway (age 7, born Iowa), daughter Susie Hemenway (age 5, born Iowa), daughter Martha Hemenway (age 3, born Iowa) and Sarah B. Haney (age 29, born Illinois).

Hemenway Post, No. 344, was organized August 6, 1884, with twenty-two charter members. It was named in honor of Capt. S. W. Hemenway, who served during the War of the Rebellion in the Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, and who lost his life through an accident in 1877 while superintending the construction of the city water system. The post was in active existence for about sixteen years, when for various reasons its charter was allowed to lapse.

His widow Martha Hemenway filed for a pension on Aug. 2, 1890.

Martha (Haney) Hemenway died Dec. 10, 1927 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa.

Martha Toll (Honey) Hemenway 1840 - 1927
HONEY, HEMENWAY, HOUGHTON, HOSMER

Posted By: Errin Wilker
Date: 5/29/2008

Martha Toll Hemenway was born in Rushville, Illinois, December 10, 1840, and died at her home in Lansing, Iowa, December 10, 1927. She was the daughter of John Honey, Sr., and Fanney Honey.

Mrs. Hemenway was the pioneer resident of Allamakee County, having come with her parents, October 14, 1848, to the site where the town of Lansing is now situated. Her father, with his son James, had come in the spring of 1848. He had secured from the government a grant of land in that locality, and in conjunction with H.H. Houghton of Galena, Illinois, founded the town of Lansing, now one of the beauty spots of the upper Mississippi.

Mrs. Hemenway received her education through private teachers and at Upper Iowa University, graduating in the famous "War Class" of 1861.

On September 30, 1866, she was united in marriage with Samuel W. Hemenway, captain of Company B, 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry. They had two sons and four daughters.

She was an artist of ability and student of the best in art and literature. Possessing a remarkable and accurate memory, she was an authority on the early history of northeastern Iowa. She recalled with pleasure the early Sunday morning in May, 1851, when the famous sculptress, Harriet Hosmer, a passenger on the packet playing between St. Louis and St. Paul, climbed the high bluff back of the Honey home. In honor of Miss Hosmer's feat that morning, it was at once christened, and has always been called, Mount Hosmer. And in the shadow of this bluff, Martha T. Hemenway spent seventy-nine years of her life.

Source: Annals of Iowa, Volume XVI, No. 7, January 1929


Hermanson, John. (aka John H. Hermanson Fretheim) He was born June 27, 1840 in Vik, Sogn of Fjordane, Norway. He was the son of Hermund Ingebrigtsen Fretheim (May 14, 1800 - July 4, 1854) and Anna Jensdotter Afet (Aprl 1804 - Sept. 7. 1870). He married Anna Iverson on Nov. 1, 1867 in Winneshiek County, Iowa.. She was the daughter of Ivar Magnusson Tveito (Mar. 14 1809 - Apr. 9, 1878) and Anna M. Eriksdtr Stalheim (1806 - Jan 19, 1875). Her brothers Amon Iverson and Erik Iverson also served in Company B. 27th Iowa.

John Hermanson John H. Hermanson Fretheim, or as he was better known in Allamakee county, John H. Hermanson, proved his loyalty in citizenship by active and able service in the Union army during the Civil war, his reliability in business by his many years of close connection with farming interests of Allamakee county, and his faithfulness to all ties and obligations by his upright and honorable life. He passed away on his farm in Waterloo township, July 6, 1904, and his death was widely and deeply regretted, for in his passing Allamakee county lost a pioneer citizen and a man who during the half century of his residence here made tangible and substantial contributions to the agricultural development and general upbuilding of this part of the state.

Mr. Hermanson was born in Norway, in which country the family name was Fretheim. He came to America with his parents in 1854 and the family remained for a short time in New York where the father and one brother of the subject of this review passed away. Afterwards the mother and the remainder of the family came west and after spending one year in Wisconsin, settled in Allamakee county, Iowa, where they took up government land and also added to their holdings by purchase. Assisted by her sons the mother operated this tract for many years thereafter and under her able management it became a productive and valuable farm. Eventually she retired from active life, selling the land to her sons, and a few years later passed away. She and her husband became the parents of nine children, three of whom survive: John, of Decorah; Mrs. Christina Ellingson, of Austin, Texas; and Mrs. Ellen Peterson, of Allamakee county.

John H. Hermanson began farming in Waterloo township at an early age, cultivating first an eighty acre tract of land which he purchased from his mother's homestead. He suspended his agricultural labors in 1861, when he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Regiment, for service in the Civil war. He went to the front as private and served for three years, taking part in many of the important engagements of the war and also the battle with the Indians at Lake Mills, Minnesota. With a creditable military record he returned to Iowa and resumed the operation of his farm, remaining active and prominent in this line of work for forty years thereafter. During this period he won success, prominence and substantial fortune and his landed holdings increased steadily until he owned a one hundred and eighty acre farm in Allamakee county with one hundred and thirty acres in a high state of cultivation and an eighty acre tract in Wharton county, Texas. He gave practically all of his time to the cultivation of his Iowa farm and upon it steadily carried forward the work of improvement and development, erecting upon it substantial buildings and installing modern equipment. In the course of years it became a valuable and productive property and stands today as a worthy memorial to his life of industry and thrift.

Shortly after his discharge from service in the Civil war Mr. Hermanson married and to him and his wife were born eleven children: Albert, who is engaged in farming in Ross, North Dakota; Anna, who married Albert Langen of Allamakee county; Mrs. Nettie Loe, of Pekin, North Dakota; Iver, a farmer of Ross, North Dakota; Henry, engaged in farming in the same locality; Emil, a farmer of Elsworth, North Dakota; Mrs. Andrew Klefstad, of Pekin, in the same state; John, who is assisting his brother and mother in the operation of the homestead; Ida, who lives at home; Sanders, aiding in the conduct of the home farm; and Mayme, at home. All these children received excellent educations in the public schools of Allamakee county and Mrs. Loe engaged in teaching previous to her marriage. The family are devout members of the Lutheran church.

John H. Hermanson gave his political allegiance to the republican party and was eminently progressive and public-spirited in matters of citizenship, cooperating heartily in all measures and projects to advance the general interests of the community. On several occasions he rendered the township excellent service as trustee and was found always prompt, capable and reliable in the discharge of his official duties. His death on the 6th of July, 1904, took from Allamakee county one whom she could ill afford to lose - a man of high principles, progressive standards and upright life, who during almost a half century of earnest and capable work along agricultural lines made many substantial contributions to the upbuilding and development of the state.

Past and Present of Allamakee County
by Ellery M. Hancock. Vols. I & II. Chicago:
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1913.
Evansville: Unigraphic, Inc., 1975 [reproduction]
submitted by Dick Barton

John Hermanson and wife The photo to the left is John and Anna Hermanson.

Johnan Hermansen Fretheim and his family arrived in New York on June 30, 1854 on the ship Jorgen Brunckhorst.

1880 Census: Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Hermanson (age 40, farmer, born Norway), Anna Hermanson (age 37, born Norway), Albert Hermanson (age 11, born Iowa), Anna Hermanson (age 10, born Iowa), Antonette Hermanson (age 8, born Iowa), Ivar Hermanson (age 5, born Iowa), Henry Hermanson (age 3, born Iowa) and Emiel Hermanson (age 7 months, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Hermanson (Township 100, Range 6, Section 31, SE SE, age 44, farmer, born Norway), wife Anna Hermanson (age 36, born Norway), son Albert Hermanson (age 16, born Allamakee County, Iowa), daughter Anna Hermanson (age 14, born Allamakee County, Iowa), daughter Antonette Hermanson (age 12, born Allamakee County, Iowa), son Iver Amarius Hermanson (age 10, born Allamakee County, Iowa), son Henry Hermanson (age 7, born Allamakee County, Iowa), daughter Emma Helena Hermanson (age 2,born Allamakee County, Iowa), John Adolph Hermanson (age 0, born Allamakee County, Iowa).

1895 Iowa State Census, Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Hermanson (age 54, born Norway, Farmer, Religious Belief: Lutheran, Soldier in the War of the Rebellion: Company B, 27 Regiment, Iowa, Rank Private), Anna Hermanson (age 46, born Norway), Iver Amalius Hermanson (age 27, born Iowa). Albert Herman Hermanson (age 26, born Iowa), Anna Hermanson (age 24, born Iowa), Henry Hermanson (age 17, born Iowa), Emil Hermanson (age 15, born Iowa), Emma Maxine Hermanson (age 12, born Iowa), John Adolf Hermanson (age 8, born Iowa), Ida Sophia Hermanson (age 8, born Iowa), Sander Tideman Hermanson (age 5, born Iowa), Mamy Josephine (age 2, born Iowa).

1900 Census: Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Hermanson (born June 1840, age 59, married 33 years, born Norway, immigrated 1855, naturalized, farmer), wife Anna Hermanson (born Sept. 1848, age 51, married 33 years 11 children born, 11 still living. born Norway). daughter Nettie Hermanson (born June 1872, age 27, born Iowa), son Emile Hermanson (born Oct. 1879, age 20, born Iowa), daughter Emma Hermanson (born May 1882, age 18, born Iowa). Son John Hermanson (born Aug. 1884, age 15, born Iowa), daughter Ida Hermanson (born Oct. 1886, age 13, born Iowa), son Sander Hermanson (born Sept. 1889, age 10, born Iowa), and daughter Mayme Hermanson (born Aug. 1892, age 7, born Iowa).

John Hermanson died July 6, 1904 and is buried in Big Canoe Lutheran Cemetery, Decorah, Winneshiek County, Iowa.

His widow Anna Hermanson filed for a pension on Aug. 3, 1904.

1910 Census: Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: Anna Hermanson (age 61, widowed, born Norway), daughter Emma Hermanson (age 27, born Iowa), son John A. Hermanson (age 25, born Iowa), son Sander T. Hermanson (age 20, born Iowa), daughter Mamie J. Hermanson (age 17, born Iowa) and brother Erik Iverson (age 73, widowed, born Norway).

1925 Iowa State Census: Union, Allamakee County, Iowa: Mrs. John Hermanson (age 76, father's name Iver Iverson, mother's name: Stalheim. She was living with son Sander Fretheim (age 35, father's name John Hermanson, mother's name Anna Iverson), daughter Ida Hermanson (age 37, father's name: John Hermanson, mother's name Anna Iverson) and Grandson Gerhard Fretheim (age 12, father Albert Fretheim, mother, Amanda Johnson).


Hughes, Pulaski Hare - He was born Nov. 23, 1839, in Marysville, Union County, Ohio. He was the son of James Eagleson Hughes and Pamelia Newton Twiford. He married Jane E. Turner on May 23, 1869. She was the daughter of Isaiah Turner, (Feb. 2, 1814 - Sept. 25, 1892) and Mary Ann Hoag (Dec. 24, 1823 - Feb. 11, 1856). Her brother Henry H. Turner served in Company H, 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry.

1850 Census: Franklinton, Franklin County, Ohio: James E. Hughes (age 40, hotel keeper, born PA), Permilia Hughes (age 30, born Ohio), Pulaski Hughes (age 11, born Ohio), Elizabeth I Hughes (age 10, born Ohio), Nicholas Hughes (age 7, born Ohio), Saml, M. Hughes (age 5, born Ohio), Thos. A. Hughes (age 4, born Ohio), Willis W. Hughes (age 3, born Ohio) and William S. Hughes (age 6/12, born Ohio).

1857 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Somerset, Steele County, Minnesota: J. E. Hughes (age 47, born Penn., Hatter), Permelia Hughes (age 40, born Ohio), Pulaski Hughes (age 18, farmer, born Ohio), Elizabeth Hughes (age 16, born Ohio), Twiford Hughes (age 15, born Ohio), Samuel Hughes (age 13, born Ohio), Thomas Hughes (age 11, born Ohio), Willis Hughes (age 9, born Ohio), Shanton Hughes (age 7, born Ohio), Mary Hughes (age 4, born Ohio), Ella Hughes (age 2, born Illinois).

1860 census - Somerset, Steele County, Minnesota: James Hughes (age 50), Pamelia Hughes (age 42), Pulaski Hughes (age 20), Elizabeth (age 19), Twiford (age 17), Samuel (age 15), Thomas (age 13), Willis (age 11), Shanton (age 9), Mary (age 7), Ella (age 5), Walter, (age 2).

1870 census - Owatonna, Steele County, Minnesota: Pulaski Hughes (age 30), Jane Hughes (age 23), Mary Hughes (born May 1870).

1885 Minnesota State Census - Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota: P. H. Hughes, (age 47), J.E. Hughes (age 38), Mary (age 15), Twiford (age 9),

1890 Veteran's Census in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota: Pulaski Hughes, Rank: Sgt. Major, Regiment: 27th Iowa Vol. Inf., Served 3 years, 1 month. Address: 1315 Adams Street, N.E.

1895 Minnesota State Census - Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota: Pulaski Hughes, (Address: 1315 Adams Street N. E. - age 54, resident of the state 12 years, miller, Soldier in the War of Rebellion), Jennie (age 47), Mary (age 24), Twiford (age 19),

1900 Census - Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota: P. H. Hughes (age 61, born Nov. 1839, married 31 years, miller), Jane E. (age 53, born April 1847, married 31 years, 2 children born, 2 living) Mary (age 30), Twiford (age 24).

Pulaski H. Hughes died Nov. 17, 1908 (Pension Index Record and Minnesota Death Records, 1866 - 1916 ). He is buried in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

Jane E. (Turner) Hughes (born April 20, 1847 in Butternuts, Otsego, New York) died Feb. 13, 1930 at Quasqueton, Iowa. The record showed her parents as Isiah and Mary Turner. Spouse: P. H. Hughes (Iowa, Deaths and Burials, 1850-1990). She is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa. Plot, Lot 20, Add. 2.


Hutson, Elias He was born March 1, 1838 in Galena, Joe Daviess County, Ill. He was the son of George Lovejoy Hutson and Hannah Daugherty.

1850 Census: Council Hill, Jo Daviess County, Illinois Geo. L. Hudson (age 36, mines, born New York), Hannah Hudson (age 39, born Pennsylvania), Wm. I. Hudson (age 14, male, born Ill), Elias J. Hudson (age 12, born Ill), Nancy Hudson (age 10, born Illinois), Nathan D. Hudson (age 7, born Ill), George Hudson (age 4, born Ill), Mary Ann Hudson (age 3, born Ill) and Benj. Franklin Hudson (age 1, born Ill). (Note this family was indexed as Huason on Ancestry.com.)

1860 Census: Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: George Hudson (age 43, farmer, born Ill), Hannah Hudson (age 46, born Penn), William Hudson (age 23, farm laborer, born Ill), Elias Hudson (age 21, born Ill), Nancy Hudson (age 19, born Ill), Nathaniel Hudson (age 17, born Ill), George Hudson (age 15, born Ill), Mary Ann Hudson (age 13, born Ill), Benj Hudson (age 11, born Ill), Dorcas Hudson (age 8, born Ill), and Josephus Hudson (age 2, born Wisconsin.

Elias Hutson died April 27, 1863, in Jackson Tenn. He is buried in Corinth National Cemetery, Mississippi, Section E, Grave 119, Jackson, Mississippi.


Hutson, Nathanial D. - He was born March 22, 1841 in Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill. He was the son of George Lovejoy Hutson and Hannah Daugherty.

1850 Census: Council Hill, Jo Daviess County, Illinois Geo. L. Hudson (age 36, mines, born New York), Hannah Hudson (age 39, born Pennsylvania), Wm. I. Hudson (age 14, male, born Ill), Elias J. Hudson (age 12, born Ill), Nancy Hudson (age 10, born Illinois), Nathan D. Hudson (age 7, born Ill), George Hudson (age 4, born Ill), Mary Ann Hudson (age 3, born Ill) and Benj. Franklin Hudson (age 1, born Ill). (Note this family was indexed as Huason on Ancestry.com.)

1860 Census: Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: George Hudson (age 43, farmer, born Ill), Hannah Hudson (age 46, born Penn), William Hudson (age 23, farm laborer, born Ill), Elias Hudson (age 21, born Ill), Nancy Hudson 9age 19, born Ill), Nathaniel Hudson (age 17, born Ill), George Hudson (age 15, born Ill), Mary Ann Hudson (age 13, born Ill), Benj Hudson (age 11, born Ill), Dorcas Hudson (age 8, born Ill), and Josephus Hudson (age 2, born Wisconsin.

I could not find anything regarding Nathanial after he was discharged. In 1870 and 1880, George and Hannah Hutson with several children were in Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin. But no Nathaniel.

His mother Hannah Hutson filed for a pension on Oct. 2, 1883 in Wisconsin. She died March 16, 1886 in Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin. His father George Hutson filed for a pension on Aug. 21, 1886.


Hutson, William J. - He was born August 14, 1836 in Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill. He was the son of George Lovejoy Hutson and Hannah Daugherty. He married Matilda Langford. She was the daughter of Edward Franklin Langford and Elizabeth Ann Smice.

1850 Census: Council Hill, Jo Daviess County, Illinois Geo. L. Hudson (age 36, mines, born New York), Hannah Hudson (age 39, born Pennsylvania), Wm. I. Hudson (age 14, male, born Ill), Elias J. Hudson (age 12, born Ill), Nancy Hudson (age 10, born Illinois), Nathan D. Hudson (age 7, born Ill), George Hudson (age 4, born Ill), Mary Ann Hudson (age 3, born Ill) and Benj. Franklin Hudson (age 1, born Ill). (Note this family was indexed as Huason on Ancestry.com.)

1860 Census: Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: George Hudson (age 43, farmer, born Ill), Hannah Hudson (age 46, born Penn), William Hudson (age 23, farm laborer, born Ill), Elias Hudson (age 21, born Ill), Nancy Hudson 9age 19, born Ill), Nathaniel Hudson (age 17, born Ill), George Hudson (age 15, born Ill), Mary Ann Hudson (age 13, born Ill), Benj Hudson (age 11, born Ill), Dorcas Hudson (age 8, born Ill), and Josephus Hudson (age 2, born Wisconsin.

He filed for a pension on Sept. 16, 1879.

1880 Census - Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: W. J. Hutson, (age 43, farmer), wife Matilda (age 29), son Albert (age 11), daughter Eda (age 9), son William B, (age 4), daughter Odelia (age 3).

1890 Veteran's Census - Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: William J. Hudson, Corporal, Co. B, 27th Iowa Vol. Inf., served 2 years, 11 months, 27 days. Post Office, Desoto, Vernon County, Wisconsin.

1895 Wisconsin State Census: Enumeration of Soldiers and Sailors of the Late War Residing in the Village of DeSoto, County of Crawford: Wm. J. Hutson, Sgt. Co. B. 27th Iowa. Post office De Soto.

1900 Census - Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: William Hutson, boarder (age 63, born Aug, 1836, widowed), There was also a Daisy Hutson in the same household, boarder, age 15. They were in the household of Walter and Edith Rogers. Edith was born Aug. 1871. Is she his daughter EDA on the 1880 census? (further research confirms that he was living with his daughter Edith/Eda).

1905 Wisconsin State Census: Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: Wm. Hutson (age 68, clam fishing), daughter Daisy Hutson (age 20), son Albert Hutson (age 36), daughter in law Effie Hutson (age 27) and grandson Cylus Hutson, (age 9).

William J. Hutson died Sept. 11, 1911 in Illinois. (U. S. Veterans Administration Payment Cards)


Iverson, Amon He was born June 8, 1843 in Vossevangen, Hordaland, Norway. He was the son of Ivar Magnusson Tveito (Mar. 14 1809 - Apr. 9, 1878) and Anna M. Eriksdtr Stalheim (1806 - Jan 19, 1875). He married Unna Knudson on May 30, 1866 in Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Knut Steffensen (1805 - 1894) and Abilona Kolbeindsatter (1818 - 1860). Based on the 1925 Iowa State Census for Anna Hermanson (showing her parents to be Iver Iverson and ? Stalheim), I believe she was the sister of Amund Iverson. She married John Hermanson, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

"Iverson, Armund" "Iverson, Aaron" IA 27th Inf Co B. Residence: Lansing, Iowa; Born 1843 in Norway; son of Iver and Anna. Civil War: Age 22. Enlisted 13 Oct 1864 at Dubuque, Iowa; Mustered 22 Oct 1864. Private. Transferred to IA 12th Inf Co B on 13 Jul 1865; Discharged from the service 24 Nov 1865 at Mobile, Alabama. Post war: Married Unne Stefenson. Three children survived him. Died in 1898 at age 55, of pneumonia, at Meckling, South Dakota, and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery there. Sources: (ISW-III p1173) (SDSA, WPA Veterans Graves Registration, Clay County

1880 Census: Clay, Dakota Territory: Amond Iverson (age 36, laborer, born Norway), wife Une Iverson (age 33, born Wisconsin), daughter Anna Iverson (age 11, born Iowa), son Knut Iverson (age 9, born Iowa), son Iver Iverson (age 7, born Dakota), daughter Carrie Iverson (age 5, born Iowa), daughter Sarah A Iverson (age 3, born Dakota), and Daughter Luvica Iverson (age 11/12, born June, born Dakota).

Amon/Amund/Aaron Iverson died May 29, 1898 at Norway Leaf, Clay County, South Dakota and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Meckling, South Dakota

His widow Une Iverson filed for a pension on June 21, 1898 in South Dakota.

1900 Census: Norway, Clay County, South Dakota: Unna Iverson (born Oct. 1846, age 53, widowed, 11 children born, 8 still living, born Wisconsin), son Iver Iverson (born Apr. 1883, age 17, born South Dakota), son Magnus Iverson (born Oct. 1884, age 15, born South Dakota), daughter Ida Iverson (born May 1887, age 13, born South Dakota) and grandson Clarence Johnson (born Apr. 1896, age 4, born South Dakota.)

Children of Amund Iverson and Unna Knudson.

  1. Anna Iverson F 17 Apr 1869 in Decorah, Winneshiek, Iowa, USA
  2. Knute Iverson M 24 Mar 1871 in Decorah, Winneshiek, Iowa, USA
  3. Karen Iverson F 13 May 1875 in Vermillion, Clay, South Dakota, USA
  4. Sarah Iverson F 10 Mar 1877 in Vermillion, Clay, South Dakota, USA
  5. Louisa Iverson F 21 Jun 1879 in Vermillion, Clay, South Dakota, USA
  6. Mary Iverson F 6 Mar 1881 in Vermillion, Clay, South Dakota, USA
  7. Ivar Iverson M 26 Apr 1883 in Vermillion, Clay, South Dakota, USA
  8. Magnus Iverson M 28 Oct 1885 in Norway Leaf, Clay, South Dakota, USA
  9. Ida Iverson F 11 May 1887 in Norway Leaf, Clay, South Dakota, USA

Unna (Knudson) Iverson (born Oct. 13, 1846) died March 28, 1919 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Meckling, South Dakota


Iverson, Erick (Erik Ivarson Langehaugen). He was born Mar. 26, 1837 in Hallingdal, Buskerud, Norway. (Some family trees say Opheim, Sogn, Norway) He was the son of Ivar Magnusson Tveito (Mar. 14 1809 - Apr. 9, 1878) and Anna M. Eriksdtr Stalheim (1806 - Jan 19, 1875). He married Berthe S. Haugland on Mar. 25, 1873.(Note the obituary says Bertha Sjurson) Based on the 1925 Iowa State Census for Anna Hermanson (showing her parents to be Iver Iverson and ? Stalheim), I believe she was the sister of Erick Iverson. She married John Hermanson, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

1860 Census: Hanover, Allamakee County, Iowa: Erick Iverson (age 23, farm laborer, born Norway). He was living with a family named Penoyer.

1880 Census: Palisade, Minnehaha County, Dakota Territory: Erik Iverson (age 43, farmer, born Norway), wife Berth Iverson (age 30, born Norway), son Iver Iverson (age 6, born Iowa) and son Anton Iverson (age 5, born Dakota).

1900 Census: Palisade, Minnehaha County, South Dakota; Erik Iverson (born Mar. 1837, age 63, married 28 years, born Norway, immigrated 1858, in US for 42 years, naturalized, farmer), wife Berthe J. Iverson (born Dec. 1849, age 50, married 28 years, 2 children born, 2 still living), son Anton S Iverson (born May 1875, age 25, born in South Dakota).

1910 Census: Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: Anna Hermanson (age 61, widowed, born Norway), daughter Emma Hermanson (age 27, born Iowa), son John A. Hermanson (age 25, born Iowa), son Sander T. Hermanson (age 20, born Iowa), daughter Mamie J. Hermanson (age 17, born Iowa) and brother Erik Iverson (age 73, widowed, born Norway).

Erick Iverson died at age 79 of carcinoma on April 17, 1916 at Garretson, S. D. (Pension Records). He is buried in Norway Lutheran Cemetery, Garretson, Minnehaha County, South Dakota, lot 2, grave 5.

Obituary found on Find a Grave

In the death of Erick Iverson of Garretson, Minnehaha county lost another of its upright and respected pioneer citizens. His funeral was held last Thursday, April 20th, at Norway Church, conducted by Rev. Bergsaker.

Erick Iverson was born in Voss, Norway, March 25th, 1837. He came to America and located in Iowa in 1859. In 1861 he enlisted and served until the close of the war in 1865. In 1868 he returned to Norway, where in 1872 he married Miss Bertha Sjurson. After the wedding they came to America, ad in 1874 they moved from Iowa to Minnehaha County, Dakota, taking up a homestead in Palisade township until the wife died eight years ago, and Mr. Iverson continued until three years ago, when he moved to Garretson.

He leaves two sons, Iver, of Bergen, N. D. and Anton, of Garretson.

He was taken sick last fall, and gradually failed until the end came.


Jackson, Robert Turner - He was born Dec. 30, 1828 in Somerset, Perry County, Ohio. He was the son of John Jay Jackson (Feb. 17, 1792 - Sept. 24, 1876) and Sarah Howard Ijams (Oct. 6, 1796 - Feb. 12, 1829). He married Matilda Ann Deaver Feb. 25, 1851 in Perry County, Ohio.

1850 Census, Reading, Perry County, Ohio John J. Jackson (age 58, farmer, born New York), Mary C. Jackson (age 47, born Virginia), Robert T. Jackson (age 21, born Ohio), Lyman Jackson (age 16, born Ohio), Caroline Jackson (age 13, born Ohio), Clarinda Jackson (age 6, born Ohio), and Ann C. Great (age 37, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census, Obispo, Chickasaw County, Iowa Robert Jackson (age 26, born Ohio), Matilda Jackson (age 27, born Ohio), Rosa M. Jackson (age 5, born Ohio), Celia Jackson (age 3, born Ohio), Edward Jackson (age 1, born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa for one year.

1860 Census - Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: Robert T. Jackson (age 31, farmer), Matilda Jackson (age 30), Rose M. Jackson (age 8), Celia (age 6), Edward (age 4) and John J. (age 2).

1870 census - Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: R.S. Jackson (age 42, invalid), Matilda Jackson, (age 42), Roseanna (age 18, school teacher), Edward (age 15), John Jr., (age 13), Comfort (age 8), Robert (age 4), Mary A (age 2).

Robert T. Jackson died Oct. 15, 1879. He is buried Gethsemane Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His widow Matilda filed for a pension on Jan. 4, 1880.

1880 Mortality Schedule, Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa Robert Jackson, age 50, married, born Ohio, common laborer, died in the month of October. Cause of death: Ball in right lung causing hemorrhage. Shot at the battle of Fort Blakely, April 1865. Physician: J. W. Davis.

1880 census - Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: His family: Matilda Jackson (age 51), Edward (age 24), Comfort (age 17), Robert (age 10), Mary (age 11) and Maude (age 8).

Children of Robert Turner Jackson and Matilda Ann Deaver:

  1. Roseanna Jackson b: 27 Nov 1851
  2. Celia Martha Jackson, b. 1853
  3. Edward Jackson b: 21 Nov 1854 in Near Lansing, Allamakee County Iowa
  4. John Jackson b: 11 Jul 1857 in Near Lansing, Allamakee County Iowa
  5. Martha Jackson b: 17 Apr 1858 in Near Lansing, Allamakee County Iowa
  6. Comfort Elizabeth Jackson b: 14 Jul 1862 in Near Lansing, Iowa Village Creek
  7. Robert Jackson b: 20 Aug 1866
  8. Mary Alice Jackson b: 15 Jul 1868
  9. Clarinda Maude Jackson b: 5 Sep 1871

Jackson, William Edwin - He was born March 23, 1827 in Somerset, Perry County, Ohio. He was the son of John Jay Jackson (Feb. 17, 1792 - Sept. 24, 1876) and Sarah Howard Ijams(Oct. 6, 1796 - Feb. 12, 1829). He married Julia Miner on January 7, 1851.

W. E. JACKSON, retired, is a native of Fairfield County, Ohio; there he was raised. Enlisted in 1846 in the Mexican war, Co. H, Third Ohio Infantry. Served one year. In 1851 he came to Allamakee County, Iowa. There engaged in farming. In 1864 he enlisted in Co. B, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry. Served to the end of the war. Returned to Iowa, and continued farming. July, 1870, he came to Webster County; the following month came to Red Cloud. Took a homestead claim of 160 acres, which has since been mostly sold for railroad purposes. he also owns 160 acres one-half mile east of town. He was the first Postmaster of Red Cloud; held the office two years. Was also the first County Superintendent. Married January 7, 1851, to Julia Miner of Perry County, Ohio. They have three children -- one son and two daughters. Mrs. Jackson was the first white woman who resided in Red Cloud. They built a stockade, where they lived during the winter, accompanied by James Calvert and Finis E. Penny.

Biographical Sketches of Red Cloud

1860 census, Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: W. E. Jackson (age 33), Julia A. Jackson (age 26), Mary C (age 7), Margaret (age 4), Simon J. (age 1).

1870 census - Iowa Township, Allamakee County, Iowa: Wm Jackson (age 40), Julia Jackson (age 38), Carrie Jackson, (age 18), May Jackson, (age 15), Wm Jackson (age 6).

Webster County was the first in the Republican valley to be organized with a county government, the date of its organization being April 19, 1871. The preliminary steps toward the organization of Webster County were taken at meetings held in the dugout of Silas Garber, who a few years later became governor of Nebraska.

In the spring of 1870, nineteen members of the Rankin colony left Omaha, to settle near the Republican river, May 16 they arrived at a large elm grove south of the present town of Guide Rock and established the first settlement in the county. An Indian scare caused considerable uneasiness and induced all members of the colony to return to Omaha, with the exception of four, Emanuel Peters, George Gardiner, Richard Paine and Donald McCallum, a surveyor. Only two, however, Messrs. Peters and McCallum, remained permanently. They constructed as living quarters, a dugout, the first of its kind in the county. They called the place Guide Rock, named for a conspicuous landmark, the large rocky bluff on the opposite side of the river.

About this same time Silas, Joseph and Abram Garber made an extended trip through the valley. Returning to Beatrice they found several other men desirous of locating on frontier lands, and in May 1870 the Garbers, A. M. Talbott, Albert Lathrop, Sam Davis, Thomas Comstock, and William McBride arrived at Guide Rock, where they found Peters and McCallum still living in a dugout. To protect themselves from the Indians they built a stockade on Soap creek.

Silas Garber later in the season pushed on up the river to the present site of Red Cloud. On July 17 the first homestead entries were made in this settlement by Garber, Dr. Peter Head, W. H. Brice, August Roats and David Heffelbower.

On Aug. 9, W. E. Jackson and James Calvert arrived with their families. That same month the settlers erected a stockade on a creek which flowed through the homestead of Governor Garber.

After the stockade was built immigration to the valley was rapid and the covered wagons or prairie schooners were seldom out of sight. Some of the conveyances were pulled by oxen, others by horses, cows or steers. The first winter was a lonely one for the settlers, the weather was cold, and provisions with the exception of meat were scarce. Butter and milk were unknown. Flour was cheap at Beatrice, but hauling it from the nearest mill a hundred miles away, was expensive.

In 1871 a settlement was formed on Elm Creek, between Guide Rock and Red Cloud, and a stockade was built there.

April 19, 1871 an election was held to organize Webster County and to locate the county seat. Forty-five votes were cast and it is thought that every legal voter in the county voted on that day. Silas Garber was chosen as judge, A. W. Brice, treasurer, Thomas B. Williams clerk, William E. Jackson superintendent of schools, Emanuel Peters sheriff, Donald McCallum surveyor, George Taylor assessor, Joseph Garber justice of the peace and A. Lathrop constable. A. W. Brice and William E. Jackson did not qualify for their respective offices, so Edward Kellogg was appointed county superintendent and Mr. Jackson county treasurer.

NEGenWeb Project - Webster County
Who's Who in Nebraska, 1940

The history of Red Cloud begins with the settlement of Capt. Silas Garber, and others, in 1870. The site of the town was entered under the homestead laws on July 17th, 1870. In August a stockade was built, that the settlers might protect themselves against the Indians. Among the first settlers were ex-Governor Silas Garber, Dr. Peter Head, Albert Lathrop, George M. Taylor, W. E. Jackson, James Calvert, Dr. T. B. Williams, Wheeler Wicks, A. H. Roat, D. Hefflebower, Ed. and John Parks, and L. F. Munsel. The first white women in the settlement were Mrs. W. E. Jackson and Mrs. James Calvert, who arrived with their husbands, on August 9, 1870.

Andreas' History of the State of Nebraska
Webster County, Early History.

1880 Census, Red Cloud, Webster Parish, Nebraska: William E. Jackson, (age 53, farmer), Wife Julia A, (age 45), son William (age 17).

He filed for a pension in Nebraska on Sept. 12, 1890.

1890 Census - Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska: William E. Jackson, Private, Co. B, 27th Iowa Vol. Inf. Enlisted Jan 4, 1864, discharged: July 11, 1865, served 1 year, 4 months and 7 days.

William Edwin Jackson died March 25, 1898 at Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska. He is buried in Red Cloud Cemetery, Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska.

His widow Julia Jackson filed for a pension in Nebraska on April 13, 1898.

Julia A. Jackson died Feb. 27, 1920. (United States Veterans Administration Payment Cards) It does not say where she died or where she is buried.


Kohr, John - He was born about 1842 in Germany. He was the son of Nicholas and Hannah M Kohr. He married Louise Albertus.

1860 census- Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Nicholas Kohr (age 49, wagonmaker), Mary Kohr (age 40), John Kohr (age 17), Margaret Kohr (age 8).

I think he was on the 1870 census in Sparta, Chippewa County, Minnesota: Cornelius Kohr (age 60), Mary (age 54), John (age 27), Louisie Kohr (age 20). (Note the ages of Cornelius and Mary - although the names do not match the 1880 census, the ages do).

1880 Census in Sparta, Chippewa County, Minnesota: John Kohr, (age 37), wife Louisa A (age 30), daughter Mary E, (age 8), son Albertus N (age 6), son Charles F (age 4), father Nicholas, (age 70), mother Hannah M (age 64).

1890 Veterans Census - Sparta and Tunsburg, Chippewa County, Minnesota: John Kohr, Private, Company B, 27th Iowa Inft, Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, Discharged June 13, 1865, served 2 years and 10 months. Post Office Address was Montevideo.

1900 Census in Sparta, Chippewa County, Minnesota: John Kohr, (age 57, born Dec. 1842, married 31 years, farmer, immigrated 1847, naturalized), Wife Louisa A (age 40 (?), born Nov. 1849, married 31 years, 3 children, 3 living), son Frank Kohr, (age 24, born May 1876 in Minnesota), mother Anna M (age 83, born Aug, 1816, widowed, 3 children, 2 living).

1910 census - Montevideo, Chippewa County, Minnesota: John Kohr, (age 67, married 1 time for 41 years), wife Louisa A (age 60, married 1 time for 41 years, 3 children, 3 living).

1920 census - Sparta, Chippewa County, Minnesota: John Kohr, (age 77), wife Louisa A (age 70).

John Kohr died Mar. 10, 1933 at Montevideo, Minnesota (Pension Index Records). He is buried in Sunset Memorial Cemetery, Montevideo, Chippewa County, Minnesota.

Louise (Albertus) Kohr died July 17, 1930 at Sparta, Chippewa County, Minnesota. She is buried in Sunset Memorial Cemetery, Montevideo, Chippewa County, Minnesota. Her death record showed her father's name as G. A. Albertus and spouse as John Kohr.


Langford, James A. He was born Oct. 6, 1840 in Ohio. He was the son of James L. Langford (1804 - 1877) and Katherine Mary Jane Langford. He married Helena Wince or Weinty. His sister Lovina Langford married George McKee, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

1850 census, Florence, Louisa, Iowa: James Langford (age 47), Mary J. (age 46), Henry (age 11), James (age 7), Mary J. (age 6), Lovina (age 4).

1856 Iowa State Census, Port Louisa, Louisa County, Iowa: They had been in the State of Iowa of 9 years: James Langford (age 52), Katherine Langford (age 52), Thomas (age 20), Henry (age 18), James A (age 16), Mary Jane (age 11), Laina (age 9)

1870 Census, Union City, Allamakee County, Iowa: J. A. Langford (age 26), Helen (age 26), N. E. (age 7), Henry (age 4), A. J. (age 3), M. E. (age 2), J. R. (age 3/12).

1880 census, Union City, Allamakee County, Iowa: James A. Langford (age 37), Helena (age 33), Elizabeth (age 16), Henry (age 14), Addie J. (age 12), Martha E (age 11), James R. (age 10), Catherine L. (age 8), Anna A (age 6), Emma (age 5), William A (age 3), Caroline H. (age 1).

1885 Iowa State Census, Union City, Allamakee County, Iowa: James A. Langford (Township 99, Range 5, Section 31 NENW, age 44, farmer), Helena Langford (age 43), Ada (age 18), Ellen (age 19), James Richard (age 14), Catherine Laura (age 11), Annie Agnes (age 10), Emma, (age 9), William Anderson (age 8), Caroline (age 5), George Albert (age 4), Walter (age 2), John Oliver (age 0).

1890 Veterans Census, Yankton, South Dakota: James A. Langford, Private, Co. B, 27th Iowa Infty, Enlisted Aug. 14, 1862, Discharged August 8, 1865, Served 2 years, 11 months and 24 days. Post Office: Volin, Disability Incurred: Sun Stroke, Remarks: Mind affected.

1900 Census, Volin, Yankton County, South Dakota: James A. Langford (born Oct. 1840, age 59, married 34 years), wife Helena (born Jan 1842, age 58, married 34 years, 13 children, 13 still living), Katie, (age 25), William (age 23), George (age 19), Walter (age 18), John (age 16),

Helen Langford died in 1905 and is buried in Union Cemetery, Wakonda, Clay County, South Dakota.

1920 Census: Mission Hill, Yankton County, South Dakota: Walter Langford (age 36, born Iowa), wife Lena Langford (age 31), son William Langford (age 10), son Roy Langford (age 8), son Leslie Langford (age 6) and father James Langford (age 89, widowed, born Ohio).

James A. Langford died March 19, 1923, and is buried in Union Cemetery, Wakonda, Clay County, South Dakota.


McKee, George - He was born Aug. 10, 1840 in Seague, Armagh, Ireland. He married Lovina Langford in 1866. She was the daughter of James L. Langford (1804 - 1877) and Katherine Mary Jane Langford. Her brother James Langford also served in Company B, 27 Iowa.

1870 census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: George McKee (age 29), Levine (age 24), Jane (age 3), Eliza (age 2), William (age 1).

1880 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: George McKee (age 40), wife Levine (age 34), Anna (age 13), Lizzie (age 12), William H. (age 10), Mary (age 8), Levine (age 4), not named son age 3/12 -- born in March).

1885 Iowa State Census: Lansing Allamakee County, Iowa: George McKee (township 99, range 4, section 12, lot 3, age 40, farmer, born Ireland), Lovine McKee (age 39), Anna McKee (age 18, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Louisa McKee (age 17, born Allamakee County, Iowa), William McKee (age 16, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Mary McKee (age 13, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Kevina McKee (age 9, born Allamakee County) and James McKee (age 4, born Allamakee County, Iowa) Note the name was indexed as Makie.

1900 census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: George McKee (born Sept. 1840, age 59, married 34 years, born Ireland, immigrated 1855, naturalized.), wife Lovina (born May 1848, age 52, married 34 years, 11 children, 8 still living), James (age 20), John, (age 13), Mimi, (age 11).

1910 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: George McKee (age 70, married 1 time for 44 years), Lovina (age 64, married 1 time for 44 years, 11 children, 8 still living).

1915 Iowa State Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Card #304, George McKee, age 74, married, retired, Extent of Education - 4 Common, Birthplace: Ireland, Served in the Civil War, Co. B, 27 Iowa, Presbyterian, can read and write, Naturalized, Years in US: 61, Years in Iowa 55.

George McKee died Sept. 8, 1916 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His widow Lovina McKee filed for a pension on Nov. 2, 1916 in Iowa.

Lovina (Langford) McKee died Oct. 1, 1917. She is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.


McKnight, Rufus Dodd - He was born Nov. 30, 1842 in Marion. Iowa. He was the son of James Wilkinson McKnight and Eunice Dodd.

1850 census Linn County, Iowa: James W. McKnight (age 50), Eunice (age 51), Esther (age 18), Eliza (age 16), Myra (age 10), Rufus (age 7), James V. Dodd (age 26), Hannah (age 23), Myra (age 1).

1856 Iowa State Census: Marion, Linn County, Iowa: James McKnight (age 56, in the state of Iowa 14 years, widowed, laborer, born PA), Rufus D. McKnight (age 13, born Iowa.

Submitted by
Brett Stuart Herndon

Memphis, Tenn., Dec.11th ' 63

Dear Sister,

I gladly improve this earliest opportunity of responding to your gladly welcomed letter of Nov. 6th that did not reach me untill day before yesterday. I presume it had been to Little Rock which may account for it's dillatory arrival. I certainly thought you maintained a very long silence for which I could not guess the reason.

Well, I commenced this two or three days ago, but was interrupted by the "long roll" and, of course had to fall out into battle array. The cause of the alarm proved to be nothing but a "scare" and we were soon allowed to retire to our quarters with the caution to be ready to go whenever called at a moments notice. Yesterday morning before breakfast we were again called into line and this time the different regiments were kept in line the greater part of the day and Co. B, was sent out to strengthen the pickets but the rebels not coming we were again called in. There has been quite a guerilla force in the vicinity of the railroad east of here for sometime past. They have been conscripting, plundering, etc. Our forces had several battles with them in which the rebels were routed but it seems they have not been entirely driven from the vicinity yet.

Nothing can be more uncertain or changable than a soldiers life. He never knows what will transpire the next moment, whether he retires at night he will be permitted to sleep or be called up at midnight to confront, or go in search of an insidious foe. He doesn't even know whether when he sits down to dinner he will be allowed to eat it or not, nor can he form the least idea of the future or his whereabouts or his doings on the morrow.

I was a little disappointed on hearing that you had engaged a school this winter. I hoped you would have gone to Hopkinton. Your imaginations in regard to my "cooking" are without foundation as I seldom do any cooking myself, never unless I want something extra. You ask if I have plenty to eat and if it is good. We usually have abundance, although the quality is not always as good as might be. We are not furnished as large a proportion of vegetables as I would like or at least not of the kind to suit my taste. We always have plenty of rice and beans but I have no great relish for either. We have bakers bread and occasionally Irish potatoes, etc., etc. Since we have been here the boys have had no real trouble in supplying their difficiency in fruit and vegetables from the many peddlers baskets that overrun the camp. This however requires money and as Soldiers purses are not usually inexhaustable this mode of replenishing their table has a very different effect on their purses. I usually exchange my coffee and sugar for such other things as my taste may suggest.

I would be very thankful for the "REGISTER" or any other paper you have read, if you could send it without any trouble. I will send you another counterfeit of my Phip (?) which I think is much better than the other one I sent you. We have our tents arranged quite snuggly and conveniently. There are four persons in the one I occupy all very nice gents except myself. We have a fireplace and everything fixed very cosily. The weather for a few days past has been cloudy and rainy but this morning the clouds have disappeared and the atmosphere is considerably cooler that usual.

But want of space compells me to make a virtue of necessity and close.

My love to all - Write often - Good bye -

Your loving brother

Rufas


Hi,

I am not a descendant of Rufas. I am descended from eight men who fought for the Confederacy. I found this letter, and the one that now is in the collection of the Old State House, at an antique store about two years ago. I have enjoyed reading it and I have enjoyed owning the letter. Since I collect old muskets mainly, I would be glad to offer you the letter to keep at no cost. By the looks of your wonderful web site you are passionate about the brave men who fought in the 27th Iowa. I feel Rufas would be glad to know the letter he wrote to his sister wound up with a person such as you who had an ancestor that was in his company. If I ever want to see the letter I can just go to your web page and be able to read it and be happy that I once owned it. If you want it, just e-mail me your mailing address and I will send it to you.

I identified Rufas as Rufas McKnight from mention of his Colonel in a previous letter he penned from Little Rock Oct. 13, 1863. I researched the OR's and found the 27th Iowa was the only unit with a Colonel by that name that was in Little Rock at that time. This letter is now part of the collection of the Old State House Museum here in Little Rock because of its origin. In the letter above Rufas mentions Co. B. He is the only Rufas listed in the roster of Co. B. and his unit was sent to Memphis from Little Rock in this time frame. The insidious foe he mentioned had my great-great grandfather among them. He rode with Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest in the 12th Tenn. Cav. He was seventeen when he joined Forrest's Cavalry in December of 1863 at Bolivar Tenn., forty miles from where Rufas penned the letter to his sister. Both their units would face each other in their future, now our past.

Brett Stuart Herndon
Little Rock Arkansas

1870 census - Fort Dodge Ward 4, Webster County, Iowa: R. D. McKnight (age 27, gunsmith), Louisa (age 22).

1885 Kansas State Census: Ninnescah, Sedgwick County, Kansas: R. D. McKnight (age 45, furniture dealer, born Iowa, from Texas to Kansas, Honorably Discharged from the Volunteer Service of the United States, Name of State: Iowa, Company B, 27th Regiment, Infantry), L. M. McKnight (age 38, born Iowa).

1895 Kansas State Census: Hunnewell, Sumner County, Kansas: R. D. McKnight (age 52, born Iowa, from Texas to Kansas, Merchant, Honorably Discharged from the Volunteer Service of the United States, Name of State: Iowa, Company B, 27th Regiment, Infantry), L. M. McKnight (age 48, born Iowa, School Teacher.

1900 Census: South Haven, Sumner County, Kansas: R. D. McKnight (born May 1840, age 60, married 25 years, Iowa, Hardware ?) Louisa M. McKnight (born June 1849, age 51, married 25 years, born Wisconsin), Kimball McKnight (born Nov. 1853, female, age 46, married 12 years, 0 children born, born Iowa).

Rufas McKnight filed for a pension on May 11, 1914 in Oklahoma.

1920 census - Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California: Rufus D. McKnight (age 77, married), wife Louise (age 72).

Rufus D. McKnight died Oct. 20, 1921 at Los Angeles, California (Pension records). He is buried in Los Angeles National Cemetery, Plot 4, K/7, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California.

His widow Louise M. McKnight filed for a pension on Jan. 31, 1922 in California.


Marshall, Aaron. He was born about 1841 in Ohio. He was possibly the son of David Marshall and Elizabeth Blazer.

1850 Centre, Carroll County, Ohio: David Marshall (age 60, born Virginia), Cath Marshall (age 31, born Ohio), Nancy Marshall (age 20, born Ohio), David Marshall (age 17, born Ohio), Louisa Marshall (age 9, born Ohio), Aaron Marshall (age 7, born Ohio), M. C. Marshall (age 2, born Ohio). (Note this on is the only Aaron Marshall I could find born in Ohio, approximately the right age. I am not sure this is him.)

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: H. R. Chatterton (age 33, Editor, born New York), Elizabeth Chatterton (age 26, born New York), Lizzie Chatterton (age 6, born Iowa), Henriette S. Chatterton (age 2, born Iowa), Henrietta S. Chatterton (age 2, born Iowa), John Henry Chatterton (age 10/12, born Iowa), Mary E. Chatterton (age 22, born New York), Thomas Medary (age 26, Printer, born Ohio) and Aaron Marshall (age 19, Apprentice Printer, born Ohio)

Aaron Marshall died Oct. 11, 1869 and is buried in Old Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

No pension was filed.


Marty, Mathias (Roster says Martle) He was born May 29, 1844 in Matt, Glarus, Switzerland. (Note: Obituary says he was born Frutigan, Kanton Clorios, Switzerland, and tombstone says he was born May 15, 1844). He was the son of Johannes "John" Marti (Mar. 3, 1821 - April 14, 1872) and Anna Maria Elmer (May 20, 1822 - Nov. 22, 1897). He married Ursula Celia Engler on Sept. 25, 1867 in Dubuque Iowa. Note marriage record on family search.org shows their names as Mathias Martey and Julia Engler. He was aged 22. She was aged 15. (Iowa County Marriages, 1838-1934)

1880 Census, Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa Mathias Marti (age 36, carpenter, born Switzerland), wife Ursula Marti (age 29, born Iowa), daughter Emma Marti (age 7, born Iowa) and daughter Fannie Marti (age 4, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census, Dubuque County, Iowa Mathew Marty (1991 Conler Avenue, age 41, carpenter, born Switzerland), Ursula Marty (age 33), Emma Marty (age 12), Fannie Marty (age 8).

1900 Census, Julien, Dubuque County, Iowa Mathias Marty (born May 1844, age 56, married 32 years, born Iowa, carpenter), wife Ursula Marty (born March 1852, age 48, married 32 years, 10 children born, 5 still living, born Iowa), daughter Fanny Marty (born Nov. 1876, age 23, born Iowa), daughter Mathilda Marty (born Aug. 1882, age 17, born Iowa), daughter Ida Marty (born April 1885, age 15, born Iowa) and son Mathias Marty (born Aug. 1890, age 9, born Iowa).

Matthias Marty died Oct. 19, 1900 and is buried in Linwood Cemetery, Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa.

Death of M. Marty

Well Known Citizen Relived from Long Suffering

Mr. M. Marty, aged 56 years, died Oct. 19, 2 p.m. at his late residence on Rhonberg avenue. Deceased was born in Frutigan, Kanton Clorios, Switzerland, and came to this country with his parents when only 3 months old. They settled down at Sherills of Dubuque for over forty years. He was a carpenter by trade. Deceased was a member of Zion's church for a good many years and they will lose a good member by his demise. He was ever ready to help the congregation and took part in necessary work to help the church along with all his power and never tired of working for his religion. About four years ago his health began to fail and he had to pass an awful suffering. Since that time nothing was left undone to relieve him of his pains, but it was all in vain and his life slowly ebbed away. But he bore his sufferings with a full Christian conscience and fortitude. He was a member of Schiller Lodge, I. O. O. F. and of Dubuque Camp M. W. A.

Deceased served in the Civil War as a corporal in Company B, Twenty-Seventh regiment from August 1862 to August 1865.

Deceased is survived by his wife, four daughters, Mrs. Iris Stutsman, Fanny, Mathilda, Edith, and one son Mathias, and five brothers and one sister.

By the demise of Mr. Marty Dubuque lost one of its best citizens. Among his friends he was known for his kind heartedness and up righteousness and was held in high regard by them. The fullest sympathy of the entire community will be with the bereaved family.

The funeral will be Sunday afternoon.

The Dubuque Herald, Saturday, October 20, 1900

His widow Ursula Marty filed for a pension on Nov. 30, 1900 in Iowa.

Ursula (Engler) Marty died Jan. 22, 1925 at Chicago, Cook County, Iowa.

Children of Mathias Marty and Ursula Engler

  1. Emma Marty, June 1873 - about 1955
  2. Fanny Marty, Nov. 7, 1876 - May 15, 1901
  3. Caroline Marty, Sept. 9, 1879 - Jan. 18, 1880
  4. Matilda Marty, Aug. 1882 - about 1955
  5. Edith C. Marty, Apr. 20, 1885 - about 1980
  6. Mathew John Franklin Marty, Aug. 8, 1890 - Dec. 7, 1965.

Maxwell, Charles H. - He was born Jan 15, 1827 in New York. He married Martha Ballow/Ballou. She was the daughter of Eddy Ballou (Aug. 28, 1811 - Aug. 24, 1881) and Mary Childs Saunders (1812- Apr. 20, 1901).

1860 Census - Wilmington, Houston County, Minnesota: Charles Maxwell (age 33, farmer), Martha A. Maxwell (age 20). They were in the household of Eddy and Mary Balloo (Ballow). I checked the 1850 census and there is a Martha A. Ballow in the household of Eddy and Mary Ballow in Rhode Island. So I believe they were living with her family in 1860.

1870 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Ch's Maxwell (age 43, laborer, born NY), Martha Maxwell (age 32, born Rhode Island), Julia Maxwell (age 7, born Iowa), and Frank Maxwell (age 4, born Iowa).

1880 census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Charles Maxwell (age 54, laborer, born NY), wife Martha (age 40, born RI), daughter Julia Maxwell (age 18, born Iowa), son Frank (age 14, born Iowa), daughter Pearl (age 7, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Charles Maxwell (East Side Bensch Street, age 58), Martha Maxwell (age 45), Frank (age 18), Mary (age 12).

1900 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Charles Maxwell (age born Nov. 1826, age 73, married for 41 years), wife Martha A (born Aug. 1839, age 60, married for 41 years, no children.). NOTE, this does not match the information on the other census records and is an obvious error. The 1880 census specifically says they had a son and daughters. The 1910 census said she was the mother of 6 children with 3 still living.

Charles Maxwell filed for a pension on July 26, 1882 in Michigan.

Charles H. Maxwell died June 21, 1903 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His widow Martha A. Maxwell filed for a pension on July 15, 1903. The pension Index card listed Co. B. 27th Iowa AND Co. K 16 VRC & Navy.

Martha Maxwell (born Aug. 20, 1830) died Nov. 12, 1912 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa.


May, James H. - He was born August 18, 1845 in Illinois. He was the son of Dexter Otis May and Eliza A. Rose.

1850 Census: Richmond, McHenry County, Illinois: Dexter O. May (age 30, farmer, born NY), Eliza May (age 23, born Massachusetts), James H. May (age 5, born Ill), Louisa P. May (age 3, born Ill) and Charles K. May (age 1, born Illinois).

1856 Iowa State Census: Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: D. O. May (age 38, born NY, Carpenter), Eliza May (age 29, born Mass), James H. May (age 10, born Ill), Louisa May (age 8, born Ill), Chas May (age 7, born Ill), Francis May (age 5, male, born Ill), Martin May (age 2, born Ill), Mary May (age 2, born Ill), Willie May (age 0, born Illinois).

1860 census - Hanover, Allamakee County, Iowa: Doo May, (age 43), E. A. May (age 34), J. H. May (age 14), L.C. May (age 13), Charles K. May (age 12), Frances D. May (age 9), Martes D. May (age 6), Mary L. May (age 6), Ellen M. May (age 2) and Ada L. E May (age 9/12).

1870 census, Hanover, Allamakee County, Iowa: James May (age 26, farmer, born Ill), Frances May (age 21, born NY) and Claude May (age 1, born Iowa).

1880 Census - French Creek, Allamakee County, Iowa: James May (age 35, farmer, born Ill), wife Franny May (age 32, born NY), son Claude May (age 11, born Iowa), daughter Minnie May (age 6, born Iowa).

1885 Nebraska State Census, Johnstown, Brown County, Nebraska: James H. May (age 39, farmer, born Illinois), Francis May (age 36, born NY), Claude May (age 16, born Iowa) and Minnie May (age 11, born Iowa).

1890 Veterans Census - Wright, Box Butte County, Nebraska: James H. May, Private, Company B, 27th Iowa Infy, served about 3 years. Post Office address was Alliance, Neb. Disability Incurred: Rheumatism and C. Diarrhea. Remarks: Discharge Papers lost.

1900 Census - Wright, Box Butte, Nebraska: James May (born August 1845, age 54, married 32 years, farmer), wife Frances M, (born May 1849, age 51, married 32 years, 3 children, 2 still living).

1910 census - Haynes, Morrill County, Nebraska: James H. May (age 64, married 1 time for 44 years, farmer), wife Francis M. (age 60, married 1 time for 44 years, 5 children born, 2 still living).

James May died March 12, 1913 and is buried in Alliance Cemetery, Box Butte County, Nebraska.

His widow Frances M. filed for a pension on Apr 1. 1913 in Nebraska.


May, Roan Clark - He was born Jan 24, 1838 in Summit County, Ohio. He was the son of John May and Juliana De Haven. (on the 1925 Iowa State Census there was an alternate spelling of her first name: Kunalie - this is probably just a misspelling of her name, but I have included it just in case). He married Elizabeth Yeoman about 1861. (Per the 1925 Iowa State Census her parents were William Yeoman, born New York and Elizabeth Woolsey, born New York)

1860 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: John May, (age 60), Julia May (age 46), Roan C May (age 22), John B. May (age 20), Matilda B May (age 17), Mary I May (age 13), Margaret E May (age 9), Lewis E. May (age 7), William M May (age 5), and Reubin May (age 2).

Roan C. May filed for a pension on Dec. 12, 1864.

1870 Census - Sheridan, Crawford County, Kansas: Rowan May (age 30, born Ohio), Elizabeth May (age 28), Rena May (age 9, born Iowa), Gilbert May (age 5, born Iowa).

1880 Census - New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa: Roan C. May (age 42, tanning mill maker), Elizabeth May (age 38), Rena May (age 18), Gilbert May (age 14), Frank May (age 7). Also in the household was Roan's brother Reubin May (age 21).

1885 Census - New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa: Roan C. May (Township 100, Range 4, section 11, Lot #251, age 47, carpenter & ??), Elizabeth May (age 43), Hiram G. May (age 19, teacher), Frank L. May (age 10). Also in the household was Michelle B. Yeoman, (age 8).

1900 Census, Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: Roan C. May (born Jan. 1838, age 62, married 40 years), wife Elizabeth A. May (born Aug. 1841, age 58, married 40 years, 4 children, 3 still living).

1910 census - Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: Roan C. May (age 72, married 1 time for 49 years), wife Elizabeth May (age 69, married 1 time for 49 years, 4 children, 3 still living).

1915 Iowa State Census, New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa: R. C. May, age 77; County: Allamakee; Township: New Albin: married, Retired, Extent of Education: Common 2; can read and write; Birth Place: Ohio; Value of farm or home: $1500. Military Service: Civil War: State: Iowa; Regiment: 27; Company: B; Church Affiliation: Methodist; Father's birthplace: Pennsylvania; Mother's birthplace: Ohio; years in Iowa: 56.

1920 census - Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: Roan C. May (age 81), wife Elizabeth A. May (age 78).

1925 Iowa State Census, Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa: Roan C. May (age 87, owned free, completed 6th reader), Father John May, born Delaware. Mother Kuliana Dehaven, born New York, parents were married in Iowa.), wife Elizabeth Yeoman (age 83, father William Yeoman, born NY. Mother Elizabeth Woolsey, born NY).

Roan C. May died May 2, 1928 in New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa. He is buried in New Albin City Cemetery.

In the same cemetery is Mrs. Elizabeth A. Yeoman May (wife of Roan C. May), born August 19, 1841, died Jan. 12, 1925.


Medary, Thomas Corwin - He was born Apr. 29, 1840 in Champion, Trumbull County, Ohio. He married Mary Ellen Price. She was the daughter of George Price and Sarah Ann Eck. Her brother Frederick Pulaski Price also served with Company B, 27th Iowa.

In the fall of 1863, George HAISLETT bought the outfit. He called his Republican paper the Union and managed to support it until 1866. In February of that year, T.C. MEDARY and F.P. PRICE bought it, changing the name to Mirror again. Though the Union had struggled in a losing fight because of the same party affiliations, this paper flourished. MEDARY sold out in 1870 to James T. METCALF and his son for $1,200, though his price to HAISLETT had been only $500 four years before.

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: H. R. Chatterton (age 33, Editor, born New York), Elizabeth Chatterton (age 26, born New York), Lizzie Chatterton (age 6, born Iowa), Henriette S. Chatterton (age 2, born Iowa), Henrietta S. Chatterton (age 2, born Iowa), John Henry Chatterton (age 10/12, born Iowa), Mary E. Chatterton (age 22, born New York), Thomas Medary (age 26, Printer, born Ohio) and Aaron Marshall (age 19, Apprentice Printer, born Ohio)

1870 census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: T. E. Medary (age 30, Editor, born Ohio), M. E. Medary (age 26), George (age 8), E. T. (male, age 3), and Charles (age 1).

1880 census - Mason City, Cerro Gordo, Iowa: T. C. Medary (age 40, Printer & Publisher), wife Mary E. (age 35), son George (age 18, Printer), son Edgar (age 13, Printer's "Devil"), son Charles (age 11) and daughter Stella (age 4).

1885 Iowa State Census - Waukon, Allamakee County, Iowa: Thomas C. Medary (age 44, address Spring Avenue, Publisher), Mary E. Medary (age 40), George C. Medary (age 22, Publisher), Edgar T. Medary (age 17), Charles T. Medary (age 15) and Stella (age 8).

This article was found on the Allamakee IAGENWEB site and reproduced with permission

Chapter 13
Past & Present of Allamakee County, 1913

The County Press, Journalistic Adventures of the Late T.C. Medary Recounted by Himself, in 1890, Local Affairs -- A Digression, The Craft Again, Off to the Front and After, Conclusion.

The COUNTY PRESS.

No calling or profession has had a more important part in shaping and preserving the history of the county than that of "the art preservative of all arts." Unfortunately no complete files of the early publications have survived the destructiveness of time -- and fires. But much information contained in stray copies of the pioneer papers has been collated in the various chapters, adding much to the value of this volume. Indeed, a systematic search through the files now existing would furnish the most complete history of the county obtainable, and the editor has drawn heavily from these sources, as fully as the time and space allotted would permit. No detailed history of the press of the county is here attempted, as it would fill a volume of itself. But a brief account of the local press will be found in the respective chapters devoted to the four newspaper towns.

It seems appropriate here to recount the personal experiences of two of our veteran publishers, which have heretofore, in part at least, been given to the public, viz.: Thomas C. Medary and James T. Metcalf: the former twenty years ago passed to his long home, and the latter still living at Washington, retired from high official position and devoting the declining years of his long and useful life to affairs connected with his first love, the printer's art.

The following narrative of Mr. Medary was written in 1890, but a few years before his death, while editing the Waukon Democrat, and contains much of interest relating to members of the craft throughout this region, and hence is entitled to the place of honor in this chapter.

Journalistic Adventures of the Late T.C. Medary Recounted by Himself, in 1890.

Thirty years ago, as the old year of 1859 was in its closing hours, the editor of this paper passed through the then little village of Waukon, by stage, on his way to Lansing to take a situation that had previously been secured on the old Lansing Mirror, then published by H.R. Chatterton, one of the ablest editors ever connected with the press of this county. We made our pilgrimage by stage from McGregor to Lansing around by the way of Decorah by the old M. O. Walker stage line, with Tom Tokes, the half-breed Indian so well known in those days, as driver between McGregor and Decorah, and Dave Telford guided the raw-boned steeds between Decorah and Lansing, and will be remembered by the old residents of Waukon and Lansing. Tom H. McElroy, a Milwaukee printer, was then publishing the Waukon Transcript, having purchased the office a few months before. The material of the then Transcript office had previously been owned by Frank Belfoy, who started the first paper in Waukon, in 1859 [1857 --Ed.] under the name of Waukon Journal, but in a few months quit its publication and went to Decorah and took charge of the old Republic, now Republican office, succeeding the Tuppers, father and son. Belfoy, however, did not last long in Decorah, either, although the field was a good one, for the reason principally that he was more fond of sitting hour after hour and day after day in "Hank" Geddes' saloon and feasting on crackers, cheese and beer, than he was of attending to his newspaper duties, and as a consequence the paper "busted" in the fall of 1859.

We, with James Zbornik and Dan. Burt, were in Belfoy's employ when the paper suspended, and were left without any means whatever to get out of town. However, a happy thought meandered into the brain of one of the trio of penniless printers who was somewhat poetically inclined, and that was to inflict upon the public a poem --so-called -- which we would sell around town and thereby try to raise enough money to get away with. The little screed took well, each one of the impecunious printers selling the slips about town and realizing funds sufficient for the purpose desired. With our portion of the wealth thus acquired we paid our stage fare to McGregor, where we applied to that good old soul, Col. A.P. Richardson of the Times, for work, but his office was then supplied with more help than he really needed. He advised us, however, to go over to Prairie du Chien, where he thought we might find temporary employment. We acted on his suggestion and the following morning we footed it across the river on the ice to the Prairie, and stating how badly reduced our surplus had become to Mr. William Merrill, the then and now proprietor of the Courier, that gentleman set us at work immediately, kindly informing us that we could remain until we obtained a permanent situation elsewhere. And from that day to this he has been a warm personal friend of the writer, and for whom we entertain the warmest regard.

We began at once to make written application to the offices in the surrounding towns for work. Finally, a reply came from H.R. Chatterton of the Lansing Mirror, offering us a place in his office. The next morning we set out for McGregor bright and early, again walking across the river on the ice and reaching McGregor in time to take the morning stage for Decorah on our way to Lansing, our object in going by Decorah being to see if we could not get some of our "back salary" due from Belfoy, but in which we did not succeed, as Frank was in a really worse financial strait than we were, for he had a family on his hands to provide for. We shall never forget our midwinter's ride from McGregor to Decorah. Our seat was on the outside with driver Tokes, the inside of the coach being filled with other passengers, and as we were without an overcoat, and perhaps no underclothing, and as the weather was intensely cold, we suffered terribly from the piercing blasts of one of Iowa's old-fashioned winters. On the 31st of December we started for Lansing from Decorah stopping at the old Dunlap House, now the Mason House, of this city, for dinner. This brings us back again to McElroy and the old Transcript office, for while in town at that time we called at the office and became acquainted with "Mac" Frank Pease, who had conducted the office for a few months just prior to McElroy's taking possession, was at work for him. And, by the way, Frank was a dandy - dude, he would be called in these days - a regular ladies' man, as it were. In this connection we may state that he was not unknown in and about the old Dunlap House. Indeed, so familiar was he with the premises that when Dunlap would go gunning for him with a pepper-box revolver, Frank knew just which door or window to scoot out of the quickest in order to escape the visitation of Dunlap's wrath, which was often wrought up to its highest pitch, it is said, because Frank frequently courted the smiles of Mrs. D. Frank always dressed in the height of fashion, if he did not make a cent, and we remember how stunning he used to look in that blue broad-cloth, brass buttoned, swallow-tailed coat, white vest, black pants, low cut shoes, white stockings, and topped off with a black silk hat. He was indeed a regular masher. But the last time we saw Frank there was a striking contrast in his appearance from the above. It was at Hot Strings, Arkansas, about sixteen years ago. He was city clerk at that place, and had been connected with the press there in one capacity and another ever since the close of the war. He had aged very fast, and dissipation was plainly visible in his features and in his negligent dress. Not the dandy and neat looking Frank of former years by any means. What has become of him in these later years we do not know. We may mention that prior to his enlistment in the army, after leaving newspaper work here, he was editorially connected with the Lansing Mirror and the McGregor Times, a few months in each place.

We arrived in Lansing on New Year's eve, stopping at the Bates Hotel. The Masonic fraternity were having a sociable that evening, and as Mr. Chatterton was one of the guests, we were unable to report to him that night for duty. However, we went down to the office, which was then situated in a little frame building adjoining James I. Gilbert's office or brick building, now occupied by Mrs. Harbauer, and we found one of the worst dilapidated print shops we had ever been into. The old Decorah Republic was bad enough, but this was ten times worse. Neither had it improved any in appearance when we went into it again the next morning, and we felt blue enough at the prospect before us, for we saw every evidence of bad management and "a screw loose" somewhere. In a few days we found out that the loose screw was "budge." The employees of the office at this time were two boys named John VanEmberg and Aaron Marshall, both of whom have been dead for many years. The material was all old, with nothing but a hand press to do all classes of work, and on that old press, one card at a time, did we print thousands of those grain tickets then in use in those days. This material had been brought up from the Gazette office in Galena, Ill., owned by Horace H. Houghton, brother of Rev. H. W. Houghton, now of Lansing, who sold this outfit to W. H. Sumner and from which emanated the Lansing Intelligencer in November, 1852. As printers Mr. Sumner brought with him to Lansing Tom Butler and Joe Taylor, the latter a negro, who in a short time went to La Crosse, and in after years became an attache of Brick Pomeroy's office, remaining with Brick for many years through his ups and down in newspaper life. Joe finally became the owner of an office over in the interior of Wisconsin, but died a few years ago, having accumulated wealth enough to place him in easy circumstances. Tom Butler got homesick, went back to Galena and died there. Mr. Sumner, being in poor health was obliged in about a year to give up the paper, and it passed into the control of Chatterton, whom Mr. H. H. Houghton had induced to take hold of it. Mr. Sumner soon died and his remains lie in an unkept grave by the roadside a short distance below DeSoto, the picket fence surrounding it being in a rotten and tumbledown condition when we last saw it a few years ago.

We will now go back to the old Mirror office at Lansing and pick up Mr. Chatterton from the rickety old lounge on which he would frequently recline after his almost daily but fruitless efforts to reduce the surplus beverages of various kinds that were on tap in the several saloons about town. That was the only failing that the gentleman had, but it was master of him to such an extent that it sadly interfered with his business, and the affairs of the office were at sixes and sevens all the time, the issuing of the paper depending almost wholly upon the boys in his employ, while the limited income went into the saloon tills, and the boys seldom got enough of the revenue to pay their wash bills. Speaking of the financial transactions reminds us of an incident that occurred one day. One of the patrons of the paper came in to pay his subscription, handing Mr. Chatterton a five-dollar gold piece, which he coolly dropped into his pocket, informing the gentleman that he did not have change enough for it that day, but the next time he came he would have the necessary change ready for him! We don't know whether that change was ever made or not, but the event made an impression on us boys, for we each thought there might be some prospects for getting a little of the gold piece. We believe we didn't, however.

The office was often without wood, and as it was necessary to have a fire the boys had to skirmish around to get the material for it, but as wood piles were not very far between we managed to keep the room reasonably warm except on very cold days, when we would pull our case stands close up to the stove. We used to feel a little guilty, though, when some one would come in from that vicinity and remark that he thought he recognized his wood piled up by the stove! Of course under such adverse circumstances the life of the paper was only a question of time. The editor would have spasms of bracing up occasionally and matters would run along more smoothly for a few weeks, but the first we would know "Chat" would be "in the soup" again, to use a vulgar phrase of today.

LOCAL AFFAIRS -- A DIGRESSION

In those days, just on the eve of the outbreak of the rebellion, political excitement ran high, and the politicians used to gather in the office to discuss the issues. Colonel Spooner, Mrs. L.E. Howe's father, would drop in occasionally for a chat, and old father Bentley and father Brownell, of Village Creek, old gentleman Haney, and other old settlers of the town and country, would come and make the political pot boil in their efforts to settle the grave questions then pending between the North and South, while us boys wished the statesmen there assembled were removed out of our hearing where they would not disturb our typesetting and burn out the wood we had been obliged to rustle around the neighborhood for.

The embryo local republican statesmen in those days were Homer Hemenway, Doctor Taylor, John Haney, John (*) Shaw, John (*) Berry and some lesser lights, while the stars of great magnitude on the democratic side were G.W. Gray, S.H. Kinne, G.W. Hays, George Kemble, W.H. Burford, George W. Camp, James Palmer, John Farrell and others whose names we do not now recall; but when these opposing forces, or any of them, met to chew each others' tobacco around the store stoves, they would often make "Rome howl," so to speak, especially Homer Hemenway, who could talk a barn door off its hinges in five minutes, and can do it yet if necessary. Mr. A.W. Purdy was the postmaster then, and his two sons, Edward, our present county recorder, and George, were his clerks. When the administration changed, however, and Lincoln became president, Mr. Purdy was promptly fired out and Homer Hemenway was appointed to the place as a reward, no doubt, for that rapidity of speech above referred to in political arguments.

In those days Columbus and Lafayette were quite busy little villages, and all steamboats landed at those points, receiving and discharging considerable freight at each. There were two stores, quite a large hotel and a steam saw mill at Columbus, and a store and saw and gristmill at Lafayette. The store at Lafayette was kept by John Tierney, and he did quite a flourishing business, accumulating considerable property, but lost it all in after years in Lansing when Lafayette and Columbus dwindled away as trading points. For some years afterward, however, Michael Brophy maintained a rach at Lafayette, the character of which was announced by this somewhat singular sign attached to the corner of the house:

WHISKEY, BEEF AND BEER FOR SALE
by M. Brophy

Harper's Ferry was also a flourishing town and David Harper did a large business in merchandising, buying and shipping produce, etc. He was considered one of the leading and influential men of the county. The steamboats nearly all passed through the Harper channel, then, except in low water stages, and the Ferry was quite a rival of Lansing as a grain market. But even before the advent of the railroad the town began to lose its prestige.

Village Creek or Milton was then known as Jesse Rose's town, he being the owner of the flouring mills there and possessor of considerable village property. There were two stores and they enjoyed a fair trade from the immediate vicinity. It was always a good milling point and for many years flour has been shipped from there to various markets along the river.

In those days Lansing's manufacturing industries consisted of the steam saw mill owned by the Woods and Shaws, the Morgan pork packing house and the brewery then operated by Julius Kerndt and Jacob Haas; James I. Gilbert was running a lumberyard and dealing in grain. The Mill Co., W. D. Morgan & Co., G. W. Gray, George W. Hays, Battles & Day, Kerndt Bros., Nielander, Shierholz & Co., and perhaps one or two others also bought and stored grain. Farmers then from away out on the Wapsie and Cedar rivers used to market their wheat in Lansing and buy lumber there, but it was not until years afterwards that the town became known far and wide as one of the very best wheat markets on the river. Thousands of bushels would be stored by the farmers to await higher prices, they paying for the storage privileges, and it would very often happen that they would be obliged to sell for a much less price than had been offered them early in the season, and pay a very large storage fee besides.

-*transcribers note: the copy was very poor & the middle initial could be I, L or J

THE CRAFT AGAIN

Now we will get back to newspaper matters again. Through the summer of 1860 the Mirror continued to eke out a sickly existence, occasionally missing a week's issue for want of the necessary paper. It being all home print, the publishing of patent outsides and insides not having come into existence in those days. The circulation of the Mirror was only about 350 copies, yet it was impossible for the publisher to keep even enough stock on hand for that number and he frequently had to buy or borrow a few quires at a time from the offices at McGregor, Prairie du Chien or Decorah. During the fall and early part of the winter Frank Pease was engaged on the paper and used to set type and do most of the writing when the editor would have his tired spells. Finally, Frank went to the Times office at McGregor and towards spring Stephen W. Smith, a printer, came over from Bad Axe, Wisconsin, and went to work in the office, and he, too, did most of the writing. Charley Smith, a carpenter by trade, who had been at work in the sawmill, concluded to take up typesetting, and as "Chat" would give any one a place who asked him, old Charley was employed.

In the meantime the writer had become acquainted with a certain red-haired girl in town and by his persistency finally induced her to commit the giddy act of marrying him, which she probably regrets to this day. This marriage took place in November 1860. That winter the Mirror petered out entirely, and we (wife and I) took a stage ride, on the ice most of the way, to Winona, stopping for a day or two in La Crosse seeking work there. At Winona we got a situation in the Tri-Weekly Democrat office, published by Charles Cottam, remaining there until along in April, when that paper, too, ceased publication for the same reason, principally, that the Mirror had. We returned to Lansing and for a short time got work with McElroy & Parker, who had moved the old Transcript office from Waukon and charged the name to the Democrat. The first issue of the paper was in February 1861, and it contained the longest tax list ever published in the county, amounting, if we remember correctly to about $800. We know they bought about 300 pounds of new long primer type to set the list up in. The firm of McElroy & Parker did not hang together, however, more than a few months. Doctor Parker, who was a former resident of McGregor, was not a printer, neither was he much of a writer, and most of the work, both mechanical and editorial, devolved upon "Mac," and he was not too fond of work either, and would rather sit around Sims & Burgess' shoe shop hour after hour than to put in the time at his office. Doctor Parker withdrew from the concern, and in the winter of '61-2 McElroy threw up the sponge and returned to Milwaukee, where he re-entered the composing room of the Daily News, which he had left to go to Waukon. He afterwards enlisted in the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin and the last we ever saw of him was in camp at Milwaukee with that regiment just before leaving for the war. The office was taken possession of by S. H. Kinne, who had claims against it for himself and other democrat's in town who had advanced money to aid McElroy in moving from Waukon to Lansing.

Meanwhile, Rev. H. W. Houghton had taken possession of the old Mirror outfit for his brother Horace, of Galena, who had a mortgage on it, and the material was stored away upstairs in the old stone warehouse. This left Lansing for a few months without any paper. During the spring of 1862, however, a German printer named Christian Lomann came down from Fountain City, Wisconsin and succeeded in getting possession of the McElroy office, and began the publication of a democratic paper called the Argus; but Lomann was an erratic cuss with an uncontrollable appetite for strong drink, of which his not very loving and affectionate wife endeavored to cure him by drugging his coffee, from which we have seen the poor devil so sick that death would undoubtedly have been a great relief to him. We worked several weeks in the office, but the woman's fiery temper and her interference in the business affairs of the office were too much for our weak (?) nerves and we quit, going thence to the Daily Sentinel office in Milwaukee. Shortly before this, however, the building which Lomann occupied as a residence and little huckster shop on the south side of Main street, about where Ruth's clothing store is now, caught fire one night very mysteriously and burned out the entire row of buildings, incurring a heavy loss. Lomann had his personal effects pretty well insured in a company represented by W. F. Bentley, and after considerable delay he got his money from the company, and from that, by a strategy agreed upon between Mr. Bentley and our self, we managed to get the balance due us for our work, some $28, we believe. The insurance money was to be paid over on a certain day and was to go into Mrs. Lomann's hands, as her husband, she considered, could not be trusted with it. We were to be present when the payment was made and Mr. Bentley was to count out the amount due us, but to do it apparently as if he were running it all off for Mrs. L., and when he named our amount we were to snatch the pile, and we did, too, with "neatness and dispatch." About the maddest woman on earth for a little while was right there at that time, and her cussing of Mr. Bentley and our self made the atmosphere turn fairly blue.

The life of the Argus extended over a few months only, when Mr. Lomann, between the setting of the sun one evening and the rising of the same the next morning, loaded the office onto two or three wagons and run it over into Wisconsin, by the way of McGregor, and located the outfit at Boscobel. Thus the old Waukon Transcript office disposed of.

OFF TO THE FRONT AND AFTER

During these several ups and downs of the papers the rebellion had broken out and the feeling of patriotism that prevailed among printers everywhere spread to those in Lansing, and the old Mirror turned out a pretty fair list of those who had been employed on it in one capacity or another, from editor down to the youngest "devil," the latter being Tommy Orr, who, without doubt, was the most youthful soldier who went to the war from Iowa. At the time Tommy went out he was not quite fourteen years old. The following is a list of those from the office who entered the country's service:

  • H. R. Chatterton, editor
  • Charles Smith, compositor
  • S. Smith, associate editor
  • T. C. Medary, compositor
  • Frank Pease, associate editor
  • -, -, Miller, devil Sr.
  • A. B. Marshall, compositor
  • Tom G. Orr, devil Jr.

In this connection we may state that we had a singular experience in our efforts to get into the army. Our first enlistment was to the 16th Regulars, Company B, which was recruited at Lansing, but when the time came for sending the boys forward to the regiment at Columbus, Captain Stanton concluded we were not in a physical condition to make a good soldier, and we were left at home. Our next effort was at Milwaukee, where we tried to get into the 24th Wisconsin, but the examining surgeon stood us to one side. Our next trial was to Warren, Ohio, in the 105th Ohio, but here, too, we couldn't pass muster. We did, however, manage to get into a company of home guards at Canfield, Ohio, in the spring of 1864, and went down "to the front" in Columbiana county, to assist in capturing John Morgan and his troops when they made their famous raid into Ohio, and our force got within six miles of Scroggs' church the morning Morgan was captured there. But in October, 1864, after our return from Ohio to Lansing, when the Government had got over being so darned particular about what kind of men they took to make soldiers of, we did manage to make an enlistment in the 27th Iowa that stuck, and we got right into active service, so, right from the word go, and saw more real war down in the enemy's country than many men who put in a three or four years' enlistment.

This left Lansing without a paper again for a short time, until Charles G. Cole, in the year of '62-3, moved the North Iowa Journal from Waukon to Lansing and began the publication of a democratic paper. Cole was in poor health and died a short time after commencing the publication of the paper, and it was suspended for a few weeks, when it passed into the hands of John G. Armstrong, who issued his first paper on the 18th day of June 1863. Armstrong was a versatile and witty writer and made his paper immensely popular. He was not a practical printer and the mechanical department was looked after by an excellent printer named Charles Keeseeker, of Dubuque, who is now a compositor in the Telegraph office in that city. No paper ever published in the county, before or since that time, made the money that the Journal did. Armstrong had full control of the county printing and advertising and blank book work, and county warrants running away up into the hundreds of dollars were issued to him at each session of the board, and John ought to have grown rich; but his generous social qualities were a bar to his retention of the wealth that came into his possession.

In the fall of 1863 George Haislet bought the old Mirror outfit and began the publication of a republican paper called the Union. Thus each party had a representative organ, and the music they used to make was pleasing to a certain class of their readers, as is usually the case; but Armstrong's volubility and wit were a little too much for the Union man, and he generally kept pretty well under cover. Haislet continued the publication of the paper until February 1866, when our self and brother-in-law, F. P. Price bought out the concern and at once changed the name back to the Mirror. After several months Mr. Price retired from the firm and we continued its publication until the summer of 1870, when he sold the office to James T. Metcalf and his cousin, John Metcalf, the latter of Viroqua, Wisconsin. J. T. had been a clerk in the Surgeon-General's office at Washington, D.C. ever since the close of the war, but tired of the monotonous work, and being a practical printer, decided to engage in the newspaper business and through negotiations made by his cousin John he came to Lansing. We paid Haislet $300 for the old office, made many additions to it in the way of new material and also increased its subscription list largely, thereby increasing its value to $1,200, the price paid us by the Metcalf's. Mr. J. T. Metcalf was a thoroughly methodical businessman and a good writer, and he succeeded well in the publication of the paper and in gaining the confidence and esteem of the citizens of Lansing, which he continues to hold, although he has been out of the business for several years. He became sole owner of the office in 1874, and in 1881 he turned the business over to his brother George and E. M. Woodward, and the former is now the proprietor of the paper.

Lansing never was known as an extraordinarily good town for advertising and the columns of the papers published there today bear evidence that it still keeps up its reputation in that direction, and in the earlier days the newspaper business was almost continued from hand to mouth struggle, although there has been some improvement in later years and the publishers have managed to get ahead a little, yet they have hardly done as well as they might have done perhaps with the same amount of capital invested in some other business. We know that it was a hard pull with us while running the Mirror, and good butter and pie and cake occasionally were luxuries on our table. We had but a small share of the county printing, and what little we did get was paid for in county warrants, which we were obliged to dispose of at from forty to sixty cents on the dollar. In some respects, therefore, the publishers there now have bonanzas compared to the business years ago. However, when Lansing started on its boom, which was kept up for several years, the printing business improved somewhat and has been much better ever since.

IN CONCLUSION

After selling out the old Mirror to the Metcalfs in 1870 we went back to our old home in Ohio for a brief visit, but arrived there just in time to get right into the editorial harness again for a short time, Messrs. Saxton & Hartzell, of the Repository and Republican, wanted to issue a daily morning paper during that time (referring to a convention lasting a week or two), and as there was no one about their concern who had ever had any experience in the daily paper business they immediately put us in charge of that project. Our youngest brother was in their employ as local reporter for their weekly paper. By the way, the Saxton we speak of, Thomas by name, and son of father Saxton, the oldest and most widely known newspaper publisher in Ohio, was a brother-in-law of Congressman William McKinley, the father of the present tariff bill now under discussion in Congress (later President McKinley). Thomas died several years ago, and his sister, Mrs. McKinley, and her husband now occupy the old Saxton homestead at Canton. This was the first daily newspaper venture in that city. A year or so after that Messrs. Saxton & Hartzell began the permanent publication of a daily.

Returning to Lansing in a few weeks, we learned that the DeSoto, Wisconsin, folks were anxious to have a paper started in their village. We concluded arrangements with them to that end and soon had the DeSoto Republican under way, agreeing on our part to keep the craft sailing at least a year, and if the prospects were favorable we would continue the enterprise. At the end of the year, however, the outlook for the future was not very encouraging and we concluded to retire from the field, packed up our outfit, removed it to Lansing and began the publication of a new paper called the Iowa North-East. The Sherburns, father and son, were running the Allamakee Democrat, having a few months before bought the office of R. V. Sharly. When we started in the business again they became discouraged and after a few weeks they made very favorable propositions for a consolidation of our business, which we accepted, but retaining our material, which we sold to T. C. Ankeny, who removed it to Viroqua and began the publication of a new paper which subsequently went into the hands of Bryan J. Castle, who is known to some of our citizens. We will remark here that in this deal we made a clear $1,000 for our year's stay in DeSoto, which was more than could be said of several other parties who afterwards struggled with newspaper enterprises in that classic village.

Our co-partnership with the Sherburnes not being wholly satisfactory, we made a proposition to buy out their interest, which they accepted, and we became sole proprietor. We then changed the name of the paper to the Lansing Journal and continued its publication until December, 1879, when we became imbued with the idea that a removal of our office to Mason City would enhance our financial condition to a marvelous extent, having been led to this conclusion from representations made to us by parties in whom we had implicit confidence. We therefore went there, remained a year, lost all the wealth, nearly, that we had accumulated in the previous several years, got discouraged and sold out to parties who moved the office to Chamberlain, Dakota, where the material is still doing good service in printing a paper, the Register by name.

Frank Hatton, who was then editor-in-chief of the Burlington Hawkeye, gave us the city editorship on that paper, but as we were in very poor health we had to relinquish the position after several months. Our family returned from Mason City to the old home in Lansing, around which our love still lingered, and does yet for that matters. Shortly after leaving the Hawkeye we went on the Dubuque Herald, doing editorial work and soliciting and corresponding on the road. It was while in this capacity that we made the deal with Mr. Hinchon for the purchase of the Democrat, of which we took possession in July, 1882, and here we are today, after the trials and tribulations incident to country journalism in all its various forms, with a fair business, a well equipped office in its own home, and still possessed of a will to try to keep up with the newspaper procession in Northeastern Iowa.

But a few months after the publication of the foregoing reminiscences Mr. Medary passed from this life, his death occurring on June 21, 1893, in his fifty-fourth year. He had on his fiftieth anniversary prepared a most entertaining sketch of his boyhood days, which is too lengthy to insert here. In substance the record of his early life is as follows:

Thomas Corwin Medary was born at Champion, Trumbull County, Ohio, April 29, 1840, but his early home was Deerfield, Portage county. His parents died while he was a boy and his early life was one of hardships. As he himself said, all his relatives took a hand in managing him, and as a natural consequence he was "numerously managed to his sorrow." He was a mail carrier, a canal boy, worked on the railroad, drove stage while yet in his teens, and compelled to make a living the best way he could. He learned the printer's trade, and removing with relatives to Iowa in 1856 worked a while at his trade in Indianola. The first two winters he chopped logs and worked in a lath mill in Mitchell and Winneshiek counties, and took the last of his little schooling, at Otranto. During the summers worked at farm work. He then had employment in the old Decorah Hotel of "Uncle John Mason," and next secured work in the Decorah Republic office. From this time on his "Journalistic Adventures," as heretofore quoted, fills out the account of his somewhat checkered but finally successful career.

In 1860 Mr. Medary was married to Miss Ellen Price, of Lansing, who is still a resident of Waukon. At his death his eldest son, George C., took up the management of the Democrat, but survived his father but a few weeks, when the management passed to the second son, Edgar F., who inherits the qualifications of a good practical printer and ready paragrapher.

In 1887 President Cleveland commissioned him postmaster at Waukon, which position he filled acceptably until the political vicissitudes of 1889. He was a member of the Masonic, A.O.U.W.K. of P., and I.O.O.F. fraternities, and of the G.A.R. The remains were deposited in Oakland Cemetery, with Masonic ceremonies conducted by Dr. J. C. Crawford, W. M.

-transcribed by Lisa Henry and Sharyl Ferrall

Thomas C. Medary died June 21, 1893 and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Main, Makee Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

HIS PEN LAID DOWN FOREVER

Thomas Corwin Medary Called to His Eternal Home

Sketch of the Life of a Brilliant Journalists, an Honorable Citizen, a Veteran Soldier, a Loving Husband and Father, a Generous Warm-hearted Man.

Confronted by the painful reality of death's victory, and cognizant of the inestimable loss of a guardian and counselor whose place can never be filled, our duty as a writer for the public was never a more sorrowful nature than at the present hour. An aching heart, a troubled mind themselves tend to stay the reluctant pen in chronicling the career of sorrows and triumphs of the notable life that has gone out from among us.

Feelings of sadness pervaded the circle - - boundless almost - - of his acquaintanceship throughout this portion of the state, on receipt of the news of his death last week. Why? Because the loss to the newspaper fraternity of his pleasing individuality as a journalist; to his town the cessation of an honorable and useful career of a citizen; the absence forever of a familiar face in the councils of his party; and to his fellow associates the loss of a genial warm hearted and generous companion.

But his absence from the family circle! A reconciliation to that fact seems beyond -- far far beyond! Kindness and generosity were a part of his nature. His own will never have occasion to know otherwise. Every comfort was theirs were it in his power to provide. Thoughtful to the very end of his life for their future welfare. His was a sympathetic mind and his heart was easily touched. He was helpful to many though he disliked to ask favors for himself. Always laboring for others, he was more thoughtful of their promotion than of his own.

HIS EARLY LIFE

Deerfield, Portage County, Ohio was his birth place where his life dates from April 29, 1840. His mother and father were both natives of the Buckeye state, his grandparents being among the pioneer residents of the Western reserve. His parents died while he was a boy. As he himself has written his life from thence on was one of hardship. All his relatives took a hand in managing him and as a natural consequence he was "numerously managed to his sorrow." He was a mail carrier, then a canal boy, worked on the railroad, drove stage, while yet in his teens – – not because he yearned for such a life but because he was compelled to obtain a living the best he knew how. He finally learned the printers trade at Warren Ohio. Removing with relatives to Iowa in 1855 he spent part of that year in Indianola Star Office. The Republic at Decorah, the Prairie du Chien Courier, and the Lansing Mirror each employed him for a time. In 1860 he established the Canfield, Ohio, Herald, since grown to be a prosperous paper. Returning to Lansing a year or so later he enlisted and went to the front as a member of company B, 27th Iowa Infantry. At the close of the war he purchased the Lansing Mirror and edited it until 1870. Thence to De Soto, Wisconsin, where he established a paper. Lansing seemed to be ever dear to him and after a short absence he returned that city and established the Journal. In 1870 he removed his office to Mason City, publishing the North Iowa Journal. He accepted the position of city editor on the Burlington Hawkeye in 1881, and later was employed in like capacity on the Dubuque Herald. In 1882 he purchased the Waukon Democrat, and by his indefatigable methods and splendid business management has established now what takes rank as one of the best all-around newspaper properties in this section.

He is survived by wife, three sons, George C., ourself and Charles T., and a daughter Stella. An only sister, Mrs. C Kenyon, residing at St. Paul, was present when life's spark went out.

His illness has been several years duration but alas, never of a serious nature to his mind. Although oppressed with a general disability and weakness that was growing upon him he continued to follow his chosen application up to a few weeks since. He knew no such words as "give up," until the very last.

In 1877 President Cleveland commissioned him Postmaster at Waukon which position he filled acceptably to all until the vicissitudes of political affairs in 1880 took place. He was a member of the Masonic, A. O. U. W., Knights of Pythias, and Odd Fellows fraternities, and the G. A. R.

The FUNERAL SERVICES

Took place, Sunday at 3:00 PM at the family residence. Rev. Vannice, a warm personal friend of the deceased, conducted the services. Beautiful floral tributes from the friends at home and abroad covered the casket. Remains were conducted thence to their last resting place in Oakland Cemetery, the various orders to which deceased belonged proceeding the cortege. The Waukon brethren were joined by delegates of Masons from Lansing, New Albany, Frankville and Postville, and Odd Fellows from Rossville. The beautiful impressive Masonic burial ceremonies conducted by Dr. J. C. Crawford, W. M., at the grave were solemnly viewed by large gathering of citizens of town and country round about.

And, when the stream
Which overflowed the soul has passed away,
A consciousness remains that it had left,
Deposited upon the silent shore
Of memory, images and precious thoughts
That shall not die, and cannot be destroyed.
Wordsworth

The Graphic, Postville, Iowa, June 29, 1893


Note this obituary appears to be written by his son Edgar. Note the Survived by: "three sons, George C., ourself and Charles T". Also note the information in the above biography that said: At his death his eldest son, George C., took up the management of the Democrat, but survived his father but a few weeks, when the management passed to the second son, Edgar F., who inherits the qualifications of a good practical printer and ready paragrapher.

As regretful a thing as we have occasion to write for this issue is the announcement of the death of Thomas C Medary, editor and proprietor of the Waukon Democrat, which occurred Wednesday evening June 21. We knew he had been in declining health for a year or two but did not suppose the sands in his hourglass had so nearly run out. He was one of the most genial of companions, a ready writer, bordering at times on the pathetic, the weak, the humorous and the sarcastic. He will be missed by the fraternity of northeastern Iowa. He served three years in the Army, in the 27th Iowa.

We understand his eldest son, who has been a postal clerk from Chicago to McGregor the past eight years, will resign and conduct the Democrat. He is familiar with the routine of the office and all its departments, and will not allow the paper to lose its interest for the public.

Thomas Corwin Medary was about our age and average constitution, and the circumstance reminds us that our hourglass is not full and that the sands are running with greater velocity than formally, and someday not far remote, some other obituary squids will be printed with another subject for consideration. Generation succeeds generations more rapidly than a century ago; the stage play is more rapidly performed and life's course more quickly run. And then what? None can see, when the electric light is turned off.

Iowa Postal Card, June 30, 1893

His widow Mary E. Medary filed for a pension in 1894.

NOTE: the 1925 Iowa State Census Records for Edgar Medary shows his parents as Thomas Medary, born Ohio and Mary Ellen Price, born Ohio, age 80 on her last birthday. His parents married in Lansing, Iowa.

The 1925 Iowa State Census Records for Mary E. Medary shows she was 80 years old, widowed. Father George Price, born Canada, mother Sarah Ann Ezk, born Pennsylvania. Her parents married in Ohio.


Melton, Benjamin Franklin - He was born March 9, 1848 in Galena, Illinois. The son of William Melton (Mar. 12, 1804 - July 6, 1863) and Mary Holloway (OR Holly) (July 14, 1809 - July 29, 1869). He married first Emma Seamon on Nov. 28, 1867. His brother George W. Melton also served in Company B, 27th Iowa Infantry. His sister Mary Melton married John Alcorn, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa. His sister Luella Melton married Peter Adrian. Peter was rejected by the 27th Iowa due to his age. His brother Michael Adrian was my great grandfather and served in Company D, 27th Iowa. ejj.

1870 Census - Freeman, Crawford county, Wisconsin: Benjamin Melton (age 22), Emma Melton (age 18), Ida Melton (age 1). Also in the household was his younger sister Isabel Melton (age 14).

He married second Ellen Bond in Jan. 1875.

1880 Census - Adams, De Kalb County, Missouri: Benjamin Melton (age 32), wife Ellen (age 34), daughter Ida (age 11), son William (age 9).

1890 Veterans Census - Sibley, Burleigh County, North Dakota: Benjamin F. Melton, Private, Co. B., 27th Iowa Infy. Enlisted Jan. 11, 1864. Discharged Jan 26, 1866. Served 2 years and 15 days. Post Office address: Sterling. Disability Incurred: Bronchitis and sore eyes. Remarks: caused by measles.

1910 census - Colburn, Mesa County, Colorado: Benjamin Melton (age 62, married 2 times, currently for 36 years), Ellen Melton (age 70, married 2 times, currently for 36 years, no children). They were living next door to William Melton and his family. (wife and 3 children).

Benjamin Franklin Melton died April 1, 1920 and is buried in Masonic Cemetery, Orchard Mesa, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado.

His widow Ellen Melton filed for a pension on May 28, 1920 in Colorado.


Melton, George W. - He was born Sept. 1, 1840 in Jo Daviess, Illinois. He was the son of William Melton (Mar. 12, 1804 - July 6, 1863) and Mary Holloway (OR Holly) (July 14, 1809 - July 29, 1869). He married Martha Cooper on April 4, 1861 in Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin. His brother Benjamin F. Melton also served in Company B, 27th Iowa Infantry. His sister Mary Melton married John Alcorn, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa. His sister Luella Melton married Peter Adrian. Peter was rejected by the 27th Iowa due to his age. His brother Michael Adrian was my great grandfather and served in Company D, 27th Iowa. ejj

1870 census - Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin: George Melton (age 29), Martha Melton (age 26), Mary Melton (age 7), Alice Melton (age 2).

1880 census - Penn, Osborne County, Kansas: George Melton (age 39, farmer), wife Martha (age 36), daughter Mary M. (age 17), daughter Alice L. (age 11), son Charles R. (age 8). Also in the household was his mother-in-law, Matilda Copper (age 58).

1900 census - Precinct 24, Gunnison, Colorado: George W. Melton (born Sept. 1840, age 59, married for 39 years), wife Martha Melton (born March 1844, married 39 years, 7 children, 4 still living), and daughter Gladys Melton (age 16). Charles Melton was living next door with his wife Aldean. Next to them was William Melton, brother of George (and Benjamin).

1910 census - Rhone, Mesa County, Colorado: George W. Melton (age 69, married 1 time for 49 years), wife Martha Melton (age 66, married 1 time for 49 years, 7 children, 4 still living).

George Melton died November 27, 1916 and is buried in Masonic Cemetery, Orchard Mesa, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado.

His widow Martha Melton filed for a pension on Dec. 8, 1916 in Colorado.

Martha Melton died in 1919 and is buried in Masonic Cemetery, Orchard Mesa, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado.


Meyers, John. He was born Feb. 1, 1826 in Switzerland. In about 1868, he married Mary (Possibly Bichsel - see 1880 census record - or Birchsel -- see cemetery records) From the 1870, 1880, and 1900 census records it appears that this could have been a second marriage for her. Note that the 1900 census said they had been married 32 years (meaning they married about 1868). In 1870 they had children aged 8 and 5 - so born before they married. In 1880 the children are listed with the last name Guzenda. So, it's possible that these are her children from a previous marriage.

1870 Census, Milton, Dodge County, Minnesota: John Myers (age 42, farmer, born Switzerland), Mary Myers (age 40, born Switzerland), Charles Myers (age 8, born Pennsylvania) and Caroline Myers (age 5, born Minnesota).

1875 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Milton, Dodge County, Minnesota: John Mires (age 48, Switzerland), Mary Mires (age 44, born Switzerland), Charles Guzenda? (age 13, born Penn), Codlena Guzenda? (age 10, born Minn), Rulolph Guzenda? (age 4, born Minn.) and John Bixel (age 50, born Switzerland). (I have no clue why the children's last name is listed as Guzenda, but this is clearly the right family - did Mary have a previous marriage?).

1880 Census: Milton, Dodge County, Minnesota: John Myer (age 52, farmer, born Switzerland), wife Mary Myer (age 48, born Switzerland), son Charlie Myer (age 18, born Penn.), daughter Caroline Myer (age 15, born Minnesota), and son George Myer (age 9, born Minnesota) and brother-in-law John Bichsel (age 54. deaf and dumb, born Switzerland). I wonder, based on the brother-in-law, if Bichsel is Mary's maiden name?

On Jan 1885, he was listed on the muster roll of the GAR Joe Mower Post No. 111 (4th Quarter 1884): John Myer, age 53, born Switzerland, Residence: Pine Island, farmer, Enlisted Aug. 20, 1862, Priv., Co. B, 27th Iowa, Discharged Aug. 8, 1865, Priv. Co. B, 27th Iowa., Cause of Discharge: Close of War.

1890 Veterans Census: Milton, Dodge County, Minnesota: John Meyers, Private Company B, 27 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 21, 1862. Discharged Aug. 8, 1865. Length of Service: 2 years, 11 months 13 days. Post Office Address: Pine Island, Goodhue County, Minnesota: Disability Incurred: Rheumatism in back g shell,

1895 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Milton, Dodge County, Minnesota: John Myer (age 68, born Switzerland, in the state and county 30 years, farmer, soldier in the War of the Rebellion), Mary Myer (age 65, born Switzerland), George Myer (age 22, farmer, born Minnesota).

1900 Census: Milton, Dodge County, Minnesota: John Meyers (Born Feb.. 1828, age 72, married 32 years, born Switzerland, immigrated 1846 naturalized, farmer), wife Mary Meyers (born Aug. 1831, age 68, married 32 years, 4 children born, 2 still living, born Switzerland), son George Meyers (born July 1871, age 28, born Minnesota).

John Meyers died Nov. 5, 1905 (Pension index records) (Cemetery Records say Nov. 4, 1905). He is buried in Berne Cemetery, Berne, Dodge County, Minnesota.

I had previously found the information below -- I am certain this is an error - the 1890 shows that John Meyers was alive and living in Minnesota. I have notified the County Coordinator for Allamakee USGENWEB Site.

Meyers, John - Paint Rock Cemetery, Taylor Township, Allamakee County, Iowa
(1843 - Mar. 1, 1880 Co B IA 27 Inf Ob)

His widow Marie Meyer filed for a pension on Aug. 26, 1911 in Minnesota.

Mary Catherine (Birchsel) Meyers, born Aug. 12, 1831, died July 31, 1928. She is buried in Berne Cemetery, Berne, Dodge County, Minnesota (Cemetery Records)


Milks, Nelson P. - Born May 9, 1834 in Cattaraugus County, New York. He was the son of Job Milks and Anna Ingram.

1850 Census - Mansfield, Cattaraugus County, New York: Job Milk (age 52), Anna Milk (age 45), Jonathan D. Milk (age 19), Nelson P. Milk (age 15), Gemima Milk (age 13), David F. Milk (age 12), Humphrey W. Milk (age 10), Adelia A. Milk (age 7), Job D. Milk (age 5), and James H. Milk, (age 2).

1860 Census - Iowa Township, Allamakee County, Iowa. With the family of Derias & Pheobe Bennett was Gidean Milks (age 21, born Ohio), Lewisa Milks (age 19, born Ohio) and Nelson Milks (age 26, born PA).

Nelson P. Milks died Feb. 15, 1864 and is buried in Sand Cove Cemetery, Iowa Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His widow Louisa J. Milks filed for a pension on June 18, 1864.

Cert. No. 31.028, Widows' Class Louisa J. Milks wid. of Nelson P. Milks B 27 Iowa Vol. Inf. consolidated with Cert. No. 252.122 Widows' Class Louisa J. Jarvis. Sept. 24, 1908 (Civil War Widow's Pensions).

1870 Census: Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: Alfred Jarvis (age 28, born NY), Louisa Jarvis (age 28, born Ohio) and C. E. female, age 3, born Iowa). (Alfred Jarvis was a soldier in Company F, 6 Iowa Cavalry. The widows certificate on his Pension Index Record was 252,122. So this is Nelson P. Milks widow remarried).


Monk, John Sherwin - He was born Nov. 15, 1842 in Kane County, Illinois. He was the son of Hugh Monk and Catherine Sherwin. He married Ella Malvina Sanford on May 11, 1870 in Douglas County, Nebraska). (Nebraska Marriages, 1855-1995). She was the daughter of Stephen Sanford and Melvina Gile (Washington Death Certificate)

.

John S. Monk John Sherwin Monk, the son of Hugh and Katherine Monk was born near St. Charles in the state of Illinois November 15, 1842. His parents not having the ability to send him to college, his early education was obtained at public and private schools at or near his home in Jo Daviess County, Illinois. When about 18 years of age he began teaching school to earn the means with which to educate himself, having a consuming thirst for knowledge and ambitions for an education.

No man or boy had greater love for his country than he, and in 1862 he left the school room at the call of this country and enlisted in Company B, 27th Infantry, Iowa Volunteers, where he served faithfully as a soldier for about one year, when, his health failing him, he was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, where he served until February, 1864, when he was honorably discharged on account of his physical disability. Upon his discharge from the service of United States Army he returned to Lansing, Iowa, where he resumed the occupation of teaching school for the period of two years, devoting his spare moments to reading law. At the expiration of this time he entered the law office of Sam A Kinne, of Lansing, Iowa, and was admitted to the bar in the fall of 1866. He remained in the office of Mr. Kinne until the spring of 1868, when he removed to Onawa, Monona County, Iowa, where he located permanently in the practice of the law, and remained there until 1879. In 1870 he entered into partnership with Jay E. Selleck, which continued until he removed to Chicago, except for about five months Mr. Monk was with Mr. Davis at Blair, Nebraska.

On 11 May, 1870, he was married to Ella M. Sanford, of Omaha, Nebraska, with whom he lived most happily, leaving four surviving children, Alice M., Laura E., Clara Louise and Florence E. Monk.

During the time of his practice in the County of Monona, Iowa he was connected with every important case brought in the courts, and a great number of the early settlers and pioneers of Monona County have cause be grateful to him and honor his memory for the indefatigable labor and energy in their behalf in what was known as the Homestead Cases, involving the title to lands owned by them and which was sought to be wrested from them. In these cases, contested as they were by the shrewdest lawyers that corporations could employ, John S. Monk stood as defender of the rights of the people, following the cases to the Supreme Court of United States, where he received unusual compliment from that august body for his manner of presenting his cause, and then sustaining his contentions in establishing the title to the lands in controversy to be in his clients' favor.

In 1879 he went to Chicago and formed a brief partnership with George B. Coe, a former student in his office, which continued about one year, when he entered into partnership with Frank C. Elliott, under the firm name of Monk and Elliott, which continued until his death, May 29, 1899. After his removal to Chicago he was employed in a large number of very important cases and his legal opinions were much sought after both by members of the bar and litigants, being often retained as special counsel, and earned a reputation among those who knew him of being one of the best trial lawyers at the Chicago bar. He was retained to try cases in other states, both East and West, and wherever he was known he was recognized as a lawyer of extraordinary ability. He was often called upon for legal opinions, and those written by him bore the mark of his ability to such an extent as to give them weight, whether he was known or not. The opinion itself was such as to compel its acceptance as being the law.

His ambition to "know the law" was his greatest enemy. His active and grasping brain would give his frail body no rest. Honor in his profession was his guiding star. His word was his bond and always so accepted by those who came in contact with him. While not first in the ways of "social law" he was his best in his home, always open to his friends.

He was remarkable for the clearness of his analytical powers, the most intricate and complicated cases being speedily sifted of immaterial matter and made plain and clear to the comprehension of either judge or jury. In his few leisure moments he devoted himself to the study of political economy and finance, which he pursued with his customary thoroughness. In 1896 he wrote an article upon this subject, which was published in the London Times and received the approbation of many economists and financiers. In argument he was logical and clear, always using apt simile and appropriate words with which to clothe his thoughts; quick at repartee and his wit was of the keen and incisive kind, pointed always with a smile; always a pleasant but dangerous opponent.

Proceedings of the First Annual Session of Iowa State Bar Association
By Iowa State Bar Association (pages 168 – 170)

1850 Census: Elizabeth, Jo Daviess County, Illinois: Eugene Monks (age 30, miner, born Ireland), Catherine Monks (age 33, born Ireland), John Monks (age 9, born Illinois), Elizabeth M. Monks (age 4, born Illinois), James H Monks (age 2, born Illinois).

1860 Census: Elizabeth, Jo Daviess County, Illinois: Hugh Monk (age 40, merchant, born Ireland), Catherine Monk (age 38, born Ireland), John S. Monk (age 18, born Illinois), Elizabeth M. Monk (age 14, born Illinois), Henry J. Monk (age 12, born Illinois), Lawrence Monk (age 9, born Illinois).

1870 Census: Onawa, Monona County, Iowa: John S. Monk (age 27, Lawyer, born Illinois, married in May), Ella M. Monk (age 16, born Illinois).

Monk, John S. [27; Onawa, IA; b: Kane County Il; f: Hugh Monk: M: Catherine Sherwin] md. Ella M. Sanford [17: Omaha: b: Illinois: f: S.H. Sanford] on 11 May 1870. Off: Rippey. Wit: Mr. and Mrs. S.H. Sanford. Written age of consent given by father of the bride. (Douglas County, Nebraska Marriages, 1854-1881)

1880 Census: Jefferson, Cook County, Illinois: John S. Monk (age 37, Lawyer, born Illinois), wife Ella M. Monk (age 26, born Illinois), daughter Alice M. Monk (age 8, born Iowa), daughter Laura Monk (age 6, born Iowa), daughter Unnamed, age 1/12, born April, born Illinois).

John S. Monk, an attorney formerly of Onawa, but now of Chicago, has been presented with a gold watch by the homesteaders of Monona county for his successful legal services in their behalf in what is known as the "homestead case."

Sioux County Herald, Thursday, Nov. 13, 1884, Orange City, Iowa

THE IOWA EVICTIONS

Chicago, October 13, – John S. Monk, Monk and Elliott, who have acted as the attorneys of the Western Land Company in the prolonged litigation over the company's lands in O'Brien County Iowa, and as well in the more recent eviction of squatters which has attracted so much attention in Iowa and elsewhere, was asked to make a statement outlining the company's position.

"The Western Land Company," said Mr. Monk, "bought the lands in O'Brien County in 1883 of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Road, paying for them in advance. There was then not a squatter on the land and no contention over the title except between the railroads. The squatters whom we are now evicting are not old residents of the county, therefore, but have come in during the last three or four years while the fight between the roads was going on. They came there through report circulated about the Sioux County road lands, and expected to make homestead entries on lands surrounded by railroads and worth from $10-$12 per acre. When we got our patents from Governor Larrabee and our deeds from the Milwaukee and St. Paul Road we found the squatters in possession. We gave them a chance to buy, charging them nothing for their improvements or taxes, and charging for the land raw prairie prices of from $9-$12 an acre, less than wildlands were bringing in adjoining counties. Our terms were most liberal, 50 cents to one dollar per acre down, and 10 years time, at 8% on deferred payments and in many cases even more liberal terms were offered. We were unable even on those terms to make any sort of compromise, and were at last compelled to bring suit. This we did in January this year against 116 squatters. To make a long story short, the result of the litigation was that the title of the company was pronounced valid and unquestioned. Judgments were entered and writs of possession were issued. I think that up to date 16 evictions made. In some cases the squatters retook possession and it was necessary to restrain them by injunction. The company, upon being put in possession would be entitled to all the growing crops, which are part of the land, but by our consent those parties who refuse to recognize our claims or deal with us were allowed after eviction to enter the premise and care for and gather their crops. Those who consented to sign a lease were not disturbed in any way. After the writs were issued General Manager McMurtrie continued to give the squatters preferred right to purchase at raw prairie prices, and refused to sell to anybody else until they had actually refused to purchase or lease. A large number of the squatters, however, bought their lands on the easy terms mentioned."

"In regard to the manner of eviction you will find by inquiring of any reputable citizen of O'Brien County that all stories of cruelty and inhumanity are groundless, and that the utmost care was taken in all cases to remove parties without putting them to any unnecessary hardships or inconvenience. I was there in the county most of the time and know the facts. It has been stated, I believe that a Mrs. John Peterson was evicted while about to suffer the pang of childbirth. In plain English, the woman used a pillow to deceive the sheriff and his men as to her condition. She was unmolested upon their first visit, but as soon as she was seen without a pillow eviction was made and her husband took a lease. Another case reported was that of Mrs. Scott, the mother-in-law of William English, a squatter. She pretended to be very sick. She was not disturbed. That night, however, she was seen in Sanford, 10 miles distant, and the next day, being found the second time in bed, the bed was carried outdoors by six men. Inside of half an hour she got up and went into her own house, not far away, as well as ever. The squatters are mainly Swedes and Norwegians, many of them whom cannot talk English, and as you may imagine, were very difficult to deal with; but the company's possession of the land has been secured with the utmost consideration and humanity."

J. M. Catlin who had charge of the eviction said; "The Cloe brothers should not be called aliens. Frederick I know is a citizen, his brothers will be so within a few days, and McMurtrie has been a citizen for 30 years and a leading Republican politician of Iowa, as well as a federal officeholder. They are not alien landlords by any means. Their methods of doing business is not to lease their lands but to sell to actual settlers on easy terms and develop the country where they are interested. The leases spoken of were generally for the year only, in order to allow people to remain in possession until the crop can be taken care of, and their terms were liberal."

Mr. Elliott said: "I will add one thing which shows that the company have acted liberally. In some cases squatters purchased their original land from purchasers who bought of company and in every case they were obliged to pay more by several dollars an acre then was charged by the company."

The Chariton Democrat, Chariton, Iowa, Thursday, Oct. 20, 1887

List of Railroads Incorporated during the year ending June 30, 1892. The Chicago, Lake Geneva and Northwestern Railway Co. From Chicago, Ill., through the counties of Cook, Lake and McHenry to a point on the boundary line between the states of Illinois and Wisconsin. Office, Chicago, Ill. Capital Stock, $2,000,000. Directors: DeClermont Dunlap, Rockford Ill., and Tremont Hill, Horace C. Alexander, John S. Monk and Frank C. Elliott, Chicago, Ill. Filed February 16, 1892.

John S. Monk died May 29, 1899 (Pension Index records). He is buried in Onawa City Cemetery, Onawa, Monona County, Iowa.

DEATH OF A GREAT LAWYER

The Onawa Democrat pays a graceful tribute to the memory of John S. Monk, of Chicago, who died in that city recently. Mr. Monk was formerly a resident of Onawa, Monona County, where he won distinction as one of the greatest lawyers which ever honored the profession in Iowa. The Democrat says:

"Twenty years ago there was probably no better known man in this county; and ever since his removal to Chicago in 1879, his visits to Onawa have been frequent enough to keep alive the admiration of the public and the affection of his closer friends. Since his coming here in 1868 no case of importance was fought out in the courts of this county without him on one side or the other. Hundreds of the farmers of Monona county owe the peaceable possession of their homes to his efforts in carrying the so-called "Homesteaders case" to a successful issue in the United States Supreme Court against the best legal talent which the railroads were able to secure; and when his ability and success brought him offers which took him away from Onawa, no man ever left behind him more regrets or carried with him more good wishes than did he. The confidence of the old-time neighbors and friends in his ability often brought him back and kept in some measure an active influence at this bar, where he will long be a tradition, a tradition of acuteness and accuracy of judgment, of ready wit and infinite resource, of physical weaknesses and the most eager courage, and above all, a tradition of absolute and unquestioned honesty.

"Never a strong man physically, even the work of a country practice, intense, but not continuous, told upon him, and the unceasing demands of practice in the perpetual courts of Chicago led him to labors which broke down his health. Insomnia and digestive troubles had been sapping his strength for months, but even his closest friends had no apprehension of a fatal result of his illness until within the last few weeks."

Des Moines Gazette, June 8, 1899

His widow Ella M. Monk filed for a pension on Oct. 1, 1899 in Illinois.

1900 Census: Chicago Ward 27, Cook County, Illinois: Ella M. Monk (born Nov. 1853, age 46, widowed, 10 children born, 4 still living, born Illinois), daughter Alice M. Monk (born Mar. 1872, age 28, born Iowa), daughter Laura E. Monk (born Nov. 1873, age 26, born Iowa), daughter Clara L. Monk (born March 1882, age 18, born Illinois) and daughter Florence E. Monk (born March 1886 age 14, born Illinois).

Ella Monk died March 19, 1922 in Spokane, Spokane County, Washington. The death record shows spouse John S. Monk, Father: Steven H. Sanford and mother: Melvina Gile.


Morris, Levi Roger. - He was born Feb. 15, 1838 in Ohio. He was the son of Thomas J. Morris and Sarah. He married Melcina Sophia Craig on Aug. 27, 1861 in Jo Daviess County, Ill. (Vol. B. Page 341). She was the daughter of James Craig (Nov. 21, 1785 - Mar. 31, 1847) and Delinda Boone (Feb 3, 1802 - Sept. 18, 1877).

1850 Census: Tate, Clermont County, Ohio:. Thomas J. Morris (age 48, Boarding house keeper, born Ohio), Sarah Morris (age 44, born Ohio), Amanda C. Morris (age 14, born Ohio), Levi R. Morris (age 12, born Ohio), Sarah M. Morris (age 4, born Ohio), William Sims (age 23, shoemaker, born Ohio), Lydia O Sims (age 22, born Oho). (NOTE: I feel very certain this is the correct family. William Sims -- in the same household also served in Company B, 27th Iowa).

1860 Census: Hanover, Jo Daviess County, Illinois: Lorenzo S. Benjamin (age 34), Phizilla Benjamin (age 42), Charles Benjamin (age 11), Jernsher Benjamin (age 9) Levi Morris (age 21, Ostler, born Ohio).

1870 Census: Hanover, Jo Daviess County, Illinois: Levi Morris (age 31, Teamster, born Illinois), Sara Morris (age 24, born Ill), Thomas Morris (age 8, born Ill), William Morris (age 4, born Ill.) and Elmer Morris (age 2, born Ill.).

1880 Census - Hanover, Jo Daviess County, Illinois: Levi Morris (age 44, farm hand, born Ohio), wife Cena Morris (age 35, born Ill), Thomas Morris (age 17), Wilber Morris (age 14), Elmer Morris (age 12), Julia Morris (age 9), Jennie Morris (age 5), and Lilla Morris (age 4).

Levi Morris died Nov. 9, 1899. He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Hanover, Jo Daviess County, Illinois.

His widow Sophia M. filed for a pension on Dec. 15, 1899 in Illinois.

1900 Census - Hanover, Jo Daviess County, Illinois: Sophia Morris (born Dec. 1844, age 54, widowed, 8 children, 7 still living.). There was a daughter Viola (born Nov, 1882, age 17) living with her.

Sophia M. Morris (b. 1 Dec 1844); d. 22 Mar 1931; 86y, 3m, 22d. She is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Hanover, Jo Daviess County, Illinois. In the same cemetery is a child named Orrin d. 23 Dec 1894; 7y, 5m, 6d; son of Levi R. & C.M.


Moyer, John - He was born in 1824 in Union County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Joseph Moyer (1800 - Feb. 5, 1878) and Elizabeth Topper (Dec. 8, 1799 - July 4, 1873). He married Mary Shedd Dodd on June 18, 1851 in Gratiot, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of Joseph Dodd (Nov. 26, 1804 - Apr. 3, 1873) and Phebe Leonard (1806 - about 1832). Her brother Calvin R. Dodd also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

John Moyer Photo was submitted by Greg Benson.

1856 Iowa State Census: Taylor, Allamakee County, Iowa: Joseph Dood (age 52), Calvin Dood (age 30), John Meyors (age 30), Mary Meyors (age 22), Joseph Meyors (age 4, born Wis.), Caroline Meyors (age 2, born Wisc), and Martha Meyors (age 1/2 born Iowa.) Joseph and Calvin Dodd had been in the state of Iowa for 5 years. John Moyer had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years. (Note: the name should have been Moyers. Mary S. Dodd married John Moyers).

1860 census - Taylor, Allamakee County, Iowa; (Indexed as Meyer on Ancestry.com): John Moyer (age 25), Mary (age 27), Joseph (age 8), Caroline (age 6), Mary (age 3), and Emma (age 1).

When he enlisted with the 27th Iowa, he was described as born in Union County, PA, age 38, occupation: Farmer, Eyes: Grey, hair: Brown, Complexion: Sandy, Height 5 ft. 9 1/4 in. He died at Adams General Hospital in Memphis Tennessee on Dec. 6, 1863. Cause of death was pneumonia.

His widow Mary S. (Dodd) filed for a pension. Information from her pension file is extracted below:

In statement dated Jan. 23, 1864, his widow stated that they married on June 18, 1851 in Gratiot, Wisconsin. A copy of the marriage certificate was in the widows pension file.

She initially listed 5 children: Joseph (12 years), Caroline (10 years), Mary Jane (7 years), Emma (5 years), and Phoebe Elizabeth (3 years).

She stated that her maiden name was Mary S. Dodd.

Children claimed on the Pension record of Mary S. Moyer:

  1. Joseph Moyer born July 6, 1852 in Franklin, Wisc.
  2. Caroline Moyer, born January 2, 1854 in Brashurtsburg, Wis.
  3. Mary Jane Moyer born May 5, 1857 at Harper's Ferry, Iowa.
  4. Emma Moyer born Aug. 13, 1859 at Harpers Ferry, Iowa

I hereby certify that the name of Mary S. Moyer, widow of John, who was a pensioner on the rolls of this agency under Certificate No. 24118 and who was last paid at $8.00 to Nov. 6, 1882, has been dropped because of remarriage of pensioner to John Fessenden, Nov. 6, 1882.

Mary Shedd (Dodd) (Moyer) Fessenden died Feb. 1, 1916 in Allamakee County, Iowa.

She is buried in Oakland Main Cemetery, Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa.


Nelson, Julius. He was born about 1828 in New York. (Note the roster says he was born in Indiana. But all Census Records say New York).. He married Lucy Ann Whaley on July 17, 1852 in Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa. She was the daughter of David Whaley (1797 - Mar. 18, 1868) and Sarah Kilbourn (1797 - Feb. 19, 1880).

Submitted by:
Lena Nelson

Name: Julius Nelson
Born: in 1828
Died: 1897 Jan 31
Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa

Married: Lucy Ann Whaley b. May 13, 1833 d. April 20, 1925

Marriage Date: July 17, 1852 in Makee, Allamakee, IA

Children of Julius Nelson and Lucy Ann Whaley:

  1. Arthur Norbert
  2. Henry b. 1853
  3. John F. b. 1855
  4. Electa b. 1857
  5. Uriah Stone b. Sept 8, 1860
  6. Lucy b. Oct. 8, 1865, d. August. 20, 1866 in Lansing, IA.
  7. Mary b. June 1867
  8. Esther b. 1869
  9. Julius Jr. b. 1871
  10. William Henry b. 1875
  11. James Bird b. 1878

Census of 1880 states that he was a miller and his sons John and Uriah were listed as Farm Laborers while Elater and Julius Jr. were "at School" at the age of 11 and 9 respectively.

1856 Iowa State Census: Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa: Julius Nelson (age 26, farmer, born NY), Lucy S. Nelson (age 23, born NY), Henry Nelson (age 3, born Iowa), John F. Nelson (age 1, born Iowa). Julius had been in the state of Iowa for 5 years. Lucy had been in the State of Iowa for 7 years.

1860 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Julius Nelson (age 31, gun smith, born New York), Lucy Nelson (age 28, born New York), Henry Nelson (age 7, born Iowa), John Nelson (age 5, born Iowa), Electa Nelson (age 3, born Iowa and Enoch Nelson (age 3/12/ born Iowa).

1870 Census: Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: Julius Nelson (age 41, farmer, born New York), Lucy Nelson (age 38, born New York), John Nelson (age 15, born Iowa), Electa Nelson (age 13, born Iowa), Uriah Nelson (age 11, born Iowa), Myra Nelson (age 8, born Iowa), and Esther Nelson (age 2, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Julius Nelson (age 51, miller, born New York), wife Lucy Nelson (age 47, born New York), son John F. Nelson (age 25, farm laborer, born Iowa), son Uriah Nelson (age 20, farm laborer, born Iowa), daughter Elater A. Nelson (age 11, born Iowa), son Julius Nelson (age 9, born Iowa), son William H. Nelson (age 5, born Iowa), son James B. Nelson (age 2, born Iowa). Written in and then crossed out was: mother-in-law, Sarah Whaley, age 82, widowed, born New York).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living In Iowa: 27th Iowa: Julius Nelson, Private, Company B. Present Post Office Address: Lansing.

1885 Iowa State Census: Lansing, Allamakee county, Iowa: Julius Nelson (age 55, retired farmer, born New York), Lucy Nelson (age 51, born New York), Esther Nelson (age 16, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Julius Nelson (age 14, born Allamakee County, Iowa), William Nelson (age 10, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Bird Nelson (age 6, born Allamakee County, Iowa.

1886 Patron's Directory: Lansing Township: Julius Nelson, Farmer & breeder of blooded stock, Section 33, PO Lansing.

Julius Nelson died Jan. 31, 1897 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, (Section C-9), Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa (Remarks in the Cemetery Listing: Co B IA 27 Inf; log/plot book; body moved from Old Oak Hill to new Oak Hill in May 1901)

His widow Lucy A. Nelson filed for a pension on Mar. 19, 1897.

1900 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Lucy Nelson (born May 1833, age 67, widowed, 11 children born, 7 still living, born New York), son William Nelson (born Feb 1875, age 25, born Iowa), and son Bird Nelson (born July 1879, age 20, born Iowa).

1925 Iowa State Census: Lucy A. Nelson, age 91, father's name: David Whaley, born New York. Mother's name: Sarah Kilbarn, born New York. Parents married in New York.).

Lucy Ann (Whaley) Nelson, born May 13, 1883, died April 20, 1925. She is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, (Section C-9) Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa


Obert, Dewitt He was born Oct. 9, 1842 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of Hartman VanDusen Obert and Harriet Greene. He married Emily Addie Allen on December 31, 1868 in Carrol, Carrollton County, Missouri. DeWitt Obert's brother Oscar Obert also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

Dewitt Obert Photos of DeWitt Obert were submitted by David Obert.

Handwritten on the bottom of the Photo: DeWitt Obert, a Civil War Veteran lived near Park Rapids & maybe Morton Minnesota. Hazel H. Cuzey

1850 census, Plato, Kane, Illinois: Hartman Obert (age 39), Harriett Obert (age 38), Huldah Obert (age 12), Lewis Obert (age 10), DeWitt Obert (age 8), Gifford Obert (age 6), and Oscar Obert (age 3).

1860 census, Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa: Hartman Obert (age 48), Harriett Obert (age 37), Louis Obert (age 19), Dewitt Obert (age 17), Gilford H. Obert (age 15), Oskar Obert (age 12), Elen Obert (age 9), Orange L Obert (age 6), Charles Obert (age 3) and Albert Obert (age 1).

1870 census, Carroll, Carrollton County, Missouri: DeWitt Obert (age 27, farmer), Adilade Obert (age 19).

Nov 3, 1876 Dewitt Obert bought land in Minnesota described as: Northwest quarter of Section twenty six in township one hundred and eight of range thirty nine in the district of lands subject to sale at New Ulm Minnesota containing one hundred and sixty acres. Homestead Certificate No. 3040, application 7899. Recorded Vol. 6, page 347.

1880 census, Holly, Maury County, Minnesota: Dewitt Obert (age 36), wife Emily A Obert (age 28), son Arthur Obert (age 8), son Silas H Obert (age 6), daughter Edith L. Obert (age 3), son Merton D. Obert (age 2) and son Roy B. Obert (age 3m).

1890 Veteran's Census, Great Bend, Cottonwood, Minnesota: DeWitt Obert (Co. B, 27th Iowa, Post Office Address: Windom, Cottonwood, Minnesota).

1910 Census, Redwood, Santa Clara, California: Silas H. Obert (age 36), wife Carrie (age 36), daughter Marion (age 8), daughter Wilma (age 3) and father Dewitt Obert (age 67, widowed).

1920 census, Park Rapids, Hubbard County, Minnesota: DeWitt Obert (age 77).

DeWitt Obert died July 15, 1926 and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Park City, Hubbard Co., Minnesota.

Dewitt Obert Obituary Submitted by Dick Gustafson

Photo was submitted by David Obert

Another Veteran Answers Final Roll Call Beyond

Funeral services for D. W. Obert, whose death occurred Thursday morning, at one o'clock at the Bundy hospital of this city, were held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the G.A.R. Hall of this city.

The services were attended by members of E. S. Frazier Post G.A.R. of this city, of which he was an honored member, also by the Ladies of the G.A.R. and neighbors and friends. The color guard also a firing squad from the American Legion post acted as military escort.

Rev. H. W. Mitchell pastor of the Methodist church gave the address and the choir rendered appropriate selections.

TThe wealth of floral offerings attested to the esteem in which Mr. Obert was held. Interment took place at Greenwood cemetery, where the firing squad fired a salute and a bugler sounded "Taps" for another of our fast diminishing number of Civil war veterans.

De Witt Obert was born October 9, 1842 in New York state, he also lived for a time in the state of Missouri. He was united in marriage to Addis Allen in Iowa fifty-two years ago. Seven children were born to this union. S. H. Obert of Calif., M.D. Obert of Redwood Falls, Minn., R. B. and E. C. of Minneapolis who are left to morn the loss of a loving father. Arthur Obert, another son, died at the age of 12 years, Edith, a daughter died at the age of 5 years and Pearl another daughter died at the age of 4 1/2 years.

Mr. Obert enlisted in the Civil War the year 1862 in company B, 27th Calvary of Iowa, and saw three years of active service.

Fifty years ago the family moved to Minnesota settling in Ottertail county, and a number of years ago to Park Rapids. Mrs. Obert died in the year 1922.

For some time Mr. Obert had not been in the best of health due to the infirmities of old age. On May 6, 1926 he left for Minneapolis where he expected to remain at the Soldier's home at Minnehaha Falls, but not being contented there, he visited with his children returning here on Saturday, July 10, accompanied by his son M. D. Obert of Redwood Falls. He was at once taken to the Bundy Hospital where he died early Thursday morning, following an operation.

Mr. Obert was an active member of the local post of the G.A.R. and met every time he was able with the few remaining members. With Dr. P. D. Winship he had made an agreement that should the doctor be called first, Mr. Obert was to give his funeral address and if Mr. Obert was called first, the doctor would give the address. Owing to his recent illness, Doctor Winship was unable to be present at the funeral services and therefore unable to keep his part of the agreement.

Mr. Obert was a pleasant gentleman to meet, making friends of all with whom he came in contact. He will be missed by his Civil War comrades also a host of other friends.

Again we are reminded that the number of these veterans of the war of the rebellion is fast diminishing.

Minnesota Death Index: Name: Dewitt Obert. Death Date: July 15, 1926. Death County, Hubbard; State File Number: 005921; Certificate Number 005921; Certificate Year: 1926; Record Number: 461751.

Application for Headstone, 51351, Civil War. Name: DeWitt Obert, Date of Death: July 15, 1926, Private, Company B, 27th Iowa. Name of Cemetery: Greenwood, Park Rapids, Minnesota. To be shipped to: Ladies of the G. A. R. Circle #28, Park Rapids, Minnesota, Hubbard County. Date: March. 9, 1930.


Obert, Oscar - Born May 12, 1848 in Warren County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Hartman VanDusen Obert and Harriet Greene. Oscar Obert's brother Dewitt Obert also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

Submitted by
David Obert

When looking through the roster, an entry is listed that shows Oscar Obert. It has a note about him dying from disease. Family notes that I have at home indicate that Dewitt and four of his brothers went off to fight in the Civil War; two of which did not return. The two that were killed are Oscar Obert and Orange Obert. Both Oscar and Orange were too young to enlist; however, family records indicate that they lied about their age and "ran off". I believe (but don't have the evidence) that the Oscar listed in the 27th and Dewitt's brother Oscar are one and the same. Orange was much younger, and I can not find any record of him in the Civil War. It is my belief that he was never actually able to enlist due to his age, but he fought and died with them just the same. Once again, I don't have the evidence. The other (surviving) brothers were Lovett and Gifford H, both from other units.


Note by Elaine Johnson. I had also noticed the two Oberts in Company B. But DeWitt was born in New York and Oscar was born in Pennsylvania, (and they were both listed as age 18 when they enlisted). So I had thought while they might be related, they were probably not brothers. I had failed to take into account that while they were both age 18 when they enlisted, they enlisted 3 years apart. And the 1860 census records below show that DeWitt was born in New York and Oscar was born in Pennsylvania.

So I agree with David's assessment that these two were probably brothers. (and that Oscar would have had to have lied about his age. According to the 1860 census he would only have been about 16.)

11850 census, Plato, Kane, Illinois: Hartman Obert (age 39), Harriett Obert (age 38), Huldah Obert (age 12), Lewis Obert (age 10), DeWitt Obert (age 8), Gifford Obert (age 6), and Oscar Obert (age 3).

1860 Census, Waterloo, Allamakee County, Iowa Hartman Obert, (age 48, male, farmer, real estate 1000, personal 350, born New York), Harriet Obert (age 37, female, housekeeper, born New York), Louis Obert (age 19, male, farmer, born New York), Dewit Obert (age 17, male, farmer, born New York), Gifford H. Obert (age 15, male, farmer born Pennsylvania), Oskar Obert (age 12, male, born Pennsylvania), Ellen Obert (age 9, female, born Iowa), Orange L. Obert (age 6, male, born Iowa), Charles Obert (age 3, male, born Iowa), Albert Obert (age 1, male, born Iowa), Mary Denhart (age 14, female, born Canada)

Oscar Obert died of disease on May 19, 1864, at Atchfalaya Bayou, La.

His mother Harriet Obert filed for a pension on Nov. 2, 1883 in Minnesota.


Oleson, Peter, AKA Peter Olson Earl. (Note: his AKA was found on his pension index Record). He was born Jan 11, 1844 in Lekasa, Skaraborg Lan, Sweden. He married Johanna Anderson.

1856 Iowa State Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa:: Andrew Oleson (age 48, born Sweden), Anna Oleson (age 44, born Sweden), Peter Oleson (age 13, born Sweden) and Lars Oleson (age 9, born Sweden). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years. (NOTE: I am not 100% sure this is the correct family. BUT he was known as Peter Oleson and was from Allamakee County, when he enlisted. He is the correct age. This appears to me that it could be him).

1860 Census: Center Allamakee County, Iowa: A. Oleson (age 53, farmer, born Sweden), Ann C. Oleson (age 49, born Sweden), Peter Oleson (age 16, born Sweden), and Lars E. Oleson (age 14, born Sweden),

Peter Olson Earl, Co. B, 27th Iowa filed for a pension on Oct. 1, 1879. (Note there was no Peter Olson Earl in Co. B. There was a Peter Olson. It is noted on his death record in California that his father's last name was Olson. I am certain this is the same person. His pension record also says "Peter Oleson AKA Peter O. Earl").

1890 Veterans Schedule: Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota: Peter O. Earl, (alias Peter Olson), Private, Co. B. 27 Iowa Inf., Enlist Aug. 15, 1862, Discharged Aug. 8, 1865, Length of Service: 1 years, 11 months, 23 days, Post Office Address: 1819-1500 S. Minneapolis, Minn.

1900 Census, Minneapolis Ward 11, Hennepin County, Minnesota: P. Olson Earl (born Jan 1844, age 56, married 31 years, born Sweden, immigrated 1855, in US 45 years, naturalized, embalmer), wife Hannah Earl (born July 1848, age 51, married 31 years, 7 children born, 6 still living, born Sweden), daughter Amalia Earl (born Mar. 1871, age 29, born Iowa), daughter Emily Earl (born Nov. 1873, age 26, born Iowa), son George F. Earl (born Mar 1884, age 16, born Minnesota), son Milton Earl (born Nov. 1886, age 13, born Minnesota).

1910 Census: Los Angeles Assembly, District 75, Los Angeles, California: Peter O. Earl (age 66, married 1 time for 41 years, born Sweden, immigrated 1854, naturalized, no occupation), wife Hannah Earl (age 62, married 1 time for 41 years, 8 children born, 5 still living, born Sweden), daughter Emily Earl (age 36, born Iowa).

Hannah O. Earl (born July 23, 1848) died May 14, 1917. She is buried in Lakewood Cemetery, Plot: Section 9, Lot 155, Grave 12, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

Submitted by
Sharyl Ferrall

Peder and Erick Olson, brothers who were early residents of Center township, but removed to Minnesota, have been visiting relatives and old friends in the vicinity of Elon and were in Waukon Monday. Both are civil war veterans, Peder having been a member of Company B, 27th Iowa, which was largely recruited at Lansing. He would have liked to have met a few of the comrades of his regiment who still reside here. He is a well preserved man of 80 years and lives in Los Angeles.

~source: 'The Democrat', Waukon, Allamakee co. Iowa, May 20, 1923

1930 Census Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California: P. Olson Earl (age 86, married at age 24 born Sweden, immigrated 1854), wife Hannah L. Earl (age 66, married at age 19, born Sweden). (I know this is the correct Peter Oleson Earl, However, I am not sure about his "wife". The cemetery records (tombstone) clearly shows that she died in 1917. Did he remarry another Hannah? The age is also very different).

1940 Census, Los Angeles, California, Fremont Hotel Peter O. Earl (Lodger, age 96, born Sweden, naturalized).

Peter Oleson Earl died March 25, 1941 in Los Angeles, California. He is buried in Lakewood Cemetery, Plot: Section 9, Lot 155, Grave 11, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

California Death Index: Peter O. Earl, Birth Date: Jan. 11, 1844, Birthplace: Other Country; Death Date: Mar. 25, 1941. Death Place, Los Angeles. Father's Surname: Olson.

MILTON G. EARL is well known throughout Minneapolis as a funeral director and embalmer, and he is the son of one of the oldest representatives of that business in this city. Peter Olson Earl, the father was born in Sweden, but came to the United States when he was a comparatively young man. It was about twenty years ago that he embarked in the undertaking business in Minneapolis, and he soon became well and prominently known in the business and was for years the leading undertaker in the city.

Milton G. Earl was born in Minneapolis September 19, 1886 and he attended its graded and high schools. When he was about seventeen years of age his father's health began failing, and coming to his assistance he assumed the management of the large business and was soon admitted to a partnership, the firm name becoming P. Olson Earl and Son undertakers and embalmers. And how well the young man succeeded in business is best told in stating that under his management the trade has grown to larger proportions and the place of business as been a model of its kind, up-to-date in every particular, and the outside equipment is second to none in the Twin Cities. Mr. Earl is a member of Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Royal League, the A.O.U.W., and the Yeomen.

He married, January 28, 1908, Miss Mattie Nodell, a daughter of one of the most prominent and highly respected business men of Minneapolis, John A. Nodell. Mr. and Mrs. Earl are the parents of one child: Rolland Milton. Mr. Earl is a member of the Swedish Baptist Church.

A history of the Swedish-Americans of Minnesota, page 694.
Algot E. Strand, Lewis Publishing Company

Children of Peter Olson Earl and Johanna Anderson:

  1. Amalia Earl, born 1871
  2. Robert Oscar Earl, M.d (Aug. 27, 1872 - Aug. 11, 1948)
  3. Emily Idelia Earl (Nov. 3, 1873 - May 24, 1957)
  4. Hilda Earl (June 8, 1875 - Sept. 15, 1957)
  5. George Arthur Earl, M.D. (May 23, 1884 - Mar 17, 1972)
  6. Milton Garfield Earl (Sept. 19, 1886 - July 21, 1916)

Peacock, Edmund.. He was born about 1836 in Iowa. He was the son of George R. Peacock and Mary Mason. He married Alzade M. Smith on July 8, 1866 in Winneshiek County, Iowa.

Additional genealogy information can be found here

George R. Peacock Sr. and Mary (Mason) Peacock The "PEACOCK IOWA PIONEERS HOMEPAGE" begins with " George and Mary." George and Mary were from England. They had a son named James who was born in Yorkshire, England on June 6, 1826. They came to the United States in 1830. They spent time in Philadelphia, PA, where they had a daughter Ruth b. 1831, a son Edmund b. 1836 and a daughter Mary b. 1837. Then they moved to Dubuque Co., IA about 1838. They lived in an area south of the city of Dubuque called Rockdale Township at a place referred to as "Dirty Hollow". (We assume that some sort of Lead Smelting or Slaughter House activities may have taken place there.) While living in this area, the final three children were born, Anne b. 1839, Thomas J. b. 1843 and George Jr. b. 1844. The 1850 census shows George Sr.'s occupation as merchant and cattleman. In 1850 their son James married Rossana Comber and in 1851 their daughter Ruth married Jonathan Crawshaw.

Some time in April 1857, mother Mary (Mason) Peacock died and was buried at the Rockdale Methodist Church Cemetery. It was after this time that George Sr. moved to unsettled territory up in Allamakee County, IA in Paint Creek Township, near Rossville and Waterville, IA. He operated a sawmill at Waterville and raised cattle on his property. He was apparently into land speculation at the time and bought and sold properties to arriving immigrants. His youngest sons Thomas (Tim) and George Jr. worked at the sawmill for him. In the summer of 1861, George Sr. died, but we do not know for certain where he is buried. (SEE NOTE 2 For Speculation on George's Probable Burial Site).

In the spring of 1862 with the Civil War cranking up, Thomas and George Jr. enlisted into the US Army at the Hotel in Waterville. They mustered into the US 16th Regulars (Infantry) forming up at McGregor, IA. Ruth, her husband Jonathan and children were living at the homestead. James and his family apparently stayed in the Dubuque area to run a business. George Jr. got some type of camp sickness, and was discharged from the Army in July 1862. Edmund decided to join the 27th Iowa Infantry, and turned over his executorship of his father's probate to a local lawyer. George Jr. re-enlisted in the 9th Iowa Calvary.

By the war's end, Tim had marched along with General Sherman to Atlanta, GA , and then musters out at "Lookout Mountain" Chattanooga, TN at wars end. Edmund's unit fought around Mississippi and Louisiana area. George Jr. unit was located in somewhere in Arkansas. All three brothers were eventually honorably discharged around 1865-66. Up until this time the Allamakee Co. seat was at Lansing, IA and this is where they all seem to have end up. Edmund married Alzade M. Smith July 8, 1866 in Winneshiek Co, IA after he got out of the Army. His veterans disability records say he spent some time down in DeFuniak Springs, FL for unknown reasons. In his brother Tim's written account of the past, Edmund apparently had the Peacock Family Bible with the traditional birth, death, marriage info. Edmund had two known children, Sammuel and ??. Some of the info about Edmund comes from his veterans disability records. Edmund died around February 1899. He is buried at Dorchester, IA Methodist Cemetery, which is on a hill outside of the town. Alzade remarried to a Ryan Morgan in 1902 and they moved to Forest City, IA.

From recent information (5-17-98) provided by one of Ryan Morgan's descendants, Ryan was born in 1836 in Lee co., IL [near Dixon] and was married first to Amanda Robertson [1839-1891], and then to Alzade. Ryan died in 1914 in Montezuma, IA. Alzade is listed as surviving him in his obit. We don't know much more about Alzade.

1850 Census: District 7, Dubuque, Iowa: George Peacock (age 51, manufacturer, born England), Mary Peacock (age 46, born England), James Peacock age 25, merchant born England), Ruth Peacock (age 19, born PA), Edmond Peacock (age 14, born PA), Ann Peacock (age 11, born Iowa), Thomas Peacock (age 6, born Iowa) and George Peacock (age 4, born Iowa).

1856 Iowa State Census: Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: George Peacock (age 55, born England), Mary Peacock (age 48, born England), Edward Peacock (age 18, born PA), Ruth Peacock (age 22, born PA), Mary (age 16, born Iowa), Ann Peacock (age 14, born Iowa), Thos. Peacock (age 12, born Iowa), Geo Peacock (age 9, born Iowa).

Is this him below?: The wife's name does not match, but it is it a nickname? His age, place of birth--according to the roster, parents place of birth, and son Samuel, makes me think this is him.

1870 Census; Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: Hartford Gates (age 24, teamster, born Canada), Ed Peacock (age 34, common laborer, born Iowa), Naomi Peacock (age 22, born NY), and Lillie Peacock (age 3, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: Edward Peacock (age 43, farmer, born Iowa, parents born England), wife Naomi Peacock (age 33, born NY), daughter May Lilly Peacock (age 13, born Iowa), son Samuel Peacock (age 6, born Iowa).

Edmund died in February 1899. He is buried at Dorchester Methodist Cemetery, Waterloo Township, Allamakee County, IA.


Pennell, Robert - He was born Aug. 17, 1840 in Cleveland, Ohio. He was the son of William Pennell (Sept. 8, 1801 - Mar. 10, 1861) and Sarah Ann Oliver (Nov. 18, 1810 - Dec. 27. 1903). He married Almina Horn on July 29, 1859 in Lordstown, Trumball County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Michael Horn (1801 - 1865) and Mary Bailor.

I think Robert lived in Iowa when he enlisted. After the war, he received a war deed in Iowa. He farmed there before crossing the river to Wisconsin. Lansing, Iowa, is just across the Mississippi River from De Soto, Wisconsin, where he finished raising his family.

Robert was my great-grandfather. His birth place seems to vary depending on the document and who filled it out so I am uncertain of the place of his birth.

He is buried in the De Soto Cemetery as is his wife, Almina Horne.

I never noticed the Illinois on the tombstone. I must have been blinded by too many dates, names, etc.

He was discharged with a disability. He served from August 14, 1862 until April 17, 1863. There was an error on one report that showed him serving until 1865, but that is wrong.

His death certificate states he was born August 17, 1935 and died January 15, 1912. His birthplace on this document states he was born in Ohio.

On a couple of census copies, he was born in Michigan. On another one it shows Wisconsin. He was married in Ohio.

He had difficulty receiving his pension. I have copies of his pension papers. Would you like me to scan them and email them to you? I am unable to find any info regarding his parents or his wife's family. Maybe someone out there can assist me in my search.

Bettie Brechwald

1870 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Robert Pennel (age 32, laborer, born Michigan), Almina (age 23), J. A. (age 8, male), T. E. (age 4, male), G. R. (age 1, male).

He filed for a pension on Sept. 16, 1879.

1880 Census: Wheatland, Vernon County, Wisconsin: Robert Pennell (age 44, farmer, born Michigan), wife Almina Pennell (age 38, born Ohio), son John Pennell (age 19, born Iowa), son Edward Pennell (age 15, born Ohio), son George Pennell (age 12, born Iowa), son William Pennell (age 9, born Iowa), son Duck Pennell (age 4, born Wisconsin) and daughter Francis Pennell (age 9/12, born September, born Wisconsin).

1890 Veteran's Census: Whitestown, Vernon County, Wisconsin: Robert Pennell, wagon master, Co. B., 27th Iowa Volunteer Inf. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1862. Discharged April 17, 1863 Length of service 8 Months, Post Office Address: Victory Wisconsin. Disability Incurred: Chronic Diarrhea. -- (Note on the roster there is a discrepancy in his date of discharge. The census record is fairly blurred and I really could not read the year of discharge. Ancestry.com had it indexed as 1863. Based on the length of service 1863 would be correct -- that date was also confirmed by a descendant Bettie Brechwald).

1900 Census: Wheatland, Vernon County, Wisconsin: Robert Pennell born Aug. 1837, age 62, married 41 years, born Michigan, Day Laborer), Wife Almina Pennell (born Jan. 1841, age 59, married 41 years, 9 children born, 6 still living, born Ohio), son Lewis Pennell (born Sept. 1879, age 20, born Wisconsin.

Almina Pennel died May 15, 1903 and is buried in De Soto Cemetery, Vernon County, Wisconsin.

Robert Pennel died Jan. 15, 1912 from pneumonia. (Vernon County, Vol. 7, page 468). He is buried in De Soto Cemetery, De Soto County, Wisconsin. I do not know the significance of the word "Illinois" on his tombstone.


Peterson, Abraham: (AKA Abraham Pederson Dille) was born in Roras, Sor-Trondelag, Norway, on 10 May 1844. He was the son of Peder Abrahamson Dille and Kerste Axelsdatter Jemt.

Axel P. Dille, son of Peter and Christine Dille, P. O. Dorchester, Waterloo Township, sec. 16, owns a farm of 200 acres, valued at $25 per acre; was born in Norway, Dec. 23, 1841, and came with his parents to America in 1857, and to his present farm in April, 1859. His brother Abraham served in Co. B, 27th Iowa Infantry, and died at Nashville, Tenn. Mr. Dille married Sarah E. Snaghoel, Jan. 13, 1862, and they have four children living, Peter, Anna, Abraham and Martin, having lost five by death: two named Peter, two named Emma, and Axel. Mr. Dille has served as justice of the peace and as assessor ten years, and was an enumerator of the last U. S. Census. He is a member of the Lutheran Church.

History of Allamakee County
W.E. Alexander, 1882, p. 483

Note by Elaine Johnson: This one is a bit of a mystery to me. There is no Abraham Dille in Company B (or anywhere in the 27th that I can find). There is, however, an Abraham Peterson (also Norwegian) in Company B. He is the only soldier in Company B named Abraham and died in Nashville. I do note that Axel's father is named Peter.

There is some interesting information found at Norwegians in the Civil War - Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum that could also be an explanation. On this website is information regarding:

DILLE, Abraham Pedersen

Residence: Allamakee County, Iowa. From Roraas, Norway. Civil War: Private. Died of disease at Nashville, Tennessee. 1864. Sources: (Ulvestad p276)

PETERSON, Abraham

IA 27th Inf Co B. Residence: Lansing, Iowa. Born in Norway. Civil War: Age 18. Enlisted 15 Aug 1862. Mustered 1 Sep 1862. Private. Died of disease 7 Dec 1864, Nashville, Tennessee. Buried National Cemetery, Nashville, Tennessee; section E, grave 2741. Sources: (ISW-III p1196)

I suspect that Abraham Pedersen Dille and Abraham Peterson are the same person -- see below

Per the Norwegians in the Civil War website:

About Norwegian Names

Anyone searching Norwegian soldiers is handicapped by changing names.

Young Norwegians used one name in Norway, frequently another in the army and a third after the war was over.

In Norway a young man would be known by his given name and his father's. As an example, Ole, son of Johan, would be known as Ole Johansen. If additional identity was needed, he would add his farm name, Myre; he was Ole Johansen who lived on Myre.

When he came to America and enlisted, he gave his name as he generally did "Ole Johansen" and the Yankee clerk would write "Ole Johnson" and "Ole Johnson" is how the soldier would be known.

An additional point of confusion results from the fact that Norway was a part of Sweden in the nineteenth century. An enlistee might give his place of birth as Norway; the Yankee clerk would write Sweden.

After the war, the immigrant soldier acquired a farm, got married, started a family and began to think seriously about what he wanted himself and his farm to be called. Take, for example, Sergeant George Johnson of the Wisconsin 15th, Company G. He came to America in 1854. After the war, he acquired a farm near Ridgeway, Winneshiek County, Iowa. He took back his baptismal name, adopted his old Norway farm name, and became Guttorm Hovden. It took help from Guttorm Hovden's grandchildren for us to connect their grandfather to soldier George Johnson.

A majority of young Norwegians enlisting in the Union army are known in the military records by their patronyms, their given names plus their father's, adding "sen" or "son." Very often their descendants do not know these soldiers by the names they used in the Army, but instead by names used after the war, and it takes a lot of searching to connect the two.

Ole Hanson of Winneshiek County, Iowa, came to America in 1862 and joined the Iowa 13th Regiment, Company G. He is known for the diaries he kept, both before and during the war. Vesterheim has them; museum visitors can hear a voice reading a portion of one telling about his arrival. Soldier Ole Hanson after the war became O. H. Nass.

Jorgen Anderson immigrated from Lier, Norway. His Winneshiek County, Iowa, neighbors knew him as George Linnevold.


I could be wrong and there may not be a connection, but, just in case, I am cross referencing these two names. ejj

On April 13, 2011, I received this update, which does confirm that they are the same person:

Dear Elaine,

I have read your comments regarding Abraham Peterson and you are, in fact, 100% correct that this is the same person as Abraham Pedersen Dille.

My wife descended from his only sibling, Axel Pederson Dille.

Abraham was born in Roras, Sor-Trondelag, Norway, on 10 May 1844. His parents were Peder Abrahamson Dille and Kerste Axelsdatter Jemt. His birth is attached and referenced to the official Norwegian Digital Archives. (Second entry on the page.) We have records from the archives for the family dating back to about 1640.

They left Norway on March 10, 1857 when Abraham was 13 years old. His parents and brother are buried at the Waterloo Ridge Cemetery in Allamakee county, Iowa.

If you have a photo of Company B before Abraham's death in December 1864, it would be appreciated.

Thank you for all of your effort, it is very much appreciated.

Richard E Ipsen
Portland, OR


Peterson, John A. He was born in January 1836 in Sweden. He married Anna Sophia Olson in June 1861 in Chicago, Illinois

John A. Peterson, sec. 20, P.O. Elon, farmer; born January 21, 1836; emigrated to the United States in 1851, stopping at Boston, working at shoemaking during the winters and fishing for mackerel during the summer. In 1857, he came to Rock Island, Ill., about the time of the Mormon massacre at Mountain Meadow, which caused quite an excitement. The government was enlisting soldiers for the regular army, to go out there, and he enlisted in Co. D. 6th U. S. Inf., and started by overland for Utah, where they stopped for a short time, soon pushing on to Benicia Barracks, Cal., remaining but a short time, when they were ordered to Mendocino, as headquarters for scouting expeditions against the Indians. During some of those excursions, and while in battle he was severely wounded by an Indian arrow, which pierced his left breast and entered the lungs. Upon falling, he pulled the arrow from his body, the blood following in a stream. He soon became unconscious, and was picked up for dead by his comrades after the battle, but finding him yet alive, they carried him to camp, when by kind care and nursing he finally recovered. But being disabled so as to be unfit for duty, he was discharged in August 1860, at Rock Island, Ill. He then went to Chicago, where he had friends, and was married there in June, 1861, to Miss Anna S. Olson, immediately starting for Allamakee County. At first he worked at his trade, but on account of his wound he was compelled to discontinue it. He then purchased 40 acres of land and commenced farming. In the spring of 1864 he enlisted in Co. B, 27th Inf., Io. Vol., went south and participated in the battle of Tupelo, Miss., which proving too hard for him, he was sent to the hospital at Memphis, and afterwards to Jefferson Barracks, Mo., and to Davenport in May, 1864, and discharged. He then moved to Webster County, Iowa, remaining about a year, when he sold out and returned to Center Township, purchasing his present farm of 177 and one-half acres, which is now worth about $4,000. Mr. P. has served as trustee of the township, and is at present serving his 11th year as justice of the peace. His children are Matilda C., Joshua A., Joel A., Huldah E., Alma O. and Jonathan A.; he has lost two children, John A. and Ogden O.

History of Allamakee County,
W.E. Alexander, 1882, Page 523-524

1870 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: John A. Peterson (age 34, farmer, born Sweden), Anna Peterson (age 28, born Sweden), Mathilde Peterson (age 8, born Iowa), Adolf Peterson (age 4, born Iowa), and Joel Peterson (age 1, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: John A. Peterson (age 44, farmer, born Sweden), wife Sophia Peterson (age 39, born Sweden), daughter Matilda Peterson (age 18, born Iowa), son Joushaway Peterson (age 14, born Iowa), son Joel Peterson (age 11, born Iowa), daughter Hulda Peterson (age 7, born Iowa), son Johnathan Peterson (age 3, born Iowa), daughter Alma Peterson (age 7/12, born Oct. born Iowa)

1885 Iowa State Census: Center. Allamakee County, Iowa: John A. Peterson (Township 98, Range 4, Section 20, S2, SE SE, age 49, farmer, born Sweden), Anna S. Peter (age 45, born Sweden), Joshua A. Peterson (age 18), Joel A. Peterson (age 15), Huldah E Peterson (age 12), Johnathon A. Peterson (age 7), and Alma S. Peterson (age 5)

1900 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: John A. Peterson (born Jan 1836, age 64, married 38 years, born Sweden, immigrated 1852, in US for 48 years, naturalized, farmer), wife Anna S. Peterson (born Jan. 1841, age 64, married 38 years, 10 children born, 5 still living, born Sweden, immigrated 1854 in US for 46 years), son Johnathan Peterson (born Mar. 1877, age 23, born Iowa).

John A. Peterson died Feb. 14, 1910 at Riga, North Dakota (pension records). He is buried at Center Baptist Cemetery, Center Township, Allamakee County, Iowa

His widow Anna S. Peterson filed for a pension on Mar. 18, 1910 in North Dakota.

1910 Census: Riga, McHenry, North Dakota: Anna S. Peterson (age 69, widowed, married 49 years, 10 children born, 5 still living, born Sweden), granddaughter Myrtie Johnson (age 14, born Minnesota)

Anna S. Peterson died June 3, 1944 and is buried in Center Baptist Church, Center Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.


Pfaff, Walter J. Per Pension Index, AKA Walter P. Walters. He was born about 1839 in Switzerland. He was most likely the son of Jerome Pfaff and Anna Maria Zobrist.

1860 Census: Clinton County, Illinois: Jerome Pfaff (age 48, farmer, born Switzerland), Mary Pfaff (age 36, born Switzerland), Walter Pfaff (age 21, laborer, born Switzerland), Anna Pfaff (age 19, born Switzerland), Jerome Pfaff (age 17, laborer, born Switzerland), Mary Pfaff (age 14, born Switzerland), Louiza Pfaff (age 12, born Switzerland), Susan Pfaff (age 10, born Switzerland), Eliza Pfaff (age 5, born Ill), Loney Pfaff (age 3, born Ill.) and Alita Pfaff (age 2, born Ill).

1870 Census: Township 3, Range 5, Madison County, Illinois: S. H. Brodtbeck (age 54, born Switzerland), Otto Brodtbeck (age 26, bookkeeper, born Switzerland), Matilda Brodtbeck (age 18, born Illinois), Susette Brodtbeck (age 50, born Switzerland), Joseph Koepflee (age 65, born Switzerland), Rosalie Koepfle (age 26, born Switzerland), Joseph Koepfle (age 4, born Illinois), Solomon Koepfle (age 17, born Illinois), Walter Pfaff (age 30, merchant, born Switzerland), Susan Meyer, age 17, housekeeper, born Switzerland). (Note: Post office address was Highland). (Note: Otto Brodtbeck also served in Company B, 27th Iowa, and it appears that Walter Pfaff was a witness to the marriage of Otto Brodtbeck and Emily Weinheimer.)

1880 Census: St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri: Jacob Weinheimer (age 42, cigar box factory), wife Annie Weinheimer (age 27), daughter Ada Weinheimer (age 5), daughter Ory Weinheimer (age 2), boarder W. P. Walters, age 41, clerk in cigar box factory, born Switzerland). I feel certain this is him. Note in 1873 he was a witness to the marriage of Otto Brodtbeck and Emily Weinheimer. Is this family related to her?

Great Register of Voters 1880 - 1887 in San Diego Leaves & Saplings: Walter P. Walters, Year 1885, age 46, born about 1839,

Walter Pfaff filed for a pension on Sept. 30 1901 in California. Pension index said: Walter P. Walters, alias Walter J. Pfaff.

1890 California, Voter Registers, 1866-1898: Voter. No. 11900, Reg. No. 218, Name: Walter P. Walters, Age 49, Nativity: Switzerland, Occupation: cabinet maker, Local Residence: 3rd ward, Naturalized: by virtue of naturalization of father. Date of Registration: April 23, 1890.

1892 California, Voter Registers, 1866-1898: No. 8207, Reg. No. 80, Walter P. Walters, Age 53, Nativity, Switzerland, Occupation: Cabinet Maker Local Residence: 6 ward, 2 prct. 5 ft 10 1/2 in., Dark Complexion, Dark Blue Eyes, Dark hair. Naturalized by virtue of naturalization of father. Address: 651 E. Street. Date of Registration: August 25, 1892.

1894 California, Voter Registration, 1866-1898 No. 7681, Walter P. Walters, age 55, 5 feet 10 1/2 inches, dark complexion, gray eyes, dark hair, nativity Switzerland, occupation: cabinet maker,

1910 Census: San Diego Ward 7, San Diego, California; Walter P. Walters (age 71, single, born Switzerland, immigrated 1844, naturalized, own income).

1920 Census: San Diego, San Diego, California: Walter P. Walters (age 81, single, born Switzerland, immigrated 1844)

Walter J. Pfaff (alias Walters, Walter P. died Jan. 22, 1922 at San Diego, California (pension records)


Price, Frederick Pulaski He was born June 25, 1841 in Ohio, He was the son of George Price and Sarah Ann Eck. He married Agnes D. Logan. She was the daughter of James Logan (1804 - Feb. 16, 1878) and Jane Dunlap/Dunlop (1802 - May 3, 1878). Her sister Louisa Logan was married to William Henry Harrison, who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa. Frederick's sister Mary Ellen Price was married to Thomas Medary who also served in Company B, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Galena, Jo Daviess, Illinois: George Price (age 47, teamster, born Ohio)), Sarah Price (age 47, born Pennsylvania)), Frederick P. Price (age 8, born Ohio), Mary Price (age 6, born Ohio), Sarah Price (age 2, born Illinois) and Elizabeth Price (age 2, born Illinois).

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Andrew J. Haines (age 50, born Ireland), Elen Haines (age 50, born Ohio), Mary E. Price (age 16, born Ohio) and Frederick Price (age 18, born Ohio).

1860 Ludlow, Allamakee County, Iowa: James Logan (age 56) Jane Logan (age 54), James Logan (age 21), William Logan (age 19), Louisa Logan (age 14), Agnes Logan (age 10)

In the fall of 1863 George Haislet bought the old Mirror outfit and began the publication of a republican paper called the Union. Thus each party had a representative organ, and the music they used to make was pleasing to a certain class of their readers, as is usually the case; but Armstrong's volubility and wit were a little too much for the Union man, and he generally kept pretty well under cover. Haislet continued the publication of the paper until February 1866, when our self and brother-in-law, F. P. Price bought out the concern and at once changed the name back to the Mirror. After several months Mr. Price retired from the firm and we continued its publication until the summer of 1870, when he sold the office to James T. Metcalf and his cousin, John Metcalf, the latter of Viroqua, Wisconsin.

1870 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: A. J. Haines, (age 55), S. A. Haines (age 62), boarders F. P. Price (age 28, printer, born Ohio), Agnes Price (age 20, born NY) and Maude Price (age 1, born Iowa). (They were living next door to James and Jane Logan).

1880 Census: New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa: Frederic P. Price (age 38, hotel keeper, born Ohio), wife Agnes Price (age 30, born NY), daughter Maud Price (age 11, born Iowa), son George T. Price (age 9, born Iowa), son James L. Price (age 5, born Iowa), and daughter Irmadelle Price (age 10 Months, born July, born Iowa)

1885 Iowa State Census: Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: Fred P. Price (New Albin, Township 100, Range 4, Section 11, Lot 165, age 43, printer, born Ohio), Agnes Price (age 32), Maude E. Price (age 16, music teacher, born Allamakee County), George T. Price (age 14, born Allamakee County), James L. Price (age 10, born Allamakee County), Irma Price (age 5, born Allamakee County, Iowa).

Frederick P. Price filed for a pension on July 6, 1891 in Kansas.

1895 Kansas State Census Collection: Parson, Labette County, Kansas: F. P. Price (age 53, born Ohio, to Kansas from Iowa, R. R. Engineer, Honorably discharged from the volunteer military service of the United States, Name of State: Iowa, Company B, 27 Inf.), Agnes Price (age 45, born New York), Irma Price (age 15, born Iowa), Fred C. Price (age 10, born Iowa), and Geo. T. Price (age 24, born Iowa).

Agnes Price died March 31, 1896 in Parsons, Labette County, Kansas.

1900 Census, New Albin Town, Allamakee County, Iowa: Frederick P. Price, born June 1841, age 58, widowed), Daughter Irma G, born July 1879, age 20), and son Frederick C (born Feb. 1885, age 15).

1910 Census - South Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska: Fred P. Price, boarder, age 68, born Ohio. Irma G. Price (age 30, born Iowa, servant) was in the same household. There were many boarders. It did not say what type of establishment it was.

1920 Census - New Albin Town, Allamakee County, Iowa: Frederick P. Price (age 78, widowed) and Daughter Erma G Price, (age 40).

1925 Iowa State Census, Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa: Fred P. Price, age 83 widowed, pension 8 per month, his father was George Price, born Ohio. Mother Sarah Price, born Ohio. (based on the record for Mary Ellen Price married to Thomas Medary, this is probably incorrect. ejj). Erma Price, daughter, age 45, single. father Fred P. Price, born Ohio, Mother Agnes Logan, born New York.

Frederick P. Price died Jan. 1, 1929 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

There are a couple of family trees that list the following children: Maude Stanley Price, born 1868, George Thomas Price, born 1870, James Logan Price born 1875, Irma Grace Price, born 1879 and Frederick C. Price, born 1885.


Reed, Milton F. He was born about June 24, 1843 in New York. He was the son of John Reed and Hannah.

The following information is about the brother of Milton Reed.

Allamakee County's David Wilson Reed of Civil War fame to be remembered

Waukon Standard
Posted on 10/13/2004 by yonif

David Wilson Reed stood proud and tall as he spoke to the crowd gathered at Shiloh National Military Park on November 22, 1906. Encircling a monument to his regiment, the 12th Iowa Infantry, the crowd heard only clear and unfettered pride as Reed pointed and motioned while describing the 12th Iowa's action in the "Hornet's Nest". The fifty-five year old man reminded his hearers how the regiment and its brigade "held the Confederates at bay all day long" on April 6, 1862, and that even sixty-two Confederate guns "failed to move the Union forces from their position."

Reed's pride was understandable on a day that summed up his entire life. For all his fifty-five years, Reed's existence revolved around a few events. He was a soldier whose most notable experience in the Civil War was being wounded at Shiloh. He was a historian whose work concentrated almost exclusively on that battle. He was an extremely particular man who always strove for truth and accuracy, and that shone forth in his writings on Shiloh. The monument dedication on November 22, 1906, therefore, was a fitting culmination of Reed's entire private and professional life.

- from "The Father of Shiloh National Military Park" by Timothy B. Smith

David Wilson Reed was born in Cortland, New York April 2, 1841. In 1855, his family moved from New York and settled in Allamakee County, in the Elon area east of Waukon, where they worked as farmers. In 1860 he was a student at Upper Iowa University when, at the beginning of the Civil War, a call for volunteers to serve in the Union Army interrupted his schooling. With a group of his friends from the university, he enlisted in the Union Army on September 15, 1861.

The "University Recruits," as they came to be known, formed a part of Company C of the 12th Iowa Infantry Regiment. Reed was joined in Company C by two other Allamakee County soldiers; Sumner J. Hartshorn, also of Elon, and Abner C. Bushnel of Jefferson Township. Bushnel became a prisoner of war during the Battle of Shiloh. Company B of the 12th Iowa included 65 Allamakee County soldiers at that time. Another 78 Allamakee County men would join the 12th Iowa as the war progressed.

The 12th Iowa Infantry would take part in the capture of Fort Henry and Fort Donelson where John J. Stillman of Company B became the first Civil War casualty from Allamakee County. After the capture of Fort Donelson, the 12th moved on to the Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River near Savannah, Tennessee. Near Pittsburg Landing there was a small log Methodist church, the Shiloh Meeting House, which would give the coming battle its name. The name "Shiloh" means "House of Peace."

The Battle of Shiloh was the first major battle between the North and the South in the western area of the war. It began in the early morning hours of April 6, 1862. A surprise attack on Union forces led to early success for the Confederate Army, until they met stiff resistance and were stopped by Union soldiers deployed in an oak thicket and along a farm road which would later become known as the "Sunken Road." The resistance of the Union forces, which included the 8th, 12th and 14th Iowa infantry units, was so fierce that the soldiers of the Confederacy named the area "The Hornets' Nest," as it is still known today.

Repeated infantry attacks by the Confederate troops could not penetrate into the Hornets' Nest. It was only after tremendous barrages from eleven artillery units called up to focus on the area, that the Southern infantry units were able to take control of the areas around the Hornets' Nest. Surrounded, the Iowa infantry units were forced to surrender. The stubborn resistance at the Hornets' Nest allowed General Grant the time and opportunity to organize and form a defensive line that would ultimately lead to a rout of the Confederate forces.

As the soldiers of the 12th Iowa Infantry recognized that retreat was no longer possible, David Reed was wounded severely in the leg. He watched as his fellow soldiers surrendered, unable to surrender himself. Three other Allamakee County men were also left wounded on the battlefield, Orison F. Adams, Cornelius Deeney, and William F. Maynard. Reed remained on the battlefield throughout the rainy night, until he was evacuated after Union forces once again took control of the area the following day.

A total of 36 soldiers of the 12th Iowa Infantry were killed at Shiloh. Another 57 were wounded and 419 were captured. Of those captured, 65 died in Confederate prison camps. In the battle that lasted just a little over one day, of the nearly 100,000 soldiers who fought on both sides, over 24,000 were killed, wounded or missing in action. More Iowa soldiers were killed or wounded at Shiloh than in any other battle of the Civil War. A collection of 6,753 Iowans fought in that battle, and 2,407 were killed, wounded or missing.

Reed would later write of old soldiers meeting at the site of the Hornets' Nest. He said they would "tell of the struggle through the thicket where the brush was literally cut away by bullets and the ground so thickly strewn with dead that a person might walk over the place on dead bodies. Many of these visitors have been able to find the very tree from behind which they carried on the stubborn contest, or the remnants of a rotting log that sheltered them when wounded."

Those soldiers of the 8th, 12th and 14th Iowa Infantry who were not captured, died or severely wounded at Shiloh were formed up into the 'Union Brigade." Only 75 of the original 981 soldiers of the 12th Iowa were left to represent that unit in the Union Brigade. Lieutenant David B. Henderson commanded the 12th's detachment of the Union Brigade. He and Reed had developed a strong personal friendship, and Henderson would prove to be a loyal and powerful friend to David Reed in his life after the war.

His wounds healed, Reed returned to the 12th Infantry and Union Brigade in time for the Battle of Corinth in October of 1862. In that Battle, 39 of the 75 soldiers remaining from the 12th were killed, wounded or missing.

David Reed went on to participate in many more battles during the Civil War. Often cited for gallantry, he distinguished himself in combat, rising to the rank of Major. He was awarded the rank of Brevet Major for Gallantry at Spanish Fort.

David Reed was one of nearly 800 Allamakee County men who served in the Civil War. Many died in combat. Others died in the squalid confines of prisoner of war camps. And many more died of disease while serving.

After the war, Reed came home to Waukon. He returned to school, studying law and was admitted to the bar in 1867. He was active in politics and served as Allamakee County Recorder for ten years. He was appointed Deputy Collector of the Internal Revenue Service for the 3rd District of Iowa in 1867, an appointment facilitated by his friend D. B. Henderson, who was working for the Internal Revenue Service. In 1880, he was appointed Postmaster of Waukon by President Rutherford B. Hayes, and served in that position until 1887.

In addition to his friendship with D. B. Henderson, Reed had met powerful people in government during his search for his brother's grave. His brother Milton was a private in the 27th Iowa Infantry and died of disease while serving. He ultimately located Milton's grave in the National Cemetery in Corinth, Mississippi. During the years he searched, he met the people who, along with Henderson, would eventually influence his appointment as secretary and historian of the Shiloh National Military Park that was established by Congress in December 1894.

D. B. Henderson grew up in Henderson Prairie between Postville and Clermont, Iowa. He was elected to the United States Congress in 1882. He had authored the bill that created the Shiloh National Military Park. Like Reed, he had fought with the 12th Iowa Infantry at Shiloh, and his brother Thomas had died there and was buried at Pittsburg Landing. Henderson subsequently became Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. He wanted his friend, David Reed, to serve as the secretary and historian of the park, and it was his influence that put Reed in the job.

David Reed plunged himself into the job at Shiloh. He meticulously studied the battle with every resource available to him. He interviewed generals and soldiers on both sides of the conflict, and spent innumerable days walking the 4,000 acres of the battlefield to locate specific sites of encampments and military actions. He was relentless in his search for accuracy, and personally supervised the location and positioning of the hundreds of historic markers and 250 cannons still present today.

He also developed maps of the battle, depicting the locations of the various units through the battle, and wrote the definitive history of the battle. For many of the years he worked at the park, which was in a very remote location, he and those assisting him lived in tents at the site. He finally moved into a house on the park grounds and became the resident park director in 1905. In 1910 he became Commission Chairman of the park.

In 1913, David Reed was injured when he was thrown out of his carriage. He was forced to turn over his onsite duties at the park because of that injury and his failing health. He returned to Waukon, but continued to supervise the park commission from his hometown. Recognized as "Shiloh's most knowledgeable historian," the "Father of Shiloh National Military Park," died September 22, 1916. He is buried in Waukon.

1850 Census: Cortlandville, Cortland County, New York: John Reed Jr, (age 37, farmer, born New York), Hannah E. Reed (age 35, born New York), David W. Reed (age 11, born New York) and Milton F. Reed (age 7, born New York. John Reed (age 69), and Joanna Reed (age 68) were living next door.

1860 Census: Center, Allamakee county, Iowa: John Reed (age 46, farmer, born New York), Hannah E. Reed (age 44, born New York), Mary I. Reed (age 20, teacher, born New York). David W. Reed (age 19, farmer, born New York), Milton Reed (age 16, farmer, born New York) and Ella I Reed (age 6, born New York).

Milton Reed died at Jackson, Tennessee on Feb. 2, 1863. There is a stone at Oakland Cemetery - Main, Makee Township, Allamakee County, Iowa
(June 24, 1843 - Feb. 2, 1863 GR Co B IA 27 Inf Lot 151)
Died at Jackson, Tn. 2-2-1863 age 19y 7m 9d - (NOTE: date of birth was computed using the tombstone information).

There is another stone at Corinth National Cemetery. Woodmanesee notes say: The Armed Forces Grave Registration records for him show that he is buried in Corinth National Cemetery, Corinth, Alcorn Co., Mississippi. The text states "enl 11 Aug 1862 age 19 res Lansing [Iowa] died disease and originally buried at Jackson TN; memorial marker for this soldier at Oakland Cem in Allamakee Co IA."

(Note by Elaine Johnson: the biography of his brother David Reed says he was originally buried at Union National Cemetery. -- The stone at Waukon, Iowa says he is buried at Corinth National Cemetery.


Reed, Perry - He was born about 1838 in Iowa. He was the son of Joshua and Martha Reed.

1856 Iowa State Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Martha Berry (age 57, born North Carolina, she had been in the state of Iowa for 20 years). Perry R. Berry (age 18, born Iowa.).

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Martha Berry (age 61, born North Carolina) and Perry Reed (age 22, born Iowa.

Perry Reed died Feb. 10, 1865 at Eruptive General Hospital, Louisville Kentucky from small pox. He is buried in Cave Hill National Cemetery, Louisville, Ky. Section C., range 2, grave 97.

His mother Martha Berry filed for a pension. The information from her pension record is extracted below.

Eruptive Genl Hospital
Louisville KY Feb. 13, 1865.

Madam

It is my painful duty to inform you of the death of your son Perry Reed at Branch No. 2 of this General Army Hospital of small pox.

If you will sign & return both copies of the annexed receipts his money ($3.40) will be sent to you by express or by mail as you may direct.

As his clothes are affected with small pox of course you will not want them.

For his back pay etc, you must apply to the adjutant general U.S.A. Washington DC.

I am sincerely
Your obdt. servant

A. C. Swartzmalden
Surg.?


His mother M. B. Berry filed for a pension on May 9, 1865.

In her application she said that she was the widow of Joshua Reed, who died Nov. 15, 1837. She was also the widow of Thomas Berry. She married Thomas Berry on Dec. 5, 1839. He died April 15, 1853. She had no children with Thomas Berry. He left her with no property and no means of support. Perry Reed was her only son. He left no widow or children and she was wholly or in part dependent upon her son for support.

The pension records show that she married Stephan Edmundson on April 5, 1868.


Robinson, John T. - He was born Feb. 1, 1841 in New York. He was the son of James Robison and Rose Steward. He married Georgiana Alberta Haines on Oct. 19, 1867 in Dorchester, Allamakee County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Sylvester Haines and Elsie Nurbe (Elcey Nourse).

1880 Census - New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa: John T. Robinson (age 40, grain dealer, born New York), wife Georgianna (age 35), son Frank H. (age 9), daughter Daisy M. (age 5), daughter Maude A (age 3), and daughter Hope (age 1). There were a couple of servants in the household and an Amelia Lane (age 70, widowed, born England - no relationship was shown.)

1885 Iowa State Census, New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa: John T. Robinson, (Lot 317, age 44, grain and stock buyer), Georgiana A. Robinson (age 39), Frank H. Robinson (age 13), Daisy M. Robinson, (age 9), Maude A Robinson, (age 7) and Hope A. Robinson (age 5). He filed for a pension on Feb. 3, 1889 in Iowa.

1895 Iowa State Census, New Albin, Allamakee County Iowa: John T. Robinson, (age 54, Stock and grain buyer), Georgiana Robinson, (age 49), Frank H. (age 24), Daisy M. (age 19, Maude (age 18) and Hope (age 15)

1900 Census - New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa: John T. Robinson (born Feb. 1841, age 50, married 32 years, born New York, Dealer - Stocks), wife Georgiana A, (born June 1845, age 54, married 32 years, 4 children, 4 living). Son Frank H, born June 1870, age 29), Daughter Daisy M., born May 1875, age 25), daughter Hope (born May 1879, age 21).

1920 census - Iowa Township, Allamakee County, Iowa: John T. Robinson, age 78, wife Georgiana A (age 74), son Frank H. (age 47) and daughter Daisy M. (age 42).

1925 Iowa State Census, Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa: John T. Robinson (age 81), father: James Robinson, born Ireland. Mother: Rose Steward, born Ireland. Wife Georgianna Haines (age 79), her father: Sylvester Haines, born Mass. Her mother: Elsie Nurbe, born Mass. (I found some family trees that showed the name Elcey Nourse)

John T. Robinson died Oct. 19, 1929 (Pension Index Record) and is buried in New Albin Cemetery, Allamakee County, Iowa.

The citizens of New Albin mourn the death of their last surviving veteran of the Civil War, John T Robinson, aged 89 years, passed away October 19. He was an Allamakee resident for 79 years and saw three years of service in the war, enlisted in Company B of Dorchester and was a member of the 27th Iowa, seeing service and 17 engagements.

Postville Herald, October 31, 1929


Roese, Emil He was born about 1841 in Germany. He was most likely the son of Herman and Charlotte: I am sure that Emil and Richard Roese were brothers. However, I was unable to find any definitive information on either one of them. I am pretty sure the 1856 census is the right family, but I don't have any proof.

1856 Iowa State Census: Center, Allamakee County Iowa: Herman Rosa (age 52, born Germany, farmer), Charlotte Rosa (age 44, born Germany), Otto Rosa (age 15, born Germany), Emil Rosa (age 14, born Germany) and Richard Rosa (age 13, born Germany), Edward Rosa (age 11, born Germany), Lowrey Rosa (age 8, born Germany), Charles Rosa (age 7, born Germany) and Sophia Rosa (age 5, born Germany).

Submitted by
John Bauercamper

INFORMATION COPIED FROM RECORDS OF COMPANY B, 27TH IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, AT THE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM, WAUKON, IOWA, FROM BOOK CALLED

"COMPANY DESCRIPTIVE RECORD":

EMIL ROESE: Age 20, height 5'6", complexion dark, eyes black, hair black, born Prussia, occupation farmer, enlisted August 13, 1862 at Lansing, Iowa, enlisted by S. W. Hemenway, term 3 years.


INFORMATION COPIED FROM RECORDS OF COMPANY B, 27TH IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, AT THE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIEITY MUSEUM, WAUKON, IOWA, FROM BOOKS CALLED "MORNING REPORTS":

PRIVATE EMIL ROESE: April 9, 1864: Emil Roese wounded at Pleasant Hill and left in Hospital.


Surgeon's Report:

"I, George Koehler, Med. D., a Physician residing and practicing in Lansing, Allamakee Co. Iowa do hereby certify that I have attended and attend Emil Roese, private in Comp B 27 Iowa Inf. Vol. on his wounds on the arm and the leg. I find him by this reason unfit to do military duty or to join his regiment while the time of his furlough is expiring on the 27th June next. I do further certify and Declare it to be my opinion that he will not be able for any military duty for the next thirty days.

Lansing, Iowa the 17th June 1864.

/s/ Dr. Med. G. Koehler Physician.


July 28, 1864: Private Emil Roese returned to the company from Absent sick Memphis, Tenn. July 28, 1864.


Roese, Richard He was born about 1842 in Germany. He was most likely the son of Herman and Charlotte. I am sure that Emil and Richard Roese were brothers. However, I was unable to find any definitive information on either one of them. I am pretty sure the 1856 census is the right family, but I don't have any proof.

1856 Iowa State Census: Center, Allamakee County Iowa: Herman Rosa (age 52, born Germany, farmer), Charlotte Rosa (age 44, born Germany), Otto Rosa (age 15, born Germany), Emil Rosa (age 14, born Germany) and Richard Rosa (age 13, born Germany), Edward Rosa (age 11, born Germany), Lowrey Rosa (age 8, born Germany), Charles Rosa (age 7, born Germany) and Sophia Rosa (age 5, born Germany).

Submitted by
John Bauercamper

INFORMATION COPIED FROM RECORDS OF COMPANY B, 27TH IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, AT THE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIEITY MUSEUM, WAUKON, IOWA, FROM BOOK CALLED

"COMPANY DESCRIPTIVE RECORD":

#60 - RICHARD ROESE: Age 19, height 5'4", complexion dark, eyes black, hair black, born Switzerland, occupation farmer, enlisted August 15, 1862 at Lansing, Iowa, enlisted by S. W. Hemenway, term 3 years.


INFORMATION COPIED FROM RECORDS OF COMPANY B, 27TH IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, AT THE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIEITY MUSEUM, WAUKON, IOWA, FROM BOOKS CALLED "MORNING REPORTS":

PRIVATE RICHARD ROESE:

April 27, 1864: Private Richard Roese was sent to the Hospital at Alexandria, Louisiana.

May 28, 1864: Private Richard Roese returned to duty.


Surgeon's Report:

"I, George Koehler, Med. D., a Physician residing and practicing in Lansing, Allamakee Co. Iowa do hereby certify that I have attended and attend Richard Roese, private in Comp B 27 Iowa Inf. Vol. on intermitting fever, liver complaint and general debility. By reason of his critical condition I find him unfit to join his regiment or to do any military duty. The time of his furlough will expire of the next first day of August and I must further certify and Declare it to be my conviction that he will not be able for any military service for the next thirty days.

Lansing, Iowa the 22nd July 1864.

/s/ Dr. Med. G. Koehler
Attending Physician


September 1, 1864: Private Richard Roese returned from Absent Sick.

Richard Roese filed for a pension on Oct. 31, 1892 in Colorado.

1900 Census: Surface Creek, Delta County, Colorado, Richard Roese, (servant, born Oct, 1842, age 57, single, born Germany, immigrated 1870 (note if the year of immigration is correct, then this is not the right person).

Richard Roese died Jan. 2, 1928. (Pension index record - it does not say where he died).


Roonsburg, Taylor (alternate name Roomsburg) - He was born about 1846 in Pennsylvania He was probably the son of Nichols Roomsburg and Lucinda Ringer.

He died of disease May 5, 1864, Columbus, Ky and is buried in National Cemetery, Mound City, Ill. Section C. grave 3107

1870 Census, Benton, Polk County, Missouri: Nicholis Roomburg (age 50), Lucinda Roomsburg (age 44), Washita E Roomsburg (age 15), Ella Roomsburg (age 13), Winfield S. Roomsburg (age 10), Charles F. Roomsburg (age 8), Ulissus Roomsburg (age 6), Alfred C Roomsburg (age 4), Susan Roomsburg (age 6/12).

1880 Census, Polk County, Missouri: Nichols Roomburg (age 59), Lucinda Roomsburg (age 50), Winfield Roomsburg (age 19), Ulysses (age 15), Alfred A. (age 12), Ida S. Age 10, Climent J. Age 8), and Laura H. (age 6).

His mother Lucinda Roomsburg filed for a pension on Sept. 22, 1886. His father Nicholas Roomsburg filed for a pension on Sept. 20, 1886. both were filed in Missouri. There was only one certificate number, so apparently the pension was given to Nicholas Roomsburg.


Rose, George H. He was born about 1847 in Wisconsin. He was the son of Jesse M. Rose and Diantha Jane Converse (Mar. 7, 1824 - Apr 9, 1915). He married Ellen Benson in 1870.

1850 census, Allamakee County, Iowa: Jesse Rose, (age 38, farmer, born Mass.), Jane Rose (age 30, born NY), Hellen J. (age 14, born Ohio), William F (age 12, born Ohio), George H (age 2, born Wisconsin), Rhoda (age 0, born Wisconsin).

In the year 1853 Jesse M. Rose built, probably, the first gristmill, with bolt, in Allamakee and Winneshiek counties. It was located on Village Creek, where the village of that name now is, in the western edge of Lafayette Township. Farmers brought their grists to this mill from Winneshiek County and from over the line in Minnesota; and it is said even from Clayton County. It did a large business, running day and night, only being delayed in order to make repairs. Azee Pratt and other Makee carpenters assisted in its construction. Mr. Rose went west about 1875.

History of Winneshiek and Allamakee Counties Iowa,1882, by W. E. Alexander, Chapter VI

Milton.--On Section 18, Lafayette township, was laid out by Jesse M. Rose, December 7, 1854. He it was who here built the first flouring mill in the county, in 1853. Afterwards, in March, 1857, Mr. Rose had another tract of land, lying to the east of Milton, divided into lots and blocks, and named it after the stream -- Village Creek.

History of Winneshiek and Allamakee Counties Iowa,1882, by W. E. Alexander, Chapter VI

1856 Iowa State Census: Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: J. M. Rose (age 34, born Mass., Miller), Jane Rose (age 33, born NY), Geo. H. Rose (age 7, born Wisc.), Roda Rose (age 5, born Wisc.), Dianthe I. Rose (age 3, born Iowa), Elijah Rose (age 1, born Iowa) and Wm Rose (age 18, born Mass, Teamster). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 5 years.

1860 Census - Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: J. M. Rose, (age 38, miller, born Massachusetts), Jane Rose (age 37, born NY), George H. Rose (age 11, born Wisconsin), Rhoda S. Rose (age 10, born Wisconsin), Denthia J. Rose (age 7, born Iowa), Minni E. Rose (age 5, born Iowa), Flora A. Rose (Age 3, born Iowa), and Mary M. Rose (age 1, born Iowa).

In his entry of October 26, 1860, he writes: "There is quite a stir with Rose and Twiford about removing the county seat from Waukon to Lansing; they are circulating a petition for this change." and on November 5th: "No school today, but went over to Lansing to lay off Court House Block for J. M. Rose. They give only about one acre of land." He was living at Village Creek then. January 26, 1861, he says: "Went over to Lansing with Mr. Rose. He requested me to see several men about the building of a house for court rooms." On September 21, 1862, after having visited Rossville, he writes: "Rossville seems not to have grown at all during the past six years."

Past and Present of Allamakee County, 1913, Chapter 20

1885 Kansas State Census: Center, Chautauqua County, Kansas: G. H. Rose (age 36, married, farmer, born Wisconsin, from Nebraska to Kansas, Honorably discharged from the volunteer military service of the United States: State: Iowa, Company B, Regiment: 27, Arm of Service: I), Ellen Rose (age 32, married, born NY), Chas Rose (age 13, born NY) and Wm. Rose (age 5, born Canada).

George H. Rose filed for a pension on July 21, 1890 in Kansas.

1900 Census - Cleveland, Dewey County, Oklahoma: George H. Rose (born Oct 1847, age 52, married 30 years), wife Ellen, (born June 1851, age 48, 2 children, 2 still living.), Son William (born Feb. 1880 in New York, age 20).

1915 Kansas State Census, Delaware, Leavenworth, Kansas: G. H. Rose (age 68, born Wisconsin, from Oklahoma to Kansas, farmer, Honorably discharged from the volunteer military service of the United States: State: Iowa, Company B, 27th Iowa Infantry), E Rose (age 53), D. Rose ( male, age 9, born NY)

U.S. National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers at Pacific Branch, Sawtelle, Los Angeles County, California: MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: 4 January 1864, Lansing, Iowa. Rank: Private: Company: B, Regiment 27th Iowa Inf. Time and place of discharge: May 23, 1865, New Orleans, LA. Disabilities When Admitted to the Home: Dble. Ing. Hernia. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Born Wisconsin, Age 63, Height 5 feet 5 inches. Complexion Light, Blue eyes, Gray hair, can read and write, Religion: Preb. Occupation: Hotel Keeper, Residence subsequent to Discharge: Clinton Okla, widowed. Name and address of nearest relative: Ms. E. Rose, W 49th St #1619, Los Angeles, CA. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: 35. Date of Re-Admission and Transfer: Ad. Western B 12/11/09; Dis Western B 23/4/10; Re Ad Western B 29/11/12; Dis Western B 20/9/18. Re Ad W B May 22, 1919. Date of Discharge: 19/4/19 Cause of Discharge: O. R.

US National Homes for Disabled Soldiers, Western Branch, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kansas: MILITARY History: Enlisted Jan. 4, 1864, Lansing, Iowa. Private Co. B. Regiment 27 Iowa Inf. Discharged: May 23, 1865 at New Orleans, LA Disabilities when admitted to the Home: Hernia, Rheu, Hernia - prob Cystitis Hypert & c. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where Born: Wisconsin, age 63, height 5-5, Complexion Light, Blue Eyes, Gray Hair, can read and write, Religion: Preb., Occupation: Hotel Keeper Residence subsequent to Discharge: Clinton, Okla. Married, Name and address of Nearest relative: Ellen Rose, Clinton, Oklahoma. HOME HISTORY: Admitted: Nov. 12, 1909 WB - Discharged Apr 28, 1910. Re AD: 2-9-1912 WB, Discharged Sept. 20, 1918; Re AD Jan 28, 1918 Pac. BR. Discharged April 19, 1918; Re Ad May 15, 1919 W. BR, Discharge Nov. 2, 1921. Re Ad Feb. 6, 1922, W. Br. Date of Death: Sept. 18, 1923. Cause of Death: Chronic Myocarditis; contrb. Arterio Sclerosis. GENERAL REMARKS: Died 6:40 AM. Brother-in-Law R. R. Wilkinson, Box 745 Retsil, Washington notified. Buried Sept. 20, 1923, Section 30, Row 17, Grave 6926. Chapl. Berry Officiating..

Per the US Veterans Gravesites: Geo. H. Rose, Leavenworth National Cemetery, Section 30 Row 17 Site 23. Cemetery Address: P. O. Box 1694 4101 S. 4th St, Traffic Way Leavenworth, KS 66048


Rose, William F. - He was born Sept. 1840 in Ohio. He was the son of Jesse M. Rose and Diantha Jane Converse (Mar. 7, 1824 - Apr 9, 1915). He married Elvira Ann Rathbun on May 17, 1893.

1850 census, Allamakee County, Iowa: Jesse Rose, (age 38, farmer, born Mass.), Jane Rose (age 30, born NY), Hellen J. (age 14, born Ohio), William F (age 12, born Ohio), George H (age 2, born Wisconsin), Rhoda (age 0, born Wisconsin).

1856 Iowa State Census: Lafayette, Allamakee County, Iowa: J. M. Rose (age 34, born Mass., Miller), Jane Rose (age 33, born NY), Geo. H. Rose (age 7, born Wisc.), Roda Rose (age 5, born Wisc.), Dianthe I. Rose (age 3, born Iowa), Elijah Rose (age 1,born Iowa) and Wm Rose (age 18, born Mass, Teamster). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 5 years.

William F. Rose filed for a pension on Jan. 17, 1877.

1900 Census, Prairie Du Chein, Crawford County, Wisconsin: William F. Rose (born Sept. 1840, age 59, married 7 years, boarding house keeper), Wife Elvira A. (born April 1849, age 51, married 7 years, 2 children 0 living).

1905 Wisconsin State Census: Prairie du Chien: Wm. F. Rose (age 64, born Ohio, Retired), Elvira Rose (age 64, born Wis.)

William F. Rose died Nov. 25, 1909 at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin (Pension Index Records). He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Prairie du Chien, Crawford County, Wisconsin.

His widow Elvira Rose filed for a pension on Feb. 8, 1910.

Elvira Rose died in 1936 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Prairie du Chien, Crawford County, Wisconsin.


Ruprecht, Paul He was born Oct. 20, 1842 in Germany. He was the son of Edward Ruprecht (July 20, 1816 - March 27, 1880) and Christina C (April 23, 1816, April 5, 1895). He married Caroline Schroeder.

1856 Iowa State Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa; Edward Ruprcht (age 46, born Germany), Christina Ruprcht (age 40, born Germany), Theodore Ruprcht (age 16, born Germany), and Paul Ruprcht (age 14, born Germany), The family had been in the state of Iowa 1 year.

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Edward Rupricht (age 44, hotel keeper, born Prussia), Christina Rupricht (age 44, born Prussia), Theodore Rupricht (age 19, hosster, born Prussia) and Powell Ruprichit (age 17, bookkeeper, born Prussia).

1870 Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Ed Utrecht, (age 54, hotel keeper), Christian (age 54), Theodore (age 29, livery stable), Paul (age 26, hotel steward), Caroline, (age 22), Emil (age 2), Theodore (age 6 mo).

1880 Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Paul Rupreckt (age 37, baker, born Prussia), Caroline (age 31, born Prussia), Emil (age 11, born Iowa), Theodore (age 10, born Iowa), Edward (age 8, born Iowa), Otto (age 4, born Iowa) and Huldah (age 3, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Paul Utrecht (age 42, Hotel keeper), Caroline (age 37), Emmil (age 16), Theodore (age 15), Edward (age 14), Otto (age 10), Hulda (age 7), Benjamin (age 4), Dora (age 0).

1895 Iowa State Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Paul Utrecht (age 52, hotel keeper, soldier in the War of the Rebellion: Company B, 27 Regiment, Iowa Infantry), Caroline, (age 45, Presbyterian), Theodore (age 25), Otto (age 19), Hulda (age 17), Barnhardt (age 14), Dora (age 11), Selma (age 8), and William (age 6).

Caroline Utrecht (born June 4, 1848), died July 26, 1898. She is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa

1900 Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Paul Utrecht (born Oct. 1842, age 57, widowed, immigrated in 1852, naturalized), son Otto (born Aug. 1875, age 24), daughter Hulda (born Mar 1877, age 23), Son Benhardt (born Sept. 1880, age 19), daughter Dorah (Born Aug 1883, age 16), Daughter Selma, (Born Feb. 1886, age 14), son Wilhelm (born May 1888, age 12).

Paul Utrecht died Feb. 19, 1904 and is buried Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

His parents are buried in the same cemetery: Edward Utrecht (born July 20, 1816 - died March 27, 1880). Christina C (born April 23, 1816, died April 5, 1895).

Per the 1925 Iowa State Census: The parents of Hulda, Otto and Selma Utrecht were Paul Utrecht and Caroline Schroeder.


Ruth, James He was born July 17, 1840 in Massachusetts (or possibly Ireland?).Note Rosters say Massachusetts, and census records say Ireland or Massachusetts, depending on the year. He was the son of Edward Ruth. (Feb. 3, 1815 - Oct. 13, 1874). He married Adelaide "Addie" Augusta Noble. She was the daughter of William Stillson Noble (Oct. 16, 1805 - June 1, 1875) and Mary Hurd (April 7, 1812 - July 20, 1862)

1856 Iowa State Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Edward Ruth, (age 45, born Ireland, widowed, in Iowa for 2 years), Maria Ruth (age 18, born Ireland), James Ruth (age 15, born Ireland), Martha Ruth (age 13, born Massachusetts), Edward Ruth (age 12, born Massachusetts) and William J. Ruth (age 10, born Massachusetts).

1860 Census - Lansing, Allamakee county, Iowa: Edward Ruth (age 45, teamster, born Ireland), Mariah (age 20, born Massachusetts), James (age 19, bread maker, born Massachusetts), Edward (age 15, day laborer, born Massachusetts), William J. (age 13, born Massachusetts).

Note: the roster information and pension records cross references Company F, Iowa Sixth Calvary. Following is the roster information from that unit:

Ruth, James. Age 22. Residence Lansing, nativity Massachusetts. Appointed First Lieutenant, Jan. 31, 1863. Mustered Jan. 31, 1863. Promoted Captain April 10, 1865. Mustered out Oct. 17, 1865, Sioux City, Iowa. See Company B. Twenty-seventh Infantry

Note: Edward Ruth (age 18), John Ruth (age 27, died of disease June 8, 1865) and William J. Ruth (age 18) were also in the 6th Calvary.

1870 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County Iowa: James Ruth, (age 29, grain dealer, born Massachusetts), A. A. Ruth (age 28, born NY), W. N Ruth (male, age 2, born Iowa).

1880 Census - Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: James Ruth, (age 39, Post Master, born Mass.), Addie Ruth (age 38, born NY), Walter Ruth (age 12, born Iowa) and James Ruth (age 6, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census - Lansing, Allamakee county, Iowa: James Ruth, (bet. 3rd and & 5th, age 44, Post Master, born Mass.), Addie A. Ruth (age 42, born New York), Walter N. Ruth (age 16, born Iowa), James E. Ruth (age 11, born Iowa).

1895 Iowa State Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa; James Ruth (age 59, born Ireland, clothing merchant, Presbyterian), Madam Ruth (age 46, born NY, Presbyterian ), and Walter Ruth (age 24, born Allamakee county, traveling man, Presbyterian)

Walter N. Ruth (born Feb. 26, 1868, died Feb. 26, 1895 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

1900 Census in Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: James Ruth (born July 1840, age 59, married 32 years, born Ireland, immigrated in 1850, in US 50 years.), Adai (born Sept. 1840, age 59, 2 children born, 1 still living, born New York), James E, born Aug, 1873, age 26),

James Ruth died April 9, 1909 (pension Index Record). The pension index is also cross referenced to Co F. 6 Iowa Cavalry (same as the roster and his tombstone - and the other pension index). He is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa. Cemetery Listing remarks: GR Co B IA 6 Cav, DCR; s/o Edward Ruth; died in Sacramento, CA.

There is a discrepancy in his date of death. The Pension Index record says April 9, 1909. His wife Addie N. Ruth filed for a pension on April 21, 1909 and was listed as a widow on the 1910 Census. There are actually two different Cemetery listings for Oak Hill Cemetery in Allamakee County, Iowa.

  1. One cemetery listing was Paul Moritz's 'Merged' Oak Hill Burials, combining the Cemetery Log Book (1916-1939), Cemetery Plot Book, superintendent burial cards, caretaker records, and several other sources of Oak Hill burials through April 2011. This listing showed date of death April 9, 1909.
  2. The other one was done by Dale P. Woodmansee in 1989. It has a date of death of April 9, 1920. And oddly enough his tombstone shows dates of 1840-1920. But based on the pension index record and the widow's information I am pretty sure the 1909 date of death is correct. His wife died in 1920, so I'm guessing somehow they got their dates of death mixed up.

His widow Addie N. Ruth filed for a pension on April 21, 1909.

1910 Census: Sacramento Ward 7, Sacramento, California: James Edward Ruth (age 36, married 1 time for 11 years, born Iowa), wife Mary K. Ruth (age 36, married 1 time for 11 years, 0 children born), mother Addie Ruth (age 71, widowed, 2 children born, 1 still living, born New York).

Addie N. Ruth (born Sept. 29, 1839 - died Feb. 19, 1920) is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa


Schmitz, John Nicholas He was born June 2, 1843 in Rodt, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany. He was the son of Nicholaus Smith and (one source says Anna Gertrude - another source says Johanna -- they could be one and the same.). He married Mary A. Weiland on October 28, 1873, at Otter Creek, Iowa.

Found on Find a Grave

John Schmitz, a Civil War Veteran, was born Dec. 2, 1843, at Rodt Rhine, Providence of Germany, and died July 31, 1905, at Odebolt, Iowa. He was the son of Nicholas and Johanna Schmitz, came to America in 1860, and settled at Dubuque County, Iowa.

He enlisted at 18 years of age in Co. B, 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry at Dubuque County, Iowa, in 1862 and served 3 years. He participated in battles of Vicksburg and Nashville, and when Hood's Army was alienated by Thomas. He went with the soldiers to Minnesota to quell the Crow Insurrection. He served in Missouri. John was discharged at Clinton, Iowa, on Aug. 8, 1865.

He taught school for 12 years.

In 1882, he came to Sac County, Iowa, and went into retail merchandising with his brother, Leonard. They were in the insurance and loan business, and in 1901, they opened the German Bank in Odebolt, Iowa.

John married Mary A. Weiland on October 28, 1873, at Otter Creek, Iowa. Mary was born on Feb. 22, 1852, at Heffen Har-stad, Germany. She died May 30, 1934.

He was a member of the G.A.R. Post 117, Odebolt, Iowa.

1870 Census, Jefferson, Dubuque County, Iowa: Nicholas Schmitz (age 51), Johanna Schmitz (age 51), John Schmitz (age 26), Leonard Schmitz (age 21), Cornelius Schmnitz (age 20), Theodor Schmitz (age 18), Gertrude Schmitz (age 16), and Anna M. Schmitz (age 10).

1885 Iowa State Census, Odebolt, Sac County, Iowa: John N. Schmitz, (age 41, Saloon Keeper), Anna M. (age 41), Augusten (age 9), Mary J (age 4), and Aloese (age 2). They were living next to the Leonard Schmitz Family.

1900 Census, Odebolt Town, Sac County, Iowa: John N. Schmitz, (born Dec. 1843, age 56, married 26 years, Immigrated in 1860, in the US 40 Years, Naturalized, Occupation: Real estate), wife Mary A (born Feb. 1852, age 48, married 26 years, 6 children born, 5 still living, immigrated in 1853.) Son Augustine (born Aug. 1875, age 24), Daughter, Mary C., (born June 1880, age 19), Son Aloysius H. (born Sept. 1882, age 17), Daughter Catharine (born June 1886, age 13) and son Alphons (born Feb. 1892, age 8).

John Schmitz died July 31, 1905 and is buried at St. Martin's Catholic Cemetery, Odebolt, Sac County, Iowa Lot 227. He was a member of the G.A.R. Post 117, Odebolt, Iowa.

His widow Mary A. Schmitz filed for a pension on March 8, 1909.

Mary Schmitz died May 30, 1934 and is buried in St. Martin's Catholic Cemetery, Odebolt, Sac County, Iowa, Lot 227.


Schneider, Christian. He was born about 1825 in Germany.

1870 Census, Freeman, Crawford County, Wisconsin Christian Snyder (age 45, farmer, born Prussia), Ruth Snyder (age 23, born Penn), Henry Snyder (age 4, born Wisconsin), Ellen Snyder (age 2, born Wisconsin), Willard Britzman (age 13, born Wisconsin).

1880 Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa Christian Schnider (age 57, laborer, born Germany), wife Ann Schnider (age 38, born Pennsylvania), son Henry Schnider (age 14, laborer, born Wisconsin), daughter Ellen Schnider (age 12, born Wisconsin), son Charlie Schnider (age 8, born Wisconsin), and son James Schnider (age 6, born Wisconsin).

1885 Iowa State Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa Ann Schneider (N side Valley 5th South Street, age 50, widowed, born Germany), Henry Schneider (age 18, born Wisconsin), Ellen Schneider (age 16, born Wisconsin), Charles Schneider (age 12, born Wisconsin), James Schneider (age 9, born Wisconsin) and Lida Schneider (age 6, born Wisconsin). I'm not sure why her martial status was "widowed". The 1900 census, the National Home records, and her obituary all show that this status had to be an error.

1900 Census, Sweetland, Muscatine County, Iowa Christian Schneider (born April 1825, age 75, married 40 years, born Germany), wife Ruthann Schneider (born June 1842, married 40 years, 7 children born, 5 still living, born Pennsylvania), son Henry Schneider (born July 1866, age 33, widowed, born Wisconsin), Grandson Arthur Schneider (born June 1897, age 2, born Iowa).

Schneider

Mrs. Anna Schneider, wife of Christian Schneider, formally of Davenport, died at Finley hospital in Dubuque this week, where she was taken ill, and an operation performed upon her.

Deceased was born Pennsylvania in 1842 and is survived by her aged husband, who served during the Civil War in Company B, 27th Iowa volunteers, and by five children as follows: Charles, formally a motor man in the employ of the Dubuque Light and Traction Company, Mrs. M O'Brien, James of Muscatine, Mrs. G Dusenberry and Henry of Dubuque.

The bereaved family have the sympathy of their friends in their sad affliction.

Davenport Republican, Thursday, August 9, 1900

National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Christian Schneider, Enlisted Aug. 15, 1862 at Lansing, Iowa. Private, Company B, 27th Iowa Inf. Discharged Aug. 8, 1865, close of war. Rank: Private. Cause of Discharge G. O. No. 90. Pensioner at $10.12 per month. Certificate Number 340.625. Disability: Chronic nephritis and lumbago. Born in: Germany. Resided last at Lansing, Iowa. Age when admitted 55 years. Occupation: Farm Laborer. Religion: Protestant. Married. Children under 16 years of age: five. Name, kinship and address of nearest relative: Wife Ann Schneider, Iowa. HOME RECORD First admitted to N. W. Branch by Major D. C. Fulton Dec. 21, 1880. Dropped for abs. w. o. leave June 8, 1882 G. O. 45. Readmitted: Jan. 4, 84. Discharged Jan. 31, 1890. Readmitted Oct. 5, 1890 to N. W. Br. Died at Hospital: June 12, 1906 - acute gastro duodenitis ?? Remains turned over to Peacock and Son, Undertakers, Milwaukee, Wisconsin for shipment to Dubuque, Iowa, June 15, 1906 - request of his son. Effects: personal appraised at $1.40.

U.S. Burial Registers, Military Posts and National Cemeteries: Christian Schneider, Company B, 27th Iowa Inf. Date of Death: June 12, 1906, aged 81. Remarks: Remains to Peacock & Son for shipment to Dubuque Iowa, June 15, 1906.


Schulze, Frederick Wilhelm August He was born Sept. 12, 1840 in Lezen, Brandenbert, Prussia, Germany. He was the son of Ludwig Wilhelm Friedrich Schulze (Dec. 24, 1808 - Dec. 20, 1882) and Sophia Marie Dorthea Kurz (Dec. 1, 1818 - April 11, 1909). He married Anna Catherine Engelhorn on July 25, 1867 in Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Thomas Gotlieb Engelhorn (Oct. 3, 1827 - Sept. 15, 1907) and Jane Vaughn (Nov. 28, 1829 - Aug. 11, 1920).

1870 Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: F. W. Schulz (age 30, teamster, born Prussia), Anna Schulze (age 18, born Iowa), Eda Schulze (age 2 born Iowa), and Charles Schulze (age 6/12, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Fred Schulz (age 39, works in saw mill, born Prussia), wife Annie Schulz (age 28, born Penn), daughter Ida Schulz (age 12, born Iowa), son Carl Schulz (age 10, born Iowa), son Freddie Schulz (age 8, born Iowa), son Leander Schulz (age 4, born Iowa), daughter Katie Schulz (age 2, born Iowa) and son Robert Schulz (age 3/12, born March, born Iowa).

Frederick Schulze died April 16, 1884, and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa

1885 Iowa State Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: Anna Schulze (near 6th, age 33, widowed, born Pennsylvania), Ida Schulze (age 16, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Carl Schulze (age 14, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Frederick Schulze (age 12, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Leander Schulze (age 8, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Catherine Schulze (age 6, born Allamakee County Iowa), Robert Schulze (age 4, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Martha Schulze (age 2, born Allamakee County, Iowa), Harry Schulze (age 0, born Allamakee County, Iowa) and Sophia Schulze (age 66, widowed, born Germany).

His widow Anna C. Schulze filed for a pension on Feb. 9, 1886 in Nebraska.

Anna Catherine (Engelhorn) Schulze married Frank Howard Golly on Dec. 17, 1887 in Orleans, Harlan County Nebraska.

A pension was filed for a minor on Feb. 24, 1888. Anna C. Golly was the guardian.

Anna Catharine (Engelhorn, Schulze) Golly died on 19 January 1927 at Trinidad, Las Animas Co, CO, at age 74. She was buried on 22 January 1927 at Trinidad, Las Animas Co, CO.

Children of Frederick Schulz and Anna Catherine Engelhorn.

  1. Ida Edith Schulze b: 22 MAR 1868 in Lansing, Allamakee, IA
  2. Carl J. Schulze b: 1 APR 1870 in Lansing, Allamakee, IA
  3. Frederick Carl Schulze b: 11 APR 1872 in Lansing, Allamakee, IA
  4. Janice W. Schulze b: 17 JAN 1875 in Lansing, Allamakee, IA
  5. Leander Vaughn Schulze b: 11 FEB 1876 in Lansing, Allamakee, IA
  6. Catherine Adina Schulze b: 6 MAR 1878 in Lansing, Allamakee, IA
  7. Robert Williams Schulze b: 9 MAR 1880 in Lansing, Allamakee, IA
  8. Martha W. Schulze b: 22 FEB 1882 in Lansing, Allamakee, IA
  9. Harry J. Schulze b: 9 APR 1884 in Lansing, Allamakee, IA

Sells, Christopher He was born about 1840 in Germany. He may have been the son of Christian Selle (April 13, 1801 - Aug. 14, 1876) and Mary Selle (Aug. 17, 1805 - ?). They are both buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Allamakee County, Iowa. There is a note that says "Mary, Mrs. Christian. The Selle bodies were moved from another place."

1860 Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa. Christsen Selle (age 59, taylor, born Prussia), Mary Selle (age 59, born Prussia), Christopher Selle (age 21, clerk, born Prussia), Frederick Selle (age 18, born Prussia) and Barnhardt Selle (age 13, born Prussia). I am not 100% certain this is the right family. But it was the only one I could find that was even close. They were in the right county, and he was approximately the right age, so I would think it would be a good possibility.

Christopher Sells died Nov. 16, 1864 and is buried in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo. Section 31, Site 2696.


Sims, William S. He was born about 1826 in Ohio. He married Lydia Olive Morris on Nov. 1, 1849 in Clermont County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Thomas J. and Sarah Morris.

William S. Sims Photo of William S. Sims

1850 Census: Tate, Clermont County, Ohio:. Thomas J. Morris (age 48, born Ohio), Sarah Morris (age 44, born Ohio), Amanda C. Morris (age 14, born Ohio), Levi R. Morris (age 12, born Ohio), Sarah M. Morris (age 4, born Ohio), William Sims (age 23, shoemaker, born Ohio), Lydia O Sims (age 22, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Hanover, Jo Daviess County, Illinois: William S. Sims (age 35, master shoe maker, born Ohio), Olive Sims (age 32, born Ohio), Morris Sims (age 10, born Ohio), Charles Sims (age 6, born Ohio), and Henning Sims (age 3, born Ohio)

William Sims died of disease Aug. 4, 1865, at Clinton, Iowa

His widow Olive Sims filed for a pension on Oct. 12, 1865. Information from her pension file is extracted below.

Olive Sims made a statement on Oct. 6, 1865 in Jo Daviess County, Illinois:

She was 33 years old and a resident of Jo Daviess County, Illinois.

She is the widow of William S. Sims, who was a 2nd Lieutenant in Company B, commanded by Captain Hemenway, 27th Regiment of Infantry, Iowa.

William Sims died at Clinton Iowa on Aug. 3, 1865. Cause of death was congestive chills and brain fever.

She was married to William S. Sims on November 1, 1849 at Bethel, Clermont County, Ohio by Rev. J. K. Morris, a clergyman.

Her name before her marriage was Olive Morris.

Her husband left surviving the named children: Morris Sims, born Dec. 23, 1851, at Bethel, Ohio; Charles Sims, born Oct. 7, 1853 at Bethel, Ohio; Henning Sims born April 22, 1856 at Bethel Ohio; and Helen Sims born July 22, 1861 at Lansing, Iowa.


Gen. J.A. Rawlins, Chief of Staff

I wish you or Comstock would see the Adj. Gn. of the army and have the case of Lt. Wm. Sims hunted up and settled as soon as possible. Sims died of disease contracted in the service when within forty miles of his home. He leaves a wife and four or five children in most destitute circumstances. They are now living in Hanover. The pay due Sims would be of great service to his family and if they are entitled to a pension it might, to a great extent, prevent want.

U.S. Grant
Lt. Gn.


Aug. 31st/65

AES, DLC-Cyrus B. Comstock. Written on a letter of Aug., 1865, from Samuel W. Hemenway, former capt., 27th Iowa, Lansing, Iowa, to Orvil L. Grant, Galena. "I beg leave to submit the following as a correct abstract of the accounts and military history of 2nd Lt. William S. Sims. Enlisted at Lansing Io. Aug. 8th 1863 by P. H. Harrington Period --3Yrs, mustered in Oct. 3rd 1862 at Dubuque Io. by Capt. G. S. Pierce. Served as Private until July 15th 1863, when promoted to 1st Sergt. Promoted to, and Mustered in as 2nd Lt. Aug. 3rd 63 at Little Rock Ark. by Lt. Wilson. Served as 2nd Lt. from that date to Aug. 3rd 65 date of his death. Pay due as 2nd Lt. from Feb. 28th 1865 to time of death. Last Paid by Maj. J. B. Young to Feb. 28th 65. Pay due for responsibility of Arms and Clothing (while commanding Co.) for months of March and April 1865 Twenty Dollars ($20.00) also 3 months Pay proper. Servant employed --"Doc" (Colored), aged 14 years, 5 feet high Eyes--Black, Hair--Black, Complexion--Black. Miles from place of [en]listment to place of Discharge of Regt. 190. Died of 'Remittent fever' (contracted in the line of duty), at Clinton Iowa Aug 3rd 1865. Post Office address of attending Surgeons Dr. David C. Hastings Quasqueton Iowa and Dr. John E. Sanborn Epworth Iowa. The above, I think comprises all the points, but if I have omitted any thing, a note to that effect to me here, will meet with prompt attention" ALS, ibid.

1870 Census: Tate, Clermont, Ohio: Olive Sims (age 42, born Ohio), Morris Sims (age 19, born Ohio), Charles Sims (age 16, born Ohio), Henning Sims (age 13, born Ohio) and Hellen Sims (age 9, born Ohio).


Sires, John He was born March 11, 1845 in Princeton, Gibson County, Indiana. He was the son of Joseph Sires (1820 - Feb. 13, 1852) and Ann Faulkner (Sept. 7. 1821 - Oct. 8, 1875). He married Sarah Jane Duff on June 22, 1865 in Union City, Allamakee County, Iowa. She was the daughter of James Kennedy Duff (1818-June 23, 1894) and Mary Agnes Robinson (1822 - 1900).

John Sires Submitted by Errin Wilker

John Sires, son of Joseph & Jane Ann (Faulkner) Sires, was born 11 Mar 1845 in Princeton, Gibson County, Indiana. He married Sarah Jane Duff on 22 Jun 1865 in Union City Township, Allamakee County, Iowa. They were the parents of eight children. His wife, Sarah, died in 1882, one day before their oldest child, a daughter, Mary Ann, died. Both died of Black Measles. He then married Katherine Burroughs on 30 Dec 1884 in De Soto, Crawford County, Wisconsin. They had 3 children. John died 04 May 1918 in New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa.

John was said to be a wonderful man, always willing to help those in need -- a trait that was passed down to his children and grandchildren. The brother of his 2nd wife, Katherine Burroughs, was actually named after John. John Sires Burroughs, was named after John Sires, friend and neighbor of Stephen & Mary (Duff) Burroughs. It is said that Stephen thought much of John Sires, and had great respect for him, so he named his firstborn son after him. Neat story!

A relative shared a Civil War story of John with me... John Sires told the story that when he was in the Civil War, the soldiers always had long days of marching and usually didn't stop until after dark. Then they would just lay down on the ground and sleep. One night it rained, turned cold and John didn't wake up until morning and his beard was frozen to the ground. Quite a story!

Anyway, will stop my rambling for today. It's probably pretty obvious that though my 2nd great grandfather passed long before I was born in 1973, I have great respect and admiration for him. John's grandson, my grandfather, Forrest Sires, was the most wonderful man, much like I imagine John might have been. I'm so proud of my heritage, and so honored to be able to share what little information I have with you and others.

CHILDREN of John Sires, Sr.~ 11 Mar 1845 - 04 May 1918 and Sarah Jane (Duff) Sires ~ 08 Dec 1847 - 05 Apr 1882:

  1. Mary Ann Sires ~ 08 Oct 1866 - 06 Apr 1882
  2. Joseph Glenn Sires ~ 21 Aug 1869 - 12 Nov 1926
  3. William Sires ~ 19 Jul 1870 - Nov 1937
  4. Thomas Sires ~ 13 Jul 1872 - 08 Jul 1928
  5. John Sires, Jr. ~ 14 Jan 1875 - 23 Sep 1935
  6. Levi Sires ~ 07 Mar 1877 - 22 Nov 1936
  7. Francis Sires ~ 04 Nov 1879 - 22 Sep 1970
  8. Minnie Jane Sires ~ 13 Jan 1882 - 29 Jul 1938

Children of John Sires, Sr. ~ 11 Mar 1845 - 04 May 1918 and Katherine(Burroughs) Sires ~ 30 Mar 1866 - 03 Jan 1946

  1. James Grant Sires ~ 03 Jan 1886 - 05 Sep 1967
  2. Roy Sires ~ 10 Mar 1888 - 18 Oct 1985
  3. Daniel Sires ~ 18 Aug 1891 - 10 Jun 1971

1850 Census, Patoka, Gibson county, Indiana: Joseph Faulkner (age 59), Joseph Syres, age 30, Ann (age 24), John (age 5), Daniel (age 3) and James (age 1).

1870 Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Sires (age 25, farmer), Sarah Sires (age 23), Mary (age 4), Joseph (age 2) and Thomas Duff (age 14, Laborer).

1880 Census, Union City, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Sires (age 35), Wife Sarah J (age 32), daughter Mary A (age 13), son Joseph (age 11), son William (age 9), Son Thomas (age 7), son John (age 5), son Levi (age 3), son Francis (age 6/12) and grandfather Joseph Faulkner (age 81).

Sarah Jane (Duff) Sires died April 5, 1882 and is buried in English Bench Cemetery, Allamakee County, Iowa. (note their daughter Mary Ann died the next day April 6, 1882 and is buried in the same cemetery. It is reported that they died from Black Measles.)

1885 Iowa State Census, Union City, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Sires, (age 39), Joseph Sires (age 16), William Sires (age 14), Thomas Sires (age 11), Johns Sires (age 10), Levi Sires (age 7), Frank Sires (age 5) and Minnie Jane Sires (age 3). Stephen and Mary Burroughs with daughter Catherine Burroughs (age 18) lived next to them. Catherine Burroughs, niece of John's first wife, worked at the Sires' home at Dorchester, Iowa for two years. John Sires married Catherine P. Burroughs on Dec. 30, 1884. She was the daughter of Stephen Burroughs (June 1832 - Oct 30, 1903) and Mary Elizabeth Duff (May 1843 - Dec. 9, 1905).

1895 Iowa State Census, Union Prairie, Allamakee County, Iowa; John Sires, Sr., (age 49, married, farmer, Presbyterian), Catherine Sires (age 28, married), William Sires (age 24), Thomas Sires (age 22), John Sires, Jr. (age 20), Levi Sires (age 18), Frank Sires (age 15), Minie Sires (age 13), James Sires (age 9), Roy Sires (age 6) and Daniel Sires (age 3).

1900 Census, Union City, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Sires (born March 1845, age 55, married 15 years), Wife, Kate Sires (born Mar. 1876, age 34, married 15 years, 3 children, 3 living), Frank Sires (age 20), Minnie Sires (age 18), James Sires (age 14), Roy Sires (age 12) and Daniel Sires (age 8).

1910 Census, Iowa, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Sires, (age 65, married 2 times, current marriage 25 years), wife Kate (age 44, married 1 time, currently 25 years, 3 children, 3 living).

1915 Iowa State Census, New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa: Card #442, John Sires, Age 70, County Allamakee, Town New Albin, Occupation Retired, Extent of Education: Common 3, Birthplace: Indiana: Military Service: Civil War: Infantry: State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company B. Church Affiliation: Methodist, can read and write; Father born England, Mother born England. Years in Iowa 61.

John Sires died May 4, 1918 and is buried in English Bench Cemetery, French Creek Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.

John Sires, March 11, 1845 - May 4, 1918

Posted By: Brian Theiler
Date: 4/23/2003

Obituary - Sires

After a year of imperfect health and many months of severe sickness and suffering, Mr. John Sires, a worthy and honorable citizen of our town, passed to his heavenly home last Saturday near the noon hour.

John Sires was born near Prince Town, Ind., March 11, 1845, and died at his home in New Albin, Iowa, May 4, 1918, aged 73 years, 1 month and 23 days.

When a boy of 7 years, he left Indiana with his mother and step father, came to Iowa and the family located at English Bench, Allamakee Co., Iowa, Oct. 5, 1854. This family represented 6 children, 1 daughter and 5 sons. Only one brother is left.

Mr. Sires grew to young manhood at English Bench where he lived most of his life. On June 22, 1865, he was united in holy wedlock to Miss Sarah Duff. To this union were born 8 children, 6 sons and 2 daughters. On April 6, 1882, the mother of this family died, and the day after the mother's death a daughter 15 years of age passed to the life beyond, a double sorrow to the bereft family. Dec. 30, 1884, he was married to Miss Catherine Burroughs and to this union were born three sons.

Deceased was a veteran of the '60's and served his country as a true and brave soldier for three years. He enlisted in Co. B, 27th Regt. Iowa Vol. and at the close of the war received an honorable discharge.

About the middle of Mr. Sires' life, as his family was growing up, he thought of the value of a Christian father's influence in his home. He gave himself to God, became a Christian man and united with the Presbyterian church at Mount Hope where he remained a true and faithful member until about 6 years ago, he and his wife transferred their membership to the Methodist Episcopal church, New Albin.

Mr. Sires was a lover of his home, a devoted husband and a kind hearted father, providing well for his family. He was a worthy citizen and a good neighbor. Standing for a high standard of morals and a religious life with a brotherly paternal spirit. As a Christian man, his home, the family and his church leaves record to his Christian principles and faithful service, being always at divine service when he possibly could. But his work is finished. He fought a good fight - for his country under the Stars and Stripes and then under the banner of the Cross of Christ. He has kept the faith and now the Captain of his salvation has called him from service to reward - the Heavenly inheritance that remaineth with the people of God.

He leaves a wife, 1 daughter, 9 sons, 3 brothers, 34 grandchildren to mourn his loss.

The funeral services were held at the M. E. church conducted by the pastor, Rev. Piper, assisted by Rev. Padden of the Presbyterian church, Mt. Hope. The pall bearers were selected from the M. W. A., of which deceased was a member. The veterans of our town and some from other towns attended to body. The mortal remains were laid to rest in English Bench cemetery ... [Unreadable] ... morn.

Asleep in Jesus, blessed sleep, From which none ever wakes to weep.

--Iowa Newspaper
--Photocopy of Original

http://iagenweb.org/boards/allamakee/obituaries/index.cgi?read=28748

His widow Catherine filed for a pension on June 7, 1918.

Catherine (Burroughs) Sire died Jan. 6, 1946 and is buried in English Bench Cemetery, French Creek Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.


Skjurson, Sampson AKA Samson Fliseram/Samson Knutson/Samuel Sherson. He was born in 1845 (baptized March 9) in Norway. He was the son of Knut Sjurson Flieseram (Dec. 22, 1805 – Sept. 29, 1868) and Martha Samsonsdtr. Selland (Aug. 15, 1818- Feb. 20, 1904). The family emigrated with name Sjurson, and later changed it to Severson. Samuel Sherson married Anna Johnson on April 12, 1873 in Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyoming.

This is a series of emails between myself and Zona Mathison. She is not actually a descendant of the soldier, but is a descendant of his father.

First, I want to compliment you for the wonderful 27th Iowa website.

Norwegian Knut A. Rene in his book Historie om Udvandringen fra Voss (History of Emigration from Voss), page 706, has the information "Samson Fliseram served in 27th Iowa Regiment".

I do not find him in the alphabetical roster list, so the information from Knut Rene must be in error. Or is it possible he is omitted for some reason?

Zona Mathison
Moorhead, MN
Jan. 28, 2006

Zona, Thank you for your email. You pose an interesting question that might have a couple of answers. First: Yes, I have come across several names that are supposed to have served with the 27th that are not on the rosters. I have no idea why.

But the Norwegians that served with the 27th have an interesting twist that I am pretty interested in. I am not of Norwegian descent, although one of my relatives married a Norwegian. I found a website called http://vesterheim.org/index.php. It has some pretty interesting information regarding Norwegian names:

About Norwegian Names

Anyone searching Norwegian soldiers is handicapped by changing names.

Young Norwegians used one name in Norway, frequently another in the army and a third after the war was over.

In Norway a young man would be known by his given name and his father's. As an example, Ole, son of Johan, would be known as Ole Johansen. If additional identity was needed, he would add his farm name, Myre; he was Ole Johansen who lived on Myre.

When he came to America and enlisted, he gave his name as he generally did "Ole Johansen" and the Yankee clerk would write "Ole Johnson" and "Ole Johnson" is how the soldier would be known.

An additional point of confusion results from the fact that Norway was a part of Sweden in the nineteenth century. An enlistee might give his place of birth as Norway; the Yankee clerk would write Sweden.

After the war, the immigrant soldier acquired a farm, got married, started a family and began to think seriously about what he wanted himself and his farm to be called. Take, for example, Sergeant George Johnson of the Wisconsin 15th, Company G. He came to America in 1854. After the war, he acquired a farm near Ridgeway, Winneshiek County, Iowa. He took back his baptismal name, adopted his old Norway farm name, and became Guttorm Hovden. It took help from Guttorm Hovden's grandchildren for us to connect their grandfather to soldier George Johnson.

A majority of young Norwegians enlisting in the Union army are known in the military records by their patronyms, their given names plus their father's, adding "sen" or "son". Very often their descendants do not know these soldiers by the names they used in the Army, but instead by names used after the war, and it takes a lot of searching to connect the two.

Ole Hanson of Winneshiek County, Iowa, came to America in 1862 and joined the Iowa 13th Regiment, Company G. He is known for the diaries he kept, both before and during the war. Vesterheim has them; museum visitors can hear a voice reading a portion of one telling about his arrival. Soldier Ole Hanson after the war became O. H. Nass.

Jorgen Anderson immigrated from Lier, Norway. His Winneshiek County, Iowa, neighbors knew him as George Linnevold.

I have a list of the Norwegians that served with the 27th. The only Samson listed is this one:

SKJURSON, Sampson

IA 27th Inf Co B. Residence: Allamakee County, Iowa. Born in Norway. Civil War: Age 18. Enlisted 12 Aug 1862. Mustered 1 Sep 1862. Private. Mustered out 8 Aug 1865 at Clinton, Iowa. Sources: (ISW-III cd)

This soldier would have been born about 1844. Do you know anything about the possible year of birth for your Samson? (Or his father's name?) I know nothing of your Samson personally, but this would seem like a good place to start. The website that I listed above seems to be an excellent resource for people of Norwegian descent. Note that they will also do research for you. (Again, I am not specifically endorsing this website. I know nothing of them, other than what is on the website. But I do know that if I had an interest in Norwegian research, I would contact them.) If you have not previously considered a name change in your research, you might want to consider that.

Again, thanks for your email. If you do find a connection, I would love to know about it.

Elaine
Jan. 31. 2006

Dear Elaine,

I was too hasty while looking at the listing of names! I had just found your website Saturday before I wrote. The soldier's name in Norway was Samson Knudson Fliseram. In addition to Knudson/Knutson I had looked at surnames Sjurson& Severson (his father was Knud Sjurson Fliseram) but I missed seeing the Skjurson. I should have spotted the first name Samson, but didn't, and knew immediately you gave me the correct person. I have Samson's baptismal date as 9 Mar 1845; I will get his birth date from the Voss films.

Yes, as genealogist for one of the Norwegian Bygdelags, I learned very quickly about the name changes. Also I had an ancestor in the 15th Wisconsin Infantry whose name in Norway was Lasse Guttormson Bo. I found him in Civil War records as Lewis Thompson, including his death date.

I am a member of Vesterheim Genealogical Center whose website you have listed. The current director has roots in the same area in Norway as I, Vik i Sogn. My main research has been centered about all who emigrated from that area; this I share with Vesterheim as well as Norway.

Having completed much of my own family research, I decided to endeavor to find out more about the father of this Samson. The reason being that his father, Knud Sjurson, fathered my great grandmother in Norway before he married Samson's mother. Several years ago I did find Knud's death record in Winneshiek Co. Recently I made contact with a descendant of Samson's sibling who lived in Allamakee Co., and now I believe I have more information than she has.  She didn't even have him listed as a child in this family. Now I am wondering what happened to him after the war........my next project!

I am probably boring you. Thanks so very much for replying so quickly.

Zona
January 31, 2006

Zona, that is exciting. I'm glad you were able to identify him. I went onto Ancestry.com and came up with something that might be of interest to you (since you said you wanted to find out what he did after the war). His wife Anna filed a widow's pension in Nebraska. I can't read the date, but it looks like it might be 1888. But that could be way off. But this is definitely the same person. Note that he served with the 27th Iowa.

I am attaching a copy of the record. Maybe you can tell something from it. Anyway, if I were you, I would request a copy of his pension record. I found out so much about my ancestor from pension records that I did not know. It was pretty interesting.

I would love to add information to the website regarding him after you have had a chance to look at this and decide if you would like to submit anything.

Thanks so much for contacting me. (and NO, I am never bored when I am finding out information about the soldiers of the 27th) I thought the whole Norwegian name change thing was pretty interesting. And it's neat to meet someone where it actually applied.

Elaine
Feb. 1, 2006

Note there were a few emails back and forth where Zona was trying to get the pension records. I did not include those. This was the final result:

Elaine,

I can't believe it! In this week's mail I received a huge file from the VA at Fort Snelling, St. Paul for the widow of Sampson Skjurson. He changed his name to Samuel Sherson. I know you would like to have some information from it. I will send you some pages, if you wish, but I don't think I will copy the whole file!! I don't even know where to begin telling you about it.............

Sampson was home on sick leave in Allamakee Co., IA, with diarrhea problems before discharge. After he mustered out in 1865, he worked for a time on the home farm and was working as a farm hand near Dubuque when he left the area in 1868. He was never seen by his family again!! Somewhere I read he was thought to have impregnated a girl, left and wrote only once after, telling that he was on his way to CA.

Sampson/Samuel married a Swedish woman, Anna Johnson, in Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyoming (file includes the marriage certificate) on 12 April 1873. Anna was from Omaha, NE, but was in WY visiting her brother. They had 4 children, 3 daughters born in WY and the younger, a son, born in Omaha. Sampson worked for the railroad. Anna wrote that she moved to Omaha in 1879, but you can find them in Rawlins, WY in the June 1880 census. He stayed in Rawlins until 1881 when he moved to Sacramento, CA. Anna again joined him there, but he lost his job so she went back to Omaha in 1882. He stayed about a year and half more, then moved to Leavenworth. KS. They were separated but not divorced. He died in Leavenworth 22 June 1886. He had been replaced the previous evening of his night switchman job because he was intoxicated. His body was found the next morning by some young boys in the outside basement entrance of the courthouse, one of those with doors over the top of the steps that were found open so they could see the body.

There was an inquest, that is included, which gave me much of this info. But the verdict of the inquest committee is not included, maybe because many longer pages are not copied completely. The wife Anna was advised he died of heart failure, according to her deposition.

There are many, many depositions and affidavits taken before Anna was approved as deserving the widow's pension! After marriage Sampson destroyed all his former information, including family info, except a picture taken while in the service. Through this picture it was verified that he was Sampson; there are even depositions from his mother and 2 brothers-in-law identifying him from the picture. His mother had a similar picture but without a mustache. Included also in the file are many depositions from men he was in service with, as well as numerous ones to identify wife Anna and her character.

I have yet to try and tell the actual family relation what I have received. It is so interesting; I hope you find it the same!! Anna died in 1945. A grandson, Frederick Sherson, requested the same file for his grandmother in 1979, but I see that this grandson is now deceased. It would be interesting to find a descendant as Frederick was working on genealogy. He probably never found Sampson's heritage as Voss in Norway. You may remember that I became interested in this family because Sampson & his siblings were born to my great great grandfather who never married my great great grandmother. He married the Martha who gave the deposition about Sampson; the family member sent me her picture plus obituary from 1904!!

I had not intended to write you all this. But now that I have, I will probably use it to send to the family. And all that I now have is because of you and your wonderful 27th Iowa website. Thanks, thanks, thanks!!

Zona Mathison
Nov. 3, 2007

1856 Iowa State Census: Hanover, Allamakee County, Iowa: Knud Siverson (age 48, born Norway, laborer), Martha Siverson (age 37, born Norway) Samson Siverson (age 11, born Norway), Julia Siverson (age 8, born Norway, Sever Siverson (age 5, born Norway), Betsey Siverson (age 3, born Norway). The family had been in Iowa 0 years.

1860 Census in Hanover, Allamakee County, Iowa (Post office: New Galena), Knute Stephenson (age 54, farmer, born Norway), Martha Stephenson (age 48, born Norway), Sampson Stephenson (age 15, farmer, born Norway), Sever Stephenson (male, age 12, born Norway), Julia Stephenson (age 9, born Norway), Betia Stephenson (age 7, born Norway)
Inger Stephenson (age 4, born Iowa), Melvina Stephenson (age 1, born Iowa)

The following is further information that Zona provided when she sent copies of his pension records.

Name in Civil War Roster listing in 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry was Sampson Skjurson. The file for his widow Anna's pension was found under the name Sampson Skiurson.

Birth name was Samson Knutson, born 1845 (baptized 9 March) to Knut Sjurson and wife Martha Samsonsdtr. The family emigrated with the name Sjurson, later changed to Severson.

After service his name was Samuel Sherson.

His parents:  Knut Sjurson Fliseram was born Dec. 22, 1806 in Voss, Norway, and died Sept. 29, 1868 in Winneshiek co., Iowa. He is buried in Big Canoe Church Cemetery. He married 10 June 1842 in Norway to Martha Samsonsdtr. Selland. She was born August 15, 1818 in Voss and died Feb. 20, 1904 in Allamakee County, Iowa. She is buried in Iowa River Church Cemetery.

1880 Census in Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyoming: Samuel Sherson, (age 33, RR Engineer, born Norway), wife Anna Sherson (age 25), daughter Martha Sherson (age 6), daughter Nellie Sherson (age 4), and daughter Mildred (age 1).

1885 Kansas State Census, Leavenworth, Leavenworth, Kansas: Samuel Sherson (age 37, single, Engineer, born Norway, To Kansas from California), Honorably discharged from the volunteer service of the United States, Name of State: Iowa. Rank: Private, Company B, 27th Iowa Infty.

Claimants affidavit. Pension Office: January 30, 1895.

State of Montana, County of Lewis and Clark.

In the pension claim of Mrs. Anna Sherson widow of Samuel J. Sherson deceased.

Personally came before me a notary public in and for the aforesaid county and state Mrs. Anna Sherson, well known to me to be reputable and entitled to credit, who being duly sworn, declares in relation to the aforesaid case, as follows:

That she is a claimant in the above cited claim and that I cannot furnish testimony in regard to any service that my late husband Samuel Sherson may have given in the military or Navy of the United States, as I did not meet him until 1873, when I was married to him at Rawlins Wyoming territory and do not know where he lived prior to his coming there and do not know any one who did: he told me he came from Iowa, but not what town or city, and for the same reason I cannot furnish evidence as to whether he was married until 1873. I was not married before I married the soldier Samuel Sherson. I cannot furnish evidence as to the birth of my children Mildred and Samuel J. as their birth was not recorded for the reason that it was not required of us to have their names placed on record. And we did not keep a family record. This is my own written statement, and in making it I was not prompted by any printed or written statement prepared or dictated for me. And further that her post office address is Helena in the state of Montana.

Attest:
Emanuel Carlson
Emma Hoover
Anna Sherson.

Note. Whenever claimant signs by mark, two persons who can write must attest to signature by signing their names opposite.


Deposition, A.

Case of Anna Sherson, widow number 366319.

On the 17th day September 1897 at Seattle, County of King, State of Washington, before me, Charles Whitehead, a special Examiner of the pension office, personally. Anna Sherson, who being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to her during a special examination of aforesaid pension claim deposes and says:

Her age is 41, and my post office address is number 121 Harrison St, Seattle, Washington. I am keeping house for my eldest girl and have a couple of boarders as an occupation. My daughter whose house I keep is a bookkeeper.

I am the claimant in pension claim number 366319 as the widow of Samuel Sherson or as he was known in the Army Sampson Skjrson. He was a private in company B. 27th Iowa infantry volunteers.

His name spelled in the Norwegian language was Sampson Skirson but it became anglicized after his discharge from the Army and he became generally known as Sam Sherson. I married him as Sherson and did not know that he had changed the name or the spelling of it until I saw his army badge.

I am an applicant for pension under the act of June 27, 1890 for myself and four minor children. Three only were alive when I applied under the new law, but I had four living when my husband died. I was never divorced.

I had not remarried since the death of my husband's Sampson Sjurson. I was born in Sweden. There's some information left out here that I need to get verified.

I first became acquainted with Sampson Sjurson at my father's house in Omaha in 1873. He came from Rawlins Wyoming with a letter of introduction to my father. He had been working in the yard at Rawlins Wyoming two or three years. He was 27 years of age when we became acquainted and a month after he came we were married. He told me that his former home had been New Galena, Iowa. Also Dubuque Iowa. I do not remember hearing him say that he had been at any other places. He was a farmer when he enlisted at New Galena Iowa.

I do not know the names or whereabouts of his parents or relatives. The only two names I remember his mentioning were his mother Martha and his sister named Olena. They were in the old country. He had, I think some relatives of Iowa, but I do not know where. He stated that he had never been married. He left no papers, not even a scrap to show who he was, where he came from or who his connections were. I never saw any of his relatives for he had no correspondence with them. He was a mere boy when he enlisted and had not been long in this country from Norway.

I went out to Rawlins Wyoming to be married. Was only between 16 and 17 years old. I went out to visit my brother and sister at Rawlins, Wyoming. I was married there by a Justice of the Peace, a certificate of marriage has been furnished in this case.

After marriage we lived at Rawlins Wy until the latter part of 1879 when I moved to Omaha and he continued to work at Rawlins as a locomotive engineer until 1881 then he went to Sacramento Cal. and ran an engine for the Central Southern Pacific on a short branch road there. Then I joined him in California in 1881. He lost his position and I was sent back to my people in Omaha. He staid in San Francisco about a year and a half then he went to Leavenworth Kansas and ran a switch engine there until he died. I never lived with my husband again after I left him in Sacramento CA in 1882. We never separated by divorce or otherwise. He never got a divorce. I was about to rejoin him to live with him in Leavenworth Kansas when he was taken sick and died. He died June 22nd 1886. It was stated that he died of heart failure. He died seated in the Court House Yard in Leavenworth Kansas. I was telegraphed for but he was buried before I got down there from Omaha Neb where I was living with my people.

We had 4 children. All were alive and under the age of 16 years at the time of his death.

I have no record showing the dates of birth of my children. Their births were never recorded in any way. The three eldest children were born in Rawlins Wyoming, where there was little settlement in those early days. The eldest child Martha died before this claim was filed so that I do not claim pension on her account. The minor children for (two of) whom I was now claiming pension were born as follows:

Nellie, born May 17th 1876 in Rawlins WY;
Mildred, born August 18, 1879 in Rawlins WY
S. James, born May 29, 1881, born in Omaha Neb.

I give the dates of birth of these children by memory. All three live here with me. Now that my attention is called to the fact that my original declaration mentions only two minor children and these being Mildred and S. James, I will correct this declaration so as to include these two only as Nellie was over the age of 16 years when I filed this claim under the new law. As proof of the date of births of each of my children I will offer as witnesses my sister Mrs. J. D. Gardner, Seattle; also Mrs. N. W. Craig 121 Butler St., San Francisco, my father James Johnson and Helen Johnson, his wife, my stepmother, 27th Ave. and Half Harwood St., Omaha Nebraska. I have no midwife or doctor testimony to offer as I do not recall the names of them being in attendance on either occasion.

At the time of the death of my husband June 22nd 1886 I was living in Omaha working in a Laundry Office. He left me no property whatever. We lived me and my children in two rooms. I continued to live in Omaha Nebraska. We had rooms on 17th near California St., with a Mrs. Alice Barrett wife of Mr. Cassius Barrett a Pullman conductor. We staid there until 1890 then I moved to Helena Mont to find work in a laundry. I was head laundress at the Broadwater Hotel until I moved from Helena Mont about 3 years ago to Seattle Washington, where I now reside. I have not remarried or cohabitated with any man as his wife but have worked to support my children respectably.

The only evidence I can offer to satisfy the questions of identity is a small photograph, which I understood was taken in 1873. I do not recognize the names of any of the comrades on the list as having been associates of my husband in service or before, as he was a very reticent and secretive sort of man and said little or nothing about himself. He destroyed all of his old papers and left nothing by which I could trace him to his kindred.

Now I think of it I recall the names of two neighbors who knew me and were present when the boy S. James Sherson was born. One was Mrs. Allison a widow who kept a boarding house on 16th North of Leavenworth St., Omaha Neb. Mrs. Burkhart whose husband was I think a machinist. Also Mrs. Annie or Hannah Whitson last I knew of her she was a clerk in the Union Pacific General Office Omaha. These are all the references outside of the relations I have mentioned heretofore who can testify in regard to birth of children. I cannot refer to any witness here in Seattle except my sister Mrs. Clarence. And to none in Helena. I will refer to Dr. Keim a doctor in Omaha as one who knew me and my way of life while I lived in Omaha Neb. After separation or death of my husband. Dr. Keim roomed in the same house I did several years.

I reaffirm the statement that the photograph I now introduce in this case is that of my husband Sampson Skerson of Co. B 27th Iowa Inft Vol. I have near around my property since my husband died.

I have made a full and complete statement mentally reserving nothing concerning this case. I have heard this read. My answers to questions are correctly recorded.

Anna Sherson

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 17th day of Sept. 1897, and I certif. that the contents were fully made know to deponent before signing. Charles Whitehead, special Examiner.


Territory of Wyoming
County of Carbon

To whom it may concern: Be it remembered that I have this day bound in the Holy Bonds of Matrimony. Samuel Sherson and Miss Annie Johnson in accordance with a marriage license issued by J. P. Keller County Clerk.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this12th day of April A. D. 1873.

H. Tuttle
Judge of Probate.

No. 22, filed and recorded May 12th 1873.

J. P. Keller, Recorder.


The State of Wyoming
County of Carbon

I, B. J. Ross, County Clerk and Ex. Official Register of Deeds in and for the County of Carbon, State of Wyoming, do here by certify that the above and foregoing is a full true and complete copy of the record of the marriage of Samuel Sherson and Miss Annie Johnson as the same appears in Book H of Marriage Records at page 13 of the records of the County and state aforesaid.

Witness my hand and official seal of said county at Rawlins, this 6th day of August A.D., 1892.

B. J. Ross.


Deposition B.

Case of Anna Sherson

On this 21 day of June 1898, at Allamakee County, State of Iowa, before me C. W. Okey, a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appears Iver Iverson, who being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during the special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says:

I am 57 years of Age; my post office address is Quandahl P. O. Ia.

I recognize the picture you have shown me as that of my wife's brother Sampson Shurson (or Sjurson) who served as a private in Co B 27th Iowa Vol. Inft. And who I have not seen for the past thirty years would not be positive as to the exact date when he left, but to my knowledge the family has not heard from him since. But I did see Andrew K. Wringe, he lives at or near Lake Mills Winnebago Co & he had had a letter from the soldier some time after he had left home and days past been long but he then said he was on his way to California, don't know that he told anything about what business he was in.

No sir, Sampson Sjirson, had never been in the military only in Co. B 27 Iowa Vol Inf unless he has served since. He left here and I have never heard of his being in the service since.

No Sir, he had never been married when he left here which must have been about 1865.

Before the solider was discharged from the army had been at home on sick furlough for a long time was suffering with diarrhea but was able to be around. I think he had some other trouble but I can't remember just what it was but I know he was only able to get around and stayed at my house a good part of the time when he was home that time. After his discharge, until he left here he worked at home on his father's farm. His father have been dead several years but his mother is (end of page)

(Note: it seems like something is missing here, this is the top of the next page)

Sir, they both served in the same co. with him and knew him all his life until the same day he did. I took all of this to Lansing.

I have no information about the marriage or death of the solder until you read me the clk. Protest.

The soldier's mothers name is Martha and he has sisters, there is Susan Iverson, my wife, Julia Quandahl, Betsy Quandahl, Inger Larson, Annie Thorson and one dead one named Olena Before the war the nearest PO was Dorchester & New Galena. New Galena has been discontinued.

Having heard you read all the clks. statements will say that I believe the man the claimant has been married to was the soldier Sampson Skjurson of Co. B 27 Iowa Inf and a brother to my wife and I am quite positive that the picture you have shown me was that of the soldier Sampson Skjurson.

You have my statement correctly recorded.

Ive Iverson


Deposition

Case of Anna Shurson

On this 22 day of June 1898, at New Quandahl, County of Allamakee, State of Iowa, before me, C. W. Okey, a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared Martha Shurson, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to her during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension deposes and says:

I am 80 years of age; my post office address is Qauandahl, IA.

Please examine the picture I now hand you and tell me whether you recognize the same as of any person you have every known: Yes, I knew that picture as soon as I saw it. It is the picture of my son Sampson Shurson, who left home 30 years ago last spring. He wrote me one letter from Dubuque. I don't remember just what he was doing but think he was working on a farm. I never heard from him but once after, Then he said he was on his way to California have never heard from him after that.

Had your son Sampson ever been married before he left home: Never never

Was he ever in the Army more than the one service in Co. B 27th Iowa Vol. Inf? No Never

What disease or disability did the soldier receive while he was in the army if any: The main thing was dysentery or diarrhea. don't remember that he complained of any thing else.

Are you positive that the picture I now show you is that of the soldier, your late son? Yes I am positive & I have a picture of him which you can examine for yourself and you will see they are both the same person only the one I have has mustache on which your has. but they look just alike (examd & there is no doubt they are one of the----

(Note by Elaine Johnson: Unfortunately, this is the end of the page and the next page was not copied.)


Mother of Sampson Skjurson

Decorah Public Opinion
February 24, 1904.

Death of Mrs. Martha Severson

Mrs. Martha Severson passed away on Sunday at the home of her daughter Mrs. L. L. Iverson in Canoe Township, at the age of 85 years, 6 months and 5 days, death resulting from the effects of a fall the week before in which she sustained a broken hip and severe bruises. She was born in Voss, Norway, August 15, 1818, where she was married to Mr. Knut Severson, coming to America in 1850, and locating at Stoughton, Wisconsin, where they live two years, afterwards moving to Allamakee County. During the winter she had been living with her daughter, Mrs. Iverson. She leaves to mourn her loss five daughters, Mrs. Iver Iverson, Mrs. N. J. Quandahl,, Mrs. P.J. Quandahl, Mrs. L. L. Iverson and Mrs. Thor. Thorson her husband and four children having preceded her. Funeral services were held yesterday, with interment in the Iowa River Church Cemetery, Reverend Vikingstad officiating. Those who knew her spoke of her as a kindly, affectionate wife and mother, a good neighbor, and a worthy citizen.


Smith, Phineas He was born about 1828 in New York. He married Ann Gallagher.

Phineas Smith Photos of Phineas Smith were submitted by Mary Hofmeister

1860 Census: Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa: Fenis Smith (age 32, carpenter, born NY), Ann Smith (age 21, born Ireland), Eliza Ann Smith (age 8/12, born Michigan).

1870 Census - Belle Plaine, Benton County, Iowa: Finis Smith (age 40, Carpenter), Lalizor (age 25), born Ireland), Guy (age 9), Harry (age 7), Ervina (age 3), Mary (age 2) and no name (male age 5/12). (Ancestry.com was WAY off on the index for this family i.e.Trinis, Lalizor, Lecy - it took a while to track them down),

1880 census - Belle Plaine, Benton County, Iowa: Phineas Smith (age 51, carpenter), wife Ann Smith (age 43), son Guy Smith (age 19), Son Harry Smith (age 17), Daughter Ermina Smith, (age 13), daughter Mary Smith (age 12), son Earl Smith (age 10), son Carl Smith (age 6), daughter Bela Smith (age 5), and daughter Elsie Smith (age 2).

Phineas Smith filed for a pension on Oct. 19, 1891.

Phineas Smith 1885 Iowa State Census: Belle Plaine, Benton County, Iowa: Phineas Smith (age 56, carpenter), Ann Smith (age 46, born Ireland)) Guy Smith (age 24), Harry P. Age 21), Ermina (age 18), Mary (age 16), Earl (age 14), Carl (age 12), Bela (age 10 and Elsie (age 6). (Ancestry.com had him indexed as Phimal).

1900 Census - Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa: Phinehas Smith (born Mar. 1828, age 72, married for 41 years, Carpenter), wife Ann (born June 1837, age 62, married 41 years, 9 children, 8 still living), Son Carl Smith (born Aug. 1872, age 37, machine expert).

Anne Smith (born in 1837) died in 1901 and is buried in Linwood Cemetery, Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa.

1910 Census - Linn, Marshall County, Iowa He was in the Iowa Soldiers Home: Phinehas Smith, Inmate, age 82, widowed, born New York)

Phineas Smith died May 17, 1912 and is buried in Linwood Cemetery in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, IA.

OBITUARY OF PHINEAS SMITH, COMPANY B.
submitted by Sue Trout

The Evening Gazette
Sat 18 May, 1912

Veteran Smith Answered Call.
Well Known Civil War Veteran Passes Away

After an illness of about a week, Phineas Smith, a well known civil war veteran, answered the final call at noon Friday when he passed away. His death occurred at the home of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. H. P. Smith, 203 F Avenue West. He was 84 years old.

Mr. Smith was born in New York in 1824. He lived in the east until 1887 when he removed with his family to this city. He took an active part in the civil war belonging to Company B, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry and participated in many battles. He was an active member of the T.Z. Cook Post G.A.R. and a beloved comrade. Twelve years ago he entered the old soldiers' home at Marshalltown, and made frequent trips to visit his children in this city. He had arrived about two weeks ago and intended to make arrangements to spend his declining days with his sons in this city.

For many years Mr. Smith was a carpenter in the B.C. R. and N. shops Three sons and three daughters survive. They are Bela and Earl Smith of this city, Carl of Des Moines, Mrs. Elsie Burge and Mrs. H.E. Newman of Marian, and Mrs. E. N. Bullock of Sacramento, Cal. Mr. Smith had a brother who died in Sacramento last fall at the age of 96 years.

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon. Services will be held at 2 o'clock and interment will be in Linwood Cemetery.

Note: On the 1925 Iowa State Census, there is a Carl Smith (age 50). It lists his parents as Phineas Smith (born New York) and Anne Gallagher. (born Ireland).


Smith, Samuel Oscar He was born Jan. 8, 1836 in Mill Hall, Centre, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Thomas Armstrong Smith and Beulah Templeton. He married Sarah Elizabeth Hazeltine on Aug. 24, 1869 in Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa.

Samuel O. Smith Image OC-1302 came from the Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection, Allen County Public Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana.

This appears to be the same photo that was submitted b Nancy Mosshammer Neuman (below). But if you are interested in ordering a better quality photo click here.

Per the librarian for the Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection at Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana "Images ordered through the “rights” link on our website can be provided at whatever resolution the customer requests up to 1200 dpi. All of the original photos are cartes-de-visit—approximately 2.5 x 4 inches. The paperwork is handled through the Indiana State Museum, and the cost of an image for personal use should be minimal. We don’t provide prints but can send image files either via email or through Dropbox, depending on the file size. A few of the photos have inscriptions on the back, and we can provide image files of those as well."



Samuel O. SmithSubmitted by Nancy Mosshammer Neuman

 Lt. Samuel Oscar Smith enrolled in the 27th Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Company B on 11 August 1862 and was discharged on 8 August 1865 at Clinton, Iowa. He was a son of Thomas Armstrong Smith (1794-1874) and Beulah Templeton (1803-1882). About 1855 they moved from Clinton County, PA to Allamakee County with seven of their nine children. Samuel was their 6th child. He was born January 8, 1836 in Mill Hall, Clinton County, Pennsylvania. He died December 20, 1913 in Jamestown, Chautauqua, New York. He is buried in Lakeview Cemetery, Jamestown, New York in Monument Hill, a section for Civil and Spanish America War veterans. The other children who moved to Iowa were Maria Young, Thomas Clingan, William Boyd, Jane Ann Hale, Gideon Wilson, Matilda, Jackson D. Jefferson, and Joseph Henry. On 24 August 1869 Samuel married Sarah Elizabeth Hazeltine in Lansing where their two children were born: Emma Gertrude (1870) and Edith Alice (1876). They moved to the family home of Sarah Hazeltine in Chautauqua County, NY after Edith's birth. Emma Gertrude Smith Mosshammer was my paternal grandmother.

Nancy Mosshammer Neuman
November 19, 2002


Letters from Samuel O. Smith to his brother Gideon Wilson Smith (1833-1913), Lansing, Allamakee, Iowa

Office of Halliday Brothers
Cairo, Ills. Nov. 12th 1862

Mr. G.W. Smith

Dear Brother:

I am well at present and the Reg't are in tolerable good health. It is 365 from Chicago to Cairo. We were 31 hours running it being on a special train we had to wait at the different stations to let the regular trains pass. Cairo is a very bleak looking town. The river is full of boats. Among the rest are several iron clad Steamers that look like war. I cannot tell how long we shall remain here but probably not very long. The other four companies are here. We have pitched our tents -- a great many troops are leaving here for Memphis where we will perhaps go.

Yours in haste,
Sam'l O. Smith


Aboard the Steamer Lebanon on White river 1 mile from Duvalls Bluffs
Sept. 16th 1863

Dear Brother:

I left Memphis on the morning of the 7th arrived in Helena same evening; waited there for a boat until the morning of the eleventh, got aboard the Lebanon bound for Duvalls Bluffs on White river, arrived at the mouth of White river same evening. As no boats dare venture up the river without a convoy, we were obliged to wait until Sunday 13th for a Gunboat to escort us up the river, we have progressed slowly but safely so far. We came about one hundred miles up the river without seeing a sign of civilization except an old deserted log cabin. We are now stuck on a sand bar. The country all along this river is a dense forest, no sign of cultivation or civilization, except a few old villages of log cabins. We saw but one white man (citizen) on the river, but the women at these old towns came down to the bank and begged for medicine and newspapers. We are off the sand bar and going ahead again. As it is time for the cooks to set the table for dinner, I will quit and close my letter after we land. We get board on the boat for $1.00 per day.

5 o'clock p.m. Duvalls Bluff Ark. Little Rock is in the hands of the Federals. They took it on the 10th Inst. The 27th Reg't is in the City, which is fifty four miles from here.

I have had strong symptoms of the ague during the last two days but I can get transportation in an ambulance for Little Rock tomorrow morning.

Yours affectionately,
S.O. Smith


Miscellaneous information dated 1863 from the papers of Samuel O. Smith.

Headqrs Detachment 27 Iowa Vol. Inf. Medon Tenn. May 8th 1863

To Saml O. Smith
2d Lt. Co B. 27 Iowa

Sir:

You are hereby detailed as a member of a Garrison Court Martial to meet at the office of the Prov. Marshall in Medon Tennessee May 8th 1863 or as soon as practicable for the trial of Levi H. Eddy a private of Co H. 27th regt. Iowa Vol. Inf and such other prisoners as may be brought before it.

By Order of Maj. G.W. Howard. Comd. Post
M.G. Dorman. A.Adj.


Signal Party of Reconnaissance
Steamer Ella off Cairo Ill
December 26th 1863

General Orders No. 1 Extract III

First Lieut. Saml O. Smith Co. B 27th Iowa Vol. Infy. Is assigned to duty as Quarter Master and Commissary.

He will report during office hours any facts relating to his duties and will receive his instructions.  

By order of Col. W. J. Myer., Comd. Expedition, J.H. Walker 1st Lt & Adjutant


Special Requisition For One Cooking Stove

I certify that the above requisition is correct and that the articles Specified are absolutely requisite for the public Service rendered so by the following circumstances. Viz: for the use of Detachment onboard Steamer Ella engaged in reconnaissance for the purpose of establishing Signal Stations, under orders from Secty of War.

Samuel O. Smith
1st Lt. 27th Iowa & A.A. S. Detachment

Approved Albert J. Meyer Col. & Signal Officer U.S.A. commanding expedition. United States Army will issue the articles specified in the above requisition.

Received at Cairo Ills the thirtieth day of Dec. 1863

LETTER USED WITH PERMISSION OF
ALLAMAKEE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM, WAUKON, IOWA

Submitted by Judge John Bauercamper


Near Pleasant Hill La.
April 13th  / 64
Capt. S.W. Hemenway
Co B, 27th Iowa

Capt:

If you have a good opportunity please send me my rubber blanket two wollen Shirts, Boots, one Pr. Drawers, 1 Pr. Stockings.  My health is good, wound doing well, my chest does not pain me internally. Send Geo. Griswold one Shirt, Drawers, and Stockings. His ball was taken from his shoulder he is doing well.

S.O. Smith Lt. Co. B. 27 Iowa

(The following is written on the back of the above letter)

Tell Capt. Granger to send Lt. Brush some under clothes and one Pr. Pants. I send to you by Mr. Stephens Sanitary Comission who came this morning with a flag of truce. The case of Lt. Brush is very doubtful. I send by bearer the keys of my valise. And Lt. Brush's watch to Capt. Granger.

Lt. S.O. Smith


[NOTE: Lt. Samuel O. Smith and Sgt. George W. Griswold of Co. B, 27th Iowa, were badly wounded and taken prisoner at the Battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana on April 9, 1864. Both were paroled in June, later recovered from their wounds and returned to duty. Smith served until his unit was mustered out of service. Griswold died of smallpox on January 11, 1865.

Lt. Frank A. Brush who served in Co. K, 27th Iowa, was also wounded and taken prisoner at Pleasant Hill. He died of wounds on April 20, 1864. Capt. Charles T. Granger was his company commander.]

Samuel O. Smith Pension Papers
Submitted by Nancy Mosshammer Neuman

Samuel O. Smith is wounded and captured at Pleasant Hill

From the pension file of Lt. Samuel O. Smith. On April 9, 1864 at Pleasant Hill, Louisiana he was wounded and taken prisoner by the rebels. The ball entered his neck on the left side of the throat just above the breast bone, passed down through his left chest, lodged in his back near the back-bone above the "coupling", and he was supposed to be mortally wounded and was so reported. He was lying on his belly facing the enemy when he was shot. About six months after he was wounded the ball passed down and out just alongside of the fundament. He was treated in hospital at Pleasant Hill, La, while a prisoner in the hands of the Confederates until 16 June 1864 when he was paroled.


Headquarters Right Wing 16th Army Corps, La Grange Tenn. July 24th 1864.
Special Orders, No. 72, Extract 5

Lt. S.O. Smith Co. "B" 27th Iowa Infty Vols. Having been wounded & captured at Pleasant Hill La. April 9, 1864, and released on parole June 16th 1864, is hereby permitted to go to his home in Iowa and remain until exchanged. He will report weekly by letter to these -- and Regimental -- headquarters, and upon receiving official notice of his exchange will immediately rejoin his command for duty.

By order of Maj. Gen'l A.J. Smith.
J. Hough, Assistant Adjutant General


Headquarters Right Wing 16th Army Corps. Holly Springs Miss. 13th Aug 1864.
Special Orders No. 101, Extract III

1st Lt. S.O. Smith, 27th Iowa Vols. Inf. Paroled prisoner of war, will forthwith proceed to St. Louis Missouri, and report to the Provost Marshal General, at that place for orders.

By Order of Maj Genl A.J. Smith
(Signed) J Hough, Asst Adjt General


Headquarters, Department of the Missouri, Office of Provost Marshal General
St. Louis, Mo., August 30th, 1864
Special Orders No. 225

Ist Lieut. S.O. Smith, 27th Iowa Vols. paroled prisoner of war, having, in compliance with Par III of Special Orders No. 101, dated Headqtrs. Right Wing 16th Army Corps, Holly Springs Miss. Aug. 13th 1864, reported at this Office, is hereby directed to report to the General Commanding for further Orders.

Joseph Darr Jr. 1st Asst. Provost, Marshal General


1865 memoranda found in Samuel O. Smith's papers

Hdqrs. 2nd Brig. 2nd Div. D.A.T., Eastport Miss. January 20th 1865
General Orders No. 4

2nd Lieut R.W. Wood 10th Kansas Vet Vol. Inf having been relieved at his own request from duty as Brigade Commissary. Samuel O. Smith 1st Lieut. Co. B. 27th Iowa Inf. is hereby announced upon the Bridge Staff for that duty. He will be obeyed and respected accordingly and will at once report at these Hdqrs for duty.

By order of James J. Gilbert. Col. Comdg Brigade.
(Signed) W.G. Dorman 1st Lt. A.A.A.G.


HeadQuarters 2nd Brig 2nd Div 16th A.C. Fort Blakeley April 10th 1865

Inventory of Commissary Stores Captured from the Enemy at Fort Blakeley April 9th 1865

  • 9390 Lbs of Meat
  • 78 Head of Sheep
  • 58 head of Cattle
  • 70 Sacks Flour
  • 190 sacks Meal
  • 55 sacks Shorts
  • 24 sacks Cattle Beans and Peas
  • 17 sacks Salt
  • 41 Boxes Hard Bread
  • 13 Boxes Soap
  • 2 Fairbanks Scales

S.O. Smith
1st Lt. 27th Iowa V.A.A.C.


Hdqrs. 3d Brig. 2d Div. 13 A.C.
Blakeley Ala. April 12th 1865

Received of S.O. Smith Lieut and A.A.C.S. 2d Brig 2d Div 16th A.C. the following list of Commissary Stores. Captured at Fort Blakeley, Ala. April 9th 1865. Viz.

  • 58 Head of Cattle
  • 78 head of Sheep
  • 70 Sacks of Flour
  • 60 Sacks of Shorts
  • 24 Sacks of Beans and Peas
  • 17 Sacks of Salt
  • 40 1/2 Boxes Hard Bread
  • 13 Boxes Soap
  • 2 Prs. Fairbanks Scales
  • One Lot of Meat said to weigh 9390 pounds.

John U. Coldren
1st Lieut. 20th Iowa Vols. And A.A.D.C. 3d Brig. 2d Div. 13th A.C.

 Submitted by Nancy Mosshammer Neuman

Samuel O. Smith to Sarah Elizabeth Hazeltine August 24, 1869, Lansing, Marriage certificate issued at Waukon, Allamakee Co. Married by Rev. James Frothingham, (husband of Sarah's oldest sister Chloe) Source: Civil War pension Samuel O. Smith, 1st Lt., Co. B, 27th Iowa Volunteers.

Notes: Sarah was from Chautauqua County, NY and working in Lansing. Samuel's parents, Thomas Armstrong and Beulah (Templeton) Smith moved to Iowa from Clinton Co. PA bet. 1840-1860.

Samuel and Sarah had two daughters: Gertrude b. 7 Aug 1870 (submitters g-mother); Edith b. 16 Jul 1876.

Samuel and Sarah moved from Iowa to her family home in Chautauqua County, NY.


Submitted by
Nancy Neuman

A few weeks ago I e-mailed you that I had discovered that Francis Hale was the brother in law of my great grandfather Samuel Smith. Both served in Company B, 27th Infantry in the Civil War. Today I was looking at Francis Hale's siblings and found that his sister's husband John Churchill and John's son Edwin Churchill also served in Company B. If you want any more genealogical information on these families let me know. I started to add that and realized this message was getting far too long, and going beyond the purpose of finding relationships among the men of Company B. Who knows what I may stumble across next?

You have information I posted in 2002 about Samuel Smith. Since then I have found more information on his family as well as a roll of honor like the one you have online, which was hidden away in a cardboard tube that once held my father's high school diploma! It was falling apart but a local framer managed to soak it, mount and frame it for me. I treasure it!

Hale, Francis H.: Married to Jane Ann Smith, sister of Samuel Smith.

Smith, Samuel O.: Brother in law of Francis Hale.

Churchill, Edwin: Son of John Churchill, nephew of Francis Hale.

Churchill, John: Married to Olive Experience Hale, sister of Francis Hale.

I am sure the widows of these men who died in the war were left with few resources. I have found Jane Hale and her daughter Clara living with relatives in various censuses. Samuel Smith remembered them in his will. When he died, he and his family were living in Busti, Chautauqua, New York on his wife's family farm. Samuel Smith met his wife Sarah Hazeltine in Lansing after the war. Sarah was from Busti (Chautauqua County) New York and was living in Allamakee County with her oldest sibling Chloe Hazeltine and Chloe's husband Rev. James Frothingham when she met Samuel Smith. According to the Chicago Daily Tribune of July 23, 1917 announcing their 60th wedding anniversary, the Frothingham's wedding journey [from Chautauqua] was made by wagon to Indian territory, [Minnesota] where they were missionaries to the Choctaws. Samuel Smith and Sarah Hazeltine were married August 24, 1869 in Lansing by Rev. Frothingham. Sarah's family also suffered losses in the war, with one brother dying of typhoid, and another nearly dying of cholera.

Samuel Smith made his will 4 December 1913 and died 28 December 1913. He remembers his sister Jane, the widow of Francis Hale, and her daughter Clara. Jane's son Frank Hale, who was 2 when his father died, was living in Minnesota in the 1880 census where he apprenticed himself as a harness maker to his uncle Joseph Smith. Frank died in 1895. Here is the excerpt from Samuel's will.

Because my sister, Mrs. Jane A. Hale, of Lansing, Iowa, is aged and infirm and has no income, and her daughter Clara Hale is an invalid and unable to earn her livelihood and their necessities require more means and money than they or either of themselves can provide, I have from time to time advanced and supplied money for their support and care and more advancements without doubt will be required to be made hereafter which I expect to make for that purpose, and may be required to be made after my decease, I direct my executrix (wife Sarah) hereinafter named or whoever may be appointed to execute the provisions of this will to continue from my estate such advancements as may be necessary, proper and suitable according to the circumstances that may then exist. It is my purpose and intention that all advancements that I have heretofore made for the benefit of my sister and her daughter and all such as may be hereafter made by myself or by my executrix under the authority of this my will, shall be regarded as advancements and loans to be returned to my estate from the property and estate of my said sister when the necessity for further advancement shall have ceased and the return of them to myself or to my estate can be made without causing distress to anyone.

Jane and her daughter are buried in Oak Hill cemetery.

Let me know if you want any additional information! I hope this fills in some blanks in your ongoing research into Company B!

Best,
Nancy Neuman

1850 Census, Lancaster, Stephenson, Illinois: Armstrong Smith (age 56, farmer, born Penn), Beulah Smith (age 47, born Penn), Maria Young (age 25, born Penn), Thomas C. Smith (age 23, born Penn.), William B. Smith (age 21, born Penn.), Ann J. Smith (age 19, born Penn), Gideon W. Smith (age 17, born Penn.), Samuel Smith (age 14, born Penn.), Matilda Smith (age 12, born Penn.), Jackson Smith (age 8, born Penn.), Joseph H. Smith (age 5, born Penn.) and Maria Young (age 1, born Ill.).

1856 Iowa State Census, Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: T. A. Smith (age 62, born Penn. Farmer,), Beulah Smith (age 53, born Penn), Maria Young (age 31, born Penn), G. W. Smith (age 22, born Penn), Samuel Smith (age 20, Laborer, born Penn), Matilda Smith (age 17, born Penn), Jackson Smith (age 14, born Penn), and Joseph Smith (age 12, born Penn). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 1 year.

1860 Census: Lansing, Allamakee county, Iowa: Samuel O. Smith (age 24, clerk, born Penn.) He appeared to be living in the household of George W. Hays (age 38, merchant, born Penn.)

1880 Census, Busti, Chautauqua, New York: Smith, S. O. (age 43), wife Sarah (age 32), daughter Gertrude (age 9), daughter Edith (age 3), Father-in-Law Edward Hazeltine (age 73), mother-in-law Polly Hazeltine (age 66), niece Louisa Hazeltine (age 12) and nephew Frederick Hazeltine (age 12).

1890 Veteran's Census, Busti, Chautauqua, New York: Samuel O. Smith, Rank: Captain, Company B, 27th Regiment, Iowa Inf. Enlisted: Aug 9, 1862, Discharged Aug 7, 1865. Severed 2 years, 11 months, and 28 days. Post Office: Busti, Disability Incurred: Gun shot Chest.

1900 Census, Busti, Chautauqua, New York, Samuel Smith (born Jan. 1836, age 64, married 30 years, born Pennsylvania, farmer), wife Sarah Smith (born Nov. 1847, age 52, married 30 years, 3 children born, 2 still living, born New York), daughter Edith Smith (born July 1876, age 23, born Iowa).

1910 Census - Busti, Chautauqua, New York: Samuel Smith, (age 74, married one time for 40 years), wife Sarrah Smith (age 62, married 1 time for 40 years, 2 children born, 2 still living).

Samuel O. Smith died Dec. 22, 1913, at Jamestown, Chautauqua, New York. He is buried in Lakeview Cemetery, Jamestown, New York in Monument Hill, (a section for Civil and Spanish America War veterans).

His widow Sarah H. Smith filed for a pension on Dec. 29, 1913 in New York.


Soderstrom, Andrew W. He was born about 1842 in Sweden. He was the son of Olaver and Margaret Soderstrom.

1860 Census: Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Olaver Soderstrom (age 49, farmer, born Sweden), Margaret Soderstrom (age 49, born Sweden), Andrew Soderstrom (age 18, farmer, born Sweden), Margaret Soderstrom (age 20, born Sweden). They were living next door to a Peter Soderstrom (age 23, farmer, born Sweden), Cate Soderstrom (age 22, born Sweden) and Roda Soderstrom (age 1, born Iowa).

Andrew Soderstrom died Aug. 10, 1865 and is buried in Memphis National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn. Section A, Site 1739.

1870 Census Center, Allamakee County, Iowa: Peter Soderstrom (age 32, farmer, born Sweden), Catherine Soderstrom (age 29, born Sweden), Roda Soderstrom (age 12, born Iowa), Helen Soderstrom (age 10, born Iowa), Mary Soderstrom (age 4, born Iowa), Edward Soderstrom (age 10/12, born Iowa), Oluff Soderstrom (age 60, born Sweden), Margarette Soderstrom (age 60, born Sweden).

His mother Margaret Soderstrom filed for a pension on Feb. 28, 1872.


Stangier, Emil. He was born about 1828 in Germany.

According to the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War Emil Stengler died Jan. 1, 1886 and is buried in Waldheim Cemetery, Cook County, Illinois. There is no STENGLER in the 27th Iowa. Is this Emil Stangier of Company B.?

I found an Emil Stenger posted on Find a Grave. There is an age discrepanies that makes me question this:

Name: Emil Stenger
Death Date: 01 Jan 1886
Death Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Gender: Male
Race (Original): white
Death Age: 70y
Estimated Birth Year: 1816

Birthplace: Germany
Occupation: Park Policeman
Cemetery: Waldheim
Film Number: 1030913
Digital Folder Number: 4004146
Image Number: 809
Reference Number: cn 76554
Collection: Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1922

I found this information on the Illinois USGENWEB site for Cook County:  The Roll of Honor, Containing the Names of Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines of All the Wars of Our Country Who Are Buried in the Cemeteries of Cook County by Eli Robert Lewis (Chicago, Ill.: Printing Products Corp., 1922) ACPL Call Number 973.001 IL6L:

Cemetery: Waldheim
Name: Emil Stenger
Rank: Pvt.
Co: A
U.S. Regiment State Organization or Vessel: 27 Iowa Inf.
Date of Death: 1/1/1886
No. of Grave: Single Grave
No. of Lot: 470
Section: I

His widow Fredericka Stangier filed for a pension on July 19, 1886 in Illinois. So even though there are discrepancies (i.e age and company), I think this is probably him.

I found bits and pieces that MIGHT fit: On familysearch.org I found a marriage for a Charles Stenger who married Lina Gotjahe on Aug. 13, 1898 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. His place of birth was listed as Chigaco, Illinois, and his parents were Emil Stenger and Fredericke Freiberg.

On familysearch.org I found a death record for an Emma Stenger who died Feb. 6 1944 at Cook County, Illinois. Her parents were listed as Emil Stenger and (mother) Frieberg.

On the 1900 census I found this family in Chicago, Ward 21, Cook County, Illinois: Fredreka Stenger, (born Aug. 1833, age 66, widowed, 4 children born, 4 still living, born Germany, immigrated 1854), daughter Emma Stenger, born July 1874, age 25, born Illinois, both parents born Germany, clerk), daughter Theresa Stenger (born April 1876, age 24, born Illinois, both parents born Germany, clerk), daughter Mina Stenger (born Oct. 1878, age 21, born Illinois, both parents born Germany, stenographer).

On the 1910 census, I found only the three girls living togehter. (No Fredericka). Did she die between 1900 and 1910? or remarry? I did not find her in the cemetery with Emil Stenger. UPDATE: Nov. 7, 2015: She died Feb. 21, 1909 and is buried in Montrose Cemetery, Cook County, Illinois.

Update: Nov. 7, 2015. I had requested a photo of the tombstone for Emil Stenger buried in Waldheim Cemetery. I received this response: "This person, although originally buried at Waldheim German Cemetery, was moved to Montrose Cemetery on or about March 15, 1909. Please move this memorial to that cemetery."

When I checked Montrose Cemetery, I found that Fredricka Stenger, died Feb. 21, 1909 and son Charles Stenger, born Feb. 8, 1868, d. Dec. 18, 1939 are also buried there. So it appears to me that his body was moved to the cemetery where his wife and son are buried. I am going to update the cemetery to Montrose Cemetery, Cook County, Illinois.


Strohm, John He was born about 1827 in Germany.

He filed for a pension on May 17, 1866.

1870 Census: Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa; John Strom (age 45, born Wurttembert, Stone Mason), He was living the household of Ole and Martha Mangason.

1895 Iowa State Census Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Strohm, age 68, single, born Germany, Laborer, religion: none, can read but not write, soldier in War of The Rebellion: Co. B, 27th Iowa Inf.

1910 Census, Lansing, Allamakee County, Iowa: John Strohm (age 85, single, immigrated in 1850 and was naturalized.)

John Strohm died Feb. 11, 1912 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.


Strong, Horace. He was born June 1, 1837. He was the son of Horace Strong (Dec. 6, 1791 - ?) and Polly Carter Nov. 27, 1798 - ?).

1850 Census, Gerry, Chautauqua County, New York: Horace Strong (age 58, farmer, born Ct), Polly Strong (age 52, born NY), Wm. Strong (age 17, Laborer, born NY), Abigail Strong (age 20, born NY), Levonia Strong (age 16, born NY), Horace Strong (age 13, born NY), Henry C. Strong (age 9, born NY).

1856 Iowa State Census: Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa: Horace Strong, age 63, born Conn. Farmer), Polly Strong (age 57, born NY), Henry C. Strong (age 12, born NY). I did not find either Horace or William Strong in 1856 or 1860.

Horace Strong died June 29, 1864 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lansing Township, Allamakee County, Iowa.


Strong, William He was born January 19, 1833. He was the son of Horace Strong (Dec. 6, 1791 - ?) and Polly Carter (Nov. 27, 1798 - ?).

1850 Census, Gerry, Chautauqua County, New York: Horace Strong (age 58, farmer, born Ct), Polly Strong (age 52, born NY), Wm. Strong (age 17, Laborer, born NY), Abigail Strong (age 20, born NY), Levonia Strong (age 16, born NY), Horace Strong (age 13, born NY), Henry C. Strong (age 9, born NY).

1856 Iowa State Census: Makee, Allamakee County, Iowa: Horace Strong, age 63, born Conn. Farmer), Polly Strong (age 57, born NY), Henry C. Strong (age 12, born NY). I did not find either Horace or William Strong in 1856 or 1860.

William Strong died July 2, 1865 and is buried in National Cemetery, Mound City, Ill. Plot E 0 3226


Sturdevant, Fletcher Franklin He was born Nov. 16, 1842 in Elizabeth, Jo Davies Co., Ill. He was the son of John Sturdevant and Lucetta Williams. He married Clara Etta Nulph on May 25, 1873.. She was the daughter of Daniel Nulph and Barbara Ann Hyatt.

1860 Census. Cedar, Mitchell County, Iowa: John Sturdevant, age 45, farmer, born Ohio), Lucetta Sturdevant (age 37, born Kentucky), Fletcher, age 17, Farmer, born Illinois), Maria (age 12, born Illinois), Ellen (age 9, born Illinois).

1880 Census; Kimball, Jackson County, Minnesota: Fletcher F. Steordevant (age 37, farmer, born Illinois), wife Clara E. Steordevant (age 29, born Wisconsin), daughter Ada E. Steordevant (age 9, born Minnesota), daughter Cora E. Steordevant (age 4, born Minnesota), son Ira F. Steordevant (age 4,born Minnesota) and son Delbert W. Steordevant (age 1, born Minnesota)

1883 List of Pensioners on the Roll: Martin County, Minnesota: Fletcher F. Sturdevant, P. O. Address: Cedarville, Cause for which pensioned: Wound left hip and loss part right index finger, Monthly Rate: $6.00.

1885 Minnesota Territorial and State Census, Kimball, Jackson County, Minnesota: Fletcher F, Sturdevant (age 43, born Illinois), Clara E. Sturdevant, (age 35, born Wisconsin), Ada E. (age 14, born Minnesota), Clara E, age 9 (born Minnesota), John J. (age 9, born Minnesota), Eva A., (age 7 born Minnesota), Walter D., (age 6, born Minnesota), Clara B., (age 9/12), Nellie M. (Age 2)

1890 Veteran's Pension, Kimball, Jackson County, Minnesota: Fletcher F. Sturdevant, private, Co. B, 27th Iowa Inft. Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, Discharged June 13, 1865, served 2 years, 10 months. Post Office: Goldleaf, Jackson Co., Minnesota. Disability incurred: shot in hip and one finger off. Filed for a pension on Dec. 15, 1894.

1900 Census, Kimball, Jackson County, Minnesota: F. F. Sturdevant (born Nov. 1842, age 57, married 27 years, born Illinois, Farmer), wife Clara (born Jan, 1850, age 50, married 27 years, 11 children, 9 still living), son Ira, (born Jan 1874, age 26), Son Delbert (born Mar. 1879, age 21), daughter Nellie (born May 1885, age 15), daughter Bellie (born July 1884, age 15), son Fred, born Sept. 1887, age 12), son Arthur (born July 1890, age 9).

Clara E. Sturdevant died Aug. 31, 1907 in Jackson County, Minnesota. She is buried in Cedar Lake Cemetery, Trimont, Martin County, Minnesota.

1910 Census, Kimball, Jackson County, Minnesota: F. F. Sturdevant (age 67, widowed), son Ira Sturdevant (age 38), Son Arthur (age 18), daughter Belle (age 25).

Fletcher Franklin Sturdevant died August. 30, 1914 and is buried in Cedar Lake Cemetery, Trimont, Martin County, Minnesota.


Tharp, John W. He was born about 1834 in Ohio. He was the son of Leonard Tharp (April 2, 1808 - Jan 6, 1856) and Nancy Cavinee (March 7, 1807 - May 28, 1858).

1850 Census: Salt Lick, Perry County, Ohio: Leonard Tharp (age 42, farmer, born PA), Nancy Tharp (age 45, born PA), Rebecca Tharp (age 20, born Ohio), Hily Tharp (age 18, born Ohio). John W. Tharp (age 16, laborer, born Ohio), Edward Tharp (age14, born Ohio), Leonard L. Tharp (age 11, born Ohio), James Tharp (age 7, born Ohio), Nancy J. Tharp (age 4, born Ohio), no name (age 1/12, female, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Union, Allamakee County, Iowa: Jackson Thorp (age 21, farmer, born Ohio), Hanah Thorp (age 29, born Pennsylvania), Mary J. Barns (age 7, born Pennsylvania), John W. Thorp (age 26, farmer, born Ohio), Edward Thorp (age 23, farmer, born Ohio) and James P. Thorp (age 16, farmer, born Ohio). (Since John W. Tharp enlisted in Lansing, Allamakee County, this could be the right person. Based on the family structure this would mean he was most likely the son of Leonard and Nancy Tharp -- Note Jackson Tharp is not listed in 1850. The only one that would fit would Leonard - His middle initial is indexed as an L. But in looking at it on the written census, and comparing it to other names that start with a J, His middle initial could be a J. I also note that numerous family trees list him as Leonard J. Tharp. So maybe his name is Leonard Jackson Tharp. The other two - Edward and James are clearly listed in the family with John W. in 1850).

All family trees online show a date of death for John W. Tharp as Jan 2, 1913 in Perry County, Ohio. There is a John Tharp that died that date in Perry County. But it did not make sense to me that he died in Ohio and was buried in Iowa. When I have seen that in the past, it is because there is a wife or other family member buried in the same cemetery. I could find no evidence of that being the circumstance here. So I contacted one of the people that had an online family tree to see if they had any knowledge of him serving with the 27th Iowa. This was the response:

Hi: This is the information that I have.

Leonard Tharp Born in 1808 in PA.; married Nancy Cavinee (also born in PA) on May 28, 1828. They had the following children all born in Ohio. Rebecca 1830; Hiley 1832; John W. 1834; Edward 1836; Leonard Jackson 1850; they lived in Perry Co. Ohio.

Edward and Evelyn Colsch of Caledonia, Minnesota have supplied information concerning Hiley, John W. and Leonard J. Tharp. Evelyn is a great grand daughter of John and Hiley (Tharp) Ross.

  1. Hiley married John Ross who was born June 18, 1818 in PA and died Sept 28, 1871 in New Albin, Iowa. They were one of the earliest settlers in Iowa Twp. and owned land where the town of New Albin now stands. This land was purchased from the government Aug 21, 1854 and sold in 1871. Their children: John Jr. 4-29-1856, Allen R. 8-9-1857, Adeline R. 9-21-1862, Mary 10-28-1859, Alice 7-7-1865, Susan Jane 8-25-1867, Infant 6-15-1870, and George William 11-5-1871.
  2. John W. Tharp was born 1834 in Saltlick Twp. Perry Co. Ohio and died March 7, 1872 at New Albin in Allamakee Co, Iowa. He is buried at Ross Cem. at New Albin, Iowa. John was never married. He was a farmer and owned land at one time in Jefferson Twp. Houston Co, Minnesota. He enlisted in Company B. 27th Reg't. Iowa Infantry at Lansing, Iowa on August 15, 1862 at age 28 yrs. He was sick in the General Hospital at Davenport, Iowa from Jan 1864 to Sept 20, 1864 when he was discharged from service. His heirs, listed in a Probate Court Record of Houston Co, Minn., included 10 nieces, 6 nephews and 1 grand nephew. These included the children of John and Hiley Ross and 4 nephews with the Tharp name: Leonard James Tharp of Hayward, Wisconsin; Edward M. Tharp of Chicago; Samuel L. Tharp of Atwood, Kansas; and David Tharp of Albany, Illinois.
  3. Leonard Jackson Tharp born Perry Co Ohio. He resided in Iowa Twp., Allamakee Co, Iowa about 1854. A record from the Probate Court of Allamakee Co, Iowa dated Feb 8, 1858 lists his estate.

I hope this answers your question. If not let me know.

P.S. The spelling started as Thorp and some changed to Tharp.

John Tharp died March, 7, 1872 and is buried in Ross Cemetery, New Albin, Allamakee County, Iowa.


Williams, Robert Hunter He was born about 1840 in Illinois

1880 Census: Logan, Marshall County, Iowa: Robert Williams (age 39, harness maker, unemployed 10 months, rheumatism, born Ill.), Louisa Williams (age 26, born New Jersey), Minnie Williams (age 8, born Minnesota).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa Infantry: Robert H. Williams, Private, Co. B. Post Office Newton.

1885 Iowa State Census: Newton, Jasper County, Iowa: Robert H. Williams (Everly Sub, L. 7, age 44, carpenter, born Illinois), Louise C. Williams (age 32, dress making, born New Jersey), Minnie Williams (age 13, born Minnesota) and Mary Dammire (age 18, born Illinois).

1900 Census: Newton Jasper County, Iowa: Ebenezer Morrison (born Aug. 1846, age 53, married 6 years, born New York), wife Minnie Morrison (born Jan. 1872, age 28, married 6 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born Minnesota), son Ray E. Morrison (born May 1896, age 4, born Iowa), daughter Harriett Morrison (born Dec. 1898, age 1, born Iowa), and mother-in-law Louisa Williams (born Feb. 1853, age 47, divorced, 1 child born, 1 still living, born New Jersey). I could not find Robert H. Williams on this census.

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Milwaukee Wisconsin, Northwestern Branch: Robert H. Williams MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 13, 1862, Lansing IA, Rank: Sgt. Company and Regiment: B, 27 IA Inf.. Time and Place of Discharge: Aug. 8, 1865, Clinton IA. Cause of Discharge: Close of war. King and Degree of Disability: Hodrocele both limbs. Muscular rheumatism, piles. When and Where Contracted: Jan. 1903. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Illinois, Age 65, Height 5.9, light complexion, blue eyes, gray hair, can read and write, Protestant, Occupation: Carpenter, Residence Subsequent to Discharge: New Albin IA, widowed, Name and Address of Nearest Relative: Daughter Minnie Morrison, Newton, Iowa. HOME HISTORY: Dates of Admission and Re-Admission: Jan. 18. 06, Aug. 2. 06, Sept. 28. 17. Dates of Discharge and Transfer: Aug. 2, 1906 and Jun 28. 17. Date of Death: Aug. 24, 1918. Cause of Death: Mitral insufficiency and Arterio sclerosis. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate 318268. Interred in Home Cemetery, Block 21, No. 84. Effects: No pension money. Personal 5.75. Check mailed Oct. 17, and effects shipped Oct. 29, 1918 to Minnie M. Dodds, daughter, Kellogg, Iowa, Authority of President Board Managers dated Sept. 25, 1918.

1910 Census, National Home Milwaukee County, Wis. Northwestern Branch: Robert H. Williams, age 69, divorced, born Illinois.

Robert H. Williams died Aug. 24, 1918 at the National Home in Wisconsin. He is buried at Wood National Cemetery, Plot 21, 84, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin.