22554925_1459383487507727_3348972156119297569_n[1] Company E Notes

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Notes for the men of Company E, 27th Iowa.

This information is a compilation of information that I have found. I have not attempted to verify any of it. But if I find a discrepancy between sources, I have noted it. All information in this section should be validated with further research. Corrections are welcome.

I use various sources. I start with the Pension Records Index to see if I can determine the spouse's name. Then I check Census records, and Family Trees on Ancestry.com. If I can determine what county/state he was in, I check the USGENWEB site for that particular county. I also use Find A Grave and Iowa Gravestones Photo Project websites. Last I do a general search of the internet.


Allen, Enoch He married Sarah J. Pettit on Dec. 17, 1868 in National, Clayton County, Iowa. He was aged 35, she was aged 26. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Bartholomew Pettit and Sarah Ann Butt. He filed for a pension in Colorado on June 16, 1890.

1900 Census, District 85, Delaware, Leavenworth, Kansas, National Home for Disabled Soldiers: Enoch Allen (age 78, married 1 time for 43 years, born New York, Farmer).

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Western Branch, Leavenworth, Kansas: Enoch Allen. MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 11, 1862, Farmersburg, Iowa. Rank: Private, Company and Regiment: E, 27 Iowa Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: June 15, 1865, Montgomery, Alabama. Cause of Discharge: Services no longer required. Kind and Degree of Disability: Genl Debility. When and Where Contracted: Not Stated. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: New York, age 69, Height: 5 81/2: Complexion: fair. Color of Eyes: Grey, Color of Hair: Gray, Can Read and Write, Religion: Prot, Occupation: Farmer. Residence Subsequent to Discharge: Denver, Cola. Married. Name and Address of Nearest Relative: Sarah J. Allen (wife), Manchester, Iowa. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension $ 12.00 - $20.00. Date of Admission: Oct. 18, 1901, W. B., Date of Death: Feb. 17, 1911. Cause of Death; Cardiac Degeneration (myocardial). GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate: 788.378. Location of Grave and Remarks: Sec. 29, Row 7, Grave 4086. Died in Hospital at 5:10 A. M. Wife notified at Manchester, Iowa. Funeral at 2:30 Feb. 18, 1911. Rev. J. M. Payne Chaplain. Effects shipped March 14, 1911 to Widow.

1910 Census, Delaware, Leavenworth County, Kansas National Military Home, Enoch Allen (age 78, married 1 time for 43 years, born New York, Farmer).

Enoch Allen died Feb. 17, 1911, and is buried in Leavenworth National Cemetery, P. O. Box 1694, 4101 S. 4th St., Traffic Way Leavenworth, KS 66048. Section 29, Row 7, Site 23.

His widow Sarah J. Allen filed for a pension on March, 8, 1911 in Iowa.


Allen, William M. He was born Dec. 28, 1828 in Ledyard, New London, Connecticut. He was the son of Abel Allyn (Dec. 24, 1790 - Aug. 20, 1857) and Polly Haix (Nov. 6, 1794 - Apr. 17, 1878). He married Juliette Eddy. She was the daughter of Joseph Eddy and Celesta Scott.

William M. Allyn is a sterling representative of an honored pioneer family given to Clayton county by historic old New England, and holds prestige as one of the vigorous and upright citizens who aided in laying broad and deep the foundations for the fine superstructure of civic and industrial prosperity now in evidence in this attractive division of the Hawkeye State.

He whose name initiates this paragraph has been a resident of Clayton county for more than sixty years and is now one of its venerable and highly esteemed citizens, the while he has not only been a prominent figure in connection with the development of the agricultural resources of the county, but his also is the distinction of having been one of the gallant patriots who represented Iowa as a soldier of the Union in the great civil conflict through which the nation's integrity was perpetuated. Though he has relegated to others the more arduous and exacting labors and responsibilities that were long his portion as one of the world's productive workers, he still resides on his fine homestead farm of 280 acres in section 2, Garnavillo township, and his residence is within easy access of the village of St. Olaf, from which he receives service on rural mail route No. 2.

William M. Allyn was born in New London county, Connecticut, on the 28th of December, 1828, and in that staunch commonwealth of New England his parents, Abel and Polly Allyn, passed their entire lives, both having been representatives of fine old colonial stock. Of the eight children Mr. Allyn is the younger of the two now living, and his sister, Margaret, is the widow of James Billings, and now a resident of New London county, Connecticut. Mr. Allyn was reared and educated in his native state, where he gained his early experience with the work of the home farm and where he continued his residence until he had attained more than his legal majority. In April, 1859, when 32 years of age, he came to Clayton County, Iowa, where he secured a Mexican soldier's claim in Garnavillo township, and on this original place he has continued to live and labor during the long intervening years, which have been marked by his faithful stewardship and by his successful achievement in connection with the basic industries of agriculture and stock- growing. His financial resources when he came to Iowa were merely nominal, and through his own well ordered endeavors he has gained large and worthy success, as indicated by his ownership at the present time of a valuable and specially well improved landed estate of two hundred and eighty acres. It is a far cry to revert to the primitive log cabin which he erected for his original abiding place to the fine modern residence which he now occupies, and all other permanent improvements which he has made on his farm are of the best type.

When the dark cloud of civil war cast its pall over the national horizon, Mr. Allyn was one of the loyal and patriotic citizens of Clayton county who subordinated all other interests to go forth in defense of the Union, and his service during the great fratricidal conflict was such as to reflect perpetual honor upon his name and memory. In the spring of 1862 he enlisted as a private in Company E, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, with which he proceeded to the front and in which he rose to the office of sergeant. His regiment was assigned to the army of Tennessee and within his service of nearly three years he took part in numerous engagements, including a number of the sanguinary battles marking the progress of the war. In an engagement at Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, he received a severe wound in his left foot, and after having been confined to a hospital for several weeks he was mustered out and received his honorable discharge.

He then returned to his farm and during the long years that have since elapsed he has here continued as one of the staunch and influential representatives of the agricultural and live-stock interests of Clayton county, with inviolable place in popular confidence and good will. He is a stalwart in the local camp of the Republican party and has shown a loyal interest in all things pertaining to the communal welfare, but he has had no desire for public office, his only service having been that of school director, of which office he was the incumbent for several years.

Soon after his service as a soldier in the Civil war had been terminated Mr. Allyn wisely girded himself the better for the active duties and responsibilities of life by taking unto himself a wife. He wedded Miss Juliette Eddy, who was born in the State of Vermont, as were also her parents, Joseph and Celeste Eddy, with whom she came to Iowa in the pioneer days, her parents passing the remainder of their lives in this state. Mr. and Mrs. Allyn shared with mutual solicitude and loyalty the joys and sorrows of life, and their ideal companionship found its greatest glory in the gracious evening of their lives, the silver cord of their devotion being severed in 1901, when Mrs. Allyn was summoned to eternal rest, her memory being revered by all who came within the sphere of her gentle influence and her mortal remains resting in the cemetery at Kandallville, Winneshiek county, not far distant from her old home. She is survived by two children, William, who has practical charge of the old homestead farm, and Juliette, who remains with her father and presides over the attractive home; she is popular in the social life of the community and was graduated in the high school at McGregor.

History of Clayton County, Iowa
By Realto E. Price

1860 Census, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: W. M. Allen (age 31, farmer, born Connecticut), W. F. Brewster (age 23, carpenter, born Connecticut), H. E. Brewster (age 21, born Connecticut), Sarah Brewster (age 1, born Connecticut) and L. M. Brewster (age 1, born Connecticut.). (Note: H.E. Brewster is his sister Hannah Ellen Allyn married to William F. Brewster).

1870 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Wm. M. Allen (age 40, farmer, born Connecticut), Juliet Allen (age 27, born Vt.), Henry Wealansich (age 20, farm laborer, born German), Wm. Meyer (age 18, farm laborer, born Hanover), and Mary Miller (age 18, domestic servant, born Prussia).

1880 Census, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: William M. Allen (age 52, farmer), wife Juliette (age 38), son William M. (age 9), daughter Juliette (age 6).

1900 census, Garnavillo, Clayton county, Iowa: William M. Allyn (born Dec. 1828, age 71, married 33 years), wife Juliette (born June 1839, age 60, married 33 years, 2 children, 2 still living), daughter Juliette (born July 1872, age 27).

Juliette (Eddy) Allyn (born June 24, 1841), died Aug. 12, 1901. She is buried in Eddy Cemetery, Kendallville, Winneshiek County, Iowa.

1910 census, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: William M. Allen (age 81, widowed), daughter Juliette (age 36). His son William was living next door with his wife Anna and children Margaret and Elmer.

1915 State Census, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Card No. 344. William M. Allyn, age 86, widowed, retired farmer, can read and write, extent of education: Grammar 8, born Connecticut, owns his own home or farm: encumbrance on farm or home - none. Value of farm or home, 41,000. Military Service: Civil War, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E. father's birthplace: Connecticut, mother's birthplace: Connecticut. Years in Iowa: 57.

William Allyn died July 9, 1917 and is buried in Eddy Cemetery in Kendallville, Winneshiek County, Iowa.


Angier, Silas Wright He was born June 16, 1844 in Westport, Essex county, New York. He was the son of Calvin Angier and Clarissa Chandler. Silas Angier married Georgianna Renshaw on Aug. 28, 1866 in Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa. She was the daughter of George S. Renshaw and Martha Evans

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: C. C. Angier (age 47), Clarissa Angier (age 47), Jane Angier (age 21). E. L. Angier (age 17), Silas Angier (age 15), Charles Angier (age 14), Eugene Angier (age 11) and John Valentine (age 35).

1870 Census: Giard, Clayton County, Iowa; Salas W. Angier (age 26, farmer, born New York), Georgianna Angier (age 27), Jesse Angier (age 2) and Eva Angier (age 5/12).

1880 Census: Storm Lake, Buena Vista County, Iowa; Silas W. Angier (age 35, born New York, Dairyman), wife Georgianna Angier (age 31), daughter Jessie F. Angier (age 11) and daughter Eva B. Angier (age 10)

1885 Iowa State Census: Storm Lake, Buena Vista County, Iowa: S. W. Angier, (age 40, born NY, Township 90, Range 37, Section 4, SE NW, married), G .A. Angier (age 36), Jessie Angier (age 17, born Clayton County), Eva B. Angier (age 13, born Buena Vista County), and Etta Angier (age 3, Born Buena Vista County). (Indexed as S. W. Angus in Ancestry.com).

Silas Angier filed for a pension on Aug. 16, 1895 in South Dakota.

1900 Census; Indianola, Warren County, Iowa; Silas W. Angier (born June 1843, age 56, married 34 years, born New York), wife Georgianna Angier (born Mar. 1849, age 51, married 34 years, 3 children born, 3 still living), daughter Jessie F. Angier (born Feb. 1868, age 32) and daughter Ettie M. Angier (born Aug. 1881, age 18).

1905 Iowa State Census: Indianola, Warren County, Iowa: Silas W. Angier, G. A. Angier, Jessie L. Angier, Ettia Angier. Post Office address for all was Indianola.

1910 Census: Indianola Ward 1, Warren County, Iowa: Silas W. Angier (age 65, born New York), wife Georgiana Angier (age 61) and daughter Jessie F. Angier. (Note: Ancestry.com indexed his name as Glas V. Angier)

1915 Iowa State Census: Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa: Silas W. Angier (age 70, Retired, Extent of Education Common 6, Birth Place New York, Military: Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E., Church Affiliation: Baptist, Father's Birth Place, N. H., Mother's birthplace: New York, married can read and write. In Iowa for 55 years.)

1920 Census: Des Moines Ward 5, Polk County, Iowa: Silas Angier (age 75, born New York), wife Georgeanna Angier (age 70), daughter Jessie F. Angier (age 51).

1930 Census: Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa: Silas W. Angier (age 85, married, age at first marriage 22), born New York), Georganna Angier (age 81, married. Age at first marriage 18), Jessie F. Angier (age 62, single) and Etta M. Vuhnonch (age 48, widowed)

Silas Wright Angier died Sept. 11, 1935 and is buried in Glendale Cemetery, Polk County, Iowa.

Iowa Cemetery Records: Name: Silas Wright Angier. Death Date: Sept. 11, 1935, Page #16, Birth date: 1844. Cemetery Glendale. Relative: 91. Level Info: Iowa Graves Registration Survey WPA Polk County, Iowa.


Arble, Richard He was born in 1836 in Cambria County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Frederick Arble (1790 - 1842) and Rebecca Fairfax.

1850 Census: District 4, Scott County, Iowa: Newton H. Collar (age 38), Rosanna Collar (age 25), Richard Arble (age 14), Thomas T. Arble (age 12) and Rebecca Arble (age 53). (Note: according to family tree information, Rosanna was Richard's married sister).

1856 Iowa State Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: N H. Coller (age 48), Rosanna Coller (age 32), Rebecca Arble (age 68), Richard P. Arble (age 20) and Thomas Arble (age 18). (Note; they were indexed as Asble on Ancestry.com).

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Asa Hall (age 22), Julia Hall (age 23), Wm Hall (age 3), Richard Arble (age 23, born Pennsylvania), Austin Owen (age 18, born Pennsylvania).

Richard P. Arble died Nov. 26, 1862 and is buried in National Cemetery, Hwy. 52, National, Iowa.


Ashline, Edward He was born about 1837 in Champlain, Clinton County, New York. He was the son of Antoine Ashline and Olive (Possibly Trumblee - See 1925 Census record for George Ashline).

1850 Census: Champlain, Clinton County, New York: Antoine Ashline (age 50), Olive Ashline (age 48), Wm Ashline (age 11), Hiram Ashline (age 9), Julia Ashline (age 15), Edward Ashline (age 14) and George Ashline (age 5)

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Louis Ashline (age 40), Margaret Ashline (age 30), Adaline Ashline (age 8), Elizabeth Ashline (age 6), Eugene Ashline (age 4), Caria Ashline (age 1), Edward Ashline (age 23) and Hiram Ashline (age 21).

From William Ashline's Biography: After a brief detour to Minnesota during the Sioux Indian Uprising, the 27th reported to Brigadier General William T. Sherman at Memphis, Tennessee, in December 1862. On New Year's Day, 1863, William and his brothers found themselves on a cold and muddy march from Jackson, Tennessee, to Clinton, on the Tennessee River, in futile pursuit of Brigadier General Nathan Bedford Forest. Following this march, brother Edward was discharged with tuberculosis. He died the following year.

Edward Ashline died March, 18, 1864 and is buried in National Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa.


Ashline, George He was born in April 1844 in Champlain, Clinton County, New York. He was the son of Antoine Ashline and Olive (Possibly Trumblee - See 1925 Census record). He married Dianna E. Knickerbocker (Feb. 22, 1849 - Jan. 11, 1928) on Nov. 20, 1868 in Prairie Du Chien, Crawford County, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of Amasy Knickerbocker (May 1819 - 1900) and Matilda Ives (Dec. 30, 1828 - Apr. 12, 1886).

1850 Census: Champlain, Clinton County, New York: Antoine Ashline (age 50), Olive Ashline (age 48), Wm Ashline (age 11), Hiram Ashline (age 9), Julia Ashline (age 15), Edward Ashline (age 14) and George Ashline (age 5)

1860 Census, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: T. J. Dripps, (age 40), Ann Dripps (age 27), Irene Dripps (age 8), Eva Dripps (age 4), Margaret Dripps (age 1), George Encenhour (age 25), George Ashline (age 16, born New York) and Roka Stoker (age19)

From the William J. Ashline Biography: Ashline's comrades saw little action through the early months of 1863, finding themselves on garrison duty, guarding trains and supply bases. One July evening, younger brother George was shot in the leg by a careless private in another company. By November, George was home in Iowa with a minie bullet lodged in the cartilage of his right knee. It would remain there until he died in 1927.

1870 Census, Polk, Bremer County, Iowa: George Ashline (age 23, farmer, born New York), Diana Ashline (age 21), Frank Ashline (age 4/12).

1880 Census: Elk, Clayton County, Iowa; George Ashline (age 35, farmer, born New York), wife Diana (age 29), son Francis (age 10) and daughter Emilla (age 7),

1885 Iowa State Census: Elk, Clayton County, Iowa: George Ashline (age 39, Township 91, Range 4, Section 21, SW SW ), Diana Ashline (age 36), Frank Ashline (age 15), Henry Ashline (age 10) and Ella Ashline (age 3).

1900 Census: Honey Creek, Delaware County, Iowa: George Ashline (born April 1844, age 56, farm laborer, married for 31 years, born New York), wife Dianna E. Ashline (born Feb. 1849, age 51, married 31 years, 4 children born, 4 still living), son William G. Ashline (born July 1887, age 12).

1910 Census: Honey Creek, Delaware County, Iowa: Geo. Ashline (age 69, born New York), wife Diana Ashline (age 60).

1915 Iowa State Census: Edgewood, Delaware County, Iowa: Geo. Ashline (age 68, married, County Delaware, Town Edgewood, Occupation Laborer, months in 1914 unemployed 7, total earnings for 1914 from occupation: $125.00. Extent of Education: Common 5, can read and write, Birth Place NY State, Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E. Father's Birthplace NY State, Mother's Birthplace: NY State. Years in Iowa: 64.

1920 Census: Honey Creek, Delaware County, Iowa; George W. Ashline (age 73), and Diana E. Ashline (age 70).

1925 Iowa State Census, Edgewood, Delaware County, Iowa: George Ashline (age 78, father's name: Anglino Ashline born NY., mother's name Olive Trumblee), wife Diana Ashline (age 75, father's name Anson Knickerbocker, mother's name Matilda Ives) (Note: the handwriting on this census record was very poor. Ancestry.com had George's parents listed as Anglino Ashline and Odlie Burnblee. It certainly looks to me like her maiden was Trumblee -- But I could be wrong).

George Ashline died Mar. 14 1927 (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Edgewood Cemetery, Edgewood, Delaware County, Iowa.

Diana Knickerbocker Ashline (born Feb. 22, 1849), died Jan. 11, 1928. She is also buried in Edgewood Cemetery.


Ashline, Hiram He was born about 1841 in Champlain, Clinton County, New York. He was the son of Antoine Ashline and Olive (Possibly Trumblee - See 1925 Census record for George Ashline). He married Kate Kenyon on Oct. 31, 1869 in Prairie Du Chien, Crawford County, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of Andrew and Rhonda Kenyon.

1850 Census: Champlain, Clinton County, New York: Antoine Ashline (age 50), Olive Ashline (age 48), Wm Ashline (age 11), Hiram Ashline (age 9), Julia Ashline (age 15), Edward Ashline (age 14) and George Ashline (age 5)

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Louis Ashline (age 40), Margaret Ashline (age 30), Adaline Ashline (age 8), Elizabeth Ashline (age 6), Eugene Ashline (age 4), Caria Ashline (age 1), Edward Ashline (age 23) and Hiram Ashline (age 21).

1870 Census: Polk, Bremer County, Iowa; Hiram Ashline (age 26, born New York), and Kate Ashline (age 18).

Hiram Ashline died June 6, 1873 and is buried in Asbury Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa (Note Pension Index Record says June 6, 1872).

His widow Catherine S. Boyles filed for a pension on May 15, 1901 in California.. There was a pension filed for a minor on June 23, 1901. Jessie Josephine Ruder was listed as a minor.

I found a marriage record for Jessie J. Ruder. She married Edwin H. Palmer on May 23, 1914 in Los Angeles, California. Parents were Hiram Ashland and Catherine Kenyon. She was 38 years old with an estimated year of birth of 1876. (California, County Marriages, 1850-1952).


Ashline, Lewis He was born about 1842 in New York. Lewis Ashline filed for a pension on June 22, 1880.

List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa in 1885: Under 27th Iowa: L. Ashline, Private, Company E. Present Post Office Address Clarksville (Butler County).

Lewis Ashline is buried in Old Town Cemetery, Butler County, Iowa.

His widow Margaret Ashline filed for a pension on June 14, 1886 in Iowa.

The other 4 Ashlines were brothers. There is a Louis Ashline that would be the right age in Champlain County, New York at the same time as they were. So it could be him. But I don't know for sure.

I found a Louis and Margaret Ashline in 1860 in Clayton County, and in 1870 in Bremer County, Iowa. But unless his age is wrong on the Roster, it couldn't be the right one. That Louis Ashline was born about 1820.


Ashline, William Jerome He was born April 15, 1840 in Champlain, Clinton County, New York. He was the son of Antoine Ashline and Olive (Possibly Trumblee - See 1925 Census record for George Ashline). William Ashline married Sarah W. White on Apr. 8, 1867 at Farmersburg, Iowa.

William Ashline Submitted by Nancy Stevenson Rubino

On a small farm in northeastern Iowa, a twenty-two-year-old William Ashline heard President Abraham Lincoln's call for "300,000 more." On August 15, 1862, William, his older brothers Hiram and Edward, and younger brother George, made their marks on enlistment papers in Dubuque, committing them to three years' service in Company E, 27th Iowa Infantry. William was destined to be the only one of the four to muster out with the regiment.

After a brief detour to Minnesota during the Sioux Indian Uprising, the 27th reported to Brigadier General William T. Sherman at Memphis, Tennessee, in December 1862. On New Year's Day, 1863, William and his brothers found themselves on a cold and muddy march from Jackson, Tennessee, to Clinton, on the Tennessee River, in futile pursuit of Brigadier General Nathan Bedford Forest. Following this march, brother Edward was discharged with tuberculosis. He died the following year.

Ashline's comrades saw little action through the early months of 1863, finding themselves on garrison duty, guarding trains and supply bases. One July evening, younger brother George was shot in the leg by a careless private in another company. By November, George was home in Iowa with a minie bullet lodged in the cartilage of his right knee. It would remain there until he died in 1927.

In September 1863, William took part in the capture of Little Rock as a participant in Major General Frederick Steele's Arkansas Expedition. The following March the 27th Iowa was with the XVI Army Corps on Major General Nathaniel P. Banks' Red River Campaign. At the Battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, William's regiment stood with the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, halted the Confederate onslaught directed by Lieutenant General Richard Taylor, and covered Banks' retreat to Grand Ecore.

In early December the 27th Iowa moved to Nashville, Tennessee, with the XVI Corps under Major General A. J. Smith. Here, on December 16, 1864, Ashline and his regiment, in the left flank brigade under command of Colonel J. I. Gilbert, struck the center of Lieutenant General John B. Hood's line between Shy's Hill and Overton Hill, overrunning the Confederate entrenchments and witnessing the destruction of the small, but once-mighty Army of Tennessee.

As the war drew to a close, Ashline saw action in the Mobile Campaign, fighting in one of the last major land battles of the conflict at Fort Blakely, Alabama. Afterward, the 27th Iowa became part of the occupation forces in Montgomery, Alabama. In June 1865, brother Hiram went home with an unnamed disability. Soon after, the regiment transferred to Vicksburg, Mississippi, and then home, mustering out at Clinton, Iowa, on August 8.

Ashline died in 1919 at Edgewood, Iowa. But years before, the clerk of Company E. one Crable, saw fit to list the battles in which William Ashline had taken part, entering them in his permanent service record. The final words read: "Character good."

Article and Picture from Civil War Times Illustrated.

Author Allan W. Heath, Jonesboro, Georgia

1850 Census: Champlain, Clinton County, New York: Antoine Ashline (age 50), Olive Ashline (age 48), Wm Ashline (age 11), Hiram Ashline (age 9), Julia Ashline (age 15), Edward Ashline (age 14) and George Ashline (age 5)

1870 Census: Polk, Bremer County, Iowa: William Ashline, (age 31, born New York), Sarah Ashline (age 19), and Hattie Ashline (age 3).

1880 Census: Elk, Clayton County, Iowa: William Ashline (age 41, farmer, born New York), wife Sarah Ashline (age 28), daughter Hattie Ashline (age 11) and daughter Claudia Ashline (age 4).

1885 Iowa State Census: Elk, Clayton County, Iowa; William Ashline (age 45, Township 91, Range 4, Section 20, SW SE), Sarah Ashline (age 33), Hattie Ashline (age 15), Claudie Ashline (age 8) and Edward Ashline (age 3)

1900 Census: Elk, Clayton County, Iowa: William Ashline (born April 1840, age 60, married 33 years, born New York, farmer), wife Sarah W. Ashline (born July 1851, age 48, married 33 years, 3 children born, 3 still living). son Wilson E. Ashline (Born Oct. 1881, age 18).

1910 Census: Elk, Clayton County, Iowa: William Ashline (age 70, born New York), wife Sarah W. Ashline (age 58).

Sarah (White) Ashline (born July 20, 1851), died Oct. 19, 1911 and is buried in Edgewood Cemetery, Honey Creek, Delaware County, Iowa.

1915 Iowa State Census: Elk, Clayton County, Iowa: Wm Ashline (age 73, widowed, Retired, Extent of Education: Common 4, can read and write, Birth Place, New York, encumbrance on farm or home: none, value of farm or home: $1200. Military Service; Civil War: Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E. Church Affiliation: Methodist, father's birthplace NY, mother's birthplace NY. Years in Iowa 50.

William Ashline died June 13, 1919 and is buried in Edgewood Cemetery, Honey Creek, Delaware County, Iowa.


Baldwin, James He was born about 1821 in Connecticut. He married Eliza Wilkins on March 5, 1846 at Jay, Essex County, NY. She was possibly the daughter of Julian Sullivan Wilkins and Wealthy Call.

1850 Census, Jay, Essex County, New York: James Baldwin, (age 29, farmer, born VT), Eliza Baldwin, (age 22, born NY), Eunice Baldwin, (age 2, born NY). Living next door to them were: Julian Wilkins (age 47, farmer, born NY), Wealthy Wilkins (age 42), Abigail Wilkins (age 13, born NY), Wealthy Wilkins (age 17, born NY), Clarinda Wilkins (age 2, born NY), Perry Wilkins (age 18, born NY). Listed on the same page was Cyrus Wilkins (age 20, born NY) and Charles Wilkins (age 20, born NY). (I would highly suspect that these are the parents and siblings of Eliza Wilkins. )

1856 Iowa State Census, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: James Baldwin (age 34, born Connecticut, In Iowa for 1 year), Eliza Baldwin, (age 28, born NY, in Iowa for 1 year), Unis Baldwin (age 8, born NY), Charles Baldwin (age 5, born NY), James Baldwin (age 3, born NY). They were living next door to Sullivan Wilkins (age 52), Welthia Wilkins (age 48), Abigail Wilkins (age 18), Welthia Wilkins (age 12), and Clarinda Wilkins (age 8). They had also been in the State of Iowa for 1 year.

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton county, Iowa: James Baldwin (age 40, laborer, Connecticut), Eliza Baldwin (age 33, born Connecticut), Eliza Baldwin (age 33, born Connecticut), Charles Baldwin (age 10, born Connecticut), James Baldwin (age 7, born Connecticut) and Warren Baldwin (age 3, born Iowa).

James Baldwin died June 28, 1864, of lung fever, at Memphis, Tenn. He is buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.

His widow Eliza Baldwin filed for a pension on Nov. 11, 1864. A pension for a minor was filed on March 21, 1867. The following information was extracted from the pension applications.

  • The pension for the minor was filed by Eliza Dawson for Warren Baldwin on Feb. 28, 1867.
  • She was a resident of Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa and was guardian of Warren Baldwin, minor child of James Baldwin who was a private in Company E, 27th Regiment of Iowa Volunteers.
  • James Baldwin died at Memphis, Tenn, on the 28th day of June 1864 of disease contracted in the service of the United States.
  • She was the widow of James Baldwin, again married, (being now the widow of Thomas Dawson) on November 8, 1866. (There was a marriage record in file stating that Thomas Dawson and Eliza Baldwin were married Nov. 8, 1866 in Kossuth County Iowa by Levi Mack, Minister of the Gospel.)
  • Warren Baldwin was born Sept. 2, 1858. (This was from the actual pension application for Warren Baldwin. Other statements say he was born Sept. 2, 1857).
  • The parents of the said ward were married at Jay, Essex Co, NY on March 5, 1846 by Samuel West, Justice of the Peace.
  • Clarinda Giffin and Lucy West made a statement that they attended the marriage James Baldwin and Eliza Wilkins, who were married at the home of Samuel West, Acting Justice of the Peace. They were not certain of the date, but knew that it had been many years ago.
  • On Dec. 10, 1866, Eliza Baldwin stated that she had four children with her late husband: Unis Baldwin, aged 16; Charles Baldwin, age 14, James Baldwin age 11, and Warren Baldwin, age 7. They all resided in Clayton County, Iowa.
  • On April 11, 1868 Mary Wilkins made a statement that she was present at the birth of James Baldwin and Warren Baldwin, minor children of James Baldwin, deceased and Eliza Dawson (formerly Eliza Baldwin). James Baldwin was born in the town of Jay, Essex County, NY on May 3, 1853. Warren Baldwin was born in the town of National, Clayton County, Iowa on Sept. 2, 1857. James Baldwin died in Kossuth County, Iowa on January 25, 1867. Charles Baldwin, son of said James Baldwin was born on Oct. 5, 1850, and Eunice V. Phillips, daughter of James Baldwin is said to be twenty years of age. (The relationship of Mary Wilkins to Eliza Wilkins (Baldwin, Dawson) was not stated. Also note: in this statement she said Eunice PHILLIPS. Everything else I found said Eunice STEBBINS. Does this indicate multiple marriages - or was it an error?). Also Note: Find a Grave says James Baldwin (the son of James Baldwin) died Jan 25, 1866. The biography below seems to indicate 1866 also. )

1870 Census, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa Eliza Dawson, age 42, born NY), Warren Dawson (age 13, farm labor, born Iowa), Orris Dawson (age 3, twin, born Iowa), Horris Dawson (age 3, twin, born Iowa). According to family tree records the twins were named Horace and Orace. Note: Wealthy Wilkins, age 62, was living a couple of houses over. And a Charles Wilkins, age 40, also listed on the same page.  

Eliza Dawson married Robert Lees on Sept. 23, 1875 in Irvington, Kossuth County, Iowa. (Iowa Marriages, 1838-1934).)

1880 Census, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Eliza Lees (age 51, widowed, born New York), son Horace Dawson, (age 12, born Iowa), son Orace Dawson (age 12, born Iowa).

DAWSON, O. T.

DAWSON, WILKINS, BALDWIN, STEBBINS, CHAPPIN, GUSLAND

Posted By: Jean Kramer

Biography reproduced from page 85 of Volume II of the History of Kossuth County written by Benjamin F. Reed and published in 1913:

O. T. Dawson is now the leading tailor in Algona, Iowa. He is a native son of Kossuth county and his parents were among the earliest pioneers of that district. He was born in Lotts Creek township, August 15, 1867, and is a son of Thomas and Eliza (Wilkins) Dawson. His father was a native of England and came to America about 1859, locating at Springfield, Illinois, where he lived until the time of the Civil war. He enlisted in the federal army as a member of Company K, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Regiment, and served with great distinction until the end of the war. He took part in the battles of Fredericktown, Missouri, October 21, 1861; Farmington, Mississippi, May 9, 1862; Corinth, Mississippi, May 28, 1862; Iuka, Mississippi, September, 1862; Corinth, Mississippi, October 3 and 4, 1862; Jackson, Mississippi, May 14, 1863; the assault on Vicksburg, Mississippi, May 22, 1863; and the battles of Fort De Russy, Henderson Hill, Pleasant Hill, Mansura, Yellow Bayou, Lake Chicot and Bayou De Glaise, Louisiana. Besides these battles in which Thomas Dawson was personally engaged his company took part in the following skirmishes: Farmington, Mississippi, May 8, 1862; Iuka, Mississippi, September 12 and 16, 1862; Mississippi Springs, Mississippi, May 13, 1863; Mechanicsburg, Mississippi, May 24 and June 4, 1863; Richmond, Louisiana, June 13, 1863; Straight Road Creek, Mississippi, October 17, 1863; Pocahontas, Tennessee; Fort Scurry, Louisiana; Grand Ecore, Louisiana; and a continued skirmish down Red river. Mr. Dawson received his honorable discharge at the end of the war and came immediately to Kossuth county, Iowa, where he took a claim in Lotts Creek township, which he improved and cultivated until the time of his death. He was married in 1866 to Mrs. Eliza Baldwin, formerly Miss Eliza Wilkins. Mrs. Dawson’s first husband had been a member of Company E, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and died June 29, 1864, at Memphis, Tennessee, leaving four children: James, who was frozen to death on a claim which his stepfather had taken up in Kossuth county; Eunice, the wife of Walter Stebbins, of Algona, Iowa; Charles, who is now living in Texas; and Warren, a drayman in Algona. Thomas Dawson’s marriage to Mrs. Baldwin occurred in 1866. The same winter he went with his stepson, James Baldwin, to carry in some hay from a remote part of his holdings, and Mr. Dawson was found a short while afterward almost dead from the cold. He lingered a few days before he died. His stepson was not living when found.

After Mr. Dawson’s death his wife remained upon the homestead until her son O. T. Dawson was five years of age and then came into the city of Algona, where she made her home. She died when our subject was eighteen years of age and is buried in the Riverview cemetery beside her husband and her son James Baldwin. She had been a prominent Methodist during her life and all the members of her family had followed this religion except her husband, who was a member of the Church of England. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Dawson were the parents of two children, twins, who were born a short time before their father’s death: Orace, the subject of this sketch; and Horace, who lived until 1903, dying at the age of thirty-six years.

O. T. Dawson was educated in Algona public schools and began to learn the tailor’s trade when twenty-two years of age. He studied the business in Sheldon, Iowa, and after two years came to Algona. He did not settle here permanently at that time but worked in various places for a few years, learning the details of his trade and becoming a master workman. He now has one of the finest tailoring shops in Algona and numbers among his clients some of the most prominent people of the city.

In 1897 Mr. Dawson was united in marriage to Miss Edith Chappin, and they became the parents of one child, Arlo Le Roy, now a student in the Algona public schools. Mr. Dawson’s twin brother, Horace, lived during his life in Emmetsburg, Iowa, where he followed the barber’s trade. His wife was Miss Jennie Gusland and upon his death he left two children, Ruby and Mina, now living in Emmetsburg.

Politically O. T. Dawson is a consistent republican but has never taken an active part in public affairs and does not seek office for himself. He is active in the affairs of the Modern Woodmen of America and gives his allegiance to the Methodist Episcopal church. He has gained during his life that success which is the outcome of hard work and attention to detail and his tailoring business has grown and developed during the last few years into an extensive and prosperous enterprise.

Kossuth Biographies maintained by Letty Henriksen with the WebBBS 4.33

I do note some discrepancies in the statements above:

  1. Pension records say James Baldwin (son) died Jan. 1867
  2. This bigrophry indicates James Baldwin and Thomas Dawson died the winter of 1866 (which could include Jan, 1867). Find a Grave says 1866.
  3. BUT it says the twins were born August 1867, a few months before the death of Thomas Dawson
  4. So either the date of death for James Baldwin (son) and Thomas Dawson OR the date of birth of the twins is incorrect. (OR it should have stated that the twins were born a few months after the death of Thomas Dawson.

Eliza (Wilkins, Baldwin, Dawson, Lees), died June 14, 1886 and is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Old Cemetery, Lot 5, Space 2, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa.


Bartke, Daniel A. He was born August 8, 1832 in Germany. He was the son of Michael and Emma Bartke. He married Mary Olson on Jan. 8, 1873.

Daniel Bartke Image LN-1942 came from the Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection, Allen County Public Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana.

If you are interested in ordering a better quality photo click here.

Per the librarian for the Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection at Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana "Images ordered through the “rights” link on our website can be provided at whatever resolution the customer requests up to 1200 dpi. All of the original photos are cartes-de-visit—approximately 2.5 x 4 inches. The paperwork is handled through the Indiana State Museum, and the cost of an image for personal use should be minimal. We don’t provide prints but can send image files either via email or through Dropbox, depending on the file size. A few of the photos have inscriptions on the back, and we can provide image files of those as well."



I found this information in an online family tree.

Name: Daniel Bartke
Born: August 8, 1832 in Prussia
Died: 1892 Veteran's hospital
Buried: Glenwood Lutheran Cemetery, Glenwood, Pope County, Minnesota

Note: He was listed on the 1890 Census as being at the National Home for Disabled Veteran Soldiers, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

He was a native of Prussia, the son a Prussian captain, who immigrated to the US arriving at Castle Garden, NY August 22, 1856. He worked on a farm in Oyster Bay, New York until April 1, 1857. He lived in St Louis Mo until 1859. He then moved to Watkins Valley in Wabasha County, Minnesota. He left there and went to Clayton County, Iowa and enlisted as a private in Company E 27th Iowa, August 16, 1862. After the war he settled in Glenwood, Pope County, Minnesota. He married Mary Olson on Jan 8th, 1873 and had five children, Emma, Lillie, Rose, Bertha and Frank. At the time of his death he was the JVC for the Jas. Camfield Post G.A.R.

Parents: Michael and Emma Bartke farmed 300 acres of land. The father was an old soldier; was taken in the wars raging against Napoleon Bonaparte, when only 12 years old, served with distinction for 40 years, was promoted for gallantry to Captain's rank.

Siblings: David, Michael, Christian and Emma Bartke

Wife: Mary Olson (1845 - 1920), who Daniel met while she was a newly arrived immigrant (from Norway) passenger on a stagecoach he was driving. She was the daughter of Lars Olson, who settled in Kensington, Minnesota.

Children of Daniel A. Bartke and Mary Olson:

  1. Emma Harriette 6/28/1873 - 1927
  2. Lillie Pauline 10/2/1874
  3. Rose Marie 8/7/1876
  4. Bertha Augusta 8/1/1881
  5. Frank August 4/23/1884

The girls were all schoolteachers before they married. Rose, Lillie and Bertha all lived in North Dakota. Emma never married and remained in the Glenwood, Minnesota area until her death. Frank married Bertha Feigum (b.1888 in Norway - d.1964 in Starbuck, Minn.) and worked the family farm near Glenwood, for the duration of his life.

Submitted by Donald P. Bond
a great-grandson of Daniel A. Bartke

This is a copy of a newspaper article published in the Glenwood (Minnesota) Herald on October 22, 1925.

The article was copied by: Edward Karrigan for the Pope County Minnesota Historical Society on Feb. 20, 1942

Background:

The letter writer in this article, Daniel A. Bartke (b.1832 in Prussia), was a Civil War veteran having served with Company E of the Iowa 27th Infantry from Aug 16, 1862 until Aug 8, 1865. He suffered a number of injuries during his military service. In his later years, he spent considerable time in a veteran's hospital, where he died in 1892. This correspondence was authored from the field, on the day before a battle against Confederate fortifications at the mouth of Mobil Bay in Alabama.

In later action, two Union columns moved against Confederate forces at Mobile, Alabama, one from forts captured during the Battle of Mobile Bay, March 17, 1865, and one overland from Pensacola three days later. Mobile was occupied on April 12 by Gen. Edward Canby, the officer who accepted the surrender of Generals Richard Taylor and Nathan B. Forrest on May 4, 1865, ending the war in this area of the country.


Glenwood Herald - October 22, 1925 Page 8 Col 1-2

LETTER FROM FRONT - DURING CIVIL WAR

Interesting document penned at battle front in Alabama in 1865 by well known Glenwood, Minnesota pioneer.

Below is reproduced a letter that is very interesting. It was written in 1865 by Daniel Bartke to a friend in Plainview. Mr. Bartke was at that time in the Northern Army and was near Mobile, Alabama.

Mr. Bartke later, after the end of the war, came to Pope County and first served as a stagecoach driver between Glenwood and Kensington, Minnesota. At that time he met Miss Mary Olson, who later became his wife. Later he became the owner of the Glenwood Hotel where he conducted a drugstore and the only hall in town. Mr. Bartke was somewhat of an accountant and for some years was Register of Deeds and was Treasurer of Pope County. The letter is the property of Miss Emma Bartke who has allowed us to copy it. It is written in a very fine hand:

In a field near Mobile, Alabama, March 16, 1865.

Respected Friend,

Our soldering at present day is very hard. We are laying under heavy shot and shell and musketry since March 25th. Our campaign is a rather hard one and our every day occurance would fill a volume of interesting items to you at home.

But home is a secret home, a peaceful home, yes, and a lovely home in far away Minnesota and therefore stories of thundering and roaring canons, of bloodshed and murder ought not to enter the premises of such a home as yours, and my story from here can be told in only such terms as stated and told in subjects as said above.

You have an idea in geographical view of the surrounding country of Mobile, of which I will try and explain our situation. The two rivers, Tombigbee, and Alabama are running nearly parallel. When Alabama makes a channel to Tombigbee, and ending there for the balance of the Alabama to the bay is the Tensan River. From this cutoff or channel the Tensan River is fortified for a distance of five miles, called Blakely fortifications. From the mouth of Tensan to the eastern corner of Mobile Bay, the Spanish fortifications lie which have a water battery and four heavy gunboats. The bay and the surrounding country are involved in a maze of torpedoes and wherever we go we have first to clear the roads of these infernal machines. Our forces at present are on this triangular line of these fortifications. We arrived and engaged the enemy on the 25th ultimo.

Still our progress as far as this has been only small and our time has been occupied in preparing for a grand finale.

On the 3rd about 140 pieces of artillery, calibre 64 to 250 lb. Ball, engaged Fort Spanish and did do great execution. The engagement lasted about four hours and about 5000 shots were sent to the rebat works. Our side gained so much as to silence all their guns except the gunboats which extended at a distance suitable to them and our gunboats could not follow them on account of torpedoes. Tomorrow Sunday, there will be another attack made on united forces of Spanish and Blakely fortifications by which a part of the Spanish fort will be blown up. Our gunboats at a fair distance have been engaged all the time and consequently thundering noise ceases in our camp. I believe if you were here you would say farewell, sleep for a week, more or less, still we are used to it and sleep under any circumstances.

Our comrades consist of three divisions of the 15th A. C. Com'g Gen'l Gordon Granger, two divisions of the 13th A. C. and one division of 16th A. C. with a detachment of a provisional division Com'g Gen'l A. G. Smith, Gen'l Canby Com'g the whole, Gen. Steele and one division of A. G. Smith's forces are engaged at Fort Blakely and the balance on Fort Spanish.

Our duty is every third day to be in rifle pits which lay about 150 yards off the rebel fort; as the relief can be made only at night, we lose consequently two nights rest and one night in three to sleep. You may think that our sleep is sweet, on such terms. The rebel force opposing us is estimated 5,000 in Fort Blakely and 8,000 in Fort Spanish. The rebels are very strong here, they have large amounts of guns of heavy caliber, and are raining shot and shell almost constantly above our heads, but we as far as this are very lucky, though hard laboring, though nightly advancing and closing nearer up; yes, crowding the rebels, nightly digging new rifle pits under fire of musketry and artillery; fire without end, but so far nobody hurt in our 27th Iowa and only few in our brig. (couple in our 6th Minnesota).

The rebels have now twice made a charge at us but they were repulsed with heavy slaughter by our determined boys, leaving their dead to decay on the field (as nobody can take them away). Our side for this fort had no artillery in position as it is impossible to place a battery without prepared fortification in face of so many batteries rebels have; we have to move nightly and are progressing finely. We have prepared places for 12 pieces of 32 lb. caliber and for three of 100 to 200 pd. calibre guns of which the rebels know nothing and they will be surprised when the Yanks will reach their hands for a bloody welcome to hospitable graves. Our lines are so close that at night when a little quiteness prevails we can hear their pieces cocking for the fireing of the same.

My love and respect to all at your noble home.

Your friend,

Daniel Bartke

P.S. Please write soon as I would be very glad to hear from you. Oh write often to me.

1870 Census: Glenwood, Pope County, Minnesota: Daniel A. Bartke (100 acres of land, 3 horses) (This looked more like an agricultural census, but it was titled 1870 Federal Census)

1880 Census: Glenwood, Pope County, Minnesota: Daniel A. Bartke (age 48, farmer), wife Mary Bartke (age 35), daughter Emma H Bartke (age 7, born Minnesota), daughter Lillie P Bartke (age 6, born Minnesota), daughter Rosa M. Bartke (age 4, born Minnesota).

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, 1866 - 1938, Milwaukee, Northwestern Branch: Daniel A. Bartke: MILITARY HISTORY; Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 15, 1862, Clayton co., Iowa. Rank: Pvt, Company and Regiment: 27th Iowa Inf. Company E, Time and Place of Discharge: August 8, 1865, Clinton IA. Cause of Discharge; Close of War. Kind and Degree of Disability: Chronic Diarrhea, Rheumatism and Ruptured. When and Where Contracted: during War. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where Born: Prussia. Age: 57, Height 5' 5 1/2". Complexion: Fair, Occupation: Farmer, Religion: Protestant. Residence Subsequent to Discharge: Glenwood, Pope county, Minn. Married. P. O. Address of Nearest Relative: Emma H. Bartke, Glenwood Minn. HOME HISTORY: Date of Admission: Oct. 25, 1889. Date of Discharge: March 10. 91 G. O. No. 9. Cause of discharge: Dishonorable

1890 Veteran's Census: National Home for Disabled Veteran Soldiers, Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Daniel A. Bartke, Pvt, Co. E, 27th IA, Inf. Enlisted August 15, 1862, discharged Aug. 8, 1865. Service: 2 Years, 11 months, 23 days. Disability Incurred: Chronic Diarr & malarial dis. Remarks: During Service May 1863.

Daniel A. Bartke died March, 18, 1892 and is buried in Glenwood City Cemetery, Glenwood, Pope County, Minnesota. (Note: Based on information that I had found online, I initially had him listed as being buried in Glenwood Lutheran Cemetery. But I was contacted by a Find a Grave volunteer who told me this: "These 2 cemeteries are very confusing, on which cemetery is where. You can't tell which lot is in which cemetery." She actually went to the Glenwood Historical Museum & copied over 90 pages of the listing of these 2 cemeteries. She sent me documentation that shows that he was buried in Glenwood City Cemetery.)

Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans: Daniel A. Bartke, Pvt, Co. E, 27th Regt, Iowa Inf. Cemetery; Glenwood, Minn. Date of Death: March 18, 1892.

GAR Post #38 Canfield Charter.

1900 Census: Minnewaska, Pope County, Minnesota: Mary Bartke (born Sept. 1845, age 54, widowed, 5 children born, 5 still living, born Norway), daughter Rose Marie (born July 1876, age 23), daughter Bertha A (born Aug. 1881, age 18), son Frank A (born Apr. 1884, age 16).


Baurette, Augustus He was born about 1839 in Wisconsin. I do not know if either of the persons below is him. But possibly.

1860 Census: Bloomington, Muscatine, Iowa: there was an Augustus Borett, age 23, born Wisconsin, living with a Fletcher family.

1870 Census: Clayton, Clayton County, Iowa: There was an Augustus Borett, age 30, born Wisconsin living with a Grinnell family.


Behrens, Johan Kasper Christian He was born Jan. 22, 1846 in Zuelow, RA Sternberg, Mecklenburg-Schwerin. He was the son of Johann Christian Heinrich Behrens (Nov. 12, 1813 - Dec. 25, 1894) and Caroline Dorthea Koehn (Dec. 11, 1812 - June 5, 1865). He married Sophie Ortman on Oct. 28, 1866 at Hope Lutheran Church, Little Port, Iowa. She was the daughter of John and Mary Ortman.

1870 Census: Volga, Clayton County, Iowa: Christian Beherns (age 24, farmer, born Prussia), Sophia Beherns (age 27, born Prussia), Emma Beherns (age 4, born Iowa) and Mary Beherns (age 2, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Volga, Clayton County, Iowa: Christian Behrens (age 34, farmer, born Mecklenburg), wife Sophia Behrens (age 37, born Mecklenburg), daughter Emma Behrens (age 14, born Iowa), daughter Maria Behrens (age 12, born Iowa), son William Behrens (age 9, born Iowa), son Henry Behrens (age 5, born Iowa), son Charles Behrens (age 3, born Iowa) and daughter Lenna Behrens (age 5/12, born Feb., born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Volga, Clayton County, Iowa: Christ Beherns (Township 92, Range 4, Section 32, SE SW, age 39, farmer), Sophia Beherns (age 42), Emma Beherns (age 19), Mary Beherns (age 17), Wm. Beherns (age 14), Chas. Beherns (age 11), Anna Beherns (age 8), Chris Beherns (age 1)

1900 Census: Volga, Clayton County, Iowa: Christian Behrens (born Jan. 1846, age 54, married 34 years, born Germany, immigrated 1855, in US 45 years, naturalized, farmer), wife Sophie Behrens (born Dec. 1841, age 58, married 34 years, 8 children born, 6 still living, born Germany, immigrated 1865, in US 35 years), son Charles Behrens (born Sept. 1876, age 23, born Iowa), and son Christian Behrens (born June 1883, age 16, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Cox Creek, Clayton County, Iowa; Christian Behrens (age 64, married 1 time for 45 years, born Germany, immigrated 1857, own income), wife Sophia Behrens (age 69, married 1 time for 45 years, 7 children born, 7 still living, born Germany, immigrated 1865).

1915 Iowa State Census; Littleport, Clayton County, Iowa; Christ Behrens (age 69, married, County: Clayton, Township: Littleport, Occupation: Retired. Extent of Education: Common 8, can read and write, Birthplace: Germany, Value of farm or home: $1600.00. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E, Church Affiliation: Lutheran, Father's birthplace: Germany, Mother's birthplace: Germany, naturalized, Years in US 57, Years in Iowa: 52.

1920 Census: Cox Creek, Clayton County, Iowa: Christian Behrens (age 74, born Germany), wife Sofia Behrens (age 77, born Germany)

Sophia (Ortman) Behrens (born Dec. 30, 1841), died Dec. 23, 1920. She is buried in Musfeldt Cemetery, Littleport, Clayton County, Iowa.

Christian Behrens married Dorothea Weltzin on June 7, 1924.

Christian Behrens died Feb. 10, 1925 and is buried in Musfeldt Cemetery, Littleport, Clayton County, Iowa.

Children of Christian Behrens and Sophie Ortman:

  1. Emma F. E. Behrens b: ABT 1865 in IA
  2. Mary S. Behrens b: Dec 1868 in Volga twp., Clayton, IA
  3. William J. Behrens b: Sept. 28, 1870 in Volga twp., Clayton, IA
  4. Henry Behrens b: ABT 1875 in Volga twp., Clayton, IA
  5. Charles Behrens b: Sept. 1876 in Volga twp., Clayton, IA
  6. Anna Behrens b: ABT 1879 in Volga twp., Clayton, IA
  7. Lena Behrens b: Feb 1880 in Volga twp., Clayton, IA
  8. Christian C. Behrens b: June 1883 in Littleport, Clayton, Iowa

Bell, Joseph Henry. He was born Oct. 21, 1836 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of William Bell and Martha L. Shannon (May 18, 1798 0 Aug. 21, 1874). He married first Amelia Elizabeth Dorr. She was the daughter of Frank Dorr (Aug. 25, 1822 - Jan 21, 1905) and Eva Halter Dec. 4, 1822 - Feb. 7, 1917). His sister Jane S. Bell married Alonzo W. Bradley, who also served in Company E., 27th Iowa)

1856 Iowa State Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: James I. Bell (age 27, born Penn. Painter), Martha Bell (age 58, born Penn)., Jane S. Bell (age 22, born Penn, Teacher), Joseph H. Bell (age 17, born Penn.) Ann May (age 12, born Penn) and Wm Irvin (age 22, born Ireland).

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton county, Iowa: Martha Bell (age 62), James Bell (age 30, painter). J. H. Bell (age 21, laborer) and Anna May (age 15).

1870 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Joseph Bell (age 30, schoolteacher, born Pennsylvania), Elizabeth Bell (age 17)

1880 Census: Exira, Audubon county, Iowa: Joseph Bell (age 42, school teacher), Wife Amelia Bell (age 27), son Joseph Bell (age 7), daughter Annie Bell (age 5), daughter Eva Bell (age 3) and daughter Lillie Bell (age 9/12 born Sept).

1885 Iowa State Census: Hamlin, Audubon County, Iowa: Jos. H. Bell (Hamlin Town, age 46, born PA, teacher), Lizzie A. Bell (age 32), Joseph H. Bell (age 11), Anna M. Bell (age 9), Eva L. Bell (age 7), and Lily L. Bell (age 5).

Amelia Elizabeth (Dorr) Bell died April 6, 1888 and is buried in Exira Cemetery, Exira, Audubon County, Iowa.

Josesh Bell married second Millie Hatfield Kennedy on Nov. 25, 1890 in Carroll County, Iowa. His parents were listed as W. Bell and Martha L. Shannon. Her parents were Robert Hatfield and Mary Jones. (Iowa Marriages, 1809-1992).

1895 Iowa State Census: Exira, Audubon County, Iowa: J. H. Bell (age 56, born PA, school teacher, Religious Belief: Christian, Soldier in the War of the Rebellion: Co. E, Regiment 27, State Iowa, Rank Private ), Melvina Bell (age 53), Lillie L. Bell (age 15) and Eva Bell (age 17)

1900 Census District 24, Exira, Audubon County, Iowa: Joseph H. Bell (born Oct. 1837, age 62, married 10 years), wife Mellie Bell (born Nov. 1841, age 59, married 10 years, 6 children born, 4 still living).

1910 Census: District 21, Exira, Audubon County, Iowa: Joseph H. Bell (age 71, married 2 times, age at first marriage 21), wife Melvina Bell (age 67, married 2 times, age at first marriage 21, 6 children born, 3 still living).

1915 Iowa State Census: Atlantic, Cass County, Iowa: J. H. Bell, age 76, County, Cass, Town Atlantic, Ward 3rd. Occupation: retired. Extent of Education: Grammar 8, High School 4. Birth Place: Penn. Value of farm or home $2500. Military Service: Infantry State Iowa, Regiment 27 & 12, Company E., Church Affiliation: Christian. Father's Birthplace, Penn. Mother's Birthplace: Penn. married, can read and write, Years in Iowa 58.

Joseph Henry Bell died Sept. 14, 1916 and is buried in Exira Cemetery, Exira, Audubon County, Iowa

Note: Martha L. Bell (May 13, 1798 - Aug. 21, 1874) is also buried in Exira Cemetery.

His widow Melvina Bell filed for a pension on Oct. 2, 1916.


Bender, Henry Adelbert (b. Dec. 19, 1837, Adams Twp., Allen CO, IN); He was the son of David Bender and Lydia Ann Tawney/Towney. He married Juliette Judith Stone (b. Aug. 9, 1850, NY; d. June 13, 1940, Fayette, IA) on Apr. 17, 1870 in Eden, Fayette County, Iowa. Juliette Stone was the daughter of Oliver Stone and Mary E. Bonesteel.

Bender, H. A., farmer, Section 18; PO Bethel; owns eighty acres of land, valued at $20 per acre; born in Allen Co., Indiana, Dec 19, 1841. Married Julia E. Stone; she was born in New York in 1851; have four children --- Hollis W., A. H., W. I. and Winfred E. Enlisted in 1862 in Co. E., 27th I.V.I. and was discharged in 1865; was in the battle of Pleasant Hill and was wounded in the battle of Old Oaks.

Page 638, "1878 History of Fayette County, Iowa", Bethel Township

1850 Census: District 54, Grant County, Wisconsin: David Binder (age 45, born Penn.), Lydia Binder (age 40, born MD.), Charles Bender (age 20, born Ohio), Hiram A. Bender (age 15, born Ohio), Henry A. Bender (age 12, born Ind.), Martha J. Bender (age 10, born Ind.), John Binder (age 8, born Ind.), Violet Binder (age 7, born Ind.), Jacob Binder (age 5, born Ind.) and James Binder (age 2, born Ind.).

1870 Census: Eden, Fayette County: Henry Bender (age 28, born Indiana) and Juliett Bender (age 19, born New York). They were living next door to the Oliver Stone family.

1880 Census: Bethel, Fayette County, Iowa: H. A. Bender (age 38, farmer), wife Juliette (age 29), son H. W. Bender (age 9), son A. H. Bender (age 7), son W. I. Bender (age 6), daughter W. E. Bender (age 4) and Babe Bender (age 3/12, born Feb. son)

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: Under 27th Iowa: H. A. Bender, Private, Company E. Present Post Office: Alpha.

1900 Census: Bethel, Fayette County, Iowa: Henry A. Bender (Born Dec. 1841, age 58, married 30 years, born Indiana), wife Juliet Bender (born Aug. 1850, age 49, married 30 years, 6 children born, 6 still living, born New York), daughter Winifred E. Bender (born Apr. 1876, age 24), son Reginald O. Bender (born Feb. 1880, age 20), and daughter Janette Bender (born June 1883, age 16).

1910 Census: Fayette, Fayette County, Iowa: Henry a. Bender (age 72, married 1 time for 39 years, born Indiana), wife Juliette Bender (age 59, married 1 time for 39 years, 6 children born, 0 still living), daughter Janette Bender (age 25) (Note the 0 still living is most likely an error by the enumerator. Most of the women on this page had 0 children still living.)

1915 Iowa State Census: Fayette, Fayette County, Iowa: H. A. Bender, age 77, County Fayette, Town Fayette, Occupation: Retired Farmer. Extent of Education: College. Can read and write. Place of Birth, Indiana. Encumbrance on farm or home: none. Value of farm or home: $2000. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment: 27, Company E. Church Affiliation: Methodist. Father's birthplace: Pennsylvania. Mother's birthplace: Maryland. Years in Iowa: 56.

1920 Census: Fayette, Fayette County, Iowa: Henry A. Bender (age 82), wife Juliette Bender (age 69), and daughter Jannette M. Bender (age 34).

1925 Iowa State Census: Fayette, Fayette County, Iowa: H. A. Bender (age 87, married, place of birth: Allen Co., Ind., father's name David Bender, born Penn. Mother's name Lyddey Towney, parents married in Ohio), wife Juliette Bender (age 74, father's name: Oliver Stone, mother's name Mary E. Bonestell, parents married in New York State), daughter Jennette Bender (age 40, father's name H. A. Bender, mother's name Juliette Stone. Parents married in Eden, Iowa). and son Reginald Bender (age 44, father's name H. A. Bender, mother's name Juliette Stone. Parents married in Eden, Iowa ).

Henry A, Bender died July 15, 1929* and is buried in Grandview Cemetery, Lot 302, Fayette, Fayette County, Iowa. GAR Marker. (* Note, there is a discrepancy in his date of death. Family tree records and the WPA records show a year of death of 1939. However, the Pension index record clearly shows his date of death as July 15, 1929, and that Juliette Stone Bender filed for a widow's pension on Sept. 23, 1929 - I checked the 1930 Census: In Fayette County Juliette Bender, age 79, was listed as a widow). Update: A photo of his tombstone was recently posted to Find a Grave. The dates on the tombstone are 1837 - 1829.

His widow Juliette Stone Bender filed for a pension on Sept. 23, 1929.

1930 Census: Fayette, Fayette County, Iowa: Juliette Bender (age 79, widowed, born New York), daughter Janette M. Bender (age 44, school teacher).

Juliette Judith (Stone) Bender died June 13, 1940 in Fayette, Fayette County, Iowa and is buried in Grandview Cemetery, Fayette, Fayette County, Iowa.

Children of Henry Adelbert Bender and Juliette Judith Stone:

  1. Dr. Hollis Wesley Bender (b. Jan. 10, 1871, Waucoma, Fayette Co, IA; d. Nov. 6, 1926 Cedar Rapids IA) m. Clara A. Green. Children were: Elizabeth M. Bender and Katherine Bender (m. Paul Hruska)
  2. Adelbert Henry (Bertie) Bender (b. Aug. 17, 1872 Bethel Twp., Fayette Co, IA; d. Feb. 4, 1949 Minneapolis, MN) m. Viola Blanche Clark. Children were: Gladys Viola Mildred Bender, Kenneth Adelbert Clark Bender (m. Margaret A. Smith), and Jean McFarland Bender.
  3. Washington Irving Bender (b. Apr. 7, 1874, Bethel Twp., Fayette Co, IA; d. Nov. 22, 1940 Waucoma, IA); m. Alice Maude Hunerberg. Adopted child was Donald (Reisner) Bender, natural child of John and Blanch Stedman Reisner.
  4. Winifred Elizabeth Bender (b. Apr. 25, 1876 d. Jan 10, 1968 Pueblo CO) m. Ray Albert Hall on Feb. 15, 1905. Children: 1) Sidney Bender Hall, 2) Margaret Agnes Hall, m. William Wright.
  5. Reginald Oliver (Reggie) Bender (b. Feb. 15 Bethel Twp., Fayette CO, IA; d. Mar. 1, 1966); unmarried
  6. Janette Martha Bender (b. July 23, 1884 Bethel Twp., Fayette Co, IA; d. Mar. 8, 1958 Pueblo CO); unmarried.

Benjamin, Samuel He was born Sept. 20, 1824 in Allegheny County, New York. Family trees say that he is the son of Russell Benjamin (1805-1862) and Abigail Bliss (1805-1860). However, his obituary says he was orphaned at the age of 10, so I find that questionable. Family trees say he married Amy Elizabeth Wiley. His obituary says he married Elizabeth Hall. They may be the same person, with a previous marriage.

1856 Iowa State Census, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa Samuel Benjamin (age 38, born New York, mason), Elizabeth Benjamin (age 36, born NY), Eudora Benjamin (age 9, born NY), Willice Benjamin (age 7, born NY). They had been in the state of Iowa for less than a year.

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Sam Benjamin (age 35, carpenter, born New York), Elizabeth Benjamin (age 34), Edward Benjamin (age 14), Willis Benjamin (age 12), Frank Benjamin (age 8) and Samuel Benjamin (age 6). It appears to me that Edward should be Eudora. The 1856 census clearly said Eudora - Female. The 1860 census clearly says Edward - Male. But note that Samuel's obituary below says he was survived by his daughter Mrs. A. A. Brunson. I found a marriage record for Eudora Benjamin to Asahel A. Brunson on Jan. 11, 1866 in National, Clayton County, Iowa. She was born in 1847 (Iowa County Marriages, 1838-1934).

1870 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Samuel D. Benjamin (age 46, carpenter, born New York), Elizabeth Benjamin (age 46, born New York), Frank Benjamin (age 11) and Freddie Benjamin (age 9).

Freddie S. Benjamin died Feb. 22, 1876 (age 14 Y, 8, m 15 d), son of Samuel & Amy Elizabeth. He is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa.

1880 Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Samuel Benjamin (age 54, carpenter, born New York), Wife Elizabeth Benjamin (age 53), son Frank P. Benjamin (age 21, telegraph operator).

1885 Iowa State Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Samuel Benjamin (College & Thornton, age 58, carpenter), Elizabeth Benjamin (age 57), Frank Benjamin (age 23), May Benjamin (age 21) and Nettie Benjamin (age 4).

1900 Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Sam Benjamin (born Sept. 1824, age 75, married 54 years, retired carpenter) wife E. A. Benjamin (born Feb. 1826, age 74, married 54 years, 5 children born, 2 still living).

Samuel Benjamin died Jan. 17, 1910 and is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa. Pension Index record shows DOD Jan. 14, 1910.

Samuel Benjamin Goes to His Long Home Friday – – Resident of Algona 36 Years

In the passing away of Mr. Samuel Benjamin last Friday morning, Algona loses another of her older citizens, who in years that are past was one of the staunch supporters of the best interest of our city and county. For some twelve or fourteen years he was a familiar figure around the Sheriff's office at the courthouse, and those who were accustomed to attend court during his years of active life, would have quickly expressed surprise had Mr. Benjamin not been present during a session of court. Not only does the County lose an old and valued citizen, but the Masonic order also loses one of its pioneer members. It is said that Mr. Benjamin joined the Masons shortly after he was 21 years old, which means that for about 63 years he was an active member of that order. He was a thirty second degree Mason and repeatedly was he called upon to accept the office at the head of the local Lodge. The deceased was also one of the enthusiastic members of the G. A. R. and for a long time was at the head of the local post, and the members of all these organizations will miss his familiar countenance as they meet from time to time.

Samuel Benjamin was born in Allegheny County, New York, September 20, 1824. Left an orphan at the age of 10, he removed to Jefferson County where he grew to manhood. In the year 1846 he was married to Elizabeth Hall and in 1856 moved to Iowa, settling in Clayton County, where they remained until 1873, coming from there to Algona which continued to be their home to the present date. Of the four children born into this home two are still living, F. P. Benjamin, now settled at Neutral, Minnesota, and Mrs. A. A. Brunson, of Algona.

Mr. Benjamin enlisted in Company E, 27th Regiment, Iowa volunteers, October 3, 1862, holding a commission as second lieutenant, and was discharged two years later on account of injuries received in the service. The funeral services were held from the Methodist Church Monday afternoon, and the old gentleman was buried with Masonic honors in Riverview Cemetery.

Upper Des Moines - Republican, Algona, Iowa, Wednesday, January 19, 1910

Samuel Benjamin's widow Elizabeth Benjamin filed for a pension on Jan. 21, 1910 in Iowa.

1910 Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Elizabeth Benjamin, (age 84, widowed).

Amy Elizabeth Benjamin (born Feb. 9, 1826), died Sept. 10. 1919, age 93 y, 7 m, 2 d. COD Senility.


Benson, John Thompson He was born May 25, 1833 in Cayuga Co., New York. He was the son of Leonard Benson (Apr. 2, 1800 - Sept. 7, 1877) and Ruth Ann Reynolds (July 23, 1805 - Feb. 2, 1853). He married Louise Clark On Oct, 10, 1855 in Huron County, Ohio. (Ohio, Marriages, 1800-1958)

1850 Census: Fitchville, Huron County, Ohio: Leonard Benson (age 50), Ruth Benson (age 45), Elisha Benson (age21), William Benson (age 19), John Benson (age 17), Emery Benson (age 13) and Finley Benson (age 9).

1860 Census: Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: Thompson Benson (age 27, born NY), Louisa Benson (age 24, born NY) and Clark Benson (age 4, born Ohio).

1870 Census: Honey Creek, Delaware County, Iowa: John T. Benson (age 27, farmer, born NY), Louisa (age 34, born Ohio), Jay C. Benson (age 13, born Ohio) and Leonard Benson (age 10, born Iowa)

1880 Census: Maple Valley, Buena Vista County, Iowa: John T. Benson (age 47, farmer, born New York), Louisa C. Benson (age 44), son Jay C. Benson (age 23), son Leonard E. Benson (age 19), daughter-in-law Maria E. Benson (age 23).

1885 Iowa State Census: Storm Lake, Buena Vista County, Iowa: J. T. Benson (age 50) and Mrs. J. T. Benson (age 45).

1900 Census: Lake Park, Dickinson county, Iowa: John T. Benson (born May 1833, age 67, married 45 years, born New York, carpenter), wife, Louisa C. Benson (born Nov. 1835, age 64, married 45 years, 2 children born, 2 still living).

1910 Census: Silver Lake, Dickinson County, Iowa: John T. Benson (age 76, married 1 time for 45 years) and wife Louisa C. Benson (age 74, married 1 time for 45 years, 2 children born, 2 still living).

John T. Benson died Apr. 2, 1914 at Lake Park, Iowa, (Pension Index Record) and is buried in Silver Lake Cemetery, Lake Park, Dickinson County, Iowa.

Obituary found on Find a Grave

Obituary in the Sprit Lake Beacon, 4/9/1914
Lake Park

Last Thursday morning our community was shocked on learning of the sudden death of our much respected citizen, J. T. Benson. Mr. Benson had been about town on the previous day apparently as well as usual and retired at night as usual. Shortly after midnight his wife noticed him groaning in his sleep and tried to arouse him but to no avail. She quickly arose and lighted the lamp and found that her worst fears were realized, and he was asleep in death. She hastened to her granddaughters, Mrs. George Jacobsen, who lived near, for assistance. Their son, L. E. Benson, who resides in the south part of town was also notified and came at once.

John Thompson Benson was born at Cayuga Co., New York, May 25, 1833. When but three weeks old he moved to Ohio where he lived with his parents until his marriage in 1855 to Miss Louise Clark. Two sons were born to this union, J. C. Benson, now of Balentine, Montana, and L. E. Benson of this place. Later the family moved to Storm Lake, afterward to St. Lawrence, S. D. where they resided until 1891, when they moved to Lake Park, where he engaged in the furniture and undertaking business, but on account of failing health retired some ten years ago. In early years, he followed the carpenter trade and also followed farming in his early years. During the Civil War he enlisted from Iowa and fought for his country three years. He was a member of the First Day Advent Church. He was an earnest, consistent Christian and a good citizen. For several years he was the justice of the peace in this place. He was a staunch temperance worker and was always doing all he could for the good of his fellow men and for the cause of right. He leaves a devoted wife and two sons and eight grand children besides two brothers and a host of friends to mourn his departure. The funeral was held Monday afternoon at the M. E. Church by Rev. Willis. The pall bearers were six army veterans who tenderly laid him to rest with old glory wrapped around him.

His widow Louisa C. Benson file for a pension on Apr. 11, 1914.

Louise (Clark) Benson died Jan. 23, 1918 and is buried in Silver Lake Cemetery, Lake Park, Dickinson County, Iowa.

Obituary for Mrs. J. T. Benson

Louisa Clark was born November 18, 1835, at Hearn County, Ohio. She was married to John T. Benson October 11, 1855. He preceded her in death while living at Lake Park, Iowa, April 2, 1914. He was a volunteer in Company E 27th Iowa infantry from August 15, 1862 to August 8, 1865. They moved to Lake Park, Iowa in 1891, where he was in business a number of years. When very young she joined the Christian Advent church but attended that M. E. Church of Lake Park. After Mr. Benson's death she moved to Ballantine, Montana, residing with her son J. C. Benson, and attending the Congressional church there. Here she passed away January 23, 1918 at 7:30 PM. Family consisted of two sons who are both living, J. C. Benson of Ballentine, Montana, and L. E. Benson of Lake Park, Iowa. There are eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren living, also one brother lives in Michigan.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thus express our thanks for sympathy and help extended to us since the death of our beloved mother. We sincerely appreciate them all and thank each one for their kindly acts and words.

J. C. Benson
L. E. Benson

Lake Park News, February 7, 1918


The paragraph below was found on Find a Grave.

The remains of Mrs. J. T. Benson were brought here for burial Tuesday morning. Deceased was the mother of L. E. Benson of Lake Park, and was a long time and very highly respected resident of Lake Park, coming here in 1891. Since the death of her husband, she has been living with her son Jay near Worden, Montana, where she died after a brief illness, being past 83 years of age. The funeral took place Wednesday. Her son Jay accompanied the remains here.


Bradley, Alonzo W He was born Apr. 20, 1836 in Russell, Geauga County, Ohio. He was the son of Jonathan Bradley (1795 - 1854) and Hannah Permelia Brooks (1800 - 1849). He married Jane Shannon Bell at Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa, Dec. 31, 1857, She was the daughter of William Bell and Martha L. Shannon. Her brother Joseph Henry Bell also served with Company E, 27th Iowa.

Alonzo and Jane BradleyPhoto of Alonzo Bradley and Wife Jane Shannon Bell was found here.

1856 Iowa State Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: James I. Bell (age 27, born Penn. Painter), Martha Bell (age 58, born Penn)., Jane S. Bell (age 22, born Penn, Teacher), Joseph H. Bell (age 17, born Penn.) Ann May (age 12, born Penn) and Wm Irvin (age 22, born Ireland)

1860 Census, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Alonzo Bradley (age 24, laborer, born Ohio), Jane Bradley (age 26, born Penn.), Cora Bradley (age 1). They were living next door to Martha Bell and family.

Alonzo Bradley FamilyJane, Effie, Alonzo and Harry Bradley

1870 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Alonzo Bradley (age 35, born Ohio), Jane S. Bradley (age 35), Effie Bradley (age 7), Albert Bradley (age 3).

1880 Census: Chicago Creek, Clear Creek, Colorado: Alonzo Bradley (age 45, born Ohio, teamster), wife Jane S. Bradley (age 44), son Harry A. Bradley (age 12), daughter Bessie Bradley (age 4) and nephew Charles E. Bradley age 23)

1885 Iowa State Census: Greeley, Audubon County, Iowa: Alonzo W. Bradley (Township 73, Range 34, Section 24, NW SE, age 49), Jenniet Bradley (age 49), Harry Bradley (age 17), Bessie Bradley (age 9), and James Bradley (age 3).

1895 Iowa State Census: Hamlin, Audubon County, Iowa: A. W. Bradley (age 57, born Ohio, Religious Belief: None, can read but not write, Soldier in the War of The Rebellion: Co. E, Regiment 27, State Iowa, Rank P.), Jane S. Bradley (age 59), Bessie L. (age 19) and James C. Bradley (age 13).

1900 Census: Hamlin, Audubon County, Iowa: Alonzo W. Bradley (born Apr. 1835, age 65, married 42 years, born Ohio, farmer), wife Jane S. Bradley (born Aug 1835, age 65, married 42 years, 9 children born, 4 still living, born Penn.), son James C. Bradley (born Mar. 1882, age 18).

Alonzo Bradley - Wedded 50 YearsSubmitted by David Bradley

Wedded for 50 Years

Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Bradley, Of Old Hamlin, Ia.

Exira, Ia., Jan. 4 -- Special: Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Bradley of Old Hamlin celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their wedded life this week, when all of their immediate family were in attendance. A. W. Bradley and Jane S. Bell were married at Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa, Dec. 31, 1857, that being four years before the civil war. Mr. Bradley answered the call to (?) and served his country faithfully. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley have four children living, namely, Mrs. H. H. Crosser of Omaha, Harry A. of Los Angeles, Cal., Mrs. Marshall McNutt of Hamlin and James C. of Missouri Valley, Ia. They have six grandchildren and five great grandchildren. Their home now is at Old Hamlin, Ia., near where they first stopped when they came to the county. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley are pioneers of Audubon county, having come to Audubon county, when the county seat was still at Exira.

1910 Census: Exira, Audubon County, Iowa; Alonzo W. Bradley (age 74, married 1 time for 53 years), Wife Jane S. Bradley (age 74, married 1 time for 53 years.

Jane Shannon (Bell) Bradley died April 22, 1914 and is buried in Exira Cemetery, Audubon County, Iowa

The Audubon Advocate
Apr. 30, 1914

Mrs. Bradley Died -- Mrs. A. W. Bradley passed away at her home Wednesday April 22, 1914 after a long serious illness with cancer. At the time of her death she was 79 years of age. Her marriage to Mr. Bradley occurred in Garnavillo, Iowa, Dec 31, 1857, to which union 9 children were born, 5 of whom preceded their mother in death. She moved to Exira with her family in the fall of 1909 from Old Hamlin where she had resided for many years The funeral services took place in the M.E. church Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev Grinyer, internment was made in the Exira cemetery. Among the out-of-town relatives who attended the funeral were: Effie Crosser and J.C. Bradley of Omaha; H.A. Bradley of California; Mrs. Bessie McNutt of Hamlin & J.H. Bell of Atlantic.

1920 Census: Omaha Ward 4, Douglas, Nebraska: Harry H. Crosser (age 44, born Wisconsin), wife Effie B. Crosser (age 55, born Iowa) and father-in-law Alonzo Bradley (age 84, widowed, born Ohio).

Alonzo Bradley died April 18, 1920 and is buried in Exira Cemetery, Audubon County, Iowa

The Audubon Advocate
Apr. 22, 1920

Alonzo Bradley, Pioneer Citizen, Dead. Passed Away at the Home of His Daughter Last Sunday. Funeral Wednesday. Alonzo W. Bradley was born in the village of Russell, Geauga County, OH, on April 20th, 1836, and died at the home of his daughter Mrs. Marshall McNutt Audubon county, Iowa, on April 18th 1920, at the advanced age of 83 years, 11 months and 28 days. He came west to Wisconsin in the year 1855 and to Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa, in the spring of 1857. He was united in marriage to Jennie S. Bell on December 31st 1857 and to this union was born 9 children; 5 of whom, together with his good wife have preceded him to the better land. The surviving members of the family are 2 sons and 2 daughters, Mrs. H.H. Crosser and James C. Bradley of Omaha, Neb., and Harry A. Bradley of Toft, California, and Mrs. Marshall McNutt of Audubon; 6 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. Mr. Bradley was a veteran of the Civil War, having answered his country's call in the spring of 63, serving faithfully til the end of the war. He was a pioneer of Audubon county, having moved here with his family in 1874 and has seen the county develop from a wild prairie to the present time. He was not a member of any church but always lived an honest, honorable life and believed in the golden rule of doing unto others as he wished to be done by. The past year he has made his home with his daughter, Mrs. H.H. Crosser of Omaha. The funeral was held at the Methodist Episcopal church Wednesday afternoon at 1 pm. Quite a large number of friends attend the services. The sermon was delivered by Rev D.J. Shenton. The G.A.R. and the W.R.C. attended in a body. The burial service at the Exira cemetery was conducted by the G.A.R. assisted by Rev Shenton.


Breene, Patrick He was born about 1820 in Ireland.

1860 Census, Girard, Clayton county, Iowa: Samuel S. Collins (age 51, farmer, born Mass.) Ann Collins (age 31, born Mass), Verena Collings (age 16, born Wisconsin) and Patrick Brim (age 40, farm laborer, born Ireland).

Note: I found conflicting information, so I am not entirely certain which one below is correct.

Iowa Civil War Soldiers Burial Records: Name: Patrick Breen Unit: IA 27 Inf E Birth Information: Ireland Cemetery: Calvary Cemetery Location: Howard Co IA (Based on this information I created Find A Grave Memorial #94219853).

Comments: on roster as BREENE; other Breen's this cemetery include Agnes (1874-1886) Catherine (1834-1890) Mary Ann (1854-1874) and Morris (1867-1895); 1880 Census shows a Morris Breen of the same age as the one in this cemetery listed as son of Patrick Breen family. NOTE by ejj: this appears to be one family with Lawrence and Catherine being the parents. I could not find a connection to Patrick Breen.

UPDATE: I discovered another reference to Patrick Breen of the 27th Iowa: Ref: VA Grave Locator, US National Cemetery Interment Control Form.

BREEN, PATRICK
PVT E 27TH IOWA INF
DATE OF DEATH: 10/17/1889
BURIED AT: GOVT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE

I found Find A Grave Memorial #113692075 which said he died Oct 17, 1889 and is buried at Saint Elizabeths Hospital East Cemetery, Anacostia, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, USA. A note said: St. Elizabeths West Cemetery was filled by 1873.

I looked up information on Saint Elizabeths Hospital and it appears that it is the same as the Government Hospital for the Insane. However, from the information below, he may not necessarily have been insane. It is a little hard to tell just based on the name of the hospital -- and what it was subsequently used for.

Soon after the hospital opened to patients in January 1855, it became known officially as the Government Hospital for the Insane. During the Civil War the West Lodge, originally built for male African-American patients, was used as a general hospital by the U.S. Navy. The unfinished east wing of the main building was used by the U.S. Army as a general hospital for sick and wounded soldiers. The Army hospital officially took the name of St. Elizabeths Army Medical Hospital to differentiate it from the mental hospital in the west wing of the same building. The name St. Elizabeths was derived from the colonial-era name for the tract of land on which the hospital was built.

After the Civil War and the closing of the Army's hospital, the St. Elizabeths name was used unofficially and intermittently until 1916, when Congress passed legislation changing the name from the Government Hospital for the Insane to St. Elizabeths Hospital, inexplicably omitting the possessive apostrophe.[4] Also it transferred hospital to the United States Department of Interior.

Based on the information about him being buried in Washington DC, it is possible that the information below is him with his family. The age and place of birth is correct, along with where he apparently was in 1889. BUT I am not 100% sure. This would definitely need to be verified.

1870 Census, Washington, District of Columbia, East of Seventh Street: Patrict Breen (age 50, born Ireland, day laborer), Mary Breen (age 45, born Ireland), Patrict Breen (age 12, born District of Columbia).

1880 Census, Washington, District of Columbia G Street NW Patrick Breen (age 60, born Ireland, laborer), wife Mary Breen (age 65, born Ireland), son Patrick Breen (age 22, born District of Columbia, lost one eye).

1900 Census, Washington, District of Columbia, G Street NW Patrick Breen (age 42, grocer, born District of Columbia), Mother Mary Breen, age 75, widowed, born Ireland, mother of 11 children, with 2 living children).


Bretz, Joseph Simon He was born September 02, 1836 in Lykens Valley, Dauphin Co. PA . He was the son of William Bretz (Mar. 16, 1796 - Jan 1, 1838) and Elizabeth Cassel (July 28, 1802 - Jan 24, 1879).  He married first Martha McAlpin on July 4, 1858 in Clayton County, Iowa. He married second Margaret Ellen Lepley on April. 26, 1886 in Hardin Co., Iowa. She was the daughter of Valentine Lepley and Margaret Scott.

Joseph S. Bretz 1856 Iowa State Census: Millville, Clayton County, Iowa: Henry Cassel (age 34), Catharine C. Cassel (age 29), Elizabeth Cassel (age 6), Mary Cassel (age 4), John Cassel, Isaac H. Preston (age 58), Elizabeth Snow (age 54), Joseph Bretz (age 19), Sarah Bretz (age 18) and Abraham Bretz (age 23).

1860 Census, Millville, Clayton County, Iowa: Joseph Bretz (age 23), Martha Bretz (age 20,), Ellen Bretz (age 2) and William Bretz (age 25).

1870 Census: Millville, Clayton County, Iowa: Joseph S. Bretz (age 34, farmer, born Penn.), Martha Bretz (age 30, born Ind.), Ellen E. Bretz (age 11), Dora P. Bretz (age 9), Alestia Bretz (age 5), Wm. H. Bretz (age 3) and Sevilla Bretz (age 3/12).


Oct. 24, 1876, California, Voter Registers: Joseph Simon Bretz, age 40, born Pennsylvania, Farmer, Local Residence: Pine Ridge.

Dec. 31, 1878, California, Voter Registers: Joseph Simon Bretz, age 42, born Pennsylvania, farmer, local residence: Pine Ridge

Joseph Bretz and Martha McAlpin were apparently divorced before 1880. In 1880 Martha had remarried and Joseph was living with his brother and family.

1880 Census: Millville, Clayton County, Iowa: Samuel Peyton, (age 38, laborer), wife Martha Peyton (age 40, born Ind.), stepdaughter Alcesta Bretz (age 15), stepson William Bretz (age 12), stepdaughter Savilla Bretz (age 10), stepdaughter Myrtle Bretz (age 7), son Otisco Peyton, age 2 and daughter Maude Peyton (age 4/12, born Feb). (Note: Samuel Peyton was a veteran of the Civil War. He served in Company B, 12th Iowa Inf. and Company C, 2 Wisconsin Inf. His widow Martha E. Peyton filed for a pension on April 14, 1915 in Iowa.)

1880 Census: Grant, Hardin County, Iowa: Abraham Bretz (age 46), wife Mary Ann (age 49), daughter Jessie D (age 17), daughter Elizabeth C. (age 14), son Joseph (age 12), son Willard (age 10), daughter Eva (age 7), son Frederick (age 5) daughter Mary E. (age 2) and BROTHER Joseph S. Bretz (age 44, born Penn. farmer)

Oct. 3, 1892, California, Voter Registers No. 1271, Joseph Simon Bretz, age 56, Height: 5 feet 8 1/2 inches, Dark complexion, brown eyes, black hair, scar on left little finger, born Pennsylvania, Precinct: Pine Ridge, P. O. Address: Pine Ridge.

Joseph S. Bretz filed for a pension on Jan. 7, 1892.

1900 Census: Township 10, Fresno County, California: Joseph S. Bretz (born Feb. 1835, age 65, married 14 years, born Penn., millman), wife Margaret A. (born May 1854, age 46, married 14 years, 4 children born, 4 still living), son Edward J. (born Aug. 1887, age 13, born Calif.) son Frank A. Bretz (born Dec. 1889 age 10, born Calif), daughter Stella Bretz (born Sept. 1890, age 9, born Calif), and daughter Lulu Bretz (born June1893, age 6, born Calif).

Civil War veteran, Union Army from Iowa. Left first wife and children after war and moved to Shaver Lake, Fresno Co., Calif. Established shake mill, then expanded to large lumber mill and large land holdings. Bretz lumber operated as a family business until the mid 1900's. Bretz mill road in rural Fresno County and the Bretz Mill condominiums take their name from this man and his family.

1910 Census: District 69, Township 10, Fresno County, California: Joseph F. Bretz (age 74, married 2 times, current marriage 23 years, born Penn), wife Margaret E Bretz (age 53, married 1 time for 23 years, 4 children born, 4 still living), son Joseph E. Bretz (age 22), son Abram F. Bretz (age 21), daughter Stella M. Bretz (age 19) and daughter Lula A Bretz (age 16).

Joseph Simon Bretz died October 25, 1911 in Fresno City, Fresno Co. CA. He is buried at Tollhouse Cemetery, Tollhouse, Fresno County, California.

His widow Margaret E. Bretz filed for a pension on May 11, 1912 in California.

Margaret E. Bretz (born May 27, 1854 in Hardin County Iowa, died April 26, 1946 in Fresno, California. She is buried at Tollhouse Cemetery, Tollhouse, Fresno County, California.


Brooker, George He was born May 10, 1840 in Morgan County, Ohio. He was the son of Jacob Frederich Brooker (1798-1874) and Catherine. He married Mary Elizabeth Killam on Nov. 23, 1865

1850 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton county, Iowa: Jacob Brooker (age 52, born Germany), Catherine Brooker (age 52, born Germany), Frederick Brooker (age 23, born Germany), Gottlieb Brooker (age 15, born Ohio), John Brooker (age 13, born Ohio), George Brooker (age 11, born Ohio), and Cristina Brooker (age 7, born Ohio)

1856 Iowa State Census, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Jacob Brooker (age 57), Cathrina Brooker (age 58), John Brooker (age 18) and George Brooker (age 16). They had been in Iowa for 8 years.

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Gottlieb Brooker (age 23, farmer), John Brooker (age 20, farmer), George Brooker (age 19, farmer), Catherine Brooker (age 62).

George Brooker, who came in 1866, married a Miss Killam. He owned the northeast quarter of section 22. He died about 1885. His children were Clinton, Elmer E. of Des Moines, Orva of South Dakota, Ernest of Jefferson Township and Mrs. Williams.

History of Madison County, Iowa, and Its People By Herman A. Mueller

1870 Census: Jefferson, Madison County, Iowa: George Brooker (age 29, farmer), Elizabeth Brooker (age 26), John Brooker (age 3), Minnie Brooker (age 2) and Elmer Booker (age 8/12).

1880 Census: Jefferson, Madison County, Iowa: George Brooker (age 39, farmer), Lizzie Brooker (age 37), Clinton Brooker (age 13), Minnie E. Brooker (age 12), Elmer Brooker (age 10), Orville Brooker (age 6), and Nelson Brooker (age 2).

George Brooker died August. 11, 1881 and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Winterset, Madison County, Iowa.

His widow Elizabeth Brooker filed for a pension on Oct. 9, 1883.

A pension was filed for a minor on Oct. 16, 1886. Elizabeth M. Swert was guardian.

1885 Iowa State Census: De Soto, Dallas County, Iowa: Elizabeth Brooker (age 49, widowed), Clinton J. Brooker (age 18), Minnie E. Brooker (age 16), Elmer E. Brooker (age 14), Orvand G. Brooker (age 10), and Nelson L. Brooker (age 6).


Brooker, John He was born Apr. 11, 1838 in Morgan County, Ohio. He was the son of Jacob Frederick Brooker (1798-1874) and Catherine. He married Mary C. Hubbard on Nov. 7, 1867 in Madison County, Iowa.

1850 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton county, Iowa: Jacob Brooker (age 52, born Germany), Catherine Brooker (age 52, born Germany), Frederick Brooker (age 23, born Germany), Gottlieb Brooker (age 15, born Ohio), John Brooker (age 13, born Ohio), George Brooker (age 11, born Ohio), and Cristina Brooker (age 7, born Ohio)

1856 Iowa State Census, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Jacob Brooker (age 57), Cathrina Brooker (age 58), John Brooker (age 18) and George Brooker (age 16). They had been in Iowa for 8 years.

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Gottlieb Brooker (age 23, farmer), John Brooker (age 20, farmer), George Brooker (age 19, farmer), Catherine Brooker (age 62).

1880 Census: Jefferson, Madison County, Iowa: John Brooker (age 42), Mary Brooker (age 35), Luela Brooker (age 10), Mary L. Brooker (age 9), Clara B. Brooker (age 6), William A. Brooker (age 4) and Ida M. Brooker (age 1)

1885 Iowa State Census: Jefferson, Madison County, Iowa John Brooker (Township 77, Range 27, Section 16, SE SW 1/4, age 46, farmer), Mary Brooker (age 39), Lulu Brooker (age 15), Mary Brooker (Age 13), Clara Brooker (age 10), Willie Brooker (age *), Ida Brooker (age 6), and John E. Brooker (age 0)

A Biography for Ira Irvin Trindle had the following information:

In 1892 Mr. Trindle married Miss Mary Brooker, who was born in Jefferson township and is a daughter of John and Mary (Hubbard) Brooker, the former born in Morgan county, Ohio, on the 11th of April, 1838, and the latter born in Lawrence county, Indiana, on the 2Oth of March, 1845. Both have passed away. Mr. Brooker removed with his parents to Clayton county, Iowa, in 1847, and after reaching mature years engaged in merchandising with his brothers, George and Gudliff. In 1862 he enlisted in the Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry and went with his command to the front, where he participated in a number of hard-fought battles. Upon the close of hostilities he returned to Clayton county and resided there until 1867, when he came to this county, buying one hundred and forty acres of land in Jefferson township. In 1904 he moved to Winterset, passing away there in April of the same year. He was a republican and served upon the board of supervisors from 1892 to 1898. He was active not only in the political and civic affairs but also in the religious life of the community and was known for his honesty and integrity.

History of Madison County, Iowa, and its people By Herman A. Mueller

John Brooker, who came in 1866, settled on section 16, Jefferson Township. He died in Winterset in 1904. He married Mary Hubbard and their children are Ernest, William, Mrs. Lou Imes, Mrs. Trindle, Mrs. Coe and Clara.

1900 Census: Jefferson, Madison County, Iowa: John Brooker (born Apr. 1838, age 62, married 32 years), wife Mary C. Brooker (born Mar. 1845, age 55, married 32 years, 6 children born, 6 still living), daughter Luella Brooker (born Nov. 1869, age 30), daughter Clara B. Brooker (born July 1874, age 25), son William A. Brooker (born June 1876, age 23), Son John E. Brooker (born Aug. 1883 (age 16), and daughter Ida M. Coe (born July 1878, age 21, married 1 year, no children).

John Brooker died April 8, 1904 and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Winterset, Madison County, Iowa.

His widow, Mary E. Brooker filed for a pension on May, 16, 1904.

Mary C. Brooker died Oct. 23, 1910 and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Winterset, Madison County, Iowa.


Brownson, Truman Murray He was born Sept. 4, 1840 in Lawrence County, New York. He was the son of Daniel Brownson and Asenath Tyler. He married Amelia Maria Jones on Aug. 27, 1874.

1850 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa; Daniel Brownson (age 37), Asneth Brownson (age 31) Truman Brownson (age 10), Freeman Brownson (age 7), Almida Brownson (age 5) and Alcida Brownson (age 3).

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa. Daniel Brownson (age 46), Asneth Brownson (age 37), Truman Brownson (age 21), Almeda Brownson (age 15), Alzada Brownson (age 13), Almyra Brownson (age 11). (Indexed as Browman)

1870 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Daniel Brownson (age 53), Asenath Brownson (age 51), Truman M. Brownson (age 29), Freeman Brownson (age 26), Almira Brownson (age 13), Jason Brownson (age 2).

1880 Census: District 310, Muddy, Richardson County, Nebraska: T. M. Brownson (age 39, farmer, born NY), wife Amelia M Brownson (age 28), son Arthur Brownson (age 4, born Nebraska), and son Glenn Brownson (age 1, born Nebraska).

1890 Veteran's Census: Muddy, Richardson County, Nebraska; Truman M. Brownson, Priv. 27 Iowa Inf. Service 3 years, Verdon Nebraska Richardson Co.

Truman Brownson filed for a pension on Sept. 1, 1891 in Nebraska.

1900 Census: Muddy, Richardson, Nebraska: T. M. Brownson (born Sept. 1840, age 59, married 26 years, born New York), wife Amelia M Brownson (born Apr. 1848, age 52, married 26 years, 6 children born, 5 still living, born Iowa) son Arthur Brownson Born Dec. 1875, age 24, born Nebraska), son Glen Brownson (born Oct, 1881, age 21, born Nebraska), son Carrie Brownson (born Nov. 1882, age 17, born Nebraska), son Eddie Brownson (born July 1884, age 15, born Nebraska), son Hollis Brownson (born Mar. 1887, age 13), sister-in law Minnie Jones, (born Mar. 1862, age 38, born Iowa

1910 Census: Verdon, Richardson, Nebraska: Truman M. Bronson (age 69. married 35 years), Amelia M. Bronson (age 58, married 35 years, 6 children born, 5 still living), Arthur M. Bronson (age 35), Hollis L. Bronson (age 22).

Amelia Maria (Jones) Brownson (born April 2, 1852), died May 16, 1913 in Verdon, Richardson Co., Nebraska

1920 Census: East Muddy, Richardson County, Nebraska: Carrey L. Brownson (age 37), Wife Daisy D. Brownson (age 38), daughter Ruth E. Brownson (age 7), son Robert E. Brownson (age 5) and father Truman M. Brownson (age 79, widowed, born New York),

Truman Murray Brownson died Jan. 8, 1923, and is buried in Prairie Union Cemetery, Shubert, Richardson County, Nebraska.

Children of Truman Brownson and Amelia Jones

  1. Arthur Morton Brownson b: Dec. 25, 1875 in Verdon, Richardson Co., NE
  2. Glen Marvin Brownson b: Oct. 3, 1878 in Verdon, Richardson Co., NE
  3. Carey L Brownson b: Nov. 27, 1882 in Verdon, Richardson Co., NE
  4. Edward Brownson b: July 27, 1884 in Verdon, Richardson Co., NE
  5. Hollis Lee Brownson b: Mar. 28, 1887 in farm 4 mi S, Verdon, Richardson Co., NE

Budd, Charles Wesley He was born Aug. 7, 1839 in Ohio. He was the son of Charles and Ester Budd. He married Mary A. Warner on July 22, 1869 in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, Iowa. (Iowa, Marriages, 1809-1992). She was born Oct. l6, 1849, in Alleghany Co. Md

1850 Census: Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio: Charles J. Budd (age 48), Esther Budd (age 42), William Budd (age 20), Job J. Budd (age 18), Sarah A. Budd (age 17), Charles W. Budd (age 11), James Budd (age 9), Elizabeth Budd (age 6), John C. Budd (age 3).

1856 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Dubuque County, Iowa: C. J. Budd (age 54), Ester Budd (age 47), William Budd (age 26), Jacob Budd (age 24), C. W. Budd (age 17), James Budd (age 14), Elizabeth Budd (age 12), John Budd (age 9), Ester Budd (age 5)

1860 Census: Liberty, Dubuque County, Iowa: Chas Budd (age 58, born New York), Ester Budd (age 51, born New York), William Budd (age 30, born Ohio), Job Budd (age 28, born Ohio), Chas W. (age 21, born Ohio), Elizabeth Budd (age 16, born Ohio), James Budd (age 18, born Ohio), John Budd (age 13, born Ohio) and Ester Budd (age 10, born Ohio).

1870 Census: Orange, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Chas. W. Budd (age 30, born Ohio, farmer) and Mary A. Budd (age 20, born Maryland)

1880 Census: Orange, Black Hawk County, Iowa: C. W. Budd (age 40, born Ohio), wife Mary Budd (age 30, born MD.), son John W. Budd (age 9), daughter Esther M. Budd (age 4) and son Ralph Budd (age 11 m).

1885 Iowa State Census: Orange, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Charles W. Budd (Township 88, Range 13, section 27, age 45), Mary A. Budd (age 35), John W. Budd (age 14), Ester Budd (age 8), Ralph Budd (age 5), Nellie Budd (age 3, and William S. Budd (age 55)

Charles W. Budd filed for a pension on Apr. 28, 1890 in Iowa

1900 Census: Saylor, Polk County, Iowa: Charles W. Budd (born Aug. 1839, age 60, married 30 years, born Ohio), wife Mary A. Budd (born Oct. 1849, age 50, married 30 years, 7 children born, 6 still living, born Maryland), son John W. Budd (born Aug, 1870, age 29), daughter Ester M (born Mar. 1876, age 24), son Ralph T Budd (born Aug. 1879, age 20), daughter Hellen W Budd (born Dec. 1881, age 18), son James O. Budd (born Oct, 1886, age 13) and daughter Beula A. Budd (born Nov. 1892, age 7).

1910 Census: Des Moines Ward 1, Polk County, Iowa: Charles W. Budd (age 70, married 1 time for 40 years, born Ohio), wife Mary Budd (age 60, married 1 time for 40 years, 6 children born, 6 still living, born Maryland) and daughter Beulah Budd (age 17).

Charles Wesley Budd died March 29, 1917 and is buried in Rose City Cemetery, 5625 NE Fremont, Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon

C. W. Budd Buried

Portland, Ore. April 1 -- the funeral of Charles W. Budd, father of the Ralph Budd, assistant to the president of the Great Northern railway, was held here today, burial being in Rose City Cemetery. The son and two daughters, Misses Helen and Beulah Budd, were the members of the immediate family present.

Mr. Budd was 78 years old and had lived in Portland since 1913, coming from Des Moines.

Ralph Budd hurried from St. Paul, Minn., but arrived after his father's death. He will remain in the West for some time.

The Anaconda Standard, Anaconda, Montana
Monday Morning, April 2, 1917

His Widow Mary A. Budd filed for a pension on Apr. 30, 1917 in Oregon.

1920 Census: Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon: Mary A. Budd, age 70, widowed, born Maryland, daughter Helen U. Budd (age 38), and daughter Beulah W. Budd (age 27).

Mary A. Budd died in 1932 and is buried in Rose City Cemetery, Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon.

Children of Charles Wesley Budd and Mary A. Warner

  1. John Wesley Budd, born 4 Aug 1870 in Orange, Black Hawk, Iowa, USA
  2. Esther Budd, born 19 Mar 1876 in Black Hawk, Iowa, USA
  3. Ralph Budd, born 20 Aug 1879 in Black Hawk, Iowa, USA
  4. Helen U Budd, born 19 Dec 1881 in Black Hawk, Iowa, USA
  5. James Budd, born 19 Oct 1886 in Black Hawk, Iowa, USA
  6. Beulah Budd, born 4 Nov 1892 in Black Hawk, Iowa, USA

The following biography is for their son, and probably explains why they ended up in Oregon after living their entire lives in Iowa.

Ralph Budd: August 20, 1879 - Feb. 2, 1962

Leading 20th-century railroad executive -- headed both the Great Northern Railway (GN) and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad (Burlington). He is perhaps best known for sparking the diesel-electric revolution with the introduction of the Zephyr streamliner.

Born on a farm near the village of Washburn in Black Hawk County, Iowa, Budd was one of six children of Charles Wesley Budd and Mary Ann (Warner) Budd. The young Budd was raised in a staunch Presbyterian and Republican household where learning was emphasized. When Budd was 13, his family moved to Des Moines. There he thrived in a progressive public school system. A bright and ambitious lad, Budd combined his later education at North High School and the Presbyterian-affiliated (now defunct) Highland Park College in only six years. Following in the footsteps of an older brother, he participated in the engineering program at Highland Park.

After graduating in 1899, Budd joined the Chicago Great Western Railway as an assistant engineer to the division engineer in Des Moines and quickly mastered the basics of railroad construction and maintenance. In 1903 Budd accepted a better-paying position with the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad and participated in the building of that carrier's route between Kansas City and St. Louis; later he served as the first division engineer of this new piece of trackage. Typical of civil engineers employed by railroads, Budd became a "boomer" of sorts, for in 1906 he participated in the construction of the Panama Canal, where he assisted in the rehabilitation of the woebegone Panama Railroad. Three years later Budd took an engineering position with the Oregon Trunk Railway (OT), an affiliate of the GN, which was then locating and building a line in central Oregon.

While involved with the OT, Budd, who not only was a crackerjack engineer but who possessed superb "people skills," developed a close relationship with James J. Hill, founder and president of the GN. Then in 1913 Budd, at age 33, moved to GN headquarters in St. Paul, Minnesota, to become Hill's assistant. There Budd prospered. Before Hill died in 1916, he told board members that in time Budd should head the railroad. And that is what happened. In 1918 Budd became executive vice president; a year later he assumed the presidency. At the throttle, Budd followed Hill's philosophy, namely, to make the road efficient and competitive. A highlight of Budd's tenure at the GN was the opening in 1929 of the new Cascade Tunnel, one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of the period. Much less apparent to the public was Budd's understanding of the need for intermodal endeavors, explaining why the GN entered the commercial bus business under the banner of Northland Transportation Company, future core of Greyhound Lines.

In 1932 Budd changed jobs. He became president of the larger Burlington, a company that since 1901 had been part of the so-called Hill Lines. This sprawling Chicago-based Granger road, particularly sensitive to downswings in agricultural traffic, needed strong leadership as the Great Depression deepened. For the next 17 years Budd provided just that, contributing much toward making the Burlington a prosperous property, ranging from launching a truck subsidiary to the building of the "Kansas City Cut-off." -- But his greatest accomplishment, at least in the eyes of the public, involved the development and deployment, beginning in 1934, of lightweight, diesel-powered passenger streamliners known as Zephyrs. Although Budd retired in 1949, he continued to be involved in the transportation industry. In 1949 Mayor Martin Kennelly of Chicago asked Budd to chair the board of the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA). In some ways a more difficult assignment than any of his previous positions because of the political environment, Budd forged ahead with modernization of the CTA and offered efficient, honest management. In 1954 he "retired" again, moving with his wife, Georgia (Marshall) Budd, to Santa Barbara, California. It was a happy home life, and the Budds remained close to their three children -- Robert, Margaret, and John, the latter a president of the GN -- until his death at age 82.

Source: The Biographical Dictionary of Iowa.


Burke, John He was born about 1828 in Ireland. He was the son of William Burke and Sarah Longmore. He married Mary Jane Kerr on Feb. 9, 1852 in Plattsburg, Clinton County, NY. She was the daughter of Jasper Crowe and Jane Deyamond.

1880 Census: McPherson, Lincoln County, Nebraska: John Burke (age 51, laborer, born Ireland), wife Mary (age 45, born Canada), son Robert (age 22, born Iowa) son George (age 20, born Iowa), son Henry (age 14, born Iowa), daughter Sarah Jane (age 21), daughter Minnie (age 17, born Iowa) and daughter Effie (age 6, born Iowa),

1900 Census, South Kommerer, Uinta, Wyoming John Burke (born Oct. 1828, age 71, married 40 years, born Ireland, immigrated 1850), wife Mary Burke (born April 1830, age 69, marri3e 40 years, 7 children born, 7 still living, born Canada), son Henry Burke, born Feb. 1867, age 33, born Minnesota), daughter Effie Burke (born Jan. 1874, age 26, born Iowa).

John Burke died March 25, 1905 in Brady, Nebraska of stomach cancer. He is buried in Brady Cemetery, Brady, Lincoln County Nebraska.

His widow Mary J. Burke filed for a pension on May 2, 1905 in Nebraska

Mary Jane (Kerr) Burke died Jan 4, 1908 in Brady Nebraska, and is buried in Brady Cemetery, Brady, Lincoln County, Nebraska.

Note: there is a discrepancy regarding when he died and where he is buried.

I initially found information on the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War that said he is buried in Plainview Cemetery, Maxwell, Lincoln, Nebraska Lot 129 (Mar 10, 1823 - June 12, 1872) (GAR Post 69, Dept. of Nebraska)

The dates did not seem right to me (John Burke should have been born about 1828), so I did further research.

First I found that his widow Mary J. Burke filed for a pension on May 2, 1905 in Nebraska. Why would she have waited over 25 years to file for a pension?

Next I found a Brady Cemetery transcription on the Lincoln county USGENWEB site. There is a John and Mary Burke buried there and it notes that they are the parents of Mary E. Beatty. (there were no dates and no mention of the 27th Iowa).

Then I found a photo of John Burke's tombstone (on Find A Grave) in Brady Cemetery showing that he was with the 27th Iowa. (but no dates)

The last thing I found was a family tree that lists John Burke and Mary Jane Kerr. It said John Burke died March 25, 1905 in Brady Nebraska. They had a daughter named Mary that was married to William Beatty. All that matches information I found and I am sure that it is correct.

So, I am convinced that the Plainview Cemetery information is incorrect. But the information is out there.

Children of John Burke and Mary Jane Kerr:

  1. William Burke b: Nov. 12, 1852 in Morristown, Clinton County, NY
  2. John Colburn Burke b: June 24, 1854 in Morristown, Clinton County, NY
  3. Robert Kerr Burke b: Apr. 3, 1856 in Morristown, Clinton County, NY
  4. Sarah Irene Burke b: Aug. 23, 1858 in Clayton City, Iowa
  5. George Thomas Burke b: Apr. 6, 1860 in Clayton City, Clayton County, Iowa
  6. Mary Burke b: Jan. 19, 1862 in Clayton City, Iowa
  7. John Colburn Burke b: June 30, 1863 in Iowa
  8. Henry Burke b: ABT. 1865
  9. Effie Myrtle Burke b: Jan. 10, 1874 in Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa

Casaday, Warren He was born Dec. 16, 1839 in Lexington, Ohio. He was the son of William Casaday (Dec. 5, 1811 - Jan 22, 1888) and Julia Hadley (Nov. 21, 1811 - Sept. 7, 1894). He married Elizabeth Monroe on Sept. 26, 1867 in Hardin, Allamakee County, Iowa. Married by Rev. Hathaway. Witness: Sarah Monroe & Harvey Murphy. Elizabeth Monroe was the daughter of Towner A. Monroe (1813 - Nov. 28, 1863) and Mary Greg. Mar 5, 1821- July 5, 1850).

Note: photos and biographical information were submitted by Mary Martensen. Census work was done by Elaine Johnson.

Warren Casaday 1850 Census, Olive, St Joseph, Indiana, William Casaday (age 38, male, cabinet maker, born New Jersey), Julia Casaday, (age 38, female, born Ohio). Louisa Casaday, (age 15, female, born Ohio) and Warren Casaday, (age 10, male, born Ohio)

1860 Census, Olive, St,  Joseph, Indiana, Wm Casaday (age 48, male, white, carpenter, born NJ). Julia Casaday (age 48, female, white, born Ohio), Louisa Casaday, (age 25, female, white, school teacher, born Ohio) and Warren Casaday (age 21, male, white, carpenter, born Ohio)/

1870 Census, Vienna, Pottawatomie, Kansas, Warren Casaday (age 30, male, white, farmer, born Indiana). Elizabeth Casaday (age 24, female, white, keeping house, born Canada), George Casaday (age 2, male, white, born Iowa).

1880 Census, Monona, Clayton, Iowa, Warren Casaday (age 40, farmer, born Ohio, father born Ohio, mother born Ohio), Elizabeth Casaday (age 33, wife, married, keeping house, born Canada, father born NY, mother born Canada), George M. Casaday (age 11, son, single, at school, born Iowa, father born Ohio, mother born Canada), Grace W. Casaday (age 8, daughter, single, at school, born Kansas, father born Ohio, mother born Canada), Gertrude W. Casaday (age 5, daughter, single, at school, born Kansas, father born Ohio, mother born Canada), and Ward Casaday (age 2, son, single, at home, born Iowa, father born Ohio, mother born Canada).

Warren Casaday Family 1884

Warren Casaday Family 1884

1885 Iowa State Census, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa, Warren Casaday (Township 95, Range 5, Section 15, 16(?) NE, age 45, male, farmer, born Ohio), Elizabeth Casaday (age 38, female, housekeeper, born Canada), George W. Casaday (age 16, male, born Clayton County, Iowa), Grace Casaday (age 13, born Clayton County, Iowa (note: ditto mark under the one above), Gertrude Casaday (age 11, female, born Clayton County, Iowa (ditto mark)), Ward Casaday (age 7, male, born Clayton County, Iowa, (ditto mark)), and Mary Casaday, (age 2, female, born Clayton County, Iowa (ditto mark)).





Warren Casaday Family 1900Warren Casaday Family 1900

1900 Census, Monona, Clayton, Iowa, Warren Casaday (born Dec 1839, age 60, married 33 years, born Ohio, father born New Jersey, mother born New Jersey, captilist), wife Elizabeth Casaday (born June 1846, age 53, married, 33 years, 6 children, 5 living, born Canada English, father born Holland, mother born Canada), son George Casaday (born Aug. 1868, age 31, single, cooper), daughter Mary Casaday (born Oct. 1883, age 16, single, born Iowa, father born Ohio, mother born Canada Eng., at school) and daughter Harriet Casaday (born June 1888, age 11, single, born Iowa, father born Ohio, mother born Canada English, at school)

Warren Casaday 50 Year Anniversary


The photo above is "Warren Casaday 50 Year Anniversary Picture (1917)"
Submitted by Mary Martensen.

My mother is in this one..in front of her mother Mary. In front, she's 6th from left..about 12 or 13. Her brothers are second from left and 4th from left. Grandma Mary is 5th.

I do recognize his other daughters and son George. They changed a LOT between teen years...the 50th anniversary picture and old age. Maybe we all do.

George was just behind Warren's wife Eliz Monroe. George married Elizabeth's brother (John's) widow and she's peeking around Hattie (Warrens youngest daughter) who is holding the baby. I assume the two women to Warrens left are his daughters Grace Evans (now that I look closer, I do recognize her) and Gertie Waalk. The couple at the right end of the picture I don't recognize and that puzzles me. Maybe one of Grace or Gertie's daughters? Mary is in the light colored skirt closer to the front and my mother Esther Beeler is to the side and front of Mary in the dark skirt. She would have been 12.

1920 Census, Monona, Clayton, Iowa, Warren Casaday (age 80, married, can read, can write, born Ohio, father born New Jersey, mother born Ohio), wife Elizabeth Casaday (age 73, married, Year of immigration: 1858, naturalized, can read, can write, born Canada, mother tongue: English, father born Canada, mother tongue: English, mother born Canada, mother tongue: English).

Elizabeth (Monroe) Casaday (born June 24, 1846 Ontario Canada) died Dec 5, 1924, Monona Iowa. She is buried in Monona City Cemetery (aka Monona Eastside) Monona, Clayton County, Iowa.

Elizabeth Monroe CasadayMrs. Warren Casaday - Monona Leader - Dec. 11, 1924

Mrs. Warren Casaday who was one of the noble citizens of our community passed to her eternal reward last Friday, Dec. 5th, after having been unconscious for one day as a result of a paralytic stroke.

Her services were held from the Methodist Church, Monday afternoon and her body was quietly laid to rest in the City Cemetery.

Elizabeth Casaday, whose maiden name was Monroe, was born June 24, 1846 at Ontario, Canada. She died at her home in Monona, Iowa, Dec. 5th, 1924, at the age of 78 years, 5 months, 11 days.

Her mother died when she was a child, twelve years of age. After the death of her mother she came from Canada with her Grandmother, Mrs. Julia Gregg. In our community she has lived practically ever since. After she was grown to womanhood she taught school for a number of years.

On Sept. 26, 1867, she was united in marriage to Warren Casaday. They started the building of their home ties on a farm near Monona. And to her home, her husband, her children, her church and her country and friends she consecrated the best of her endeavors. She belongs to the best of our noble women. She was a home-builder and a companion who will be much missed by these who knew her best.

To this happy union were born two sons and four daughters of which two sons preceded the mother in death.

In 1899 Mr. and Mrs. Casaday left the farm and built themselves a cozy home in the southern part of our city, where they have had their home ever since. The neighbors and friends who knew Mrs. Casaday best said; "She was an excellent woman." She was a hard worker, honest and faithful to all trusts. Love, faith, hope and courtesy and friendship around these everlasting qualities and virtues her who life was centered. Early in life she joined the forces of the church and remained true to her covenant to her very end. She was one of those admirable women who endeared herself to all with whom she came in contact. And yet it was a life that was beautifully simple. Greatness in every realm attains its best in simplicity. This is especially true in character.

For many years Mrs. Casady was Sunday School Superintendent and Sunday School Teacher. Also she was interested in affairs of public life. For many years also Chaplain and President of the Women's Relief Corps.

Her habits of life drew the noble and good toward her here; the noble and good, we are sure, are already drawn toward her there.

Mrs. Casaday leaves to mourn her, bereaved companion and husband, Mr. Warren Casaday, and her four daughters; Mrs. Grace Evans of Weyerhaeuser, Wisconsin., Mrs. Gertrude Waalk of Monona, Mrs. Mary Beeler of Waukon, Iowa, and Mrs. Harriet Barker of Glen Flora, Wisconsin. as well as one sister, Mrs. Sarah Freeman of Los Angeles, Calif., two half-brothers Reuben Monroe of Wy., Ontario, Canada; James Monroe of Manitoba, Canada and 23 grandchildren, 6 great - grandchildren, and other relatives and many friends.

"Hearts are dust, hearts' love remain.
Heart's love will meet Thee again."
"A soul can split the sky in two,
And let the face of God shine through."

Elizabeth Monroe born in Canada of Scotch and French parents came to U. S. in 1848 and married Warren Casaday. Written by Mary Casaday Beeler.

January 1, 1925 Iowa State Census, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa, Warren Casaday (age 85 widowed, own free). (Note the index information on this one said he was born in Indiana, mother Julia Hodley, father William Cosoday. That information was not on the actual census record and appears to be a compilation from some other source.)

Monona Pioneer Ninety Years Old

Monona, IA., Dec. 20 - - Special: Warren Cassaday quietly celebrated his ninetieth birthday at his home Monday, receiving the congratulatory messages of his friends. The W. R. C. and a large number of friends gave him a post card shower.

Mr. Cassaday was born Dec. 16, 1839, at Lexington, Ohio, and is the only living member of a family of three children. In 1860 the family moved to Monona and on August 15, 1862 he enlisted and was with Co. E, 27th Iowa Infantry, serving until the close of the war. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Monroe, Sept. 26, 1867, who died in 1924. They were the parents of six children. Only three daughters are living, Mesdames Willis Evans and Henry Waalk of Monona and Nelson Beeler of Long Beach, Cal.

Mr. Cassaday spent the greater part of his life in or near Monona and is the oldest member of the Methodist church and the oldest member of the G. A. R.

Mr. and Mrs. Willis Evans entertained at a birthday party in his honor Tuesday. Relatives who were guests were Messes. and Mesdames Henry and Guy Waalk of Monona and Ray Waalk and daughter Eileen and La Vone of Mendota, Ill.; Mesdames George Cassaday of Charles City and Adeline Findlay of Monona; Misses Marian Waalk, Florence Evans and Marian Findlay of Monona.

1930 Census, Monona, Clayton, Iowa, Willis Evans (age 63, age married 27, can read, write, born Wisconsin, father born New York, mother born New York), wife Grace W. Evans (age 57, married, age married 20, can read, write, born Kansas, father born Ohio, mother born Canada). daughter Florence E. Evans (age 20, single, can read, write, born Iowa, father born Wisconsin, mother born Kansas) and father in law Warren Casaday (age 90, widower, age married 24, can read write, born Ohio, father born New York, mother born Ohio).

Warren Casaday died August 5, 1930 and is buried in Monona City Cemetery (aka Monona Eastside) Monona, Sec 12 SE/SE Monona Twp., Clayton County, Iowa.

Obituary

Warren Casaday

Warren Casaday, the son of William and Julia Casaday, was born at Lexington, Ohio on December 16th 1839 and departed this life from his home in Monona, Iowa, on August 5th 1930 at the age of 90 years 8 months and 10 days.

On September 26, 1867 he was united in marriage at Hardin, Allamakee County, to Elizabeth Monroe who preceded him in death on December 5th 1924. To this union were born 6 children; George, deceased, Mrs. Grace Evans, Mrs. Gertrude Waalk, both of Monona, Ward, deceased, Mrs. Nelson Beeler, of Long Beach, California, and Mrs. Earl Barker, deceased.

In the spring of 1861 Warren Casaday came with his parents to Iowa settling in Clayton County on one of Iowa's early Homestead farms, and following that occupation for many years.

On August 25th 1862 Mr. Casaday enlisted in Company E, 27th Iowa Infantry and served his country until the close of the Civil War. He was a member of Monona Post G. A. R. and was the oldest living member of First Methodist Church, Monona, Iowa.

After the death of Mrs. Casaday Mr. Casaday lived for a long time with his daughter Mrs. Gertrude Waalk then returned to his home where for four years he was cared for by Mrs. Grace Evans and her family.

Mr. Casaday was a consistent Christian all his life, sustaining, with his wife, a membership in the Congregational church until its disorganization, when he and Mrs. Casaday joined the First Methodist church. On Memorial Day, Sunday May 25th 1930, Mr. Casaday and his only comrade of the war of Rebellion, Mr. Melvin Davis, attended divine service for the last time, being honored guests in a union service in the Pilgrim Evangelical church.

There remains to mourn his passing, beside the children above mentioned, 23 grand-children and 13 great grand children, beside a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were conducted at the First Methodist Church, Monona,  Iowa, on Friday afternoon August 8th 1930 at two o'clock by the Rev. Louis H. Joslin, Pastor of the church.

Card of Thanks

We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to our friends, relatives and neighbors for their kind assistance and expressions of sympathy extended us during our recent bereavement, the illness and death of our beloved father and grandfather, Warren Casaday. We are also grateful for the many floral and spiritual offerings in his memory.

Mrs. Grace Evans
Mrs. Gertrude Waalk
Mrs. Mary Beeler
and families

Notice of Proof of Will

Estate of Warren Casady Deceased
State of Iowa, Clayton County SS

TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

You are notified that on the 19th day of August A. D. 1930, in vacation of District Court of Clayton county, Iowa, the Clerk opened and read an instrument in writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Warren Casady late of said county, deceased, and you are further notified that the 22nd day of September A. D. 1930. has been set by the Clerk as the day for the final hearing and proof of said will, at which time all persons interested may appear and show cause why the same should not be admitted to probate.

Dated August 19th 1930
9-11 H. L. Meyer, Clerk.
D. D. Murphy and Son, Attorneys

Children of Warren Casaday and Elizabeth Monroe.

  1. George Warren born Aug. 4, 1868 in Iowa, died: Nov. 22 1922
  2. Grace W. born Jan 30, 1872 in Oswego, Labette, Kansas, died Feb. 8, 1950 in Monona, Iowa of heart attack
  3. Gertrude Wilda born July 10, 1874 in Wamego, Pottawatomie, Kansas; died: May 12 1957 in Minneapolis, Minnesota
  4. Ward Almond, born Mar 9, 1878 in Iowa; died: Jan 12 1893 of ruptured appendix.
  5. Mary Louise born Oct 8, 1883 in Monona, Iowa: died Mar. 13 1960 in Long Beach, California
  6. Harriet Elizabeth, born June 21, 1888 in Monona, Iowa. Died: Dec. 7, 1925

Clough, Warren He was born about 1840 in Maine. He was the son of Zacheus Clough (Apr. 12, 1802 - Sept. 2, 1877) and Abigail Jones (Apr. 3, 1806 - June 20, 1891). He married Harriet E. Schmutz on July 13, 1871.

1850 Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: Zacheus Clough (age 67), Abigail Clough (age 54), Nathan Clough (age 30), Warren Clough (age 22), Elizabeth Clough (age 13), Ruth Clough (age 13), Henry Clough (age 24).

1860 Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: Zacheus Clough (age 67, farmer, born Maine), Abagail Clough (age 54, born Maine), Nathan Clough (age 30, born Maine), Warren Clough (age 22, born Maine), Elizabeth Clough (age 13), Ruth Clough (age 13), Henry Clough (age 24), and Syvilla Crossman (age 25).

Murder of a Former Citizen of Postville!

Cold-Blooded Butchery of Nathan Clough, of Seward, Nebraska!

MURDERED FOR MONEY!

His Brother, Warren Clough Arrested for the Crime

(From the Nebraska Reporter of May 4, 1876)

Our usually quiet city was thrown into feverish excitement last Tuesday morning by the announcement that Nathan Clough well-known as brother to Warren Clough, the landlord and proprietor of the Blue Valley House, had been quietly murdered during the night and robbed of his money. There was not the least noise or intimation of the horrible deed until Warren Clough proceeded to the stable, where his brother was accustomed to sleep, to call him for breakfast as it was getting unusually late for Nathan not to be around. When Warren entered the stable he called, but as no answer came, he walked upstairs, near the bed and called again repeatedly; still no answer coming, Warren walked up and shook the body of Nathan to try and awaken him: this not having the desired effect. Warren noticed that the bedclothes had been thrown over the sleepers head and so pulled them off; he noticed some blood on the bed clothes, but that did not startle him as his brother had in the past been subject to nose-bleeding and thought nothing strange, though as soon as he discovered that his efforts proved fruitless to awaken the sleeper, his eyes chanced to rest on the mutilated head and some of the bedclothes heavily clotted with blood, he realized for the first time the sad fact that his brother had been foully dealt with. This is substantially the statement as we received it from Warren himself. Calling aide, the news spread like an electric shock through the community, and excited crowds rushed to the place where the dark deed had been perpetuated.

We repaired to the bedside of the unfortunate victim of inhuman avarice, and beheld a most heartrending sight. There were all the evidences that he had retired as usual the previous night, undressed, and even the truss that he wore was carefully laid on a chair and his hat covering the same, his clothes in their usual places; all indicated that he had retired in perfect health and safely got to sleep, when the murderer stole up to his bedside and dealt him a heavy blow with the pole of an axe crushing in his skull over the left temple while he must have been laying on his right side, and unconsciously sending his soul into eternity. Then the murderer must have struck another blow with the pole of the axe over the right eye, reaching another large fraction of the skull, followed by a heavy cut with the sharp edge of the axe to the left cheek, laying open part of the chin, penetrating clear through the cheek and lower jawbone, which was the most ghastly wound, though not as fatal as the others. When found he was lying on his left side, with his wounds downward; the blood had saturated blankets, robes, quilts and pillows and run down into the corner of a small box standing under the bed. There was a bloody track immediately under the front and head of the bed, and a piece of carpet on which it seems the murderer had wiped his hands. No weapon could be found that had been used for striking the fatal blows, but from the wounds it was unmistakable that an axe must have been the weapon with which the murderer was armed.

Only a few days ago, his brother had given Nathan a check for $1000 for speculating, buying up notes and commercial paper, dealing in horses, etc., and he must have had in his possession at the time the deed was done $625. Another man used to sleep with him in the barn, but as he had departed during the day and would not return at night, it is evident that the perpetuator was a man well acquainted with all the circumstances and knew the money was in his victim's possession. On Monday night Nathan was in the barn talking to some men who were acquainted with the landlord, and shortly thereafter retired. In the morning the front door, which is usually closed during the night was found open, where the person or persons must have escaped, and then finding Nathan Clough murdered.

Dr. L. Walker, the coroner, not being at home, Sheriff Nethardt impaneled a jury, consisting of William Leese, I. B. Surser, S. H. Marshall, Luke Agur, E. C. Carns and S. S. Reynolds, who proceeded to hold inquest over the body of the deceased, and Dr. J. H. Woodward and H. C. Hastings, examined and pronounce them as having been battered with an axe. The large gash was found to measure 4 inches in length and the fracture on the left side of the head 3 inches in length. On removing the skin from the forehead it was found that the skull had been frightfully crushed, but no other marks of violence or any evidence of a struggle were seen.

The coroner's jury have been in session day and evening ever since they were impaneled, and still continue in session with closed doors at this writing. Nothing is known as regards the evidence obtained so far. As soon as prudent, we will give their entire results and findings.

Search was made in the yard for the weapon. An axe was discovered near the woodpile, though no clear implications of blood appeared thereon that would lead anyone to believe it to be the fatal weapon from casual observation; but upon closer examination, blood and hair of the victim's eyebrows were discovered on the handle and at different places on the iron. Upon examination with a magnifying glass it was revealed that it was the weapon used, as the color of the hair corresponded with the hair of the eyebrows of the murdered man. It seems that after the murderer had accomplished his bloody deed he went and washed the axe in some water near the well and chopped it into the ground near the woodpile. This shows that the perpetuator was a man familiar with the premises, and of a cool, calculating determination and iron nerve. So far he has successfully screened himself and evaded detection. But as the old saying is "murder will out" we have hope for his apprehension some time, and that punishment may be meted out to him according to his desserts.

Nathan Clough was born in Canefield, Franklin County, Maine, and was 49 years of age at the time of his death.

The funeral services were held at the Blue Valley House yesterday at 10 o'clock and the ceremonies conducted by Rev. T. L. McLean of the M. E. Church, assisted by Rev. Mr. Newell of the Baptist Church. There was a large attendance, all the available rooms of the hotel were crowded with citizens and a large number remained outside, who could not gain admittance. The body was encased in a finally finished, silver mounted coffin, and carried to his last resting place in the Seward Cemetery immediately after the funeral services were ended. This is the first real murder that has ever occurred in Seward, and it caused unusual excitement and sorrow.

Later – – the Chicago papers give the information that Warren Clough, the brother of the murdered man, has been arrested and lodged in jail, charged with the crime, and that a strong guard has to be kept over the jail to prevent mob violence.

The Postville Review, Postville, Wednesday, May 17, 1876

MURDER OF NATHAN CLOUGH.

In regard to this tragedy we are partially at a loss to give exact conditions, having nothing but our memory for a great portion of the details as a guide. There were two brothers, Nathan and Warren Clough residing in the city of Seward. Warren Clough was engaged in keeping a hotel and his brother, Nathan, was a horse breeder and made his home at his brother's hotel, keeping his horses in the hotel barn. The hotel keeper was a married man while his brother was single and it was reported that jealousy existed between the two brothers. One bright spring morning, in the month of May, 1874, Nathan Clough was found dead in the hotel barn, having been slain sometime during the night or morning with an axe. This created a great excitement and people's tongues ran wild. Everybody laid the blame for the bloody deed upon Warren Clough and like everything else that becomes matter of fact by continual wordy speculation the coroners jury brought in a verdict charging Warren Clough with the murder of his brother. The prejudice against the accused had been worked up to such a pitch in the city of Seward that a change of venue was granted: and the trial took place in the neighboring city of York -- not very greatly removed from the scenes of the crime nor the exciting prejudice it had created. And outside of this prejudice which seemed to be based upon opinion more than proof, there was none but circumstantial evidence against the man and the strongest of this evidence was reported to have consisted in the conduct and actions of the accused. But he was convicted of murder in the first degree, was sentenced to be hung and all preparations were made for executing the sentence. On the evening before the execution was to take place Governor Garber commuted the sentence to life imprisonment. After serving fifteen years of his sentence he was pardoned by Governor Thayer. Whether Warren Clough was or was not guilty no one but himself knew, and if innocent no one but himself and the guilty one knew. Jack Trent, a notorious character who was afterwards convicted of burglary at Seward and sentenced to serve three years in the penitentiary, died before his sentence had expired and was reported to have made a statement on his death bed that he killed Nathan Clough, but the confession received no attention or credit, although it was possibly true.

(Source: General History of Seward County, Nebraska, by John Waterman).

Note: None of the accounts mention this, but I found it interesting that the Nebraska Governor was Silas Garber, who served in Co. D. of the 27th Iowa. I have to wonder if he knew Warren Clough?

Clough Murder - Seward County, 1876

Nathan Clough rode his prize back stallion into Seward the afternoon of April 30, 1876. He often rode into Seward and spent the night because his brother, Warren and his wife owned and operated a hotel in Seward called the Blue Valley House. Nathan and Warren were on the best of terms in spite of the fact that Warren was considered wealthy, while Nathan was a man of only moderate means.

Nathan never took a room at Warren's hotel because he wanted to stay close to his valuable stallion. This night, like all nights on previous visits, Nathan put his stallion in the hotel stable then climbed into the loft directly above the stallion's stall and made his bed in the hay.

Nathan and Warren looked quite a bit alike. Both were tall and considered by most to be two of the more handsome men around. Warren didn't even invite Nathan to sleep inside the hotel, knowing he would never allow himself to be that far from his prize stallion.

When morning came, Warren expected Nathan to come in for breakfast. When he didn't show up on time, he went outside, found the hostler who cared for the horses of overnight guests at the hotel, and asked him about Nathan. The hostler said that Nathan apparently was sleeping late. He hadn't heard any sound from him when he had gone in to give the horses their morning hay and grain.

Warren went on to the stable and called for Nathan. Getting no answer, he climbed into the loft and found Nathan wrapped tightly in his blankets and a buffalo robe. It had been chilly the night before. But Warren was stunned by the sight of Nathan's forehead split open by an ax. Blood had run down his face and dropped through the loft floor onto the mane on his stallion.

Warren called the sheriff and a quick investigation was made. They found no money on Nathan. Warren said that Nathan had received a thousand dollars recently from an estate in Appanoose County, Iowa, and he had told Warren that he had spent three hundred dollars of it paying his bills. There was no money to be found on Nathan. Warren was sure he had the seven hundred dollars with him the night before.

The sheriff began inquiring as to who could have known that Nathan had money with him. No one, it seemed, had known anything about Nathan's inheritance, but Warren. Further investigation turned up nothing else and suspicion pointed toward Warren. In spite of Warren's denial, the sheriff arrested Warren on a charge of murdering his brother.

Warren was put in jail. Those who knew Warren were shocked and almost all were convinced that arresting him was a big mistake. Then as Nathan's affairs were beginning to be cleared up, another bit of evidence popped up that put Warren in a worse light. Nathan had recently separated from his wife and had made a new will. He left only a little of his wealth to his wife (they were not divorced) and all the rest went to Warren. It gave the prosecution more ammunition to use at the trial. Not only was the seven hundred dollars missing and claimed by the prosecution to surely have been taken by Warren, but now Warren was to profit a great deal by his brother's death through the will that Nathan had recently made.

All of Warren's denials were shunted aside. He'd have his day in court to prove his innocence. Many of Warren's friends remained loyal; they were positive that he was innocent. But those who were not close to him were being swayed by the evidence, even though circumstantial, piling up against him.

The trial date approached, but it quickly became evident that they would not be able to get an unprejudiced jury in Seward. Everyone had heard of the murder and almost everyone had made up his mind whether Warren was guilty or not. So the judge called for a change of venue. The trial was moved to York in Hamilton County, Just to the west of Seward.

The trial last for a month. The court room was filled to capacity almost every session. People came for miles, especially from Seward County, and many camped near York and hurried in each morning to get a seat in the court room. Passions were divided. There were those who declared that Warren Clough could not possibly be guilty of murder. Others looked at the evidence and were convinced that only Warren's hanging could clear the air of this foul crime.

The trial finally ended and the jury was instructed. They brought back a verdict of guilty of murder in the first degree. Some cheered; others groaned. Warren's friends would not believe he was guilty. O. P. Mason appealed the decision to the state supreme court. But that court did not change the verdict. Warren Clough was sentenced to die by hanging.

Since the trial had been held in Hamilton County, the sentence was to be carried out in York. The gallows were to be built in the court yard just a few yards from the jail cell where Warren Clough waited for his last day of life.

Warren's friends did not give up. They were not convinced that the circumstantial evidence was correct. They flooded the governor's desk with letters until he finally took notice, reviewed the case, and commuted the sentence to life imprisonment. The hammers on the scaffold stopped. Warren cleared his ears of the dreadful beat and he was transported to Lincoln to spend the rest of his life in prison there.

After he had been in prison for a while, Warren gave up ever seeing freedom again. His wife, according to the law, could and did divorce Warren, and took their son and moved to Oklahoma, far away from the stigma that had fallen on the family.

Then one day, fifteen long years after Warren had been committed to the state penitentiary, a fellow prisoner named Jack Trent confessed on his death bed that he had used the ax on Nathan Clough and robbed him of the seven hundred dollars.

O. P. Mason immediately went to then-Governor Thayer and requested the release of Warren from prison. After hearing what had happened, the governor asked how long it would take to get him released from prison. Mason told him just as long as it would take the governor to sign the papers and put them in Mason's hand. Mason went personally to the prison and took Warren Clough out into freedom.

Warren was gray headed and stooped now, his health in bad shape. Free at last, he went back to Seward and York to see his friends, blaming no one for the circumstances that had sent him to prison. From York he went to Oklahoma to see his former wife and his son. He settled in Oklahoma and a few years later, his friends back in Nebraska received word that he had died. The prison bars had been taken away but his shattered life could not be put back together.

Bad Men and Bad Towns,

Now it becomes a painful duty to record the most sorrowful event in all our history. Thus far no tragic event had occurred to mar the peace of our people. We had been noted for sobriety, industry, and general good behavior, notwithstanding we were drawn together from so many localities in our own country and foreign lands. With all our diversified peculiarities, and with all our different, and in many cases antagonistic, interests, no human blood had been shed in all our borders until the sad event of which we now write. One beautiful morning in the month of May, while all nature was smiling with gladness, and our little city was basking in the sun, enjoying the fragrance of the opening buds of spring, there breaks upon our ears the astounding news that a man, a neighbor, had been murdered. A chill of horror ran through the community as the news rapidly spread that Nathan Clough was the victim, and that he lay in the loft of the Blue Valley House barn wrapped in a bloody mantle of death. Suspicion was fastened upon various characters who harbored around the hotel, and a close surveillance was kept upon many while the coroner and his jury were trying to fathom the mystery.

The air was filled with rumors, and the people were almost wild with excitement. The jury was in session for about nine days. Meantime the excitement spread from Seward throughout the county, and then to the uttermost bounds of the state, and far into adjoining states, and it was the absorbing theme of conversation everywhere throughout the country. The newspapers were full of it. The pleasant sunshine of that morning was turned into a dark cloud that hung like a pall over our fair city. There was apparently an instantaneous suspicion arising in the minds of the people far and near that the foul deed was committed by the brother of the deceased. It seemed to float in the very air, without the aid of the telephone. The business men of Seward were wisely cautious of their words, but the women and children would indiscreetly say, upon the spur of the moment, "It's nobody but Warren Clough."

People from far in the country would come in and whisper, "I believe it's Warren Clough."

Traveling men on the cars would read in a daily paper of the murder in Seward, and they would exclaim, "It's Warren Clough."

Without evidence, or in advance of evidence, it was whispered into the ears and hearts of thousands of persons that Warren Clough was the murderer of his own brother. We confess that the impression darted through our mind unbidden, and entirely without evidence, and fastened itself upon us so firmly that we have never been able to shake it off. Why it was so it is impossible to explain. The jury traced every shadow to its substance, or until it entirely disappeared in the mist, and finally fastened the crime where the multitude had placed it without evidence.

Warren Clough, after a long and tedious trial in another county (York), was convicted and condemned to death, which sentence was commuted to imprisonment at hard labor for life. We hope the jury acted only on evidence, and not preconceived impressions. Now long years have passed, and Warren Clough has become an old man. His punishment has certainly been severe. He was convicted entirely on circumstantial evidence or impressions. We are not certain which had the most weight. Is it not time to remember mercy? We do not know whether it would be a mercy to restore him to the world, considering that his friends and property are gone, but, should he desire it, would it not be proper to give him the last few days of his life to enjoy freedom? Let us remember the sentiment of Pope's universal prayer, " That mercy I to others show, that mercy show to me."

(Source: History of Seward county, Nebraska: together with a chapter of reminiscences ...By William Wallace Cox)

Reports of Cases in the Supreme Court of Nebraska, Volume 7.

1880 Census: Lincoln, Lancaster, Nebraska, Penitentiary, W. Clough, (age 42, prisoner, occupation Hotel Keeper, born Maine)

1880 Census: Empire, Ellsworth, Kansas: Wm. C. Hagar (age 28, farmer, born NY), wife Hattie Hagar (age 26, born Ohio), step son Freddie Clough (age 7, born Nebraska), and boarder William H. Henderson (age 33, born Indiana). (Note this was Warren's wife with his son and her second husband)

1885 Nebraska State Census Collection: Yankee Hill Precinct, Lancaster, Nebraska: Warren Clough, age 47, Prisoner, married, Hotelkeeper, born Maine.)

1890 Veteran's Census, Hyersville Penitentiary, Lancaster, Nebraska: Warren Clough, Private, Co. E, 27th Iowa, Inf. Enlisted Aug 16, 1862. Discharged Aug 16, 1865, service 3 years. Post Office Address: Lancaster, Neb. Disability Incurred: Gun shot through ri wrist. Remarks: deaf right ear.

The Clough Murder Case

New Year's Day in 1891 was a momentous one for Warren Clough, who had spent almost fifteen years in the Nebraska State Penitentiary for the 1876 murder of his brother, Nathan, in Seward. Clough was granted a new chance for life outside prison walls by a pardon issued by Nebraska Governor John M. Thayer, which took effect on January 1.

The crime for which Clough was convicted and incarcerated was well remembered by residents of Seward and York counties. Warren Clough, who with his wife kept the Blue Valley House hotel at Seward, was accused of murdering his brother, Nathan Clough, a horse breeder, at the hotel. The motive was apparently robbery. Warren denied any involvement in the crime, but it was noted that some jealousy had existed between the two brothers and that only Warren had known that Nathan had with him a large sum of money at the time he was killed-money that was missing after the murder was discovered.

Despite the lack of definitive evidence against Warren Clough, he was widely blamed by his neighbors for the gruesome killing (done with an ax), and he was eventually indicted and tried for murder. Feeling against him was so strong in Seward that a change of venue was granted and the trial took place in the neighboring city of York. He was convicted of murder in the first degree and was sentenced to be hung. On the evening before the execution was to take place, Governor Silas Garber commuted the sentence to life imprisonment.

As the years progressed, however, doubts grew about Clough's guilt. The Omaha Daily Bee in its January 1, 1891, report of Thayer's New Year's pardon, said, "The evidence that convicted Clough was circumstantial only, but somebody had to be punished for the crime and on the brother of the murdered man the blame was laid. The old neighbors of Warren Clough in Seward have of late begun to believe that possibly an innocent man might have been punished. The testimony brought out in the trial a decade and a half ago has been reviewed and not only have his old acquaintances, but the prosecuting attorney that worked for his conviction, the judge that sentenced him, and a number of the surviving jurymen that sealed his doom, have all united in asking Governor Thayer to free the old man."

Judge O. P. Mason, who had defended Clough at trial, "made a most eloquent plea for the imprisoned man. He declared that there had not been a scintilla of evidence presented that would convict Clough, that the conviction was on only the slightest evidence; that the testimony which sent Clough to the penitentiary was, in fact, not sufficient to bind him over to the district court." The Bee noted on January 2, 1891, that "[w]ithin the past few weeks important testimony has been developed showing that Jacob Trent and Charles Wilcox, both in the employ of Warren Clough at the time, were the real murderers." Trent had reportedly once told Mason "that Clough was an innocent man and if the worst came he would tell all. Before he could tell all he suddenly died with heart disease in the penitentiary."

After his release, Clough went back to Seward, where he was given a reception and dinner, but he found it difficult to return to his former life. The hotel he once operated was now owned by others, and his wife had secured a divorce and married again, relocating with their son to Oklahoma. Warren Clough reportedly went to Oklahoma to visit them, and died there several years later.

The pardon of Warren Clough by Governor Thayer is an act of Justice as well as mercy that was too long delayed. Clough had been confined fourteen years on a life sentence for murder of which he was wholly innocent, as nearly every person must believe who remembers the circumstances. During his imprisonment, his wife remarried and lives in another state. His fortune is gone, and his life has been ruined, but his old friends at Seward have never lost faith in him, and rejoice that one the first day of the new year he steps out into the world a free man.

Kearney Daily Hub, January 2, 1891.

All the boys of the 27th will remember Warren Cluff, the wagon master, a large well-built man and good-natured comrade. Mr. Cluff has been in Independence this week visiting some of his old comrades, some of whom he is not seen for 20 years, and none for over 14 years. Mr. Cluff has had a sad experience. About 16 years ago he was a prosperous man. He was located at Stuart, Nebraska and was engaged in the hotel and livery business. One day his brother was found murdered in the stable, and through false swearing on the part of the guilty parties, Warren Cluff was arrested, charged with the horrible crime of fratricide. The evidence was all circumstantial, but so clever and ingenious were the witnesses, that he was convicted of murder and sentenced to be hanged. A new trial was granted and he was sent to the penitentiary for life. He had spent nearly $10,000 defending himself and when he entered the prison fourteen years ago he had but $350 left, which he gave his wife. Many of his old comrades remember the incidents of the trial. After he had been in prison for several years, his wife visited him and he gave his consent to her marriage to a man who has made her a good husband. He has one son living, who had visited frequently. Not long ago one of the murderers died and on his deathbed made a confession which proves Mr. Cluff's innocence beyond a doubt, this was forwarded to the state authorities, and on January 1, after 14 years confinement, a separation from his wife and family and the expenditure of a fortune, he was released from the Nebraska state prison. Truth is stranger than fiction, and the facts concerning his imprisonment could be woven into a novel of intense interest. As he gave his consent to his wife's second marriage, he will never interfere with her new relations. While here Mr. Cluff met many of his old comrades, who congratulated him on the fact that his innocence had been proven, and who hope that he may yet have many years in which to enjoy his escape from a living tomb. Mr. Cluff was on his way at Postville to visit his parents, who reside at that point. The reunion of father, mother and son after so many years of deep sorrow, will indeed be a joyous one – Independent Journal.

Waterloo Daily Courier, January 17, 1891

The New York Times, published March 22, 1891
PARDONED AFTER FOURTEEN YEARS

Independence, Iowa, March 21 -- Warren Clough, who was convicted of the murder of his brother fourteen years ago, has been pardoned by the governor. The real murderer has confessed.

The murder was committed in Western Nebraska, where Clough was keeping a hotel. Clough's brother was found dead in a barn. Money which was identified by a bank cashier as paid to the dead man was found on Warren Clough. He was convicted on circumstantial evidence and sent to prison for life. Upon confession of the real murderer Clough was pardoned and returned here to visit relatives.

A Strange, Sad Story

Warren Clough, 27th Iowa Veteran, whose life is an eventful one was in town yesterday. It will be remembered that Mr. Clough was pardoned from the penitentiary of Nebraska several years ago where he had been committed for life 14 years before, a death sentence having also been passed upon him, for the alleged murder of his brother. The evidence was all of a circumstantial nature and many believed him innocent. Finally a convict on his deathbed in a California prison confessed to having committed the murder, and the facts being brought to the attention of the Nebraska officials, Mr. Clough was given his freedom. It was deemed obligatory upon the state to make a suitable remuneration to Mr. Clough for depriving him of his freedom for 14 years and strong petition to that effect will be presented to the Nebraska Legislature at its session in a few weeks. The sum of $20,000 is asked for, and there is hardly a doubt but that the petition will be granted. Mr. Clough resides at present with his nephew at Postville (Waukon Democrat)

Anyone who hears Mr. Clough's recital of the terrible experience through which he has passed, cannot fail to be impressed with the story, and wish him a full measure of success in securing from the state of Nebraska some return for the great wrong he has suffered through the error of its courts.

Graphic, January 25, 1894

1910 Census: Okmulgee Ward 2, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma: Warren Clough (age 72, married 1 time, divorced 15 years, born Maine, Veterinary S.)

1920 Census: Okmulgee Ward 3, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma: Fred E. Clough (age 46, born Nebraska, father born Maine, mother born Pennsylvania, bookkeeper in Foundry), wife Bertha May Clough (age 36, born Kansas), daughter Thelma Clough (age 17, born Indian Territory), daughter Mary Evelin (age 7, born Oklahoma), daughter Lillian Opal (age 4 1/2, born Oklahoma) and father Warren Clough (age 83, born Maine).

Warren Clough died June 5, 1921 at Claremore, Oklahoma (Pension Records)


Cooley, Peter S. He was born Oct. 1843 in Iowa. He was the son of Andrew Sutherland Cooley (August 1, 1804 - 1890) and Salome Warren (1809 - 1895).

1850 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Andrew S. Cooley (age 46, born Vt), Salome Cooley (age 41, born Mass), Andrew S. Cooley (age 20, born NY), Stephen W. Cooley (age 18, born Mich), Thomas W. Cooley (age 19, born Mich), Noah Cooley (age 13, born Iowa), Emily E. Cooley (age 10, born Iowa), Peter S. Cooley (age 8, born Iowa), Hersy Cooley (age 6, born Iowa), Robert R. Cooley (age 5, born Iowa), Clara S. Cooley (age 4, born Iowa), Ella E. Cooley (age 2, born Iowa) and Lewis L. Cooley (age 0, born Iowa).

1856 Iowa State Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Andrew S. Cooley (age 51, born Vermont), Salomi Cooley (age 46), Thomas M. Cooley (age 22), Noah Cooley (age 19), Emeli S. Cooley (age 15), Lewis T. Cooley (age 14), Peter S. Cooley (age 12), Hursee C. Cooley (age 10), Robert R. Cooley (age 9), Clara S. Cooley (age 7), Elly I Cooley (age 6), Isabelle S. Cooley (age 5),

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Andrew S. Cooley (age 55), Salome Cooley (age 50), Louis S. Cooley (age 17), Peter Cooley (age 16), Hersy C. Cooley (age 14), Robert R. Cooley (age 12), Clara S. Cooley (age 11), Ella T. Cooley (age 10), Isabel S. Cooley (age 9).

1870 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Andrew S. Cooley (age 65), Salina Cooley (age 60), Peter S. Cooley (age 25, school teacher), Hersey Cooley (age 24), Robert R. Cooley (age 23), Ella J. Cooley (age 20)

Peter S. Cooley died Aug. 15, 1873 and is buried in Old Garnavillo Cemetery, Section 18, SE/SW, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa. It was noted that he died from wounds received in the Battle of Murfreesboro, Tenn. (Interesting that there is no mention of him being wounded in the Roster)

This note was found in a family tree: The following copied by Viola Kyffin Cooley, which accompanied the handstamp now possessed by Daniel Berton Cooley: "Peter S. Cooley 1843-1873; This printing press belonged to Peter S. Cooley, a Civil War veteran, Co. E 27th Iowa Infantry. He died Aug. 15, 1873 from wounds received in action at Murfreesboro, Tennessee." On the underside of the handstamp there is an engraving as follows "Pat'd Nov.14,1871". From the Flagler News v. V#50 (3 Jan 1918): "For three years (Robert Reed Cooley) took care of a helpless brother who was wounded in the Civil War."

Posted By: Daniel Cooley Date: 6/2/2004 at 02:28:12

While not a direct descendant, my great grandfather's elder brother, Peter S. Cooley, was in the 27th Infantry from, probably, Garnavillo. He was born in 1843 in Garnavillo and he died 15 Aug 1873 "from wounds received in action at Murfreesboro, Tennessee." In my great grandfather's obituary in the Flagler, Colorado News 3 Jan 1918: "For three years [Robert Reed Cooley] took care of a helpless brother who was wounded in the Civil War. Peter is buried in the Old Garnavillo Cemetery.

Peter's mother Salome Cooley filed for a pension on July 21, 1884 in Iowa. (Note: the indexed version of the pension index says Louisiana. It looks like they mistook IA (on the handwritten version) as LA).


Cosler, William Augustus He was born Feb. 23, 1845 in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was the son of John Jacob Coslor and Adeline. He married Alda I. Carr on Sept. 5, 1877 in Putnam, Fayette County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Rufus George Carr (1836 - ?) and Sarah Daniels (1842 -1912)

1880 Census: District 170, Precinct 5, Custer, Nebraska: Coslor, William A (age 34, farmer, born Ohio), wife Alda (age 19, born Ill.) son Leroy Cosler (age 6/12, born Dec. in Nebraska). (note: indexed as Gosler)

1900 Census: West Union, Custer County, Nebraska: William A. Coslor (Born Feb. 1845, age 55, married 22 years, born Ohio), wife Alda I. Coslor (born Feb. 1851, age 39, married 22 years), son Earl W. Coslor (born April 1884, age 16, born Nebraska), daughter Elma V. Coslor (born Nov. 1898, age 1).

1910 Census: District 85, Sargent, Custer County, Nebraska: A. Wm. Cosler (age 65, married 1 time for 32 years, born Ohio), wife Alda (age 49, married 1 time for 32 years, 3 children born, 3 still living, born Ill), daughter Elma (age 11, born Nebraska)

Alda I (Carr) Coslor died Mar. 14, 1916 and is buried in is buried in West Union Cemetery, Lot 25, Sargent, Custer County, Nebraska

1920 Census: District 56, Gardena, Los Angeles, California: William Coslor (age 74, widowed, born Ohio), daughter Ellna B. Coslor (age 21, born Nebraska).

William Augustus Cosler died Nov. 5, 1925 and is buried in West Union Cemetery, Lot 25, Section 2, Grave 6, Sargent, Custer County, Nebraska.


Crain, Edmond F. He was born May 25, 1834 in New York. He married Martha Lorinda Lowell on Sept. 11, 1867 at Caledonia, Houston County, Minnesota. (Minnesota Marriages Index, 1849-1950: Name: Edmund F. Craine, age 35, Birth date: 1832, Marriage Date: Sept. 11, 1867, Marriage Place: Caledonia, Houston, Minnesota: Spouse's name: Martha L. Lowell, Spouse Age: 15, Spouse Birth Date: 1852, FHL Film Number: 1316885). She was the daughter of Timothy Lowell ((Dec. 13, 1822 - ?) and Mary Garnes/Carnes.

1880 Census: Brownsville, Houston County, Minnesota: Edmund Craine (age 48, disability: paralysis, born New York), wife Martha Craine (age 27, born Michigan). Living next door was Timothy Lowell (age 57, express agent, born New York), wife Mary Lowell (age 51, born New York), son F. W. Lowell (age 25, RR Agent, born Michigan), son Alfred Lowell (age 16, born Michigan) and son Albert Lowell (age 16, born Michigan).

Edmond F. Crain died July 8, 1880. He is buried in Zion Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery, Cork Hollow Rd., Brownsville, Houston County, Minnesota.

His widow, Martha L. Crain filed for a pension on Aug. 17, 1880.

1900 Census: Bristol, Day County, South Dakota: Timothy Lowell (born Dec. 1822 (age 79, widowed, born New York), Martha L. Grain (born Sept. 1852, age 47, widowed, 0 children born, born Michigan).

http://www.iowahistory.org/libraries/index.html

Papers, 1863-1867
1 volume

Civil War diary kept by Edmond ("Lee") Crain (Clayton County, Iowa), 7th Corporal with Company E of the 27th Iowa Infantry, from January 25th to December 31st, 1864. Diary is accompanied by 5 related family letters.

I made inquiries as to whether this collection had been transcribed and was online or if I could transcribe it and got the response below. For now I will just wait and see if there is an interested descendant:

Thank you for your interest in the State Historical of Iowa manuscript collection of Edmond Crain. These have not been transcribed, nor are they available online as of yet. We do not send out materials or copies of a whole collection for transcription. I do not know for sure, but this approximately year-long diary is most likely a series of brief entries within a small volume, plus there are five letters. We can make copies of the material for you as reply to a reference request. Complete information on our research services and fees is located under the Services to the Public heading on the website, www.iowahistory.org

I hope this takes you a step further along your research trail.

Susan Jellinger, Librarian II
State Historical Society of Iowa
600 E. Locust Street
Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0290
Ph: 515.281-6897
susan.jellinger@iowa.gov


Dames, Charles Jr. He was born about 1835 in New York. He was the son of Charles and Catherine Dames. He married Maria Morris on Mar. 24, 1856 in Clayton County, Iowa. She was the daughter of John Morris (Sept. 12, 1807 - 1873) and Christiana Lyons (April 4, 1811 - March 31, 1870).

1850 Census: Mooers, Clinton County, New York: Charles Dames (age 40, laborer, born Canada), Catharine Dames (age 40, born Vermont), Charles Dames (age 16, born NY), Caroline Dames (age 14, born NY), Louis Dames (age 10, born NY), Catharine Dames (age 6, born NY), John Dames (age 5, born NY) and Sophia Dames (age 2, born NY).

1856 Iowa State Census: Cox Creek, Clayton County, Iowa: Charles Dames (age 41, born Canada, farmer), Catharine Dames (age 37), Lewis Dames (age 17), John Dames (age 14), Catharine Dames 9age 12), Sophia Dames (age 8), Julia Dames (age 3) and Elizabeth Dames (age 1). They had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years. Living next door was: Charles Dames (age 21, born NY, farmer) and Marie Dames (age 18). They had also been in Iowa for 2 years.

1860 Census: West Union, Fayette County, Iowa; Charles Dane, (age 23, Saloon keeper, born New York), Maria Dane (age 21) and John Dane (age 4)

1870 Census: Mendon, Clayton County, Iowa: Charles Dames (age 36, farmer, born NY), Mariah Dames (age 32, born Pennsylvania), John Dames (age 15, born Iowa), and Frankie Dames (age 10, born Wisconsin) (name was indexed as Danus).

1880 Census: Mendon, Clayton County, Iowa; Mary Dames (age 35, born Penn), son Frank Dames (age 20, collar maker, born Wisconsin) Where was Charles?

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Charles Dames, Enlisted Aug. 15, 62, where: Clinton, Rank: Pvt. Company and Regiment: E, 27 Iowa Vol. Discharged: when: Aug. 8, 65, Where, Clinton, Rank, Pvt. Cause of Discharge: G. O. aka 96. Pensioner at $12.00 per month, Certificate Number 708,803, Disability: Rheumatism. Born in New York. Resided last at Lansing, Iowa. Age when Admitted: 51 years. Occupation: Laborer. Religion: Catholic. Married. Children under 16 years of age: None. Name, Kinship and Address of Nearest Relative: Son, Frank E, McGregor, Iowa. HOME RECORD: First Admitted to N. W. Branch by Capt. John Mitchell, July 21, 1886. Died in Hospital. March 4, 1897. Interred in Home Cemetery, Block 31, Row #1. Effects: Money found on Person $.45. Personal, appraised at $.40. Sold. $.45. Total. $.90.

U.S. Veterans Gravesites: Charles Dames, PVT, U.S. Army, Death Date: Mar. 4, 1897, Cemetery: Wood National Cemetery, Address: 5000 West National Ave., Bldg. 1301, Milwaukee, Wi 53295. Buried at Section 15, Site 5.

Headstones Provided for deceased Union Civil War Veterans: Charles Dames, Pvt. Co. E, 27th Regt. Iowa Inf. Cemetery: Natl Home, Milwaukee, Wis. Date of Death: March 4, 1897.

His widow Maria Dames filed for a pension on Oct. 4, 1897, in Iowa


Dickman, William H. He was born Sept. 1846 in Germany. He was the son of Henry H. Dickman and Johanna Whitty (per 1925 Iowa State Census - and 1860 Federal Census). He married Casindera Beck on Dec. 2, 1871. (obituary).

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Henry H. Dickman (age 43, farmer, born Hanover), Johana Dickman (age 40), Hermann Dickman (age 19), William Dickman (age 14), Ann Dickman (age 8), Mina Dickman (age 5), Jacob Dickman (age 65) and F. Dickman (age 74). All born in Hanover. (are the last two the parents of Henry H. Dickman??)

1870 Census: New Wine, Dubuque County, Iowa: There was a William Dickman age 28 living with a large Schafer family. Occupation was farm laborer. I don't know for sure that is him, but it was the only one I found that was the right age.

1880 Census: Riverton, Floyd County, Iowa; John Binger (age 34), Minnie Binger (age 27), Elizabeth (age 10), Nellie (age 7), Lucy (age 5), Henry (age 1) and servant William Dickman (age 34, widowed, farming)

1900 Census: Union, Floyd County, Iowa: Lewis O. Flora (age 35), wife Edith M. Flora (born Jan. 1874, age 26, married 6 years, 2 children born, 2 still living), daughter Hazel Flora (age 5), daughter Odra Flora (age 2), father in law William H. Dickman (born Sept. 1846, age 53, widowed , born Germany, immigrated 1870, in US 30 years, naturalized, farmer)

Note, the 1900 Census records for Edith (Dickman) Flora shows that she was born in Nebraska in Jan. 1874. The 1915 Iowa State Census for her shows that she lived in the US for 41 years and lived in Iowa for 39 years. So assuming that is accurate, they came back to Iowa about 1876. In 1880 there was a widowed William Dickman living with another family, but no Edith that I could find. Did she live with another family? It appears that he must have been married only a short time and they had the one child. Every census after 1870 shows him as widowed.

1910 Census: Union, Floyd County, Iowa: Louis Flora (age 46), wife Edith Flora (age 36), daughter Odna P. Flora (age 13), daughter Beulah Flora (age 6), son Harold Flora (age 4), father in law William H. Dickman (age 64, widowed, born Germany, immigrated 1848, naturalized, own income)

1915 Iowa State Census: Union, Floyd County, Iowa; W. H. Dickman (age 69, widowed, County: Floyd, P. O. Marble Rock, Town or Township: Union. Occupation: Retired, Extent of Education: Common 8, can read and write, Birth Place Germany. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa Regiment 27, Company E. Father's Birthplace: Germany, Mother's Birthplace: Germany. Naturalized. Years in U.S. 69. Years in Iowa 69 (note: indexed as Dickenson)

1920 Census: Rockford, Floyd County, Iowa: Lewis P. Flora (age 54), wife Edith M. Flora (age 46, born Nebraska), daughter Beulah I. Flora (age 16), son Harold A. Flora (age 14), Daughter Ruth I Flora (age 9), father-in-law William H. Dickman (age 75, widowed, born Hanover, Germany)

1925 Iowa State Census: Nashua, Chickasaw County, Iowa: Lewis Flora (age 59), wife Edith Flora (age 51, born Neb. Father William Dickman, born Germany, age at last birthday 79, mother's name: Casta Beck, born Ohio. Parents married in Iowa), daughter Ruth Flora (age 14), boarder: William Dickman (born Germany), Father's name H. H. Dickman, born Germany. Mother's name: Johanna Whitty, born Germany. Parents married in Germany)

William Dickman died Feb. 8, 1926 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Nashua, Chickasaw County, Lot 36.

Obituary of Wm. Henry Dickman

Wm. Henry Dickman was born at Hanover, Germany, Sept. 2, 1845 and died at the home of his daughter Mrs. Lou Flora, in Nashua, Iowa on Feb. 8, 1926 at the age of 80 years, 5 months and 6 days.

When three years of age he came with his parents to America, settling in Ohio and later moving to Clayton County, Iowa. Sept. 12, 1864, he enlisted in the Civil War., Co. E, 27th Iowa Inf. and served until the close of the war. Dec. 2, 1871, he was married to Casinder Beck and to this union three children were born. Grace, who died in infancy, Mrs. Mayme Barker of San Francisco, Calif. and Mrs. Edith Flora, with whom he made his home for the past thirty years. He is also survived by five grandchildren.

Deceased was a member of G. A. R. Post 200 at Greene.

Thus taps has sounded once more for another old settler and comrade of '64 who was ever true to his country and home.


Card of Thanks

We wish to thank the neighbors and friends for the many deeds of kindness and sympathy extended to us and for the beautiful floral offerings sent in during the illness and at the death of our beloved father and grandfather Wm. Henry Dickman.

Mrs. and Mrs. Lewis Flora, Ruth and Harold: Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Schuliz and Family and Mrs. and Mrs. Verie Church.


Drips, Thomas G. He was born Oct. 20, 1820 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of William Allison Drips (Nov. 22, 1789 - Mar. 18, 1881) and Martha Ann Clark (May 15, 1792 - Apr. 22, 1874). He married Ann Bull on May 9, 1850 in Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Francis Bull (Jan. 21, 1777 - Jan 22, 1863) and Elizabeth Lambert. (Sept. 29, 1789 - Dec. 24, 1851).

Thomas Drips
Image LN-1937 came from the Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection, Allen County Public Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Per the description provided below the photo (on the website above), the reverse was inscribed "Truly yours Thos. G. Drips"

If you are interested in ordering a better quality photo click here.

Per the librarian for the Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection at Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana "Images ordered through the “rights” link on our website can be provided at whatever resolution the customer requests up to 1200 dpi. All of the original photos are cartes-de-visit—approximately 2.5 x 4 inches. The paperwork is handled through the Indiana State Museum, and the cost of an image for personal use should be minimal. We don’t provide prints but can send image files either via email or through Dropbox, depending on the file size. A few of the photos have inscriptions on the back, and we can provide image files of those as well."


The office of Sheriff is one requiring cool and undaunted detective abilities. The office is one known in all civilized communities, and in Iowa came in with organization of the Territory.

John W. Griffith was the first sheriff of Clayton County, and was appointed on the organization of the county and continued in office by the vote of the people at its first election. Mr. Griffith was one of the first settlers of the county, and as Sheriff took its first census. He served until 1841.

Henry Holtzbecker succeeded Mr. Griffith, and served one year. Mr. Holtzbecker came to the county in 1836. he was of German decent, but of exceedingly high temper, which eventually proved his ruin. While holding the office of Sheriff, he got into a quarrel with James A. McClellan, and while intent on taking McClellan's life was shot and killed by the latter.

Ambrose Kennedy succeeded Mr. Holtzbecker, and served four years.

Charles E. Bansell came next, in 1846, and served eight years.

Thomas G. Drips succeeded Mr. Bensell in 1853 and served two years. He was a native of Pennsylvania, and was the son of William and Martha A. (Clark) Drips, natives of the same state. His parents came to Clayton County in 1850, where his mother died in 1850, and father 1881. Thomas G. was born October 20, 1820, and in early life learned the trade of carpenter. In the spring of 1849 he came to Clayton County, and in May, 1850, he married Ann, daughter of Francis and Elizabeth (Lambert) Bull, natives of England. Six children were born unto them, L. Irene, now the wife of Fred King, living in Sac County Iowa; Francis William, deceased; Eva, deceased; Madge, now the wife of H. H. Barnard; Lilly, Anna F. After serving out his term of Sheriff Mr. Drips engaged in farming. He was a thoroughly patriotic man. When the war with Mexico broke out he enlisted in a Pennsylvania regimen, served during the war and was in most of the battles. He was at Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo Jalapa, Perote and Pueblo, in the latter of which the Mexicans occupied the one side of the plaza and the American army the other and behind the building, through which they had a cut their way to save life, as Mexican cannons were planted on all the streets. Here Mr. Drips displayed much bravery, and was one of the first who came through the houses and attacked the enemy. He was also at the storming of Churubusco and Contreras, and entered into the City Of Mexico with the victorious army. When rebel hands were arrayed against the General Government Mr. Drips enlisted in a company of the Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry and was elected Captain. He served two and a half years, and on account of continued ill health was compelled to resign. His record in this was honorable indeed, and his bravery unquestioned. After coming home from the war, he engaged in hotel keeping, and also as a dealer in agricultural implements in Clayton. He died December 27, 1868, beloved by all.

The History of Clayton County

Captain T. G. Drips
(submitted by Dick Barton)

In June, 1854, the county was shocked by an attack upon Sheriff Drips, who was knocked senseless on the deck of the boat Henrietta when he attempted to serve papers on the officers at McGregor. He was set adrift on a log raft near Clayton and might have died but for three passengers who left the boat and rescued him.

History of Clayton County, Iowa:...
edited by Realto E. Price. Chicago: Robert O. Law Co., 1916.
LaCrosse, WI : Brookhaven Press, 2000. 2v [Reprint]

1856 Iowa State Census, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa : Thomas E. Dreps (age 35, born Penn), Ann Dreps (age 28, born Penn), Linda Dreps (age 4, born Iowa), Eva Dreps (age 1, born Iowa), Francis Bull (age 24, born England), Frances M. Bull (age 12, born Iowa), The family had been in the state of Iowa of 7 years.

1860 Census, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: T. J. Dripps, (age 40, farmer, born Penn.), Ann Dripps (age 27, born Penn), Irene Dripps (age 8, born Iowa), Eva Dripps (age 4, born Iowa), Margaret Dripps (age 1, born Iowa), George Encenhour (age 23, farm laborer, born Hanover), George Ashline (age 16, born New York) and Roka Stoker (age 19)

I decided to also add this Biography that I found, because this would be information regarding his sister: http://www.sharylscabin.com/Clayton/biographies/powell_j.htm (ejj)

James W. Powell (deceased) was a son of John and Nancy (Sheller) Powell, natives of Virginia. They moved to Missouri many years ago, where they died. James W. was born in Virginia, on Oct. 2, 1823; he was a self-educated man, of unusual energy, and received what schooling he had in Missouri. His father died when he was young, and James had to struggle with the adversities of life for many a year. He came to Clayton County and bought his farm of 200 acres of excellent land on sections 24, 25 and 13. In April, 1861, he married Catherine J., daughter of William and Martha A. (Clarke) Drips, natives of Pennsylvania; they came to Clayton County, Ia., in 1850, and died in Farmersburg Township. Catherine was born June 15, 1833. By this marriage there are three children - Maggie, born Sept. 16, 1862; Nettie M., July 4, 1865; Nancy, March 12, 1868. Mrs. Powell is a member of the Congregational church. Mr. Powell died Oct. 15, 1879; his death was occasioned by the kick of a horse, after much suffering. Mr. Powell came to Farmersburg at an early day and built his shanty. It was a custom of the country at that time to leave food so that a person coming along hungry could find something to eat. To this custom Mr. Powell was no stranger. In addition to this the custom was to leave one's name after helping themselves, so that the generous host might know who had been there, but finding his food often gone and nothing to show who took it, Mr. Powell, from appearances about, thought it best to set his gun for wolves, which he did. Soon after this a certain nameless M.D. had a Winnebago cadaver, and soon thereafter a fine skeleton, and Mr. Powell lost no more food.

Thomas G. Drips died Dec. 27, 1868. He is buried in Eastside Cemetery, Elkader, Boardman twp., Clayton County, Iowa.

Submitted by Sharyl Ferrall

Death of an Old Citizen

Capt. Thos. G. Drips, one of the old settlers of Clayton County, and once Sheriff and holding other offices at different times in this County, died at Clayton on Sunday morning past. He was carrying two pails of water for his mules and after carrying them for a short distance set them down to rest himself, when all at once he dropped down dead. Heart disease is suppose to be the cause of his sudden death. Capt. Drips', death will be mourned by a large circle of friends. When we get further particulars we shall have more [illegible] of Mr. Drips.

~Clayton County Journal, December 30, 1868


The Late Capt. Drips

The last No. of the 'North Iowa Times' gives the following additional account of the death of Capt. Thos. G. Drips, of Clayton, in this county:

"He ate breakfast as usual with his family and went to the river for water for his team. Being gone longer than usual, he was looked for, and found dead, reclining against a board pile near the river. He had filled the bucket and sat down to recover from the dizziness which overcomes persons afflicted with epileptic affections or heart disease, but, alas he was unable to rise. His life was insured for $2,000.

~Clayton County Journal, January 6, 1869

(submitted by Dick Barton)

The last days of the year [1868] were saddened by the sudden death of Captain T. G. Drips of Clayton. He ate breakfast as usual with the family and went to the river for water for his team. Being gone longer than usual, he was looked for, and found dead, reclining against a board pile along the river.

Mr. Drips was born in Pennsylvania in 1820. He served with distinguished bravery as an orderly sergeant in the Mexican war, and come to Garnavillo in 1849. He served as deputy sheriff and was for four years sheriff of Clayton county. He was the captain in the Twenty-seventh Iowa and made a good record, resigning after two years' service on account of ill-health.

History of Clayton County Iowa
edited by Realto E. Price. Chicago: Robert O. Law Co., 1916.

LaCrosse, WI : Brookhaven Press, 2000. 2v [Reprint]

His widow Ann Drips filed for a pension on Feb. 27, 1883.

1870 Census: McGregor Ward 4, Clayton county, Iowa: Anne Dripps (age 40, born Penn), Irene Dripps (age 19, born Iowa), Margaret Dripps (age 11, born Iowa), Lilly Dripps (age 9, born Iowa) and Anna Dripps (age 4,born Iowa).

Ann (Bull) Drips (born July 16, 1831) died March 10, 1901. She is buried in Eastside Cemetery, Elkader, Clayton County, Iowa.

Submitted by Sharyl Ferrall

At Madison, Wis., on Sunday, March 10th, occurred the death of Mrs. Ann Drips, a former resident of this county, death being caused by heart disease.

Mrs. Drips was the daughter of Francis and Elizabeth Bull, natives of England and was born in Pennsylvania about 69 years ago. She was married in May 1850 to Thos. G. Drips in Clayton county. Mr. Drips was sheriff of the county in 1853 after which he engaged in farming. He was a veteran of the Mexican war in which he took a valorous part and at the outbreak of the civil war enlisted in the 27th Iowa, being elected captain of Co. E. After coming home from the war he engaged in hotel-keeping at Clayton where he died Dec. 27, 1868.

Six children were born to them of whom two are dead, those living are Mrs. Irene King and Mrs. Lilly Thomason, residing in Oregon, Mrs. Madge Barnard, of Elkader, and Mrs. Anna Seidell, of Waukegan, Ill.

The remains were brought to McGregor Tuesday and taken from thence to National for burial beside her husband. Funeral services were held today, Rev. G.W. Baxter, of the Congregational church, officiating.

Mrs. Drips was a woman, who, left alone to bring up her children, did all that the loving heart of a mother could suggest and their great loss is tempered by the recollection of her truly noble life. She was well known in Elkader, where her sweet face, which was an index to her kind and gentle character, will be long remembered.

~Elkader Argus, 3/13/1901

~Note: the obit is incorrect in giving burial in the National cemetery, she & her husband Thomas are buried in Eastside cemetery, Elkader. The gravestone has these dates for Ann: July 10, 1831-March 10, 1901


Ellis, Nicoll Wyckoff. He was born Apr. 22, 1823 in Lodi, Seneca County, New York. He was the son of Moses Ellis (Mar. 5, 1792-April 12, 1876) and Mary "Polly" Travis (Dec. 1, 1788 - Mar. 9, 1854). He married first Lidia Ann Noble on July 2, 1845. Nicoll W. Ellis married second Ann Hudson Smith on Nov. 11, 1851 in Medina County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Avery Smith and Elsie Hudson.

1850 Census: Westfield, Medina County, Ohio: Moses Ellis (age 58, blacksmith), Mary S. Ellis (age 61), Nicoll W. Ellis (age 27, carpenter & Joiner), Sylvanus Ellis (age 23, painter), and Sophia E. Ellis (age 17).

1856 Iowa State Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: N. W. Ellis (age 33, carpenter, born New York), Ann H. Ellis (age 23), Mary Ellis (age 3, born Ohio) and Viola Ellis (age 2, born Iowa). They had been in the state of Iowa for 3 years.

1860 Census: Burr Oak, Winneshiek County, Iowa: Avery Smith (age 51,farmer), Elsie Smith (age 51), Horace D. Smith (age 22), Harrison Smith (age 20), Harriet Smith (age 20), Emeline Smith (age 18), Lewis Smith (age 16), Joel Smith (age 9), Nichol W. Ellis (age 36, carpenter, born New York.), Ann H. Ellis (age 25), Mary Ellis (age 10), Viola Ellis (age 7), Francis Ellis (age 2), not named Ellis (male age 1/12)

1870 Census: Lake, Cerro Gordo, Iowa: N. W. Ellis (age 48, carpenter, born New York), Ann Ellis (age 36), Mary Ellis (age 17), Viola Ellis (age 15), Frank Ellis (age 12), Ralph Ellis (age 8) and Willie Ellis (age 7).

Anna H. Ellis (born Sept. 19, 1832), died Aug. 11, 1871. She is buried in Clear Lake Cemetery, Clear Lake, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa.

1880 Census, District 42, Lake, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa: Nicoll W. Ellis (age 57, mill wright), daughter Hattie M. (age 14), daughter Jessie E (age 9), son Frank A (age 22), son Ralph B. (age 20) and son William H. (age 16)

1885 Iowa State Census, Clear Lake, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa: Nicoll W. Ellis (Township 96, Range 21, Section 18, Lot 1, NW SW 1/4, age 61, widowed, carpenter, born New York), Frank H. Ellis (age 26, born Clayton County, Iowa), William Ellis (age 21, born Clayton County, Iowa), Hattie Ellis (age 18, born Minnesota), and Jessie Ellis (age 13, born Cerro Gordo County, Iowa).

Nicoll W. Ellis died Nov. 13, 1894 in Beaver Creek, Rock County, Minnesota. (DOD Source: Roll of the Dead 1886-1906 Dept. of Minnesota GAR).


Everall, John He was born April 20, 1839 in Peplow Parish of Hodnett, Shropshire, England. He was the son of Richard Everall and Elizabeth Liversage. He married Vallonia Lone Renshaw on Oct. 25, 1865 at Farmersburg, Clayton County. Iowa. She was the daughter of George L. Renshaw and Martha.

John Everall.-There is no need for puzzling or indirection in determining the sterling value of the life services of this venerable and honored pioneer citizen of Clayton county, for he has marked the passing years with earnest and effective endeavor, has shown a high sense of personal stewardship and has held the unequivocal confidence and esteem of those whom his benignant influence has touched in the varied relations of his long and useful career. Mr. Everall was born in Shropshire, England, on the 20th of April, 1839, and in that same section of the "right little isle" were born and reared his parents, Richard and Elizabeth (Liversage) Everall, folk of superior mentality and fine attributes of character. The paternal grandfather of the subject of this review was one of the pioneer clergymen of the Congregational church in England, and it is worthy of note that all of his children, seven in number, were residents of the United States at the time of their death.

In 1851 Richard Everall came with his family to Clayton county, Iowa, and became one of the pioneer farmers in Farmersburg township, where his well directed labors brought to him a generous measure of prosperity, as gauged by the standards of the locality and period. Both he and his wife passed the closing years of their life in the village of Farmersburg and both were venerable in years at the time of their death. They were zealous members of the Congregational church, instant in human sympathy and kindliness and in good deeds. They became the parents of three children, and the only survivor is the honored citizen to whom this sketch is dedicated, he being the eldest of the number; Elizabeth was a resident of Farmersburg at the time of her death; and Mrs. Martha Ann (Everall) Sutton died at Bloomington, Wisconsin.

John Everall gained his rudimentary education in his native land and supplemented this by attending the pioneer schools of Clayton county, as well as by individual application, which, with his naturally studious tendencies, effectively broadened his intellectual horizon. In Clayton county he gained in his youth a close fellowship with the work of the pioneer farm of his father, and during many years of his active career he continued his close allegiance to the basic industry of agriculture, through the medium of which he gained substantial success.

He has long been one of the prominent and influential citizens of Clayton county and special distinction is his for the valiant service which he rendered as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war. From 1858 to 1862 he was a successful and popular teacher in the schools of this county, and he abandoned his pedagogic services only to respond to the call of higher duty, for in August, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Company E, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, with which he proceeded to the front and took part in the various engagements that marked the record of this gallant Iowa regiment. He lived up to the full tension of the great conflict between the states of the North and the South, was wounded in action in July, 1864, but was not long incapacitated for service, as he continued with his regiment until the close of the war, rose from the rank of first sergeant to that of first Lieutenant of his company, and received his honorable discharge in June, 1865. In later years he has vitalized the more gracious memories and associations of his military career by his appreciative affiliation with the Grand Army of the Republic.

After the war Mr. Everall resumed his association with farming in Farmersburg township, and his ability and unqualified popularity have brought to him many official preferments in the public service. He has filled nearly all township offices, and for a period of four years he was county superintendent of schools. He was for six years the incumbent of the office of county auditor, and for eight years he represented Clayton county in the upper house of the Iowa Legislature. In every public office to which he has been called he has proved a faithful, loyal and efficient incumbent, and he has shown himself well fortified in his opinions concerning matters of economic and governmental polity.

He is now living virtually retired in his attractive home at Farmersburg, and finds that his lines are cast in pleasant places, for he is surrounded by a host of friends who are tried and true, and is revered alike by old and young. In a basic way he has ever given stalwart allegiance to the Democratic party, but in local affairs he has not been constrained by strict partisan lines, as he has given his support to men and measures meeting the approval of his judgment. Mr. Everall has been long and appreciatively affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and for eight or nine years he held the office of master of the lodge of Ancient Free & Accepted Masons at Farmersburg.

In this village, on the 25th of October, 1865, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Everall, then a youthful veteran of the Civil war, to Miss Vallonia Renshaw, who was born at Brownsville, Pennsylvania, on the 9th of April, 1841. Of the seven children of this union, five are living. Richard, the firstborn, died in boyhood; Martha remains with her parents; John is successfully established in the practice of law in the city of St. Paul, Minnesota; Dr. George L. became a representative physician and surgeon in the city of Clinton, Iowa, but was at the old home in Farmersburg at the time of his death; Bruce B., M. D., is engaged in the practice of his profession at Monona, Clayton county; Dr. Benjamin C. was engaged in the practice of medicine in the city of Waterloo, this state, until the border troubles with Mexico, in the summer of 1916, led to his going to Texas as captain and surgeon of the hospital corps of the First Iowa Volunteer Infantry, in which capacity he is serving at the time of this writing; Bessie E., the youngest of the children, is now an efficient and popular teacher in the public schools of Lake City, Minnesota.

Senator Everall was one of the leaders of his party while in the Iowa Senate and was known for his quiet, but forceful support of wise measures for the benefit of the people. He still takes an active interest in the bank at Farmersburg and is known and loved throughout the county.

source: History of Clayton County, Iowa; From The Earliest Historical Times Down to the Present;
by Realto E. Price, Vol. II; pg. 114-115

-submitted by S. Ferrall

The early settlers of Iowa took a deep interest in the cause of education, which interest has always been maintained, so that to-day illiteracy among the native born is almost unknown. Clayton County pioneers were no exception to the rule, the school-house being erected as soon as a sufficient number of scholars could be gotten together for the purpose of receiving instruction. The first schools in the county were private or select schools, but the public school system was adopted as soon as a sufficient fund was created for that purpose.

By an act passed by the first General Assembly, and approved by the Governor, Jan. 24, 1847, the office of school fund commissioner was created, and Eliphalet Price was the first person elected to that office in Clayton County. A sketch of Judge Price will be found in the chapter of "Illustrious and Prominent Dead." He was succeeded in 1850 by Samuel Murdock, who served with ability and fidelity until 1858. He was succeeded by H. S. Granger, and he by Isaac Mathews, in whose term the office was abolished. Judge Murdock's biography appears in connection with the history of the bar of Clayton County, of which he is the father. On the subject of "School Fund Commissioners," Hon. John Everall, in an address delivered before the Teachers' Institute in 1875, thus speaks:

"By the old law, in force previous to 1858, the man at the head of the school interests of the county was the school fund commissioner. He had the power, and it was his duty to organize new districts and establish their boundaries. He was not obligated to confine his lines to the township boundaries. The center of a settlement was generally made the center of a district, and hence some of the peculiarly shaped districts we now have. It was also his duty to make an abstract of the reports of the district secretaries for the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, but his most responsible duty was taking charge of and apportioning the school fund, a duty now falling to the county auditor, this apportionment needing the interest of the proceeds of the sale of the sixteenth section of land in each township, set apart by the General Government for school purposes. The salary of this commissioner was such pay for his services as the sheriff, clerk and district attorney were pleased to allow him, subject to the approval of the superintendent of public instruction, and amounted in this county to about $300 per year, to which was added something for contingent expenses. The law made it the duty of directors to examine teachers, touching their qualifications to teach spelling, reading, writing, geography, history and English grammar, but I never heard of a Board of Directors doing it. Districts had a right to levy a tax for building school-houses and contingent expenses, but if they wanted any more money than the commission furnished for the teachers, they had to raise it by voluntary subscription, or by an assessment of so much a head on pupils.

"Of course the school accommodations were not in those days what they are now. The first house in which I taught was of logs, with a 'shake' roof that was decidedly shaky. When new it had been the shelter of a family; when too far gone for that it had answered the purpose of a stable, and -- then it was our schoolroom. The transition was not sudden, for I remember that the Director, pointing to an old fireplace back of the extemporized desk where I was to preside in all my first-term dignity, said, "John, thar's an old hen on fifteen eggs in thar; she'll be off in a few days, and I'll be obliged if you will watch 'er a little and not let the children disturb 'er!" And so I watched for the chickens while I taught the children and all came off right as near as I can remember."

From that address of Mr. Everall, already quoted from, the following is extracted:

"In the spring of 1858 our first County Superintendent, Alonzo Brown, was elected. He was, at the time, comparatively a stranger and for his nomination and election, the friends of education were in a large measure indebted to Judge Murdock. I have, in the past, often spoken to you of him and of Mr. Emory, his successor. I was a frequent visitor at both their homes, and am aware that I may be too partial for a historian. About a month after Mr. Brown's election I obtained my first certificate. A history of that transaction, and the effect it had upon me when afterward called upon to examine teachers, I gave you on a previous occasion. The history of the High-School building, and its crumbling foundation, at Garnavillo, which foundation I have told you I regarded a fitting monument to the memory of the Legislature that repealed the law, is familiar to the most of you. The law provided that the directors of each township, should, at a yearly competitive examination, select three of their best scholars who should receive tuition free at the High-School.

"Mr. Brown believed that the true way to improve our schools was to improve our teachers and excite a deep interest among patrons. The latter he undertook by holding meetings throughout the county, in most of the townships, where teachers, parents and children were brought together. These meetings were highly successful. For the improvement of teachers he had, though not without opposition, a Teachers' School at Garnavillo in the fall of 1858. As our teacher, many of us met here, for the first time since that time, and has probably educated more teachers than any other person in the county, and has, besides, done very much for our educational interests. At the close of the school we held our first institute. About thirty-five teachers were present. It was not unlike institutes we have attended since. Some of us were deficient in scholarship, but many were there who would stand well to the front at your institutes of to-day. And many of the discussions, if they could be reproduced, would, I think, convince some of the teachers of the present institutes that there is not so much of the new under the sun as they seem to imagine. Of course there was the usual arithmetical puzzles, the usual amount of sparring and sulking among the singers, and lastly, I can assure you, there was the usual amount of flirtation. If any of the 'schoolma'ams' went home alone in the evening it was not the fault of the boys! I always dream of those old friends at our first School and Institute as they appeared then, though I know it to be a false picture. Time changes us all.

"During this institute this association was organized, with Prof. Briggs as President and W.H. Muzzy as Secretary. The winter after its organization the association met at Elkader. The minutes are lost, but I remember that we had a good meeting. A Mr. Ainsworth, of West Union, delivered an excellent address. It was our custom to hold a June session. The June session of that year was at National. The minutes of this meeting are also lost. We had a live meeting, and, for the first time at our meetings, the Bible question was discussed. After a spirited debate, a resolution declaring it the duty of every teacher to read the Bible in school was lost, by a close vote, and a substitute adopted, which declared that it should be left to the discretion of the teachers.

"It is to be mentioned of Superintendent Brown, that he never acted as presiding officer. Notwithstanding his activity in educational matters, his constant attendance, his ever ready word in season, I never knew him to preside at a teachers' meeting. During the war he was elected President of the association, but he never accepted even that compliment from the institute. The President of the first institute was E.A. Crary. At our second institute, many of us met for the first time Mr. Emery. He brought with him quite a number of teachers from the neighborhood of Monona. Many had been attending his fall term of school, and between these and those who had been attending Mr. Briggs' school there was considerable rivalry.

"This Briggs school was one the teachers had put on foot. The High School having been abolished, several teachers clubbed together and hired Mr. Briggs to teach a two-months' fall term. About twenty-five of us attended, and I do not remember that we claimed any particular credit for spending our own money for the improvement of our own minds. For the encouragement of some who complain of hard times for teachers, I may say that $15 a month in summer and $25 in winter was then regarded high wages. At this institute were over fifty teachers. The Journal, then published at Garnavillo, gives a long and highly favorable account of the session, rather flattering all who were connected with it. Mr. Emery presided, and John Everall was Secretary. I will take occasion to say that the account just mentioned was not from the pen of the secretary, but from that of the then editor of the Journal, friend Eiboeck.

"Our principal teachers were Messrs. Brown, Briggs and Emery, Mr. Smart running the musical department. It was here that friend Kingsley first appeared among us, and I will say to the ladies that, as there are exceptions to most rules, he may be an exception to the one I mentioned, that time changes us all, for to the best of my recollection he looked then just as he looks now! And that reminds me of a joke on Mr. Briggs, laid at Mr. Crosby's door. Mr. Crosby was a general favorite at our first institutes. Always ready with a telling story he delivered the first lecture on physiology to the teachers of the county. Some one, knowing that in Mr. Crosby's youth he had known Mr. Briggs, asked him how old he thought Mr. Briggs to be. 'Well,' said Mr. Crosby, 'that is just what older people used to ask of each other when I was a school-boy. Nobody ever knew then, and, of course, I can't tell now.'

"To return to Mr. Kingsley, who deserves more than a passing notice, at this institute he distinguished himself as a fleet runner (we played at 'goal' during recesses), and as a poet. Our leaders had been arguing for some time on a grammatical question, something about a trumpet, and whether 'the winds blew the signal for the combat' or whether it was not, 'the signal blow winds,' etc.. Kingsley, thinking with others that the question should be laid away, took occasion, at roll-call, to respond in several stanzas, turning the whole matter into ridicule, as he has done with serious subjects several times since. Prof. Briggs came in just as Kingsley recited something about 'that old teacher Briggs' (I forget what he made Briggs to rhyme with, but I am sure no offense was intended), and the Professor evidently thought those Monona fellows were hitting him. His combativeness was aroused -- and being an old acquaintance I can say, privately, that this bump has a larger development on the Professor's head than many suppose -- and when his own name was called he responded sharply and sarcastically with a proverb slightly changed, something about its being 'easier to contend with seven wise men who can render a reason,' etc. This retort was a settler, and I am sure Mr. Kingsley thought the Professor incapable of appreciating poetry. However, from the fact that he has read several poems at our meetings since that occasion, I conclude that he was not entirely discouraged.

"During this year association meetings were held at McGregor and at Strawberry Point. The institute in the fall of 1860 was held at Monona. Mr. Emery was now superintendent. The pay had so changed that he could not afford to give his full time to the work of his office, but, although not as active as Mr. Brown, he did good service, and the teachers became strongly attached to him. Mr. Briggs being at Pike's Peak, many of his pupils attended the fall term of Mr. Emery's school. The teachers at this institute were Mr. Barnes, Rev. J.R. Upton and the superintendent. Mr. Brown was there a portion of the time, and read a valuable address to the teachers. Again I pass over the meetings of the association, and come to the institute of 1861, held at Garnavillo. So far, the only schools in the county where teachers had attended in a body for the purpose of better preparing themselves for the work had been held at Garnavillo and at Monona. A large majority of the teachers in attendance at our meetings were from Garnavillo, Farmersburg and Monona Townships, which accounts for the extraordinary number of meetings held within the limits of those townships.

"Mr. Emery's fall term had been attended by a large number of teachers, and we all went to Garnavillo expecting a profitable time. We were not disappointed. At this time attendance upon the institute was not compulsory, but we had a large one, and one of the best ever held in the county. Prof. Putnam, of Indiana, conducted it, assisted by Mr. Brown. Prof. Cramer, our third superintendent, met us here for the first time. The teachers had become better acquainted, with each other and seemed to work more in harmony than ever before. This institute will never be forgotten by its members. At this meeting a fine edition of Bancroft's History of the United States, unabridged was presented to Mr. Brown by the teachers, and indeed it was a free-will offering. Already some of the teachers, including Kingsley and Crary, had gone to the front to help Uncle Sam with the Rebellion. We missed Kingsley, for he was always opposed to whipping. He and Miss Melvina Stewart were leading disputants on the "moral persuasion" question. We thought perhaps he had gone South to illustrate his argument. Monlux, Payne, Harrington and some four or five others enlisted during this institute. At this session was started the Friday evening sociable.

"A profitable meeting of the association was held at Windsor the following winter. I remember that Mr. Emery here called attention to the damage done our schools by the continual change of teachers. His remarks would apply to the present with almost equal force. Prof. E.B. Wakeman addressed us, taking for his text the words of Commodore Foote when receiving the rebel general's sword at Donelson, 'General, I meant to take your fort of go to the bottom'! It was an appeal for earnestness and determination on the part of the teachers in behalf of their schools, no matter what difficulties might be encountered. Up to the time of this meeting I had not, I think, been absent from a regularly called meeting of the teachers of the county since the first institute, and, so far as I know, the first gathering of teachers in the county. But at this time, from all accounts from the South, I thought Kingsley and the other boys needed help down there, I wanted to see Kingsley, to talk over 'moral suasion' with him, so I went to find him. Over a year afterward I found him in Arkansas, and, seated on a tree, overhanging the river nearly opposite Little Rock, we had a good chat. He confessed that he believed in whipping as a last resort!

"During the winter of 1863-'64, I was home for a short time, and met the teachers at Windsor, where a watch was presented to Superintendent Emery. When I returned to my regiment I bade him what we then knew was the final good-by. He was dying of consumption. Mr. Brown, then provost marshal, called with me at the time. He was healthy and strong and could not have dreamed that he was so soon to follow from the same dread disease. Both of these excellent men was called away in middle life. there were at least twenty-two members of this association in the United States service during the war of the Rebellion, not reckoning any that have become members since the war. I do not know how many of this number are living, but know that eight are dead. So far as I now but two died in battle. Daniel Payne and Seth Martin were their names; the first was killed in the charge on Vicksburg, the other at Chickamauga. Levi King, who was known to all the old teachers as an active member of the association, died in hospital in Jackson, Tenn. I made his acquaintance at my first examination before Mr. Brown. I saw him a few hours before his death. He was propped up in his bunk, in a tent, delirious with fever, and imagined himself at one of these meetings. He recognized me and called upon me for remarks. We will cherish his memory."

Mr. Everall concluded in some general remarks on the objects of the association, urging the teachers to carry home something of profit from the meeting, and to remember that determination, earnestness and perseverance constitute the key to success. He referred to the incoming of the Centennial year of our national life as an excellent time for the young to make good resolves, and hoped the year might be a good one for keeping them. He wanted his young friends to have an object in life worth working for and fighting for, and he wanted them to go to work and attain it. He closed by repeating a very appropriate poem, of which we give the last verse:

Choose well the path in which you run,
Succeed by noble daring;
Then though the last, when once 'tis won,
Your crown is worth the wearing.
Then never fret, if left behind,
Nor slacken your endeavor;
But ever keep this truth in mind,
'Tis better late than never.

John Everall served two terms, from 1869 to 1873. He was a good officer.

John Everall, now a farmer, P.O. Farmersburg, was the son of Richard and Elizabeth (Liversage) Everall, natives of England, who came to America in 1850, located in Lodomillo Township, and afterward moved to Farmersburg. He was born in England, April 20, 1839; he was educated in England, and in Clayton County; he studied law some time, and from a lawyer's office enlisted in the Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, Company E., Capt. Drips. He was in many battles, and was wounded at Tupelo, Miss., in 1864, by a musket ball in the mouth, taking away a portion of his lower jaw. He was discharged at Keokuk, Iowa, in June, 1865. During his service he was a correspondent of the press at McGregor. After his return he purchased a farm, and has followed farming ever since. In 1865 he married Bellonia, daughter of G.L. and Martha (Evans) Renshaw, natives of Virginia. They came to Clayton County, Ia., and died here. By this union there are five children -- Martha, born Jan. 20, 1869; John, Feb., 16, 1871; George L., June 10, 1873; Bruce, Sept. 12, 1877; the babe was born Oct. 23, 1881. Mr. E. is a member of the A.F. & A.M. fraternity, and is Master of the lodge. He has held the office of County School Superintendent for four years, the duties of which he faithfully discharged. Has held most of the township offices, and in all has been a valuable and efficient officer. He has voted the Democratic ticket. He has been Secretary of the Clayton County Agricultural Society for several years, and has contributed much toward its success.

Notes written by John Everall in November, 1906

I have often wished that my father had told me more of his family or that I had asked him more, perhaps my children may feel the same sometime.

Both my grandfathers were dead when I was born. I know but little of them. I know that Grandfather Richard Everall was a Congregational Minister at Wem, Shropshire, England, that he had four sons, vis Benjamin, Joseph, Richard & Jesse. Three daughters, Mary, Sophia and Bithia. All came to U.S. Of the sons Benjamin left Ohio for the south & was never again heard from. Joseph died at Burlington, Iowa, Dr. Salter preaching the funeral, Jesse died at Oskaloosa, Iowa, my father Farmersburg, Iowa. Only father left children Myself, Elizabeth, and Martha Ann.

Of the girls Mary married "Thomas" I think Morris and lived near Zanesville, Ohio. They had a large family. I never saw any of them. She died at Delivan, Ill, Sophia unmarried at Farmersburg, Bithia married John Clayworth & died in Ohio leaving one boy whom I saw at Grinnell, Ia. He had quite a family and was then working for either the R.I. or Iowa Central R.R. His father married again & lived in Oskaloosa, Ia.

I remember both Grandma Everall [nee Martha Rhodes] and [Grandma] Liversage, nee [Sarah] Venables. The first was tall & spare, the latter short & fleshy. The Liversage family was large John, Thomas, Robert & George, Elizabeth my mother, Ellen, Sarah & Margaret. Ellen married Uncle Jesse & died at Oskaloosa a few days before him. Sarah [married] Rev. John Henry Barrow quite a noted preacher & writer. She died in Australia where he held important offices. Margaret married John Callant died Spencer S. Dak. Many of the cousins I remember well, particularly those children of John, Sarah, Thomas & Robert. Tom was Robert's son.

I was born Apr 20, 1839 at Peplow Parish of Hodnett, Shropshire, England. I was about five when Grandma Everall died but remember the funeral well. I went to the village school kept by a Miss Williams. Then to a Boarding School at Market Drayton kept by my Uncle Barrow, who was also a Congregational Minister there. This was about 9 miles from home but I thought it a long way.

Grandma Liversage had a pony & small carriage & I used to drive her around. She lived at Wollerton about 1/2 way to Drayton. I also liked to visit Whitchurch where Uncle Joseph & Aunt Sophia lived. I was very fond of fishing and when I was six or seven yrs. old caught a great many. Father [Richard Everall jr.] was a tenant of Lord Hill, farmed some & made malt, also kept the village shop or small store.

Came to America where all of Father's family were & two of Mother's sisters in 1851 or 52. Sailed from Liverpool in sailing vessel to New Orleans then up river to Burlington. Were nearly 8 weeks on ocean, stayed a few weeks with Uncles Joseph & Jesse then came to Galina where we expected to find Uncle Callant but he had gone to Yankee Settlement so we went to Dunleith, crossed the river in a [horse?] ferry boat, stayed a few days with Rattrys who came over the ocean with us & then hired a team to Yankee Settlement.

[John eventually married Vallonia Renshaw and became an Iowa state senator.]

John Everall

State Senator, Democrat

Occupation: Farmer

Home County: Clayton

Dates Served: 1/10/1898 - 01/07/1900

District: 36


JOHN EVERALL Born in Shropshire, April 20 1839. When he was a youth his parents came to this country, where the son received his education for a practical business life. He has always lived in Clayton county, and been identified with all interests of the locality. He was married October 25, 1865, to Miss Vallonia Renshaw, and has a family of six grown children, four boys and two girls. The senator is very proud of his boys, any one of whom he claims is a greater man than his father. But the senator's friends, while they do not doubt the ability of the sons, do not agree with him in this statement, owing to his record as a citizen and as a statesman. Senator Everall studied in the common schools, and received a substantial education therefrom, by the closest application. When the war opened, he served as first sergeant of Company E, 27th Iowa infantry, till the close of the war. His political race record is as enviable as his soldier, having served his county as superintendent of schools four years, and county auditor for six. In 1891, the democrats of his district selected him as the best man to represent them in the senate. He was reelected in 1895. Senator Everall is no orator, but thoroughly understands all matters of legislation, and but little occurs in either party of which he is not cognizant. His greatest ability is in committee work, where his power is felt. No senator of the past two sessions had more good friends than "Uncle John," by reason of his charitable way of looking at all things. He belongs to the Masonic, the A.O.U.W., and G.A.R. organizations. He is a member of no church, but attends the Congregational. In the Twenty-sixth General Assembly he served on the ways and means, appropriations, agriculture, insurance, schools, senatorial and representative districts, military, and claims committees. For the greater portion of his life Senator Everall has been a farmer near Farmersburg, in which community he is highly respected. His particular interests in legislation are the ones by which the people of the state and his constituents will profit.


Occupation: Farmer
Home County: Clayton
Dates Served: 01/13/1896 - 01/09/1898
District: 36

JOHN EVERALL Born in Shropshire, England, April 20, 1839. His parents moved to this country while he was still very young, so by practical experience he did not get much of an idea of his native country. They settled on a farm in Clayton county and sent John to school. He did as most boys in the country do worked on the farm while not at school and studied industriously while he had a chance. When the war came on he was found ready to fight for his adopted country. The records show that lie was first sergeant of Company E, 27th Iowa Infantry when he was mustered out at the close of the difficulty. He was married in October, 1865. Mr. Everall has spent the greater part of his life on the farm, though this is not the only pursuit for which he is fitted. The people of Clayton county have seen fit to place him in charge of their schools for four years, and afterwards made him county auditor for six years. In both of these positions he gave satisfaction, for in 1891 they elected him to the Senate, and again in 1895. In the last Senate he was a member of the committees on ways and means, schools, agriculture, labor, highways, and military.


Occupation: Farmer
Home County: Clayton
Dates Served: 01/08/1894 - 01/12/1896
District: 36


Occupation: Farmer
Home County: Clayton
Dates Served: 01/11/1892 - 01/07/1894
District: 36

John Everall JOHN EVERALL Born in Shropshire, England, April 20, 1839. His parents moved to this country while he was still very young, so by practical experience he did not get much of an idea of his native country. They settled on a farm in Clayton county and sent John to school. He did as most boys in the country do worked on the farm while not at school and studied industriously while he had a chance. When the war came on he was found ready to fight for his adopted country. The records show that he was first sergeant of company E, 27th Iowa infantry when he was mustered out at the close of the difficulty. Mr. Everall has spent the greater part of his life on the farm, though this is not the only pursuit for which he is fitted. The people of Clayton county have seen fit to place him in charge of their schools for four years, and afterwards made him county auditor for six years. In both of these positions he gave satisfaction for in 1891 they elected him to the Senate, and this session he is a holdover. A plain, steady, modest man who attends well to the duties entrusted to him and makes no boast about it. Such is John Everall.

Source: The Iowa Legislature

1860 Census, Giard, Clayton County, Iowa: John Everall (age 21, Teacher, born England). He was living with the family of James and Ellen Tapper.

1870 Census, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Richard Everall (age 64, farmer, born England), Elizabeth Everall (age 58, born England), John Everall (age 31, Co. School Supt. born England), Valonia Everall (age 29, born Penn), Richard Everall (age 3, born Iowa) Martha Everall (age 1,born Iowa), and Henry Lempka (age 30, farm laborer, born Iowa) and Merill Carly (age 11, lives with J. Everall, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: John Everall (age 41, farmer, born England), Wife Vallonia Everall (age 39, born Pennsylvania), daughter Mattie Everall (age 11, born Iowa), son John Everall (age 9, born Iowa), son George Everall (age 7, born Iowa), son Bruce Everall (age 1, born Iowa), Gotleib Wickerseim (age 28, farm laborer, born Baden) and Matilda Kephart (age 20, servant, born Iowa),

1885 Iowa State Census: Boardman, Clayton County, Iowa: John Everall (Township 43, Range 5, Elkader, age 45, auditor, born England), Valonia Everall (age 43, born Pennsylvania), Mattie Everall (age 16, born Clayton County, Iowa), John Everall (age 14, born Clayton County, Iowa), George Everall (age 11, born Clayton County, Iowa), Bruce Everall (age 7, born Clayton County, Iowa), Benn Everall (age 3, born Clayton County, Iowa), Bessie Everall (age 1, born Clayton County, Iowa.

1900 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: John Everall (born Apr. 1839, married 34 years, born England, immigrated 1852, naturalized, farmer), wife Vallonia Everall (born Apr. 1841, age 59, married 34 years, 7 children born, 6 still living, born Pennsylvania), son Bruce B. Everall (born Sept. 1877, age 22, born Iowa), daughter Mattie Everall (born Jan. 1869, age 31, born Iowa), son Ben C. Everall (born Oct. 1881, age 18, born Iowa), daughter Bessie E. Everall (born Nov. 1884, age 15, born Iowa), boarder Charles Renke (born Jan 1882, age 15, born Iowa)

1910 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: John Everall (age 70, married 1 time for 45 years, born England, Bank President), wife Vallonia Everall (age 69, married 1 time for 45 years, 7 children born, 5 still living, born Pennsylvania), daughter Mattie Everall (age 41, born Iowa), and daughter Bessie Everall (age 25, born Iowa).

1915 Iowa State Census, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: John Everall (age 75, married, Clayton County, Farmersburg, Occupation Retired. Extent of Education: Grammar 7, High School 2, can read and write, Birth Place: England, Value of farm or home: $1600.00. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry. Church Affiliation: None. Father's birth place: England, Mother's Birthplace: England.

1920 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: John Everall (age 80, married, born England, immigrated 1851), wife Vallonia Everall (age 78, born Pennsylvania), daughter Martha Everall (age 50, born Iowa), daughter Bess E. Everall (age 35, born Iowa), Daughter-in-law Catherine J. Everall (age 49, widowed, born Iowa), and Granddaughter Marjorie J. Everall (age 16, born Iowa). (Note according to the 1910 census, Catherine J and Marjorie were the wife and daughter of their son John).

John Everall died May 17, 1920 at Monona, Iowa (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa

Laura's delightful post about the crocheted firework created by her Renshaw grandmother reminded me of a Renshaw grandmother story.

My mother's grandmother was Vallonia Renshaw who married John Everall. John and Vallonia lived in Iowa where in 1909 my mother, Eleanor, was born to their son George Everall and his wife, the former Amy Ford. Sadly, in 1910 George died, and Amy and little Eleanor moved to Massachusetts. At least once a year, however, they took the train to visit the Iowa relatives.

As mother told the story, one year when she was about eight years old she and Amy arrived at the Everall farm and saw the feather bed laid out over the old couch. It looked lovely and inviting, softly plumped up. Mother took a flying leap and landed in the midst of the feather bed -- on top of ten loaves of bread which had been set out under the cover to raise.

What impressed Mother about the whole episode was that her grandmother did not scold her or speak harshly in any way. Maybe after seven children of her own, Vallonia was used to anything children might do. Or perhaps with one son already dead and two others fighting in World War I, the destruction of a few loaves of bread did not disturb her calm.....

Eleanor Everall Gordon

Valonia (Renshaw) Everall (born Apr. 9, 1841), died Jan. 17. 1926 at Monona, Clayton County, Iowa. She is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa.


Failey, Lawrence C. He was born April 1, 1837 in Vermont. He was the son of Laurence Failey (Mar. 20, 1800 - Nov. 10. 1881) and Catherine Finnegan (Sept. 8, 1804 - Jun 14, 1881). He was married to Catherine King on Jan. 8, 1867 in Fairfield, Vermont, by Geo. N. Caissey, Catholic Priest. Lawrence was 29 years old, a farmer, and it was his first marriage. The marriage record said he was born in Canada. (Vermont, Vital Records, 1760-1954).

Submitted by
Penny Cutler

Lawrence C. Failey was born April 1, 1837, in either Canada or Vermont. He died Dec 20th, 1927. He is buried in St. Patrick's Cemetery, East Fairfield, Vermont. He went back to Fairfield, Vermont after the war and raised a family there. He is in Fairfield, Vermont on the 1870 census rolls. His parents, Laurence and Catherine were still there along with many of his siblings: Patrick, Ellen, Thomas, John, Francis (Frank), James F., Michael B., and Mary.

Lawrence C. Failey married Catherine King. They had 7 children, Ellen (Nellie), Lousie Bridget, Elizabeth Cora, John, Anna E, Jane (Jennie), Rose E. His second wife was named Margaret.

1850 Census: Fairfield, Franklin County, Vermont: Lawrence Failey (age 50, born Ireland), Catharine Failey (age 46, born Ireland), Patrick Failey (age 20), Elen Failey (age 18), Thomas Failey (age 16), John Failey (age 14), Lawrence Failey (age 12) Francis Failey (age 10, James Failey (age 8), Michael Failey (age 6) and Mary Failey (age 4). (Note all the children except the last two were stated to be born in Canada.)

1870 Census: Fairfield, Franklin County, Vermont: Lawrence Failey Jr. (age 33, farmer, born Canada), Kate Failey (age 29), and Nellie Failey (age 7/12). His parents Lawrence and Catherine Failey are living next door. Ann Finnegan (age 20, born Ireland) was a housekeeper in his parent's household).

1880 Census: Fairfield, Franklin County, Vermont: Lawrence Failey (age 45), wife Catherine Failey (age 40), daughter Ellen Failey (age 15), daughter Rosa Failey (age 12) and daughter Mary Failey (age 8).

1890 Veterans Census: Fairfield, Franklin County, Vermont: Lawrence C. Failey: Private Co. E 27th Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 15, 1862. Discharge Aug. 8, 1865. Service 2 years, 11 months, 23 days. Current Post Office: Fairfield, Vermont

1900 Census: Fairfield, Franklin county, Vermont: Lawrence Failey (born Apr. 1837, age 63, married 33 years, born Vermont), wife Catherine Failey (born June 1840, age 59, married 33 years, 8 children born, 6 still living), daughter Elizabeth E. Failey (born Nov. 1878, age 21, born Vermont), daughter Margaret A. Failey (born Aug. 1883, age 16, born Vermont), and son Joseph R. Failey (born Apr. 1882, age 18, born Vermont)

Catherine King Failey died Oct. 8, 1903 and is buried in Saint Patrick's Cemetery, East Fairfield, Franklin County, Vermont.

He married second Margaret.

1910 Census: St. Albans, Franklin County, Vermont: Lawrence C. Failey (age 71, married 2 times, currently for 3 years, born Vermont), wife Margaret Failey (age 59, married 2 times, currently for 3 years, 0 children born).

1920 Census: St. Albans, Franklin County, Vermont: Lawrence Faley (age 82) and wife Margaret Faley (age 70).

Margaret Failey died in 1925 and is buried in St. Patrick's Cemetery, East Fairfield, Franklin County, Vermont.

Lawrence C. Failey died Dec. 20, 1927. He is buried in St. Patrick's Cemetery, East Fairfield, Vermont.

Death: Full Name of Deceased: Lawrence Failey. Usual Residence: St. Albans, Vt., Color: White. Age: 90 years, 8 months, 19 days. Occupation: Retired Farmer. Birthplace: Canada. Birthdate: April 1, 1837. Father's Name: Lawrence Failey. Father's birthplace: Ireland. Mother's Maiden Name: Catharine Finnigen. Mother's birthplace: Ireland. Date of death: Dec. 20, 1927. Disease causing death: Senility. Medical Attendant: Edwin A. Hyat, St. Albans, VT. (Vermont, Vital Records, 1760 - 1954)


Fisher, Adam He was born Dec. 8, 1832 in Germany. He married Barbara Arrett on July 7, 1867 in Grant County, Wisconsin.

1860 Census: Read, Clayton County, Iowa: John Rife (age 34, born Germany), Kathrain Rife (age 34, born Germany), Kate Rife (age 4/12, born Iowa), Kitty Rife (age 4/12, born Iowa), Louisa Fisher (age 60, born Germany) and Adam Fisher (age 27, born Germany, Farmer). (I suspected that Adam and his mother Louisa were living with a married sister. I looked for and found a family tree for Catherine Fisher married to John Reif. She died Jun 18, 1888 and is buried in Postville Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa - So I strongly suspect this is a family unit),

1870 Census: Clayton, Clayton county, Iowa; Adam Fisher (age 38), Barbara Fisher (age 19) and George Fisher (age 1).

1880 Census, Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: Adam Fisher (age 46, farmer), wife Barbara Fisher (age29), son Henry Fisher (age 12), daughter Eva E. Fisher (age 8), daughter Emmie Fisher (age 7), son Samuel Fisher (age 5), daughter Annie L. Fisher (age 4 m, born Feb). and servant Charles Burshek (age 16, farmer).

1885 Iowa State Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: Adam Fischer (Township 95, Range 6, Section 23, NW NW, Farmer, age 52), Barbara Fischer (age 34), Henry Fischer (age 15), Lizzie Fischer (age 13), Emma Fischer (age 11), Samuel Fischer (age 9), Anna Fischer (age 5) and Sabina Fischer (age 1). All the children were born in Clayton County, Iowa.

1900 Census: Westfield Township, Dodge County, Minnesota: Adam Fisher (born Dec. 1832, age 67, married 32 years, born Germany), Barbara Fisher (age 49, born Sept. 1850, age 49, married 32 years, 9 children born 7 still living, born Switzerland), Henry H. Fisher (born Aug. 1869, age 30, born Iowa), daughter Annie L. Fisher (born Feb. 1880, age 19, born Iowa), daughter Geneva M (born Sept. 1883, age 16, born Iowa) and son Eli N. Fisher (born Oct 1885, age 14, born Iowa)

Adam Fisher died Aug. 22, 1906 in Austin, Minnesota. He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Mower County, Minnesota.

OBITUARY

Adam Fisher was born in Bavaria, Germany, Dec. 8, 1832, and died at his home in Austin, Minnesota Aug. 22, 1906, in his 74th year, after four months of intense suffering from cancer of the stomach. He came to this country in 1858, settling first at Ottawa, Ill. where he remained for a short time. In 1862 he enlisted in Co. E. 27th Iowa Regiment and served three years in the Civil War, during which he was wounded in the right leg, and arm, and came home on crutches. In 1865 he settled at Clayton, Iowa. He was married to Barbara A. Arett July 7, 1867, in Grant County, Wis. The family resided in Clayton for five years, removing in 1872 to a farm southeast of Postville. In 1892 they moved on a farm 6 1/2 miles northeast of Blooming Prairie, Minnesota and in 1903 moved to Austin to reside. At the time of his death he was a member of McIntyre Post G.A.R. He is survived by his wife and seven children, Henry G., of Blooming Prairie, Minnesota; Mrs. Lizzie Eberling of Postville, Iowa; Emma; Samuel J.; Eli; Lena and Mrs. Jas. Lode of Austin, Minnesota. He also leaves 11 grandchildren. The funeral was held from the Lutheran Church at Austin at two o'clock on Saturday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Rowland. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.

Postville Review, August 1906 - contributed by Mary Durr & Dorothy Schave

His widow Barbara A. Fisher filed for a pension on Sept. 12, 1906 in Minnesota.

Barbara (Arett) Fisher (born Sept. 15, 1850), died Dec. 30, 1910. She is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Mower County, Minnesota.


Edward Flaherty He was born about 1835 in Ireland. He married Mary Quinn on Oct. 8, 1865 in Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa. (Iowa County Marriages, 1838-1934)

1860 Census: Taylor, Dubuque County, Iowa: Thomas Hooper (age 46), Georgiana Hooper (age 12), David Hooper (age 10), Martha Hooper (age 5), Emilie Hooper (age 3), Sarah Wilson (age 30), Thomas Wilson (age 21) and Edward Flaherty (age 23, farm laborer, born Ireland)

He is buried in Saint Joseph Catholic Cemetery, Farley, Dubuque County, Iowa.

His Widow Mary Flaherty filed for a pension on May 1, 1888 in Iowa.


Fillmire, George (Note: Pension index records says Fillmore). He was born about 1830 in Germany.

1870 Census, Cub Creek, Jefferson County, Nebraska: George Fillmire (age 39, farmer, born Bavaria)

1880 Census, Cub Creek, Jefferson County, Nebraska: Boarder George Fillmire (age 51, farmer, single, born Prussia). He was living with a family named Seemore.

George Fillmore filed for a pension on Apr. 3, 1884 in Nebraska.

1885 Nebraska State Census: Jefferson County, Nebraska: Boarder George Fillmore, (age 56, single, born Prussia). He was living with a family named Hoppe.

I could not find him after the 1885 state census. He was not on the 1890 Veterans Census. Did he die between 1885 and 1890?

Nebraska Civil War Grand Army of the Republic

Basically this is a listing of soldiers of the GAR of Nebraska. It includes the GAR Post # and the Town and County the Post was located in.

Name: George Fillmore, Unit: 27th IA Inf. Company: E; GAR Post: 201, Town: Plymouth. County: Jefferson.


Fonda, James Mitchell He was born Sept. 30, 1840 in Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. He was the son of William Henry Fonda (Nov. 10, 1790 - Sep. 4, 1847) and Henrietta Sarah Mitchell (Oct. 9, 1796 - Apr. 27. 1873). He married Mary Jane Slitor on Dec. 21, 1865 in Hardin, Clayton County, Iowa. He was age 25. She was age 18. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Truman G. Slitor and Jane Van Zant.

1850 Census: Ohio, Herkimer County, New York: Henrietta Fonda (age 54), Eliza Ann Fonda (age 23), William Fonda (age 20), Henrietta S. Fonda (age 19), Alexander Fonda (age 12) and James Fonda (age 10).

1856 Iowa State Census: Giard, Clayton County, Iowa Haretta S. Fonda (age 59), Annalina Fonda (age 33). R. M. Fonda (age 31), William Fonda (age 26), Clementine Fonda (age 20), Alexander Fonda (age 18), and James M. Fonda (age 15).

1860 Census: Giard, Clayton County, Iowa: R. W. Fonda (male, age 40), Henrietta Fonda (age 63), Ann Fonda (age 38), Mary Fonda (age 32), William Fonda (age 30), Hellen Fonda (age 23). Alex Fonda (age 21) and James Fonda (age 18).

Monona Twp. -- Truman G. Slitor, retired farmer, was born in Schuyler, Herkimer Co., N.Y., March 27, 1809, a son of James and Fannie (Mandigo) Slitor, who were the parents of nine children, two living. The family are remarkable for their longevity, all living to the age of eighty or ninety. The subject of this sketch was married in Yates County, N.Y., to Jane Van Zant, who was born in Seneca County, N.Y., April 6, 1809. Their union has been blessed with five children, four living--Hannah J., widow of Charles Strobridge; Richard, living in Le Roy, Minn.; Edward, and Mary Jane, wife of James Fonda. In 1853 Mr. Slitor left his home in Yates County, N.Y., and emigrated with his family to Clayton County, Ia., locating in Monona Township, where he followed the trade of a carpenter eight years, then purchased a farm, and followed farming until 1881. He then removed to Monona, where he purchased property, and has resided since. He came to the county a poor man, but, by good judgment and economy has accumulated a competency, and to-day is enjoying the fruits of his labor.

History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1882, p. 1061

1870 Census: Stacyville, Mitchell County, Iowa: James Fonda (age 29), Mary J. Fonda (age 22) and Ida Fonda (age 3).

1880 Census: Jenkins, Mitchell County, Iowa: James M. Fonda (age 39, farmer, born New York), wife Mary J. Fonda (age 32), daughter Ida M. Fonda (age 13), daughter Lorena S. Fonda (age 7), son Fred Servall Fonda (age 4) and sister Helen C. Fonda (age 45, teacher)

James M. Fonda filed for a pension on Apr. 18, 1881 in Iowa.

1900 Census: Bellevue, Jackson County, Iowa: J. M. Fonda (born Sept. 1840, age 59, married 35 years, mail clerk, born NY), wife Mary Fonda (born Aug. 1847, age 52, married 35 years, 7 children born, 4 still living, born NY), daughter Ida Fonda (born June, 1867, age 32), daughter Mildred Fonda (born Nov. 1887, age 12)

Mary J. (Slitor) Fonda died Oct. 20, 1908 and is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa.

1910 Census: Bellevue Ward 2, Jackson County, Iowa: James M. Fonda (age 69, widowed, mail clerk - railroad), daughter Ida Fonda (age 42)

1915 Iowa State Census: Bellevue, Jackson County, Iowa: James Fonda (age 74, widowed, County Jackson, P. O. Bellevue, Township, Bellevue, Occupation: Mail Agent, Total earnings in 1914 from occupation: $1000. Extent of Education Common 15, can read and write, Birth Place: New York, value of farm or home: $1200. Military Service; Civil War: Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment: 27, Company E, Church Affiliation: Presbyterian, father's birth place: New York, mother's birth place: New York. Years in Iowa: 59.

1920 Census: Bellevue, Jackson County, Iowa: James M. Fonda (age 79, widowed) and daughter Ida M. Fonda (age 52);

James Mitchell Fonda died Feb. 21, 1923. He is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa

James F. Fonda, a Civil War veteran and an old resident of Bellevue, died at his home last week. He was a member of Co. E of the 27th Iowa Volunteer Regiment.

James F. Fonda, for 33 consecutive years a mail agent on the narrow gauge railroad between Cascade and Bellevue died at the latter town, February 21, at the age of 83 years.

The Monticello Express, Monticello, Iowa, March 1, 1923.

Note: there are three infant daughters listed in the cemetery records as the daughters of James M. and Mary J. Fonda: Nita Bell (Sept. 20, 1869 - Nov. 21, 1869), Winnie (Feb 8, 1871 - Aug. 15, 1871) and Marie (Sept. 27, 1884 - Oct. 8, 1884).


Fox, Daniel E. He was born Apr. 27, 1831 in Adams, Jefferson County, New York. He was the son of Buell Fox (Apr. 8, 1799 - Dec. 11, 1875) and Laura Tremaine. He married Rachel A. Partlow on May 28, 1861 in Prairie Du Chien, Crawford County, Wisconsin. She was born May 8, 1843 in Freeport, Illinois. She was the daughter of William Partlow and Mariah Stokes.

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: D. E. Fox (age 29, Farm Laborer, born New York., Minerva Fox (Age 13), and H. B. Fox (age 17, Farm Laborer)

Daniel Fox filed for a pension on July 6, 1866.

1870 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Daniel E. Fox (age 37, farm laborer, born New York), Rachel A. Fox (age 27m born Illinois), Harriet A. Fox (age 8), George D. Fox (age 6), Buell K. Fox (age 4), Minnie R. Fox (age 2), and Nellie M. Fox (age 9/12).

1880 Census: Windsor, Clayton County, Iowa: Daniel E. Fox (age 49, farmer, born New York), wife Rachel Fox age 37, born Illinois), daughter Harriet (age 18), son Buell (age 14), daughter Minnie (age 12), daughter Nellie (age 10), son Joseph (age 8), son Willie (age 6), daughter Nellie (age 5), son Charles (age 2) and son Daniel (age 1).

1885 Iowa State Census: Fairfield, Fayette County, Iowa: Daniel Fox (age 53), Rachel Fox (age 42), Buel Fox (age 18), Minnie Fox (age 17), Nelly Fox (age 15), Joseph Fox (age 13), William Fox (age 11), Millie Fox (age 10, Charles Fox (age 7) and Daniel Fox (age 5)

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Northwestern Branch: Daniel E. Fox. MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Each Enlistment. Farmersburg, IA: Feb. 1, 1864, Pv Co. E 27th IA Inf. Transferred: Keokuk IA April 28, 1865 Pv 169 2 Batt VRC. Transferred: Keokuk IA Aug 21, 1865 PV 172 2 Batt VRC. Discharged Oct 2, 1865 at Davenport IA. Cause of Discharge: Close of War. Kind and Degree of Disability: GSW R Thigh July 13, 1864 Old Town Creek LA. Rheumatism & old age. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where Born NY, Age 62, Height 5'7" Complexion Light. Can Read and Write. Religion Prot. Occupation Farmer. Residence Subsequent to Discharge: Lamont IA, Married. Name and Address of Nearest Relative: Wife Rachael Fox, Lamont, Buchanan Co. IA. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: $8.00 Date of Admission Oct 24, 1893. Date of Discharge: Sept. 2, 1894. Cause of Discharge: Trans to W. Br. GENERAL REMARKS: Admission Paper, Col. Jno. L. Mitchell, Mgr. Army Discharge: on Oct. 2, 1865. Certificate of Service None. Pension Certificate 81,073.

Report of the Board of Managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1895 Descriptive list of members admitted to the Iowa Soldiers, Home during the year ending June 30, 1895.

Name: Daniel E. Fox
Regiment: E, 27th Iowa Inf.
Rank: Private
Months Served: 20
Birth Place: New York
Age: 64
Disability: wounds
Place of Admittance: Leavenworth, Kans.
Occupation: Farmer
Marital Status: Married
He was discharged from the Western Branch on Apr. 27, 1895.

1900 Census: Sperry, Clayton County, Iowa: Rachael Fox (born May 1844, age 56, widowed??, age 56, 13 children born 10 still living, born New York), son William (born Apr. 1873, age 27), son Daniel R. (born May 1879, age 21), son Benjamin H (born Oct. 1889 (age 10), daughter Prudentia A. (Born Feb. 1885, age 15), and Son Charles A. (born Apr. 1877, age 23).

1910 Census: Sperry, Clayton County, Iowa: Rachael A Fox (age 65, married 48 years, 13 children born, 10 still living). Son Daniel R. Fox (age 30), son Benjamin H. Fox (age 20). Living next to them was Buell Fox and family. Several families over was Joseph G. Fox (age 38), wife Emma (age 31), daughter Gladys (age 7/12) and father Daniel E. Fox (age 78, married 48 years.)

1915 Iowa State Census: Putnam, Fayette County, Iowa; Daniel E. Fox, age 84, County Fayette, P. O. Arlington, Township Putnam. Occupation: Retired Farmer. Extent of Education: common 8, Birthplace New York. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E. Father's birth place: Vermont. Mother's birth place Mass. Remarks: Could read and write if could see. Blind. Years in Iowa 58.

Rachel A. (Partlow) Fox died Mar. 20, 1915 in Taylorsville, Iowa. She is buried in Taylorsville Cemetery, Arlington, Fayette County, Iowa.

Daniel E. Fox died Dec. 3, 1916 and is buried in Farmersburg-Wagner Cemetery, Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa.

OBITUARY

Daniel E. Fox, son of Buell and Prudency Fox, was born April 27, 1831, at Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, where he lived till April 5, 1857 when he came to Iowa and settled at Farmersburg, Clayton County. He was married to Rachel A. Partlow, May 28, 1861. He enlisted in the 27th Iowa Volunteers for February 1. 1864, was mustered in at Davenport, Iowa, as a recruit and was kept at McClellan under Capt. White to guard the Indian prisoners until May when an order came for every able-bodied soldier to be sent down south. He met his Regiment at Memphis the last of June 1864 and started for Tupelo where they had a hard victorious fight with Forrest and then started back to Memphis but was followed by Forrest and engaged in another fight at Old Town Creek where he received a gun wound in his right thigh which caused him to be sent to the hospital at Memphis and from there to Jefferson Barracks, thence to Keokuk where he stayed till everything was sold out of the hospital, then going back to Farmersburg where he stayed with his family, and lost three children and in April 1884 he moved to a farm near Volga where he lived until July 1890 then moving onto a farm near Lamont where he resided until September 22, 1892. Since then he has been at the Soldiers home at Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Leavenworth, Kansas; and Marshalltown, Iowa. Since leaving the soldiers home he has lived with his children until his death December 3, 1916. He was 85 years, seven months and six days old, and leaves 10 children.

Children of Daniel E. Fox and Rachel A. Partlow:

  1. Hattie A. Fox b: 23 MAR 1862
  2. George D. Fox b: 13 AUG 1863
  3. Buel Kirk Fox b: 28 MAY 1866
  4. Minnie Rachel. Fox b: 27 DEC 1867
  5. Nellie M. Fox b: 10 AUG 1869
  6. Joseph Grant. Fox b: 20 SEP 1871
  7. William H.L. Fox b: 21 APR 1873
  8. Millie May Fox b: 5 JAN 1875
  9. Charley Albert. Fox b: 23 APR 1877
  10. Daniel R. Fox b: 28 MAY 1879
  11. Peter Cooper. Fox b: 30 DEC 1881
  12. Prudency A. Fox b: 4 FEB 1885
  13. Benjamin Harrison. Fox b: 16 OCT 1889

Ganow, Francis Marion. He was born Dec. 4, 1844 in Ohio. He was the son of Alva Gano (June 5, 1820 - Feb. 14, 1885) and Harriet E. Asher (June 17, 1816 - Apr. 19, 1891).

1850 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Alva Gano (age 30, farmer, born NY), Harriett Gano (age 31, born Ohio), Marion Gano (age 4, born Ohio), Calista Gano (age 2, born Ohio), Hezekia Lylinger (age 29, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census, Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa.: Alva Gano (age 32, born NY), Harriet Gano (age 35, born Ohio), Francis Gano (age 11, born Ohio), Calista Gano (age 7, born Ohio), Lydia Gano (age 5, born Iowa) and Nancy Gano (age 1, born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa of 6 years.

1860 Census, Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: Alva Goyner (age 45, born New York), Henrietta Goyner (age 42, born Ohio), Marrin Goyner (age 18, born Ohio), Calista Goyner (age 11, born Ohio), Lydia A. Goyner (age 7, born Iowa) Mary Goyner (age 6, born Iowa) and Deborah Goyner (age 3, born Iowa).

The statement below (found on Fold3), convinces me that this is the same Francis M. Ganow that enlisted with the 27th Iowa. (Note that the roster for the 27th Iowa states that he was transferred to the 16th U.S. Infantry).

Final Statement of Francis M. Ganow, Sergeant Co. A. Battn. Sixteenth U. S. Infantry.

Died Dec. 22, 1865.

I certify that the within named Francis M. Ganow, a Sergeant of Captain Arthur W. Allyn's Company "A", Sixteenth Regiment of United States Infantry. Born in the State of Ohio, aged (18) eighteen years, (5) five feet and (3) three inches high, light complexion, black eyes, dark hair and by profession a farmer. Was enlisted by Captain Lewis at McGregor, Iowa on the 21st days of February eighteen hundred and sixty two to serve (3) three years, and is now entitled to a discharge by reason of death. Died in Post Hospital, Nashville, Tennessee December 22, 1865.

The said Sergt. Francis M. Ganow was last paid by paymaster Maj. Vrooman to include the 31st day of October (1865) eighteen hundred and sixty five and has pay due from that time to the present date. Promoted to Corporal Sept. 1, 1865., Sergeant Oct. 15th 1865. The records of the Company show that Sergeant Francis M. Ganow deserted from the unassigned recruits of the Regiment during the month of April 1862 (no specific day) which time was before the organization of the Company (May 13, 1862). He was arrested March 1864 (day not given). He was restored to duty without trial by order No. 94 Hd Qrs 1st Div 14th A. C, Series 64 on the 15th day of April 1864, forfeiting all pay and allowances to that date and two months future pay and making good time lost by desertion..

He has drawn clothing to the amount of $162.55. There is due him retained pay amount not known.

He is indebted to the United States for one letter "A" numbers 12 & 6

He is indebted to Charles H. Handy Sutter 16 US Infty, $2.00

He is indebted to Laundress - nothing.

The contract price of the ration at Nashville, Tenn. is 25.20 cents

Given in duplicate at Nashville Tenn., this fifteenth day of February 1866.

Arthur W. Allyn

Caption 16 US Infty, Comdg. Co.

Francis Marion Gano died Dec. 22, 1865. He is buried in Postville Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa.

Note. Further research shows that there was a Warren R. Reed that also enlisted in Co. A, 16th US Infantry at McGregor in Feb. 1862. He also enlisted in Company E, 27th Iowa and was transferred to the 16th U.S. Infantry. I wonder if there is some connection between the two soldiers.

Alva Gano 1821-1886
Posted By: Sharyl

DIED. At his residence, in Grand Meadow township, near Postville, Feb. 14th, Mr. A. Gano, aged about 69 years. Deceased had been for several years at intervals, a sufferer from a serious combination of incurable disorders. Mr. Gano was an early settler in this vicinity, a kind-hearted man, a good neighbor, and universally respected by all who knew him.

Mr. Alva Gano died last Sabbath evening at 8:30 in his home one mile south-east of Postville. He was buried Wednesday, Feb. 17, 1886, in the cemetery at Postville. Mr. Gano was born in June, 1821, in Brown Co., New York, moved into Clayton Co., Iowa in 1851, where he has lived ever since. He was the father of five children, four daughters and one son. The latter died in the army during our late civil war. His wife, well advanced in years and in feeble health, survives him. Those who personally knew the deceased say he was an honest man, a good husband, father and neighbor. As such he will be much missed by a large circle of relatives and friends. (by J.W. Ferner)

source: Postville Review (Allamakee co) Feb. 20, 1886.


Godfrey, Jerome C He was born in 1841 in Pennsylvania. He married Mary S. Dennis on June 5, 1863 in Clayton County, Iowa. He was aged 22. She was aged 19. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934)

1850 Census, Monroe, Green County, Wisconsin Osbem Sherman (age 51), Anna Sherman (age 55), Jerome Porter (age 27) Wm. Porter (age 23), Ann Carr (age 20) and Jerome Godfrey (age 9, born Pennsylvania).

He filed for a pension on Dec. 31, 1864.


Goslin, John Linton He was born about 1846 in Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa. He was the son of Simon W. Goslin and Betsy Amanda Peters.

1850 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Simon W. Goslin (age 32, carpenter), Betsey A. Goslin (age 28), Nelson H. Goslin (age 8), George L. Goslin (age 4), James A. Goslin (age 1). (Note: George L Goslin probably should be John L. Goslin)

1856 Iowa State Census, Clayton, Clayton county, Iowa: S. W. Goslin (age 37, carpenter, born Canada), Betsey A. Goslin (age 33, born Vermont), Horatio Goslin (age 13, born Vermont), John L. Goslin (age 9, born Iowa), James A. Goslin (age 7, born Iowa), Emily A. Goslin (age 5, born Iowa), and Martin L. Goslin (age 2, born Iowa).

I could not find John L. Goslin on the 1860 census. I found his family, but not him.

John L. Goslin died June 21, 1864 and is buried in Memphis National Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee, Section A, Site 2104


Goslin, Nelson Horatio He was born June 28, 1843 in Vermont. He was the son of Simon W. Goslin and Betsy Amanda Peters. He married Hariett Goslin. She was the daughter of William Goslin and Sally Holcombe.

1850 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Simon W. Goslin (age 32, carpenter), Betsey A. Goslin (age 28), Nelson H. Goslin (age 8), George L. Goslin (age 4), James A. Goslin (age 1).

1856 Iowa State Census, Clayton, Clayton county, Iowa: S. W. Goslin (age 37, carpenter, born Canada), Betsey A. Goslin (age 33, born Vermont), Horatio Goslin (age 13, born Vermont), John L. Goslin (age 9, born Iowa), James A. Goslin (age 7, born Iowa), Emily A. Goslin (age 5, born Iowa), and Martin L. Goslin (age 2, born Iowa).

1860 Census: Jefferson, Clayton County, Iowa; S. W. Goslin (age 34), Harriet Goslin (age 30), Horatio Goslin (age 18), A. Goslin (age 11), Emily Goslin (age 9), Harriet Goslin (age 1)

He married Harriet H. Goslin about 1869 in Greenbush, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of William D. Goslin and Sally Holcomb.

1870 Census: St. Clair, Benton County, Iowa: S. W. Goslin (age 52), Harriet Goslin (age 39), Nelson H. Goslin (age 28), Hattie Goslin (age 22, born Vermont), Frank Goslin (age 15), Hattie Goslin (age 10), Lucus Goslin (age 8), Henry Goslin (age 6), and Libbie Goslin (age 2)

1880 Census: Cady, Saint Croix, Wisconsin: Nelson H. Goslin (age 37, farmer, born Vermont), Harriet A. Goslin (age 31, born New York), Daughter Ina M. Goslin (age 8, born Iowa), daughter Clara B. Goslin (age 6, born Iowa), son Merrit L. Goslin (age 1, born Iowa) and daughter Mary L. Goslin (age 1, born Iowa). (living next door to them was William Goshlin (age 64, physician, born Vermont) and Sally Goshlin (age 58, born Vermont) -- according to information below they were Harriet's parents.).

1890 Veterans Census: Roberts County, South Dakota: Nelson H. Ghoslin, Private, Co. E. 27 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Dec. 21, 1863, Discharged Jan. 18, 1866. Service 2 years 7 month, 29 days. Post Office Address: Corona, Roberts County, S. Dak. Disability Incurred: Chronic diarrhea & kidney trouble.. Remarks: Transferred to 12th Reg. Iowa Inf. July 17, 1865.

1900 Census: District 290, Garfield, Roberts County, South Dakota: Ghoslin, Nelson (born June 1843, age 56, married 31 years, born Vermont), wife Hattie (born July 1848, age 51, married 31 years, 4 children born, 4 still living, born New York), son Merritt Ghoslin (born Aug. 1878, age 21, born Iowa) and daughter Mary L. Ghoslin (born Aug. 1878, age 21, born Iowa).

Nelson H. Goslin died Sept. 5, 1904. He is buried in Milbank Cemetery, Milbank, Grant County, South Dakota. Date of death is from Find A Grave.

His widow Harriet K. Goslin filed for a pension on Dec. 8, 1904 in South Dakota.

In looking for his date of death and cemetery information, I came across these Postings. Each paragraph is a separate posting and indicate that Nelson's father (Simon Goslin) and Harriet's father (William D. Goslin) were possibly brothers. Most of the information was posted by Allen Goslin about 2001. I was unable to find an email address for him.

The tree that I am researching starts with William D. and Sally (Holcomb) Goslin. A daughter of his is Harriet H. Goslin. She married Nelson Horatio Ghoslin (Goslin, Gosselin). Their children are Ida Marion, Betsy Clarry, Mary L., and Merrit L Ghoslin. If this is the same tree I would love to trade information.


I am just getting back into this after a sabbatical. William D. Ghoslin was my GGGrandfather. I found him living in Franklin Co. NY in 1850 Census with his wife Sally his children and Polly Goslin. His mother. Where did you find the record that his father was James? I have found his birth place listed variously as VT, Canada E, and NY. From a family Bible I have the children of Nelson and Harriet listed. I am trying to discover the parents of William D. and Sally Holcomb Ghoslin.


My GGGrandfather is Simon Zelotus Watson Goslin born December 20, 1818, Quebec, Canada. His eldest son is Nelson Horatio Goslin born June 28, 1843, Viniard, Addison Co., Vermont. That family move to Clayton Co., Iowa about 1847. Nelson left when he was about 28 years old and went to Wisconsin and married Harriet A. Goslin. Her father is William D. Ghoslin born September 08, 1816 at Isle La Motte, Vermont. Simon's parents James and Polly (Pratt) Goslin, I got from his bible (there were too many matches for it to be false). Now that you tell me that William's mother is Polly, that is one too many coincidences for anything else but that Simon and William are brothers. Email me. We are cousins. I have a lot more that I think you would like to have including two pictures of Simon, Nelson Goslin Bible (covers dates from 1811 to 1921) Simon Zelotus Watson Goslin married Betsy Amanda Peters in Vermont (records lost). Their eldest son is Nelson Horatio Goslin. He married Harriet A. (Goslin) Goslin. Her father is William D. Goslin. William and Simon had similar personalities, born two years apart in Canada, both moved to Vermont at about the same time and then they moved west. Their children and grandchildren have similar names. My fathers first, middle and last name is the same as one of Williams grandsons. Simon's bible lists his parents as James and Polly Goslin and lists all of his children's birth dates and some other dates. Except for the discovery of his parents names, the other information confirms what I already knew. I learned Harriet's information from her descendants. They think her grandmother is a Poly but know nothing about her grandfather (William D. Goslin's parents). They think William's ancestry is French. Now you know what I know.


Simon Watson Gosselin (Goslin, Ghoslin) is my gg grandfather. His eldest son is Nelson Horatio Gosselin (Ghoslin, Goslin) born June 28, 1943 in Viniard, Addison Co., Vermont. When he was young the family moved to Iowa. When he was 28 he went to Wisconsin where he met and married Harriet Goslin (her father is William D. Goslin). They had four daughters, Ida Marion (born June 24 in Edan, Iowa), Betsy Clarry (born June 26, 1874 in Edan, Iowa), Mary L. (born Abt. 1879 in Edan, Iowa), and Merrit L. (born abt. 1879 in Iowa). Nelson and Harriet were married in Greenbush, Wisconsin and moved immediately to Corona, South Dakota where he enlisted in the army. Their children were born in Iowa but they ended up living in Wisconsin. His wife's family lived there and still do. Simon and William D. were born in Canada abt 1817 and they both moved to Vermont at about the same time. I suspect they were brothers. Simon's parent's are James and Polly Goslin.


Green, Harvey. He was born May 18, 1845 in Wisconsin. He was the son of Harvey Green (1812 - 1880) and Eliza Foster (1818 - Feb. 15, 1855). He married Ann. There is a family tree that says he was married to Marry Ellen Foster (daughter of John Pickering Foster and Marion Wallace Davenport)., but that does not agree with the 1870 census that I found.

I had a very hard time researching Harvey J. Green and William H. Green. It would appear that they are the sons of Harvey Green and Eliza Foster. But there is a discrepancy in the information regarding Harvey J. Green and William H Green listed below. The only thing I know that is correct for certain is the date of death and burial for Harvey J. Green. I know from Pension Records and the Veterans of Moody County that Harvey Green that served with the 27th Iowa died June 24, 1931 and is buried in Union Cemetery in Moody County, South Dakota. All the family trees list his date of death as 1930 or after 1930 in Moody County. It would make sense that Harvey Green and William H. Green are brothers. The two sons of Harvey Green and Eliza Foster fit with regard to age and place of birth. If the census information below is correct for the William H. Green that died in 1907, then possibly I have Harvey connected to the wrong family. The census information seems to fit for Harvey and William. BUT William H. Green that died in 1907 did not serve with the 27th Iowa. So I either have the wrong family OR all the family trees have the wrong William H. Green associated with Harvey and Eliza Green.

1850 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Harvey Green (age 35, farmer, born Mass.), Eliza Green (age 29, born Ohio), Henry W. Green (age 9, born Wis.), Harriet Green (age 7, born Wis), Harvey Green (age 4, born Wisc.), Hiram Green (age 3, born Iowa), Mason Green (age 6/12, born Iowa), and Jane Stults (age 22, born Tenn.)

1857 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Township 112, Dakota, Minnesota: Harvey Green (age 40, farmer, born New York), Henry Green (age 16, born New York), Harriett Green (age 13, born Wisconsin), Harvey Green (age 11, born Wisconsin), Hiram Green (age 8, born Iowa), Taylor Green (age 7, born Iowa), Elizabeth Green (age 5, born Iowa),

1870 Census: Osage, Mitchell County, Iowa: Harvey Green (age 23, born Wisconsin. laborer), Ann E. Green (age 21, born Wisconsin), James Green (age 1, born Iowa).

Harvey J. Green got a land patent in Moody County on 9/25/1882. Document No. 3657, BLM Serial Nr: SDMTAA 071409. Authority: May 20, 1862: Homestead Entry Original. Total Acres: 160. Land Description: State: SD. Meridian: 5th PM. Twp.-Range: 106N - 048W Aliquots: NW1/4. Section 26. County: Moody. Note: there are two other Land Patents for Harvey Green dated 12/20/1884 and 3/10/1887. But they are in Miner County. I am not sure they are for the same person.

1900 Census: Fairhaven, Whatcom County, Washington: Harvey J. Green (born May 1845, age 55, widowed, married 32 years, born Wisconsin, laborer), boarder John Baker (born Nov. 1854, age 45, single, born Indiana, night watchman)

1910 Census, Bellingham Ward 6, Whatcom County, Washington: Harvey J. Green (age 64, divorced, born Wisconsin, Gardner), boarder John W. Baker (age 55, single, born Indiana, Carpenter).

1920 Census, Bellingham Ward 6, Whatcom County, Washington: Harvey J. Greene (age 74, widowed, born Wisconsin) Boarder John W. Baker (age 65, born Indiana).

1930 Census: Iroquois, Beadle County, South Dakota: William H. Meyers (age 72, married at age 31, born Minnesota), wife Harriet A. Meyers (age 59, married at age 18, born Iowa), father-in-law Harvey J. Green (age 83, widowed, married at age 22, born Wisconsin, retired).

Harvey J. Green died June 24, 1931 at Flandreau, South Dakota (Pension Index Records). He is buried in Union Cemetery, Flandreau, Moody County, South Dakota. (Note: there is a discrepancy in the date of death: The Pension index record says June 24, 1931 - the tombstone says June 1930. I am using the 1931 date from the Pension Index Record.

Veterans, Moody County:

Name: Harvey J. Green
Served in: Civil War
Reg/Branch: 27th Reg, IA
Co: E
Date Enrolled: 1863
Service Ending: 1866
Rank: PVT
Cemetery: Union


Green, William H. He was born about 1843 in Wisconsin.

Every family tree indicates that he is the son of Harvey Green (1812 - 1880) and Eliza Foster (1818 - Feb. 15, 1855) However, there are some major discrepancies.

See my notes in Harvey J. Green above. The family tree information shows that he was born about 1841 in Crawford County, Wisconsin. It shows his brother as Harvey Green who was born May 18, 1845 in Wisconsin and died after 1930 at Flandreau, South Dakota. I know from Pension records that Harvey Green did die in 1931 in Flambeau, so I am pretty certain I have the correct Harvey Green. HOWEVER, there are several William H. Greens that served in the Civil War. I am finding conflicting information within the online family trees. Several family trees list Harvey Green and Eliza Foster as the parents of William Henry Green (born 1841 and died in Dec. 14, 1907. He was married to Johana Yeaky. He served with Co. B, 95th PA Vols. and is buried in Fernwood Cemetery, Fernwood, Del. Co., PA. I looked up the pension Index card for William H. Green in Co. B, 95th PA Inf. Regt. It is cross referenced with K 12 VRC, B 54 PA Inf and C & I 95 PA. (I followed the link on this one. It appears that the burial card was first added to a family tree for William H. Green son of Henry Green and Elizabeth Jane Hover. I realized that the family trees that copied this burial card had the same date of death as the paragraph below (May 21, 1907) with the burial card showing a date of death of Dec. 14, 1907. So I firmly believe this one is an error.)

There are other family trees that has Harvey Green and Eliza Foster with son William Henry Green (married to Johana Yeaky). He was born Dec. 1836 and died May 21, 1907. He is buried in Ludington Cemetery, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. His tombstone shows the name Henry Green and that he served with Co. G. 3 Wis. Inf.

There is no mention of the 27th Iowa. I do not believe they are the same person.

I am unable to find any other William H. Green that seems to fit. So (A) either I have the wrong Harvey J. Green above (B) the William H. Green that is the son of Harvey Green and Eliza Foster IS NOT the same as the one that was in the 95 PA or 3 Wisconsin. OR (C) Harvey Green and William H. Green are not brothers.

Maybe someday I will be contacted by someone that will give some clarification to this.


Hamilton, Patton He was born about 1841 in Wisconsin. He was the son of James Hamilton and Margaret:

1850 Census: District 24, Grant County, Wisconsin: James Hamilton (age 32, farmer, born Ireland), Margaret Hamilton (age 32, born Ireland), John P. Hamilton (age 9, born Wisc.), Maria Hamilton (age 7, born Wisc.) Hannah Hamilton (age 3, born Wisc.) and Child Hamilton (male, age 1, born Wisc.).

1856 Iowa State Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: James Hamilton (age 35, born Ireland, laborer), Margret Hamilton (age 31, born Ireland), Patton Hamilton (age 13, born Wisconsin), Maria Hamilton (age 11, born Wisconsin), Anna Hamilton (age 8, born Wisconsin). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 5 years.

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: James Hamilton (age 50, laborer, born Ireland), Margret Hamilton (age 40, born Ireland), Patton Hamilton (age 17, born Iowa), Hannah Hamilton (age 11), James Hamilton (age 9). L. M. Hamilton (age 7), Andrew Hamilton (age 6) and Chesterfield Hamilton (age 1).

Patton J. Hamilton died before Dec. 11, 1869 and is buried in St. Joseph Cemetery, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa.

His mother Margaret Hamilton filed for a pension on Dec. 11, 1869.


Hancock, Morrison N. He was born July 12, 1839 in Elkhart, Indiana. He was the son of Ephraim Millman Hancock (Jan. 9, 1809 - April 29, 1885) and Mary Ann Burget (May 20, 1817 - June 22, 1894). He married Adeline Arnold on Nov. 19, 1867 in Waukon, Allamakee County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). His sister, Minerva Hancock, married Charles F. Mitchell, who served in Company A, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Washington, Elkhart County, Indiana: Emphaim Hancock (age 39, farmer), Mrs. Hancock (age 33), Manerva Hancock (age 16), Martha A. Hancock (age 14), Morrison Hancock (age10), Thomas Hancock (age 8), Elizabeth Hancock (age 6) and Margaret Hancock (age 2).

1856 Iowa State Census: Linton, Allamakee County, Iowa: Emphram Hancock (age 47, born Ohio), Mary A. Hancock (age 39, born Indiana), Morrison Hancock (age 16), Thos. J. Hancock (age 15), Martha A. Hancock (age 18) Elisabeth Hancock (age 19), Margret A. Hancock (age 8), John Hancock (age 5) and Homer Hancock (age 2). (Note all the children were born in Indiana and they had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years).

1880 Census: Franklin, Allamakee County, Iowa; Morris Hancock (age 40, farmer, born Indiana), wife Adaline Hancock (age 34) and daughter Martha Hancock (age 10)

1885 Iowa State Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Morrison N. Hancock (age 45, laborer), Adaline Hancock (age 38), Martha L. Hancock (age 15) and Morris H. Hancock (age 3).

1900 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Morris N. Hancock (born July 1839, age 60, married 32 years, carpenter), wife Adiline Hancock (born July 1854, age 54, married 32 years, 4 children born, 2 still living, born Ohio) and son Morris Hancock (born Jan, 1882, age 18).

Morrison N. Hamilton died June 6, 1907 and is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa.

His widow Adaline J. Hancock filed for a pension on June 27, 1907 in Iowa.

Adaline Hancock died Jan. 22, 1927 (United States Veterans Administration Payment Card).


Hanna, Henry D. He was born May 6, 1822 in Trumball County, Ohio. He married first Marguertta J. Rice. She died in 1849. He married second Mary Dice. His son Isaac Sherman Hanna also served in Company E, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Poland, Mahoning County, Ohio: James B. Scott (age 28, carriage maker), Sarah L. Scott (age 21), John Scott (age 7) and Henry D. Hanna (age 32, carriage maker).

1850 Census: Boardman, Mahoning county, Ohio: John Dice (age 42, farmer), Margaret Dice (age 56?) Eliza Fankell, (age 20), Mary M. Dice (age 18), Jas. J. Dice (age 16), Thomas Dice (age 14), Dulice (age 9) and William H. Fankell (age 24)

1860 Census: Perry, Jackson County, Iowa: H. D. Hanna (age 38, wagon maker, born Ohio), Mary Hanna (age 28), I. S. Hanna (age 14, born Penn), Chas. A. Hanna (age 4, born Iowa), and Clara Hanna (age 1, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Boulder, Linn County, Iowa: H. D. Hannah, (age 48, born Ohio), Mary Hannah (age 38, born Ohio), Sherman Hannah (age 13, born Iowa), Clara Hannah (age 10, born Iowa) and Maggie Hannah (age 7, born Iowa). (Note: Isaac's name was Isaac Sherman. However, the age listed for Sherman on this census seems to fit Charles.)

This information came from the Jones County US Genweb site.

H. D. Hanna Born 1822

H. D. HANNA, merchant, and proprietor of Rose Creamery, Scotch Grove; was born in Trumbull Co., Ohio, in 1822; he came to Andrew, Jackson Co., Iowa, in the spring of 1853, where he lived seven years engaged in the wagon-making business; was Justice of the Peace while there, from 1855 to 1860. His first wife was Mariette Rice; she died in Ohio, in December. 1849; his present wife was Mary Dice, from Mahoning Co., Ohio; has one son by first marriage-Isaac S., and three children by second marriage-Charles, Clara and Maggie. Mr. Hanna removed from Jackson Co. to Clayton Co. in 1860, thence to Linn Co. in 1863. He came to his present location in May, 1874, and engaged in the grain trade; he engaged in the merchandise business in December of that year; built his creamery in the spring of 1879. He and family are members of the Christian Church.

History of Jones County, Iowa,

Western Historical Company, Chicago, 1879, page 655,

Submitted by Lori J. Mentzel.

1879 - The Scotch Grove Creamery

Mr. H. D. Hanna's creamery, at Scotch Grove is in successful operation. Mr. Hanna informs us that he is now using 6,000 lbs. milk per day, and a month hence will probably be using 7,000 to 8,000 lbs. The Eastern market for creamery butter is at its lowest ebb, and those larger establishments that can afford to hold their butter for a few months are the fortunate ones. There can be no doubt that the price will improve in a month or two.

The creameries are now paying 50 cts. Per 100 lbs. for milk. Allowing four lbs. of butter per 100 pounds of milk, it takes 12 1/2 cents worth of milk to make one pound of butter. Add to this the cost of manufacture, and the first cost of the butter cannot be less than 15 cts. Per pound. Now at the old prices of 28 to 35 cts. Per pound, there would be a good healthy profit. But at the present quotations of 17 to 19 cts. Per pound, the margin is not particularly stalwart. Another month will doubtless see a change for the better. [June 12]

1880 Census: Scotch Grove, Jones County, Iowa: Henry D. Hana (age 50, merchant, Groceries Dry Goods, born Ohio), wife Marry Hana (age 48, born Ohio), son Charles N Hana (age 24, works in Creamery, born Iowa), daughter Clara B. Hana (age 19, born Iowa), and daughter Maggie J Hana (age 17, born Iowa)

Henry D. Hanna died July 16, 1881 and is buried in Scotch Grove Presbyterian Cemetery, Jones County, Iowa

Note: Cemetery information shows that Henry D. Hanna was born in 1822 and is buried in Scotch Grove Cemetery in Jones County. (Per Steve Hanken there is a GAR marker by his tombstone) His pension records show a widow named Mary. Marriage records of Clara Hanna, Maggie Jennie Hanna and Charles M. Hanna all show their parents names as Henry D. Hanna and Mary Dice.

His widow Mary Hanna filed for a pension on Sept. 27, 1881.


Hanna, Isaac Sherman He was born Sept. 14, 1845 in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Henry D. Hanna and Marguretta J. Rice. Henry D. Hanna also served in Company E, 27th Iowa. Isaac Sherman Hanna married Maria Green on Dec. 12, 1868. She was the daughter of Thomas Green and Mercy Hancock.

1850 Census: Poland, Mahoning County, Ohio: Sherman Rice (age 70, farmer, born Connecticut), Peggy Rice (age 51, born Connecticut), Isaac S. Hanna (age 6, born Ohio). (I would assume these are his grandparents. According to the information under Henry D. Hanna, Isaac's mother Marietta Rice died in Dec. 1849).

1860 Census: Perry, Jackson County, Iowa: H. D. Hanna (age 38, wagon maker, born Ohio), Mary Hanna (age 28), I. S. Hanna (age 14, born Penn), Chas. A. Hanna (age 4, born Iowa), and Clara Hanna (age 1, born Iowa).

Alfred F. Green

There is no family better known in the northeastern part of Linn county or more deserving of prominent mention in its history than the Green family. The late Alfred F. Green, who for several years was one of the foremost business men of Coggon, was born in Venango county, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1841, a son of Thomas and Mercy (Hancock) Green. The father was also a native of the same state, born in 1805, and continued his residence there until 1844, when he removed with his family to Iowa, settling in Dubuque county, where he followed farming for some years. He then removed to a farm in Delaware county, where he resided about three years. Subsequently he came to Linn county and located in Jackson township, where the village of Coggon now stands, erecting there the house in which his son-in-law, I. S. Hanna, now resides, where his last days were spent with his children in retirement from active labor. He died May 9, 1887, and his wife passed away November 19, 1882.

Unto this worthy couple were born eight children, as follows: Sarah Ann, deceased, was the wife of John De Woody; Lydia, deceased, was the wife of Anthony English, of Dubuque county; Amos H., was one of the prominent citizens of Coggon, was a director of the Coggon State Bank, and was engaged in the milling business at that place for a number of years, after which he conducted a boarding house until his death, March 18, 1901. He married Sarah Spurgeon, and his widow and daughter now carry on the boarding house; Ruth is the wife of Milton Haggard, a resident of De Soto, Iowa; Alfred F., our subject, was next in order of birth; William died young; Maria is the wife of I. S. Hanna, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work; Henry married Mary Coquillette and lives in Clark, South Dakota.

On the 12th of June, 1870, Mr. Green was united in marriage with Miss Lydia Castle, who was born in Canandaigua, New York, April 2, 1853, and is a daughter of Lemuel and Mary (Case) Castle, also natives of the Empire state. It was in 1860 that her family came to Linn county, Iowa, and for several years her father was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Jackson township, but spent his last years in retirement with our subject. Mr. and Mrs. Green became the parents of seven children: Francis, who died in infancy; Milan J., who married Emma Mammoser and resides in Wesley, Iowa, where he is editor of the Wesley World; Minnie, wife of G. W. Olinger, a teacher of vocal music residing in Coggon; Carl A. and Ray L. are engaged in the hardware business in Coggon; Leo Rex and Glen Castle are at home.

During his residence in Delaware county Mr. Green taught school and also taught vocal music, but after coming to Coggon embarked in general merchandising and the milling business, he and his brother Amos H. owning the mill at this place, known as the Green Brothers gristmill, which they conducted for about twenty-five years. Our subject was also land agent and served as postmaster at Coggon for several years. He successfully carried on the mercantile and milling business until his death, which occurred November 23, 1899. He was a wide-awake, energetic and reliable business man, whose word was as good as his bond, and his affairs were so managed as to win for him the confidence of the public and the prosperity which should always attend honorable effort. In politics he was a Democrat, and in his social relations was a charter member of both the Masonic and Odd Fellows Lodges of Coggon. After Mr. Green removed to Coggon he took up the study of law, in which he met with fair success, although he was never admitted to the bar. He always took an active interest in church work, both he and his wife belonging to the Christian church of that place. Mr. Green was a man who was beloved by all and at all times his hand and pocket were ready to assist any one in need of help. His family is one of prominence in both social and business circles, and own considerable property in Coggon and Jackson township. They have a pleasant home in the eastern part of the village, where hospitality reigns supreme.

Biographical Record of Linn County, Iowa
Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1901

Hanna, Isaac S., Farmer, Sec. 5. P.O. Nugent's Grove; owns 118 acres of land, worth $3,000; born in Fayette Co., Penn. Sept. 14, 1845; moved with his parents to Mahoning Co., Ohio, where they remained until 1853, when they came to Jackson Co., Iowa, and in 1860 to Clayton Co. Mr. Hanna enlisted Aug. 15, 1862, in the 27th I. V. I., Co. E; participated in the battles of Pleasant Hill, Nashville, Blakely and many others; was honorably discharged Aug. 8, 1865. Married Maria Green, Dec. 12, 1868; she was born in Dubuque Co., Iowa, July 29, 1845; their children are Stella M. and Jessie L. Is a Republican and a member of the Church of Christ.

The History of Linn County, 1878

I. S. HANNA

For many years I. S. Hanna, of Coggon, was one of the active and progressive business men of this county, as well as one of its most reliable and honored citizens and he is now enjoying a well-earned rest, free from the cares and responsibilities of his business life. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born in Fayette county, September 14, 1845, but his parents only resided there about two years when they moved back to Mahoning county, Ohio, where they had formerly resided. In 1854 he came to Iowa with his parents, Henry D. and Mary Hanna, who located in Jackson county. There the father worked at his trade, that of wagon making, until 1860, when he removed to Clayton county, Iowa, and turned his attention to farming In 1863 he came to Linn county and purchased an unimproved tract of land in Bowlder township for four dollars per acre, and at once commenced to improve the farm. In 1864, during the dark days of the Rebellion, he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry. In the early part of his service he was injured by being thrown from a car. From the effects of that injury he was discharged in November, 1864. After his return from the army he located at Hopkinton, Iowa, where the family had resided during his absence, but resided there only a short time, and then returned to this county and resumed the operation of his farm in Bowlder township. He subsequently engaged in farming on another place in that township until 1873, when he sold out and removed to Jones county, Iowa, where he carried on the merchandising and creamery business and also bought and shipped grain. There he resided until his death, which occurred July 16, 1881.

The mother of our subject had died in 1849, and the father subsequently wedded Miss Mary Dice, who departed this life October 26, 1890. By the first union there were two children: I. S., our subject; and Martha A., who died in infancy. The children born of the second marriage were Charles M., now a resident of Manchester, Iowa; Clara M., deceased; and Maggie J., a resident of West Liberty, Iowa. They were all educated in the public schools of this county.

Like his father, I. S. Hanna also decided to shoulder his gun and fight for his country in her hour of peril. Although only sixteen years of age, he enlisted on the 15th of August 1862, in Company E., Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel James I. Gilbert and Captain Thomas G. Drips. He was then living in Clayton county, Iowa. This regiment participated in many important engagements and a large number of skirmishes, including the battles of Fort De Russy, Pleasant Hill, Kane River, Old Oaks and Tupelo, Louisiana; Old Town Creek, Mississippi; Nashville, Tennessee, under General Thomas; and Fort Blakely, Alabama, taking part in the last named engagement April 9, 1865, -the day of Lee's surrender. During the last ten months of his service Mr. Hanna was leader of the regimental brass band and played an E flat instrument. He was never wounded nor injured during his entire service, and when hostilities ceased was honorably discharged at Clinton, Iowa, August 8, 1865.

Returning from the war Mr. Hanna rejoined the family in Linn county, they having located in Bowlder township during his service. After assisting his father on the farm for a short time, he commenced work at the plasterer's and stone mason's trades, following those occupations all through the northeastern part of the county.

On the 12th of December, 1868, Mr. Hanna married Miss Maria Green, a native of Dubuque county, in 1845, and a daughter of Thomas P. and Mercy (Hancock) Green, who were among the first settlers to locate here. The father was born in 1805 and followed farming throughout his active business life. He lived in the house in Coggon now occupied by our subject, it being the old Green homestead. For a time he resided in Delaware county, but returned to this county and lived retired with his children on the old homestead until his death, which occurred May 9, 1887. His wife had departed this life on the 19th of November, 1882. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hanna were Stella M., who died at the age of twenty years; Jessie L., wife of A. W. Savage, of Coggon; Cora, at home with her parents; and Elmer and Ethel, who both died in infancy.

After his marriage Mr. Hanna commenced farming in the western part of Bowlder township, where he lived for twelve years, and then removed to Scotch Grove, Iowa, where he engaged in the creamer business with his brother for a year. In 1882 he came to Coggon and built a creamery, which he opened for six years, and in the meantime entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, A. F. Green, in the general mercantile business and continued his connection with the store until June, 1899, when he sold his interest in the business and has since lived retired. Besides his property in Coggon he still owned the old farm in Bowlder township, consisting of one hundred and twenty acres of rich and arable land.

Politically Mr. Hanna was formerly a Republican, but is now a supporter of the Prohibition party. He has never sought official honors, but has served as school director in Coggon for six years, and was secretary of the board for some time. Socially he is a member of John Kyle Post, No. 457, G. A. R., of Coggon, of which he is now quartermaster. Both he and his wife are earnest and consistent members of the Christian church of that place, which was organized in 1866, and he is now senior elder of the same. He has always taken quite an active part in church work, and has given his support to every enterprise calculated to advance the moral, social or material welfare of his town and country.

Source: The Biographical Record of Linn County Iowa, Illustrated, Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1901, pages 747-9.

Submitted by: Terry Carlson

1880 Census: Boulder, Linn County, Iowa: Sherman Hanna (age 34, farmer, born Pennsylvania), wife Maria Hanna (age 34), daughter Stella M. Hanna (age 10), daughter Jessie L. Hanna (age 6), cousin Minnie Young (age 19) and nephew Myron Green (age 19).

1885 Iowa State Census: Jackson, Linn County, Iowa: Isaac S. Hanna (Township 86, Range 6, Section 10, NE NW, age 39, born Pennsylvania, butter manufacturer.), Maria Hanna (age 39), Stella M. Hanna (age 15), Jessie L. Hanna (age 11), Thomas J. Green (age 79), Jane Robbinson (age 27, domestic) and Lulia M. Hopkins (age 21, teacher).

1910 Census: Des Moines Ward 1, Polk County, Iowa: Isaac S. Hanna (age 64, married 1 time for 42 years, born Pennsylvania, own income), wife Maria Hanna (age 64, married 1 time for 42 years, 5 children born, 2 still living, born Iowa), daughter Cora F. Hanna (age 23, born Iowa).

1915 Iowa State Census: Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa; I. Sherman Hanna (age 69, County Polk, Town: Des Moines, Ward 1, Occupation Retired, Extent of Education, Common 8, can read and write Birth Place, Pennsylvania, Owns own home or farm, value $3000.00. Military Service: Civil War, State Iowa, Regiment 27th, Company E., Church Affiliation: Christian, Father's Birth place, Ohio, mother's birthplace New York. Years in Iowa 60.

Isaac Sherman Hanna died Sept. 3, 1919 and is buried in Coggon Cemetery, Linn County, Iowa.

His widow Maria Hanna filed for a pension on Oct. 4, 1919 in Iowa.

Maria Hanna died May 3, 1920 and is buried in Coggon Cemetery, Linn County, Iowa.


Heinz, Henry. He was born May 1841 in Missouri,

1870 Census, Giard, Clayton County, Iowa: Henry Heinz (age 29, Merchant (ret), born Missouri), Mena Heinz (age 25, born Hesee-Darmstadt).

Nov. 7, 1876 California, Voter Registers: Henry Heinz, age 35, born Missouri, laborer, Local Residence: Martinez

1880 Census: Martinez, Contra Costa, California: Henry Heins (age 39, laborer, born Missouri), wife Wilhelmina Heins (age 25, born Hesee-Darmstadt).

Aug. 15, 1892 California, Voter Registers Henry Heinz, age 51, Height: 5 feet, 9 1/2 inches. Complexion: Light; Color of Eyes: Gray, Color of Hair: Grayish, Occupation: farmer; born Missouri, Place of Residence: Franklin Canon; Precinct: Alhambra; P. O. Address: Martinez.

May 19, 1896 California, Voter Registers Henry Heinz, age 55, Height: 5 feet, 9 1/2 inches. Complexion: Light; Color of Eyes: Gray, Color of Hair: Gray; born Missouri.

1900 Census: Alhambra, Contra Costa, California: Henry Heinz (born May 1841, age 59, married 35 years, born Missouri, farmer), J. M. Conan (born June 1845, age 50, single, born Illinois, farm laborer).

Henry Heinz died May 30, 1907. (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Alhambra Cemetery, Martinez, Contra Costa County, California.

His widow Mena Huffer field for a pension on Jan. 15, 1910 in California. George P. Huffer was guardian.


Henderson, James A. He was born Oct. 1847 in Scotland. He was the son of James and Joan Henderson. He married Helen A. (probably Kerr). I found a marriage record for James A. Henderson and Helen A. Kerr on Dec. 16, 1869 in Fayette County, Iowa (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). I also found a marriage record for Katharine Florence Henderson (born 1877) to Robert McIntosh on Oct. 3, 1906 in Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa. It lists her parents as James A. Henderson and Helen A. Kerr. This name appears to match Katie F. Henderson on the 1880, 1885, and 1900 Censuses. I also found a marriage record for Bertha Asenath Henderson (born 1870) to William Shardlow, Jr. on Aug. 25, 1903 in Cherokee County, Iowa. She lists her parents as James Ales. Henderson and Helen A. Kerr. This name appears to match Bertha Henderson on the 1880, 1885 and 1900 Censuses. Also NOTE: Bertha A. and William Shardlow are buried in the same cemetery as James A. and Helen A. Henderson. From the 1860 Census, Helen A. Kerr was probably the daughter of George and Barbara Kerr who were in Clermont, Fayette County. They had children: Albert J., H. A. Kerr (age 9, female, born Illinois), Lovina Kerr, Asenath Kerr, Alice Kerr and Chas. Kerr. I also found them on the 1856 Iowa State Census in Clermont, Fayette County, Iowa. In 1856, she was listed as Helen A. Kerr. They had been in the State of Iowa for 3 years.

1850 Census: Janesville (east side of Rock River), Rock County, Wisconsin: James Henderson (age 50, born Scotland, Harness maker), Susan Henderson (age 28), born Scotland), James Henderson (age 3, born Scotland), Joan Henderson (age 8/12, born Wisconsin and Barbara Channers (age 45, born Scotland) (Note: I have some serious reservations about this census record. I always start at the most recent and work backwards, so I found this one last. I am sure the 1860 census is the correct James A. Henderson. Note that it says that the 2 children just younger than James were born in Wisconsin. So in 1850 I looked specifically in Wisconsin. This appears to be the same family but the ages are considerably off except for the children. The name SUSAN is clearly "Susan" -- Not "Joan". The thing that makes me really think this is the same family is the Barbara Channers that is living with them).

1860 Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton county, Iowa: James Henderson (age 40, farmer, born Scotland), Joan Henderson (age 30), James Alex Henderson (age 12), Isabella Henderson (age 10, born Wis.), Thomas Henderson (age 7, born Wis.), Howard Henderson (age 5, born Iowa), and Barbara Chamer (age 63, born Scotland).

1870 Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: James Henderson, (Age 23, farmer laborer, born Scotland) (He was listed with a family and 4 other farm laborers)

At Cherokee

The Congregational Church at Cherokee was organized in 1870. Rev. J. R. Upton, one of the original seven ministers of this church faith, who came to Iowa at a very early date commenced missionary work and was better know as "Father Upton" of Spirit Lake, and was the first one to visit Cherokee County. He began work as a missionary in 1869 and June 15, 1870, he appointed a meeting of a preliminary nature at Hazard (now called Meriden). This meeting was held at Hazard because no room could be procured in Cherokee, the Presbyterian brethren having preempted the only available room for that day and for the same purpose of organizing a church at Cherokee. The meeting held at Hazard resulted in a determination to organize a church and the meeting adjourned to meet June 12th at Cherokee in the old courthouse where the church was organized with the following as charter members of the "First Congregational Church of Cherokee, Iowa: Calvin Bushnell Mrs. Mary Bushnell, Henry Bushnell, Mrs. Sophia Bushnell, James A. Henderson, Mrs. Angelina Henderson, Mrs. E. E. Kellogg, and Dr. Royal L. Cleaves.....

In the autumn of 1873 the congregation because weary of having no church building and it was determined to erect a house of worship of their own, so a frame building 34 X 50 feet was built at an expense of $4,000, which was dedicated March 22, 1874, by Rev. John Morley of Sioux City assisted by Rev. D. D. Frost of Le Mars and Rev. W. L. Coleman of Spencer. Later a lecture room was added and other improvements made making a total cost of church and furnishings of about $6,000. This edifice served the congregation until the erection of the present magnificent brick structure completed in 1900.

History of Cherokee County, Iowa, Volume 1, Page 274.

1880 Census Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa: James A. Henderson (age 33, Lightening Rod Peddler, born Scotland, Wife Angie Henderson (age 29, born Illinois), daughter Bertha Henderson (age 9, born Iowa), Son Wilfred E. Henderson (age 7, born Iowa), daughter May A (age 5, born Minnesota), daughter Katie F. Henderson (age 2, born Minnesota).

1885 Iowa State Census: Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa: James A. Henderson (born Scotland), Hellen A. Henderson (born Illinois), Bertha A. Henderson born Cherokee County, Iowa), May A. Henderson (born Minnesota), and Katie F. Henderson (born Minnesota).

1900 Census: Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa: James A. Henderson (born Oct. 1847, age 52, married 30 years, born Scotland, immigrated 1850, in US 50 years, naturalized. U. S. Postmaster.), wife Helen A. (born July 1851, age 49, married 30 years, 5 children born, 3 still living, born Illinois), daughter Bertha (born July 1871, age 28, born Iowa, school teacher), daughter May A. Henderson (born Aug. 1874, age 25, born Minnesota, music teacher), daughter Kate F. (born July 1876, age 24, born Minnesota, school teacher), mother Joan Henderson (born May 1821, age 79, widowed, 7 children born, 6 still living, born Scotland, immigrated 1850, in US 50 years.)

1910 Census, Cherokee Ward 1, Cherokee County, Iowa James A. Henderson (age 62, married one time for 40 years, born Scotland, immigrated 1845, naturalized, Commercial Salesman, Nursery), wife Hellen A. Henderson (age 59, married one time for 40 years, 5 children born, 3 still living, born Illinois), daughter Mae A. Henderson (age 34, born Minnesota, music teacher). (Note: the name was indexed as Hauderson and had a note of Handerson).

1915 Iowa State Census: Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa: James Alexander Henderson (age 68, County Cherokee, Township Cherokee Ward 1, Occupation Salesman. Total Earnings for 1914 from Occupation: $500. Extent of Educations: Common 7, High School 2, College 10, Birth place: Scotland, Value of farm or home: 2,200. Military Service: Civil War 3. Church Affiliation: Unitarian, father's birthplace Scotland, mother's birthplace Scotland., Naturalized, in US for 60 years.

1920 Census: Cherokee Ward 1, Cherokee County, Iowa: James A. Henderson (age 72, immigrated 1850, naturalized, wife Hellen A. Henderson (age 68, born Illinois), daughter Mae A. Henderson (age 44, born Minnesota, music teacher - piano).

James A. Henderson died Feb. 25, 1924 at Cherokee, Iowa (Pension Index Records). He is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa. Plot: Blk 1, lot 2, grave 2. (Note: Find a Grave has DOD as Feb. 28, 1924. That might be a burial date).

His widow Helen A. Henderson filed for a pension on Mar. 10, 1924 in Iowa.

Helen A. Henderson died Feb. 24, 1927 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa. Plot Blk 1, lot 2, grave 1. (Note: since the date for James A. Henderson appears to be a burial date, this date might also be a burial date).


Herman, Oley (Alias Roley O. Harmon) Born 1844 in Norway.

He filed for a pension on Jun 4, 1894 in Oklahoma.

1910 Census: Linn, Marshall County, Iowa, Old Soldier's Home: Oley Hermann, (age 66, widowed, born Norway)

U.S. National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Milwaukee Wisconsin Northwestern Branch: Oley Herman, MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 11, 1862, National, Iowa. Rank P, Company and Regiment: E, 27 Ia. Inf. Time and Place of Discharge; Aug 9, 1865, Clinton, IA. Cause of Discharge: close of war. Disabilities when admitted to the Home: Rt. Ing. hernia, Arterio Sclerosis, hypertrophy of prostate - chr artho rheumatism. Mental condition appears normal. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born Norway, age 63, height 5.6, complexion fair, gray eyes, gray hair, can read and write, Religion: Prot. Occupation: Stone Mason, Residence Subsequent to Discharge: Kansas City, Mo. Married or Single: Wid., Name and Address of Nearest relative: daugh. Mrs. Iris Keeler, Scottsville, Kansas. HOME HISTORY: Adm. West. Br. Nov. 20, 06. Discharged Aug. 26, 08, Cause of Discharge: OR. Re-adm Wes Br. June 25, 09. Discharged Apr. 13. 10, OR. Re-adm May 13, 12. Date of Death May 4, 1915. Cause of death: Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Senility. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate 996,096. Effects: Cash: 59.15. Person appraised at 8.85. Sold 5.90 on Jan. 5, 1916. Total: $65.05. Location of Grave and Remarks: Interred in Home Cemetery, Block 20, Row 27.

Oley Herman died May 4, 1915 and is buried in Wood National Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Plot 20-27.

His widow Sarah O. Barber filed for a pension on Apr. 30, 1919 in Kansas.


Hill, David S. He was born about 1822 in New York.

His widow Anna M. Hill filed for a pension on Mar 1, 1890 in Illinois.


Hudson, George Washington He was born about 1832 in Vermont. He was the son of Washington William Hudson (Aug. 21, 1807 - June 4, 1886) and Roxanne Bagley (June 6, 1807 - July 1, 1899). He married Martha Josephine Neeling on July 2, 1861 in Clayton County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of James Neling (July 4, 1800 - Apr. 12, 1886) and Ann Cameron (Dec. 5, 1801 - Jan 31, 1885). Her brother Daniel A. Nelings and two cousins, James Nelings and William H. Nelings also served in Company E, 27th Iowa. George W Hudson's brother Harry H. Hudson also served in Company E, 27th Iowa. His sister Mary R. Hudson, married Cornelius Morgan, who also served in Company E, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census, Riley, Sandusky, Ohio Washington Hudson (age 43, blacksmith, born Vermont), Rosana Hudson (age 43, born Vermont), George Hudson (age 19, laborer, born Vermont), Horace Hudson (age 16, born NY), Harry Hudson (age 14, born NY), Mary Hudson (age 12, born NY), Edward Hudson (age 8, born NY), Albert Hudson (age 5, born Ohio) and Squire Hudson (age 1, born Ohio).

1870 Census: Algona, Kossuth, Iowa; George W. Hudson, (age 38, carpenter, born Vermont), Martha Hudson (age 26, born Pennsylvania), Lewis Hudson (age 8), George Hudson (age 6), William Hudson (age 3), Estella Hudson (age 1),

1880 Census: Algona, Kossuth, Iowa: George W. Hudson (age 46, carpenter, born Vermont), wife Josephine M. Hudson (age 36, born Pennsylvania), son Willie H. Hudson (age 13), son Louis F. Hudson (age 18), daughter Estella Hudson (age 11), and daughter Mary J. Hudson (age 4),

George W. Hudson died June 20, 1882. He is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa. (the date was found on Find a Grave. His widow Josephine M. Hudson filed for a pension on Dec. 11, 1882.

1885 Iowa State Census: Algona, Kossuth Iowa: Josephine M. Hudson, (age 40, widowed, born Pennsylvania), Lewis F. Hudson (age 22), William H. Hudson (age 17), Dora E. Hudson (age 15), Mary J. Hudson (age 8), and Georgiana Hudson (age 3).

1888 Iowa State Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Josephine Hudson (age 44, born Pennsylvania) Male L. F Hudson (age 26) female Stella Hudson (age 18), female Josie Hudson (age 12), and female Georgia A. Hudson (age 7).

Martha Josephine (Neeling) Hudson died June 2, 1902 and is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa.


Hudson, Harry Henry He was born about 1836 in New York. He was the son of Washington William Hudson (Aug. 21, 1807 - June 4, 1886) and Roxanne Bagley (June 6, 1807 - July 1, 1899). Henry H. Hudson married Huldah R. King on June 12, 1859 in Clayton County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Gideon King and Lydia Brown. Harry's brother George W. Hudson also served in Company E, 27th Iowa. His sister Mary R. Hudson, married Cornelius Morgan, who also served in Company E, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census, Riley, Sandusky, Ohio Washington Hudson (age 43, blacksmith, born Vermont), Rosana Hudson (age 43, born Vermont), George Hudson (age 19, laborer, born Vermont), Horace Hudson (age 16, born NY), Harry Hudson (age 14, born NY), Mary Hudson (age 12, born NY), Edward Hudson (age 8, born NY), Albert Hudson (age 5, born Ohio) and Squire Hudson (age 1, born Ohio).

1860 Census, Giard, Clayton County, Iowa: Henry Hudson (age 23, blacksmith), Huldah Hudson (age 20 and Henry Hudson (age 1). They were living next door to Gideon King (age 45, Elizabeth King (age 40), Henry King (age 16), Marsh King (age 14) and Ellen King (age 12).

1870 Census: Scott, Madison County, Iowa: Harry Hudson, age 33, Hulda Hudson (age 29), Benjamin Hudson (age 9), Gideon Hudson (age 3) and Phoebe Hudson (age 8/12).

Harry H. Hudson died Aug. 22, 1871 and is buried in Winterset City Cemetery, Winterset, Madison County, Iowa.

Hulda R. Hudson married Chauncey C. Shults on Oct. 6, 1875 in Madison County, Iowa.

1880 Census: Winterset, Madison County, Iowa: Chauncey C. Schults (age 50), wife Huldah R. Schults (age 39), son, David F. Schults (age 24), daughter, Adella Whittaker (age 22), stepson Benj F. Hudson (age 20), stepson Gideon H. Hudson (age 12) and stepdaughter Hattie Hudson (age 10).

Harry Hudson's widow Hulda Schults filed for a pension on July 15, 1981.

1925 Census Winterset, Madison County, Iowa Hulda Schults, age 84, (father's name Gideon King, born Scotland, mother's name Lyda Brown, born England).

Winterset City Cemetery had this information: Hulda Shults born 1840, died Jan 3, 1928 (nee King), w/o Harry H. Hudson and Chauncey C. Shults.


Hudson, John W. He was born 1840 in Pennsylvania. He married Bertha Ebel on Feb. 28, 1871 in Clayton County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). In 1870 I found Bertha Ebel, (age 16, born Iowa) living with a family named Straemeyer as a domestic servant. They lived next door to the John W. Hudson family. I found her as a 2 year old with Frederick and Catherine Ebel in 1856 in Clayton County, Iowa.

1850 Census: Camden South Ward, Camden, New Jersey: John R. Mulliner (age 53), Caroline Mulliner (age 39, born Maryland), John Hudson (age 10, born Maryland) and Napoleon B. Mulliner (age 6, born Maryland) (I would highly suspect that Caroline is John's mother and that John R. Mulliner was a second husband).

1856 Iowa State Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Richard Onley (age 39), Mary Onley (age 24), Mary Jane Onley (age 7), Ray Onley (age 1), Carline Mulliner (age 43), John W. Hudson (age 17), and Napoleon J. Mulliner (age 12)

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Levi Anger (age 45), Sarah Anger (age 20), Mary Anger (age 9.12) and John W. Hudson (age 20, born Pennsylvania, laborer)

1870 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: John W. Hudson (age 30, Teamster, born Maryland), Caroline Mulliner, (age 60, born Maryland), Napoleon Mulliner (age 26, born Maryland), Eddy Mulliner (age 23, born NY), Harry Mulliner (age 1, born New York), and Mary A. Krout (age 20, born Iowa)

1880 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: John Hudson, (age 40, farming and thrashing, born Maryland), wife Bertha Hudson (age 26, born Iowa), daughter Gertrude Hudson (age 7, born Iowa ) and daughter Lucy Hudson (age 1, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: John Hudson (Garnavillo, Lot 5, Block 10, age 45, teamster, born Maryland), Bertha Hudson (age 31, born Clayton County, Iowa), Gertrude Hudson (age 12), Louise Hudson (age 6) and Cora Hudson (age 2).

1900 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: John Hutson (born Oct. 1839, age 60, married 29 years), wife Bertha Hutson (born July 1853, age 46, married 29 years, 3 children born, 3 still living, born Illinois(?), daughter Cora Hutson (born Sept. 1882, age 17, born Iowa)

1910 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: John W. Hudson (age 70, married 1 time for 39 years, born Maryland, own income), wife Bertha Hudson (age 56, married 1 time for 39 years, 3 children born, 3 still living, born Illinois) (Note: indexed as Hindson)

1915 Iowa State Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa John W. Hudson, age 75, County, Clayton, Town or Township Garnavillo, Occupation: Retired Teamster. Extent of Education Common 2, can read and write, Birth Place Maryland, value of farm or home: 2,000/ Military Service: Civil War: Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E. Father's birthplace Maryland. Mother's birthplace Maryland. Years in Iowa 60.

1920 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Enumerated on 2-3 January, 1920: John W. Hudson (age 80, born Maryland), wife Bertha Hudson (age 66, born Iowa)

John W. Hudson died May 31, 1920 (Pension Index Record) and is buried in Garnavillo Cemetery, Garnavillo Twp., Clayton County, Iowa, GAR Marker.

His widow Bertha Hudson filed for a pension on June 23, 1920 in Iowa.


Hunt, Charles He was born about 1832 in Germany. He married Augusta Lange on Sept. 24, 1862 at Dubuque, Iowa.

1860 Census: Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa: Chas. Hunt (age 29, shoemaker, born Prussia), Augusta Hunt (age 21, born Prussia) and Charles Hunt (age 4/12, born Wisconsin).

Charles Hunt died June 3, 1864, from acute diarrhea at Vicksburg, Mississippi. He is buried in Vicksburg National Cemetery, Section I, Grave 7824, Vicksburg, Warren County, Mississippi

His Widow Augusta Hunt filed for a pension on Aug. 8, 1864 in Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin. The following information is from her widow's pension.

Camp 27 Iowa Infantry Vols.
Near La Grange, Tenn, July 22 of 64

Dear Madam,

I have a sad duty to perform this morning in returning to you the enclosed letters (five) directed to your late husband. There were received by the mail last evening and the post mark and date lead us to believe they are from you and that you have not yet received the sad tidings of his last sickness.

Charles accompanied his Regiment through many of their severe trials up the Red River in Louisiana and though in very poor health he done his duties manfully and uncomplainingly, as if determined not to fail. But disease finally wasted his strength until he was no longer able to carry his gun. He was then transferred to the transport steamer Diadem where he remained until the close of the expedition. When we returned to the Boat, we thought he was much better and hoped that rest and careful nursing would restore him to health. At this time his diarrhea was better, but his limbs were much swollen.

A few days after, his diarrhea increasing, he was removed with other sick and wounded soldiers to a Hospital Boat to be taken to St. Louis. And we are without any information positive concerning the remainder of his sickness. He was then able to walk about and seemed to be in no greater danger than for some time previous, if as great. And was much elated at the prospects of good that would result from a change of climate.

Our surgeon however says that his sickness increased so that they were obliged to transfer him to the U.S. General Hospital at Vicksburg and just before our Regiment left Memphis the last of June we received notice from his surgeon of his decease. The 3rd day of June 1864 of acute diarrhea.

I feel that but little can be said to give consolation to you in your hour of sore affliction. Friends may gather around you and soothe for a few moments your pangs of sorrow. But when in the lone hours of your life your heart mourns him most let it then be a consolation to know as I fully believe that his last hours were given to thought of his family. and that he died as becomes a soldier. uncomplainingly, submitting to all necessary privations and cheerful throughout. He has done his duty faithfully, died heroically and is sincerely mourned by all his comrades. No man was ever more prompt and active in the performance of duties. None cheerful in camp or more ready to assist his failing companions. he done all his duty as a soldier and all his duty as a man. and all mourn him as such. one whose place will not be filled. he gave his life in devotion to the country of his adoption and though he fell not on the field of human strife. yet his last hours were just as noble from the unflinching manner in which he met and battled with deadly disease.

For your assistance and information in regard to his account with Government, I will state he was last paid to Dec. 31, 1863 and has pay due from that time to April 30 at $13.00 per month and 16.00 per month from that date. Also a balance on Clothing account due him of $21.28 and $75.00 on account of Bounty. There is 57.00 stoppage from his pay. (Balance Due: 165.31)

There may be a further deduction made for support of Soldiers Homes, but I am not aware of it. His effects are at Hospital and will be sold and proceeds added to above and paid by the Treasury Department, but if you wish you can have them forwarded to you by writing to the surgeon in charge of U.S. General Hospital (McPherson) Vicksburg, Miss. provided they have not been administered on and sold before you write. Any further information will be cheerfully furnished by directing a letter to "The Commanding Officer of Co. E 27 Iowa Infy Vols. Cairo Ill".

I am very respectfully
your obt. servant and friend
Garner C. Williams 2nd Lt.


State of Wisconsin

County of Winnebago

Augusta Hunt being by me duly sworn says she is the wife of Chas. Hunt, died late a private of E Co. 27 Iowa Reg. Vols. that she claims a pension by nature of said husbands death.- that she is the mother of one child by her said husband as follows:

William Hunt born May 31, 1863 that said child now resides with her in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

Signed Augusta Hunt.
August 24, 1864


Charles Hunt ]
Augusta Lange] Marriage License

On application of said Hunt and satisfactory proof license issued this day 8th day of Sept. AD 1862.

The marriage of the above parties was solemnized on the 24th day of Sept. 1862 by Michael Ehl, a Justice of the Peace.

S. Hempstead, County Judge.


Children of Mrs. Augusta Hunt:

  1. Charles Ludwig Frederick, born on the 16th day of February A.D. 1860
  2. Justin Edward, born on 16th day of August A. D. 1861
  3. John Frederick William born on the 30th day of May A. D. 1863.

These three children, yet living, were baptized on the 30th day of September 1863 in the Evang. Lutheran Church at Oshkosh, Winnebago Co., Wisc. by Rev. Ed. Multanowsky.

Drawn out of the church book of the Evang. Lutheran Congregation of Oshkosh, Wisc.

In Witness thereof I have set herewith my hand and seal

August Rohrlack
Minister of the Evang. Lutheran Church
at Oshkosh, Wisconsin.


State of Wisconsin
Winnebago County

Augusta Hunt being first duly sworn deposes & says that she had heard read the annexed record of baptism of her three sons Charles Ludwig Fredrick Hunt, Gustavus Edward Hunt & and John Frederick William Hunt & carefully compared it with private records of the birth of her children & knows the contents thereof to be true of her own knowledge. That they are all the children of Charles Hunt, by her living. That the first two children were born before deponent was married to said Charles Hunt late a private of Co. E. 27th Regt. Iowa Volunteers. That said Charles Hunt legitimized & adopted the said two first children above mentioned & took care of said children the same as the last named which was born in wedlock. That when she made her first application & mentioned only the birth of one child, it was through delicacy of mentioning the above facts, & not for the purpose of deceit or fraud.

And deponent saith that she has never been married to any other man than said Charles Hunt aforementioned and that all three of her said children were begotten by said Charles Hunt & adopted by him as aforesaid & further saith not.

Signed Augusta Hunt.
Feb. 11, 1867

This statement was followed by several witness statements of people that knew them during the time they lived together as man and wife, before the actual marriage.


I hereby report that the name of Augusta Hunt, who was a pensioner on the rolls of this Agency, under certificate 52.168, and who was last paid at $12 to 4 June 1888, has been dropped because of her death.


Hutchins, Dexter Hazen He was born Sept. 10, 1823 in Moira, Franklin County, New York. He was the son of Erastus Hutchins ((Mar. 10, 1792 - Sept. 28, 1874) and Luretta Hazen (Mar. 1872 - Mar. 1798). He married Helen Mary Whitney on May 16, 1848 in Maline, Franklin County, Iowa.

Dexter Hutchins D. H. Hutchins, a prominent and well known resident of Algona, has reached the venerable age of eighty-nine years and has spent half of his life in this county. In former years he was engaged in the implement trade and was also a leading factor in financial circles here as the vice president of the Algona State Bank. His landed holdings embrace several hundred acres in Kossuth county. His birth occurred in Franklin county, New York, on the 20th of September, 1823. He was reared on a farm and obtained his early education in the district schools, subsequently attending Franklin Academy for three terms. In the spring of 1845 he removed to Indiana but after two years’ residence there returned to his native county, where he remained for five years, working on a farm during the summer months and teaching school in the winter seasons. In the spring of 1852, in company with his brother, he went to California, where he followed mining and other pursuits for two years, returning home in the spring of 1854. A year later he removed to Clayton county, Iowa, and there devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits. In 1862 he enlisted for service in the Union army as a private of Company E, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry. In the spring of 1863 he was elected orderly sergeant by the company and in the fall of 1864 was promoted to the rank of second lieutenant. He participated in the battles of Little Rock, Fort De Russy, Pleasant Hill, Yellow Bayou, Fish Bayou, Tupelo and Nashville, and was discharged on the 15th of May, 1865, while in a hospital at Natchez, Mississippi. Returning to Clayton county, Iowa, he remained there until March, 1869, when he settled in Algona and embarked in the implement trade. For many years he held the office of vice president of the Algona State Bank, Ambrose A. Call being during that time the chief executive officer of the institution. He owns several hundred acres of land in this county and for more than four decades has been numbered among its most respected and substantial citizens.

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life Mr. Hutchins chose Miss Helen M. Whitney, of Franklin county, New York. Unto them were born four children, as follows: Clayton B., a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work; Marshall L., who died in infancy; Lucina M., the wife of A. F. Call, of Corona, California, who is a lawyer by profession and also owns large orange and lemon groves; and Celia V., who is the wife of George W. White, the pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal church of Oakland, California.

Mr. Hutchins is a republican in politics and has been prominent in public affairs. He served as supervisor of Kossuth county for one term and was four times elected to the office of justice of the peace, proving an efficient and loyal public servant. He was commissioned captain of uniformed militia by Governor Seymour of New York and of the Home Guards by Governor Stone of Iowa. D. H. Hutchins has now passed the eighty-ninth milestone on life’s journey and his career has ever been such that he can look back over the past without regret and forward to the future without fear.

History of Linn County, Iowa: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 2, 1913, page 163

Following an education in district schools and at Franklin Academy, Dexter went to Indiana, where he spent the years 1845-1846. He then returned to Franklin County and there devoted five years to farming in summer and to school-teaching in winter. Lacking money to purchase a farm of his own, he yielded to the gold rush appeal and, accompanied by his brother Claudius, as well as sixteen acquaintances, he sailed 19-Mar-1852 on the steamer "Pioneer," bound for San Francisco via the Straits of Magellan. The new but ill-fated ship narrowly escaped wreck twice and finally broke up before reaching its destination. Dexter and Claudius had the foresight to transfer at Panama to the "Winfield Scott," which after four weeks reached San Francisco. The journey had taken six months.

Disillusionment with gold-mining developed very soon and the brothers took up game hunting, selling their quarry in the Stockton market. In May 1854 they returned home via Lake Nicaragua. Still unable to purchase a good farm in Franklin County, Dexter set out with his wife and son 8-Mar-1855 on a trek to the midwest. They traveled by prairie schooner, by boat, and by covered wagon and finally reached National, Clayton County, IA, where they made their first home in the midwest.

In August 1862 Dexter enlisted as a private in Co. E, 27th Regt. of Iowa Volunteers. He participated in the battles of Pleasant Hill, Old Oaks, Nashville and others. A nervous ailment incurred during military service necessitated his hospitalization, first at New Orleans and later at Natchez. Unable to accept pay for idleness, he requested a discharge, which was granted August 1865, when he held the grade of second lieutenant. Later he became captain of the Iowa militia.

Dissatisfied with the prospects in Clayton County, he departed with his family on 9-May-1869. After eight days of difficult travel they reached Algona, Kossuth County. Dexter there engaged very successfully in the farm implement business, acted as assistant cashier of the County Savings Bank, supervised the draining and other improvements and the farming of 250 acres of land which he owned, and served his community in many positions of public trust.

1850 Census: Moira, Franklin County, New York: Dexter H. Hutchins (age 26, farmer, born New York.), Helen Hutchins (age 21) and Clayton B. Hutchins (age 1). They were living next door to the family of Thaddeus Hutchins (age 32).

Hutchins, Dexter H. Letters to his wife, dated Stockton 1853-54. MSS in poss. Warren White, College of the Pacific, Stockton, California. http://www.yosemite.ca.us/library/big_oak_flat_road/bibliography.html

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa; Dexter Hutchins (age 35, farmer, born New York, ), Ellen Hutchins (age 30), Clayton Hutchins (age 12) and Emma Hutchins (age 1).

1870 Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa; Dexter H. Hutchins (age 46), Hellen M. Hutchins (age 42), Clayton B. Hutchins (age 21), Lucia M. Hutchins (age 11) and Velette Hutchins (age 7), (Family was indexed as Hutcherso)

I found this information for a patent by Dexter H. Hutchins. It appears to be some sort of machine that kills grasshoppers.

Report Commissioner of Agriculture, By Washington Government, page 313.

The machine invented by Mr. Dexter H. Hutchins, of Algona, Iowa (patent No. 187,012, dated February 6, 1877), differs from all the others in having attached a. contrivance for killing the insects by means of sulphur fumes. PI. XII, Fig. 1, is a top view, and PL XII, Fig. 2, shows a sectional view. The following description and letters refer to the accompanying drawings:

The frame A has a wooden bottom, B, and is mounted upon wheels C C. A drawer, D, is made in the front of the frame A, and opens to the front between the flies E E, attached to the frame P so as to project at an angle of about forty-five degrees outwardly from the frame F. The flies E E consist of wire frames O G, covered with canvas H, and are secured to the front uprights of the frame F, which is also of wire. Draw-flies 11 are hinged to the front standards of the frame F, and are connected with the frames G G by spiral springs J J, which hold them open.

The frame F has its top ends and rear side covered with wire gauze. A tongue, K, leads from the rear of the frame A, is supported at its rear end upon a caster-wheel, L, the shank of which penetrates the tongue K, and is provided with a foot-lever, M. A driver's seat, N, resting upon a spring, O, is secured to the tongue at its rear end, in a

Cition to permit the driver to operate the foot-lever M. A cord, P, connects the draw911, and a cord, Q, attached to the cord P at its center, leads to a Blot, R, in the tongue K, where it connects with two cords, S S'. The cords S S' are secured, one to each side of the frame T, in which the caster-wheel L has its bearings. Pins U U' are fixed in opposite sides of the wheel L near its periphery. Metallic slats V are pivoted longitudinally on the frame A, and are connected at one end by the rod W. A singletree, X, is secured to the tongue K slightly in front of the foot-lover M. The horses are harnessed to the machine with their heads facing the frame A.

The operation of the invention is as follows:

The slats V are left partially open, and the machine driven over the infested field. The grasshoppers rise from the ground, and are drawn or driven into the frame F by the draw-flies 11, which are closed every revolution of the wheel L by the pins U or U' engaging with the cords S or S', as the case may be, both pins engaging when the wheel L is straight, but only one when it is turned to either side to guide the machine.

The pins U and U' are beveled on their rear sides, and the cords S and S' slip from said pins, when the pins are at the rear of the wheels and in line with the bearings of the same, and permit the draw-flies to open by the spiral springs J J.

The pins U U' and cords S S' may be dispensed with, if desired, and the cord Q maybe extended to the driver's seat and there operated by hand.

When the space beneath the metal slats V in the frame A has been filled with the insects, the. slats V should be closed, and the drawer D, previously supplied with sulphor, opened, the sulphur ignited, and the drawer closed. The fumes of the sulphur will destroy the grasshoppers, after which the machine may be cleaned and the operation repeated.

1880 Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Dexter H. Hutchins (age 55, banker, born New York), wife Ellen M. Hutchins (age 51), and daughter Letta Hutchins (age 18).

List of Pensioners on the Roll January 1, 1883, Kossuth County, Iowa:

No. of Certificate: 206,368
Name of Pensioner: Hutchins, Dexter H.
P. O. Address: Algona
Cause for Which Pensioned: chr. diarrhea
Monthly Rate: 14.00
Date of Original Allowance: Apr., 1882

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living In Iowa: Under 27th Iowa; D. H. Hutchins, Rank: Lieutenant. Company E., Present Post Office Address; Algona.

1885 Iowa State Census Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Dexter H. Hutchins (North and Heall, age 61, retired farmer, born New York), Helen M. Hutchins (age 55), Viletta C. Hutchins (age 22, teacher).

1900 Census: District 134, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: D. H. Hutchins (born Sept. 1823, age 76, married 52 years, born New York), wife Helen M. Hutchins (born Jan. 1836, age 64, married 52 years, 4 children born, 3 still living, born New York).)

Story of a Rebel Guerrilla's Death
Told by Lieut. D. H. Hutchins, of the 27th Iowa

Shelby Cole was a notorious Confederate guerrilla of whose brutality many stories are told. After his capture Cole made a record of killing one man who showed him more than common kindness, and of assaulting with intent to kill four others, one of whom was D. H. Hutchins of this place, then Orderly Sgt. of Company E, 27th Iowa. Cole made his boast that he had killed 30 union soldiers and declared that if he could kill 30 more he would be willing to die. He was encountered by the 27th Iowa at Mineral Point, Missouri, where a prominent citizen advised his arrest as a dangerous man. The following letter from Mr. Hutchins pen appeared in the National Tribune several years ago. The facts stated in it have never been questioned.

Editor National Tribune: There have been a number of accounts of the capture and death of Shelby Cole, which no doubt have been amusing to the men of the 27th Iowa; the first from Comrade McKinney, then from F. M. Riddle, Fred Rumble and a member of Company F, 14th Iowa, and lastly one from J. B. King, company E, 27th Iowa. Some write from memories, others copy their diaries written at the time; all saw and reported differently. Comrade King mentions my name in connection with the affair and I write this to correct him, he being in my company, and others whom I have heard relate the circumstances, all of whom must have got their information from hearsay, none of which are correct. No doubt the reason why members of my Regiment are in error is because those who knew the most about the matter were taken to the hospital without first seeing the members of the several companies to which they belonged, and none of those who were participators seemed to think that they had done any thing brilliant, and said but little about it. In fact they were rather laughed at, and it was a conundrum among the men. "If one guerilla with a little knife could kill one union soldier and disable four others, how many would it take well armed to clean our Regiment?"

Cole was arrested as a spy but order of Col. Gilbert, 27th Iowa upon advice of citizens of Mineral Point, and he was allowed to go under guard to a citizen's house for his breakfast, and when returning to the guardhouse he seized the gun from his guard and snapped it at the Sgt., who I think was reported unarmed. He then threw down the gun, pulled off his coat and hat and threw them down, and, as has been stated by others, ran like a deer for the timber nearby, but was stopped by the pickets and brought back to camp and again put into the guardhouse, where he remained until the Regiment took the cars, about sundown on 27 September, 1864. The day had been quite warm, but the evening cool for the time of year. Sgt. Treat, seeing his prisoner suffering from cold, in the goodness that was characteristic of the man took off his own overcoat and gave it to Cole to keep him warm. He also divided his rations with him; in fact, he treated him like a brother. When the train stopped after crossing the bridge mentioned by others, Cole said to Treat: "Here, take your coat," "No," said Treat; "you need it more than I do, keep it." Cole said; "I will not have it any longer," and after being further urged by Treat to keep it, he threw the coat on to Treat, and at the same time struck him in the neck, killing him almost instantly. He then jumped from the platform car. Up to this point I know nothing only what was talked at the time by the 27th men. As soon as the car stopped the order was given for the men to get off on the right side of the train. Companies E and K were mostly on top of two boxcars, K behind E, and Sgt. Penny, of K, and myself orderly of Company E, were talking together, he on the left front corner and I on the left rear corner of the two. As soon as the order to get off was given there was much noise and confusion, the men shouting: "hand down my gun," "my haversack," my this or that, and it seemed as though it would be some time before Penny and myself would be able to get down on the right side. So he said "let us get down on this side"––the left. "All right," I answered: "go ahead." He reached over and went down on the ladder at my side. As soon as he was out of the way I followed him, and when nearly down he was six or eight feet from the end of my car, going to the rear. I immediately followed him, and think he would not have been more than 15 or 20 feet in advance, and when about half the length of company K's car was reached I heard the cry, "Catch him! Catch him!" I knew not what it meant, but without changing my gait continued on until I came to the end of the box car in front end of the platform car from which Cole jumped. Here I saw two men in a struggle, both standing, one bent over and the other at his back trying to hold him. I dropped a sword I was carrying, and tried to seize the lower man by the coat collar. It was so dark I could not see who they were, but knew one must be Penny, and concluded the other was the prisoner, Cole, trying to escape. The man had no coat on so I found no collar. I then put my hand on his head, thinking to force him down by holding him by the hair; but he had a short cut, and I could get no hold. I then stepped in front, and as I did so he straightened up, and I seized him around the waist and closing his arms in my grasp. As he straightened up Penny stepped back a few feet and stood with his hands up to his face or neck. Not a word had been spoken up to this time by either. I then pulled the man Cole, as it proved to be, onto me, knowing he would be held surer by locking hands and feet over him than any other way, and as my shoulders touched the ground his knife went into my back. I made up my mind at once that I had got a Tarter and immediately shouted "Help, help; he is trying to stick something into me," but no one came. There we were, all alone in that cut, where it was very dark, made more so by persons looking into camp fires a few rods away on the banks or sides of the cut. As soon as a knife was felt I made up my mind that probably my life depended on my holding his arm so he could not use his knife anymore, and strained every muscle that could be used; and during the time Cole was trying to insert his knife, I could feel the prick of it and the motion of his hand, but he could get no force; his elbows were fast, and his weight and my own were on his forearm. After shouting for help, in holding him probably one half minute, though it seemed 10, I again shouted; "Help, help; he is sticking something into me." After a while I shouted a third time, "Help, help; he is sticking something into me." During all this time he had lain without the least attempt to get away; and without making a motion except with the hand that held the knife. Immediately after shouting the third time, Jake Shannon, of Company G, came up and struck Cole on the head with his gun, and it was said that he broke it at the small of the stock. At any rate, he took out his bayonet and struck several times with that, when Cole's head dropped by the side of mine, and thinking he was used up, I loosened my grasp around him, and he seemed to slide off without any effort. Shannon says he pulled him off Penny. That is where he is mistaken. He pulled him off from me; if anyone. Cole was not dead by any means. As he slipped off he struck my left arm with his knife above the elbow, cutting deep and making a painful wound. He also struck me over the heart, but a row of pins stopped the force of the blow. He cut a hole through my coat a half-inch long above and four or five inches below the pins. He then got on his feet, turned around and struck Shannon in the back with the knife and then started toward the rear of the train. I immediately got on my feet and saw Cole opposite the middle of the platform car, and just at this time A. Cordell of Company H started up the side of the cut, and Cole turned several feet out of his way and gave him a stab in the side. Cordell turned around to defend himself and got another stab in the left eye, destroying it entirely. Immediately the cry was raised, "Shoot him! Shoot him!" And one or two guns were fired, when someone said, "Don't shoot; you will shoot each other," Cole then dropped down, crawled under the platform to the other side, where the crowd was, and where he had his hands tied behind him and then put on the car, under guard. After an hour or two it was reported that he was dead. The wounded were placed in a box car by themselves in charge of the hospital steward, who said he would go out and see Cole, and started taking a lantern with him. Not being disabled I followed, and stood leaning against the side of the platform car, while the steward, lantern in hand, got onto it and around to the opposite side of Cole and remarked; "Yes; he is dead."

But from where I stood, having Cole between me and the light, and on a level, I could see his chest rise and fall, and remarked that he was not dead.

"Yes he is," said the steward; "his eyes are set."

He lay with his eyes wide open, and to all appearances look to be dead. I then said, "Hold the light down to his eyes," he did so and the glare was too much for such a live corpse. His eyelids came together in spite of him. He intended, no doubt, to roll off the car when the train got under motion and the guard was not watchful, and of course he would have escaped if his 'possum playing had not been detected.

Capt. Hemmingway told me that Cole said he had killed 30 union men, and that if he could kill as many more he would be willing to die. Cole was taken off the car at De Soto and laid on the ground, and the Sgt. he had murdered laid about 6 feet from him, with the gaping wound in the neck toward Cole so he could scarcely help looking at it. I very much doubt if the sight awakened any feeling of regret, much less of remorse.

In the morning a crowd gathered around myself among the rest, and for some time within 2 feet of Cole, and while there some soldier I knew not what Regiment he belonged, came up and stood by the side of Cole's head, with his gun at order arms and but a few inches away; he looked down at Cole and said: "Why did you kill that man?" He treated you like a brother; he took his coat off and gave it to you to keep warm; he divided his rations with you to keep you from being hungry, and to pay him for his kindness you killed him. Why did you do it?" Cole answered, "I thought he meant to impose upon me." At this time the soldier raised his gun a foot or more above Cole's head and at the same time said, "– – you," which he seemed to speak through his firm set teeth, and brought the gun down across Cole's forehead with much force, causing the blood to spurt from his nose. Cole said "Oh! Don't!" Immediately after this men came with a rope, and putting it around his ankles started off on a double quick, dragging Cole behind.

General A. J. Smith had been informed of the main facts of Cole's killing one man and wounding four others, and was asked what should be done with him. He was reported as saying, "Why bury him."

"But, General, he is not dead."

"Damn the difference; bury him."

The men dragged Cole eight or ten rods and then took the rope off his ankles and put it around his neck, and threw the other end over the limb of the tree and drew Cole up so his feet were four or five feet from the ground.

This was the last I saw Cole, as the train started for Jefferson Barracks and the wounded for the hospital.

That afternoon he was buried face down, so they said, and near evening his wife and sister, or sister-in-law came to his grave. The wife shed some tears, but the sister said she was glad he was dead; that he was an awful man; that he had killed a sister or sister-in-law. Penny got a very severe wound which nearly cost him his life. Cole striking upward and forward over his shoulder, hit him in the collarbone, cutting him to the chin, between the trachea and carotid artery. Shannon was hurt but little; neither was I. The wound in my neck was 2 inches long, but not deep or painful; the one in my arm was very small, but quite painful. Cordell suffered very much from the wound in his eye. I think that when I fell on the knife, that it shut down on Coles index finger, as I noticed the next morning as it looked to be cut half off, and was quite bloody, the only blood I could see about him except what came from his nose. I take no stock in a statement that he was pinned down to the car by bayonets.

Now, no doubt this statement will be criticized, but all those wounded are yet living, and I believe all will say they saw no one on the north or left side of the car during all the time mentioned, except the ones injured, and will corroborate this as far as they were individually concerned.

Cole was not a giant as related by McKinney, but was about 5 feet 10 or 11 inches tall, and would weigh about 180 pounds. I have no excuse for writing this, except to correct hearsay evidence and at the earnest solicitation of comrades. D. H. Hutchins, Company E 27th Iowa, Algona, Iowa

The Algona Republican, Algona, Iowa, Wednesday March 19, 1902

1910 Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa; Dexter H. Hutchins (age 86, married 61 years, retired farmer, own income), Helen M. Hutchins (age 81, married 61 years, 4 children born, 3 still living).

Helen Mary (Whitney) Hutchins died on July 6, 1910 in Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa and is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa.

Dexter Hutchins Civil War Comrades Fortunate in Battle
DISEASE STRUCK DOWN ABOUT 30 OF THE MEN
Samuel Benjamin Was Lieut. of Company until Let Go Because of Illness
By C. B. Hutchins

In the early days newspapers, magazines and all kinds of reading matter was not so plentiful as now. Not every little town of a few hundred could afford a paper, as such towns do now. The New York Weekly Tribune, then edited by Horace Greeley, was the paper most in evidence among the Republicans of those days, and the Chicago Times, edited by W. F. Story, was the paper the Democrats swore by. We did not have daily mail service in those days, and part of the time during the Civil War, it was only a weekly, and carried by a man on horse from McGregor.

I was 12 years old when the war began and I took great interest in its progress. My father enlisted in Company E, 27th Iowa volunteers, early in September, 1862, and went into camp with the Regiment at Camp Franklin at Dubuque. That year the fair was held at Dubuque, and my mother and I went down to see the fair and to pay father and other soldier boys a visit. During our stay father and mother had a room somewhere near the campground, and I stayed with the soldiers, and slept with father's bunkmate–– which was the extent of my soldiering.

First and last, recruits and all, were probably 120 men in father's company. The company served its full term of three years. The Regiment and Company was in a number of pitched battles, among them were Fort De Russey, Pleasant Hill, Old Oaks, Tupelo, Yellow Bayou, and the two-day battle at Nashville, between Thomas of the union forces and Hood, commanding the Confederates.

Benjamin and Hutchins, Soldiers

In all these battles not a single soldier in father's company was killed, although quite a number were wounded. I think not one died of his wounds; but not less than 30 of the company died of disease during the term of service. About one half company was raised in our immediate vicinity, and furnished the captain and second Lieutenant. Mr. Samuel Benjamin, so long a resident of Algona was the Lieut., but his term of office lasted only a few months, as he was soon discharged on account of illness. Father was appointed company commissary when the company was organized and when the vacancy caused by Mr. Benjamin's discharge occurred father was elected orderly Sgt. to fill the vacancy caused by promotion of the orderly Sgt. to Lieutenant. Subsequently the captain resigned and father was made lieutenant, the first and second Lieut. having been advanced to captain and first Lieut. respectively. I believe no man ever enlisted with a bigger sense of duty and a purer feeling of patriotism than did my father. At the time of his enlistment he was within a few days of 39 years old or nearly double the average age of the union soldiers. There were only one or two older men in his company. He realized far better than younger men what war meant, and of course, having had to leave his home, wife and children, he sacrificed more than most soldiers, who were single men and not bound to home by so many ties as were those that were married. I was 13, my oldest sister was ? Years old and my youngest sister about 7 1/2 months at the time of father's enlistment.

Guerrilla Caught and Hanged

Fortunately during most of his term of service my father's health was good, and he was never wounded in battle, although he had one or more bullets passed through his coat sleeve, between his arm and body, but he received a couple of knife wounds at the hand of a guerrilla with whom he had personal encounter one dark night. He prevented the guerrilla, who was about to escape, from getting away, and the next morning the guerrilla was at one end of a rope, the other end of which was thrown over the limb of the tree, and fastened in a manner that the guerrilla had nothing to walk on except the air. I have heard my father relate a story of two offices of his Regiment, that shows that a man's will may determine rather he will live from the effects of a gunshot wound. One, a Lieutenant Brush by name, received a flesh wound of the leg, a wound which ought not prove fatal once in 10,000, but he had no sand and said "I shall die, I shall die" and he did. The other officer a captain ? was shot through the body near the groin, a wound that would naturally prove fatal a thousand times where the other would once, that he met the condolences of his friends by saying, "oh, hell, boys! I'll get well," and get well he did.

30 in Company Died

I shall never forget an incident in connection with father's company. The company met one day at the little village, near where we live, to elect officers and perfect the organization. A part of the day's program was a picnic dinner, at the close of which an old gentleman by the name of Watkins spoke up loudly and said; "How many of you boys will meet me here three years from today?" Of course everyone who heard him said "I," little realizing what three years would bring forth. As stated above nearly or quite 30, at the end of the three years were sleep in the sleep that knows no waking, and among them was a grandson of the man who asked the question.

There were some exciting times during the war. War meetings, so-called, were held in the school houses and churches, speeches were made, and songs were sung to arouse enthusiasm and encourage enlistment. I remember, at one war meeting held in the church, my mother sang alto in a duet, the chorus of which was, "we are coming, we are coming, the union to restore; we are coming, Father Abraham, three hundred thousand."

Some other war songs were "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, the Boys are Marching;" "Just Before the Battle, Mother;" "Babylon is Fallen;" "Rally Round the Flag;" and many others too numerous to mention.

Great Union Rally in 63

On 30 June, 1863, a great Union rally was held at McGregor. The three principal speakers were Matt Carpenter, afterwards US senator from Wisconsin, Judge John F. Dillon, a member of the Supreme Court of the state, and D. B. Henderson, so long a congressman from the third district. Henderson at that time was probably not more than 21 years old. He lost a leg at the battle of Pittsburg landing, at which a brother, Thomas Henderson was killed. All three of the men mentioned were good speakers and much enthusiasm was aroused.

There were, in McGregor and vicinity, at that time a good many southern sympathizers, and one incident of the day was the open threat, by a strong union man, to thrash any man heard uttering any disloyal sentiments. As the man was well known for his fighting ability and propensity, there were no takers, which fact was perhaps occasioned, not alone, by his threat, but because of the strong loyal sentiment prevailing, which would have brought him plenty of backers, had there been any necessity.

Donny Brook Fair at McGregor

On the 4th of July succeeding the rally a celebration was held at McGregor, and it came the nearest to being what my idea is of a Donny Brook fair of anything I have ever seen.

The buildings of the Milwaukee railway from McGregor West had only recently been begun, and there were a lot of men in town from the railway gangs, and among them were usually many roughs, and the roughs on this occasion were gathered there from all quarters. There was a plenty of liquor, so, quite a while before noon, the "fun" began. I suppose it was "fun," of a kind I was mighty careful to indulge in at a distance, usually from the sidewalk, as the fracases took place in the street. The combatants did not confine themselves to the use of their fists, but stones were thrown, clubs were used, anything they could get their hands on to make their exertions more effective. No one was killed but it was a wonder that there was none.

Priest Disperses Combatants

There's no telling what might've been the result of the numerous battles that were started had it not been for the good offices of the Catholic priest of McGregor, Father Nagel by name. No sooner was his attention called to any these combats and he would march into the thickest of the fray, slashing right and left with a writing whip, and seizing the leading combatant by the collar, lead him to the outskirts of the crowd and say to him: "Go home." If the man demurred, or said anything in return, the priest would say, "Shut up! You go home!" And everyone thus ordered left the crowd, and whether they did go home or not I do not know, but they went somewhere away from the trouble. I have no idea how many times the scene was repeated between 9 o'clock and noon, enough times however so that by noon the tough element has been pretty well quieted by the almost unaided exertions of the good priest, and the afternoon was fairly quiet.

I saw one man with a hole cut out of the side of his head, just above the ear, it as slick a manner, by a stone that was thrown, as though it has been done by rifle ball. If the stone had hit him a square instead of a glancing blow it would, in all probability, have killed him.

Kossuth County Advance, Algona, Iowa, Wednesday, June 23, 1915

Dexter Hazen Hutchins died Aug. 5, 1915 and is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa.


Jones, Thomas Freedom He was born Apr 7, 1823 in Chautauqua County, New York. He was the son of Stephen Jones (1782 - 1850) and Clarissa Clara Atkins (1787-1844). He married Nancy Ann Varley (daughter of William Varley)

1860 Census: Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: Freedom Jones (age 37, farmer, born NY), Nancy Jones (age 32, born Virginia), Reuben Ross (age 12, born Iowa), Lyman Ross (age 10, born Iowa), Polly Ross (age 8, born Iowa), Helen M. Jones (age 6, born Iowa) and Clayter Jones (age 1, born Iowa). (It appears that Nancy was previously married to Lyman C. Ross: 1850 Census shows this: Boardman, Clayton County, Iowa: Lyman C. Ross (age 35, born New York), Nancy Ross (age 20, born Virginia), Reubin Ross (age 1, born Iowa) and Phebe Varley (age 16, born Virginia).

1880 Census: Webster, Hamilton County, Iowa: Freedom Jones (age 56, farmer, born New York), wife, Nancy Jones (age 52, born Virginia), son Frank Jones (age 16, born Iowa), daughter Clarisa Jones (age 13, born Iowa) and daughter Martha Jones (age 11, born Iowa).

1890 Oklahoma Territorial Census, Logan County: Freedom Jones, (age 67, born New York, If Soldier, State Company and Regiment: Co. E. 27 Iowa), wife Nancy Jones (age 62, born Virginia), daughter Martha M. Jones (age 21, born Iowa), son Frank Jones (age 26, born Iowa).

Freedom Jones died Feb. 20, 1899 in Guthrie, Logan County, Oklahoma and is buried in Summit View Cemetery, Guthrie, Logan County, Oklahoma.

NOTE: Iowa Civil War Soldier Burial Records has him listed as buried in Plainfield, Bremer County, Iowa. WPA Records show him buried in Willow Lawn Cemetery, Polk Twp., Bremer County, Iowa with notes: "Civil War Vet Co. E 27th IA Inf." But there is a note attached to the record from Mike Peterson that states: "Freedom Jones who was a Civil War Vet in Co. E 27th IA Inf; b. in Chautauqua Co, NY 7 Apr 1822 and died in Guthrie, Logan County, OK on 20 Feb 1899 is buried in Summit View Cemetery, Guthrie - not here. I have pictures of headstones. Don't know why he is listed here although he lived here at one time. Another Freedom buried Giard Cemetery, Farmersburg, Clayton Co but unlikely both in same CW Co."

His widow Nancy Jones filed for a pension on Sept. 8, 1899 in Oklahoma.

Nancy Ann (Varley) Jones (born June 16, 1829) died Jan. 26, 1909 and is buried in Summit View Cemetery, Guthrie, Logan County, Oklahoma.


Jones, Webster: He was born about 1823 in Vermont. He was probably the son of Gillead and Anna Jones.

1850 Census: Vershire, Orange County, Vermont: Gillead Jones (age 60, farmer, born Vermont), Anna Jones (age 58), Alonzo Jones (age 20), John R, Jones (age 18), Mary Anne Jones (age 17) and Webster Jones (age 13).

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Webster Jones (age 23, born Vermont), Anna Jones (age 60, born Vermont and D. E. Harrington (age 18, laborer, born Vermont).

Webster Jones died Jan. 2, 1863, Hospital Memphis, Tenn.


King, James B. He was born about 1841 in Morgan County, Illinois. He was the son of William King and Mary Anne Cadwell (June 26, 1806 - Jan 18, 1842). He married Calla J. Cowell on Dec. 25, 1866 in Morgan County, Illinois. (Note: family tree information says Cowell. The Illinois Marriages 1851-1900 says Calla J. Cerrell. County Court Records, Film #1317641-1317643).

1850 Census: Jacksonville, Morgan County, Illinois: R. King (female, age 44), G. C. King (male. age 19), J. W.. King (male, age 15), J. B. King (male, age 9), M. E. King (female (age 5), A. C. Marshall (female, age 17), C. L. Marshall (female age 10), and N. King (male, age 55). (I am certain G. C King (age 19) is George C. King in 1856, making him James' older brother).

1856 Iowa State Census: Milford, Crawford County, Iowa: George C. King (age 26, born Illinois, Surveyor, had been in Iowa for 3 years ), Emma E. R. King (age 22), Julia M. King (age 1) and James B. King (age 14, had been in Iowa for 1 years),

1870 Jacksonville, Morgan County, Illinois: James King (age 29, farmer, born Illinois), Calla King (age 19, born Indiana), Samuel King (age 2, born Iowa), Amy King (age 8/12, born Illinois) and Mollie King (age 8, born Illinois).

1880 Census: Vail, Crawford County, Iowa: James B. King (age 39, born Illinois, City Weight Master), wife Calla C. King (age 29, born Indiana), son Samuel C. King (age 12, born Iowa), Amy King (age 10, born Illinois), Evaline King (age 7, born Illinois) and Anne King (age 2, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Vail, Crawford County, Iowa: James B. King (township 84, range 37, section 30, Vail, age 43, clerk, born Ill.), Calla C. King (age 33), Samuel c. King (age 17), Amy King (age 15), Evalin King (age 12) and Anna King (age 7).

1900 Census: Seattle Ward 4, King County, Washington: Calla King (born Mar. 1851, age 49, married 33 years, 5 children born, 4 still living, born Indiana), daughter Amma (born Nov. 1871, age 28, born Illinois), daughter Evelyn Carskaddorn (born Oct. 1874, age 26, married 6 years, 1 child born, 1 still living). son-in-law John K Carskaddorn (born May 1858, age 42, married 6 years), son Ford K. Carskaddorn (born Nov. 1895, age 4) and daughter Anna King (born Dec. 1879, age 20, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Pearson, Kitsap, Washington: B. James King (age 68, married 1 time for 43 years), and wife C. Calla King (age 59, married 1 time for 43 years, 5 children born, 4 still living, born Indiana.)

James B. King died April 11, 1915 in Seattle, King County, Washington, and is buried in Grand Army of the Republic Cemetery, Seattle, WA, Lot H10, Section 291, Seattle, King County, Washington.

-- Funeral notice, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Tuesday, April 13, 1915, page 15, column A

KING - In this city, April 11, 1915, James B. King, age 74 years. Member G. A. R.

Funeral services will be held at the Seattle Undertaking parlors, 1512 Fifth avenue, today (Tuesday) at 1 p.m. under auspices of the G. A. R. Interment at G. A. R. cemetery.


-- "Daily Statistics," Seattle Daily Times, Thursday, April 15, 1915, page 22

James B. King, April 11, Providence Hospital, 73

James B. King died Apr. 11, 1915 in Seattle, King County, Washington. He is buried in Grand Army of the Republic Cemetery, Seattle, WA., Headstone H10, Plot 291.

Children of James B. King and Calla J. Cowell (Cerrell)

  1. Samuel C. King b: DEC 1867 in Iowa
  2. Amy King b: 4 NOV 1869 in Illinois
  3. Evelyn King b: 7 OCT 1872 in Illinois
  4. Anne King b: 1878 in Iowa

Kicherer, Charles David He was born about 1839 in Germany. He was possibly the son of David and Christiana Kicherer. Charles David Kicherer married Anna Elisabetha Schosi on Nov. 8, 1866 at Elkader, Clayton County, Iowa. He was age 27. She was age 26. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934).

1856 Iowa State Census: Girard, Clayton County, Iowa: David Kicherer (age 50, farmer, born Germany), Christiana Kicherer (age 34, born Germany) and Charles Kicherer (age 17, born Germany). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 1 year.

1860 Census, Giard, Clayton County, Iowa: David Keherer (age 58, farmer, born Hanover), Mary Keherer (age 42, born Hanover), Charles Keherer (age 12, born Hanover), David Keherer (age 10, born Hanover), Mary Keherer (age 8, born Iowa) and Catharine Keherer (age 6, born Iowa).

1885 Minnesota State Census, Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota: C. D. Kicherer (age 47, born Germany), Anna Kicherer (age 39, born Germany), Henry Kicherer (age 16, born Iowa), Fred Kicherer (age 14, born Iowa), Christina Kicherer (age 11, born Iowa), Carrie Kicherer (age 7, born Iowa) and Charles Kicherer (age 2, born Minnesota).

His widow Anna E. Kicherer filed for a pension on Jan. 13, 1888 (I could not make out the last digit of the year for sure. 1888 is my best guess).

1890 City Directory Minneapolis, Minnesota: Anna Kicherer (wid Charles), r 2012 N. Bryant Av. Henry D. Kicherer, driver St. Ry, b. 2012 N. Bryant Av.

1895 Minnesota State Census, Minneapolis City, Ward 8, Hennepin County, Minnesota: Annie E. Kicherer (201 West 33rd, age 50, born Switzerland), Henry D. Kicherer (age 26, born Iowa), Christina Kicherer (age 21, born Iowa), Carrie Kicherer (age 19, born Iowa) and Charles Kicherer (age 12, born Minnesota.


King, Levi He was born about 1842 in New York.

Levi King died April 15, 1863 and is buried in Corinth National Cemetery, Plot 2036, Corinth, Alcorn County, Miss

His mother Phebe D. King filed for a pension on June 7, 1880.


Knight, Ralph Ladd He was born April 8, 1826, in North Hero, Grand Isle County, Vermont. He was the son of Augustus KNIGHT (1799-1876) and Wealthy LADD (1804-1861). He married Arabella Marie Little on Dec. 1, 1860 in North Hero, Grand Isle County, Vermont. She was the daughter of Samuel Little (May 22, 1801 - Mar. 20, 1878 and Catherine Payne (Sept. 3, 1805 - ?).

Notes for Ralph Ladd KNIGHT

15 August 1862 Ralph, at the age of 34, enlisted as a drummer into the United States Volunteer Army.

29 August 1862 Ralph was enlisted into Company "E," 27th Iowa Infantry Regiment.

1 March 1863 Ralph transferred from Company "E" to Company "S"(?). He was promoted to "Full Drum Major" on the same day. (Note Company S is the Staff. ejj)

8 August 1865 Ralph's regiment is mustered out of service while in Clinton, Iowa.

June 1870 Ralph and his family lived next to Arabella's family

1870 Census: Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: Ralph L. Knight, (age 45, farmer, born Vermont), Arabell Knight (age 39, born New Hampshire), Burt Knight (age 8), and Ebin Knight (age 7/12). Living next door were Samuel (age 69) and Catherine (age 64) Little. John M. Little (age 32) and Lucinda lived on the other side of them.

1880 Census: Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: Ralph L. Knight (age 54, farmer, born Vermont), wife Arabelle M. Knight (age 48, born New Hampshire), son Henry L. Knight (age 18, teaching school), son Ebin L. Knight (age 9) and boarder Minna Huaskis (age 5).

1885 Iowa State Census: Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: Ralph Knight (Township 94, Range 5, Section 13, SW SW, age 57, farming), Arabell Knight (age 53), Eben Knight (age 15) and Minnie Hushen (age 14)

Ralph L. Knight died Nov 5, 1894, in Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa. He is buried in Farmersburg & Wagner Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa.

OBITUARY: The McGregor News 11/14/1894

This community has seldom been so deeply moved, as by the death of Ralph L. Knight at his home in Farmersburg on Monday evening Nov. 4th, 94. He had never been in robust health after he came out of the army, in 1865, and for the last few years, a general decline of strength and health has been evident in his appearance. During the last year he had ceased to be a familiar figure in the business places of McGregor. The hardships of the service have been telling on his physical strength for many years, and at last it wasted away. He was well known to most of the people in Clayton County and was a universal favorite, but his cheerfulness at last yielded to the inevitable. In common with all his acquaintances, we mourn his death as the loss of a good citizen, a faithful friend and a patriot. Honest and upright in all his dealings, he had the confidence of all with whom he came in contact. His natural musical talent made him a prominent figure in all social gatherings, and his army comrades testify that it cheered many a dreary camp and bivouac. His son Dr. H. L. Knight of Leroy, Minn., a physician of great learning, was with him much of the time during the last year or two, so that with local medical aid, everything possible was done to prolong his life and make his last days comfortable. He leaves a wife and a second son, E. L. Knight, residing at home. The funeral on Nov. 6th, was unusually large. He was buried under the auspices of the McGregor, Elkader and Monona Posts, G.A.R. The sermon of the Rev. J.J. Littler at the church was simple, appropriate and eloquent, and the remarks of Dr. Clark were unusually touching and suitable. Notwithstanding the discomfort of the day, the ceremonies were orderly and appropriate. No man was ever laid away in the grave with more sincere grief, than he, real heart felt grief, and sense of loss were seen on every face. Gallant soldier, good citizen, kind and loving husband and father, loyal friend, hail and farewell!!

Arabella (Little) Knight (born April 1, 1831, New Hampshire) died 15 Mar 1908, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa. She is buried in Farmersburg & Wagner Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa.

OBITUARY: Northern Iowa Time - 19 March 1903
Farmersburg

Died at her home in Wagner township March 14, 1903, Mrs. R. Knight. The deceased was a daughter of Dr. and Catherine Little and the widow of R. L. Knight. She leaves to mourn her loss three sons and one brother Dr. Bert Knight of Adams, Minn. And Eben L. K. at the home residence and John Little of Wagner. The funeral took place at her home Tuesday at eleven o'clock, Rev. Baxter of Elkader officiating. She was laid to rest in the Farmersburg cemetery.

Children of Ralph L. Knight and Arabella Little

  1. Burton Knight, b. Nov. 1, 1861
  2. Henry Knight , b. Nov. 1, 1861
  3. Eben Little Knight, b. Dec. 15, 1869
  4. Ralph Knight (1876-1972)

Koehn, William He was born Feb. 3, 1848 in Mecklenburg, Germany. He was the son of Frederick Koehn (1818 - Feb. 23, 1862) and Sophia Suckow (d. May 7, 1920) William Koehn married Maria Kreig on May 11, 1869 in Volga, Clayton County, Iowa. She was the daughter of John Jacob Krieg (b. Aug 6, 1814) and Christina Kiesling (b. 1830)

1870 Census: Volga, Clayton County, Iowa: Wm Koehn (age 22, born Mecklenburg), Mary Koehn (age 18), Augusta Koehn (age 3/12) and Caroline Kreig (age 13).

1880 Census, Volga, Clayton County, Iowa; William Koehn (age 32, farmer, born Mecklenburg), wife Mary Koehn (age 28, born Wurttemberg), daughter Augusta Koehn (age 10), son William Koehn (age 8), daughter Amalie Koehn (age 5), son Fred Koehn (age 3) and daughter Mary Koehn (age 1) (this family was indexed as KOCKN)

1885 Iowa Census: Volga, Clayton County, Iowa: William Koehn (Township 72, range 33, section 4, SE 1/4 SW 1/4, age 36, farmer, born Germany), Mary Koehn (age 33), Augusta Koehn (age 14), Wm Koehn, Jr. (age 12), Emma Koehn (age 10), Fred Koehn (age 8), Mary Koehn (age 5), Charles Koehn (age 3), and Manda Koehn (age 4). All children were born in Clayton County, Iowa.

1900: Census, Volga, Clayton County, Iowa: William Koehn (born Feb. 1848, age 52, married 31 years, born Germany, immigrated 1851, in U.S. 49 years, Naturalized, Farmer), wife Mary (born Aug, 1850, age 49, married 31 years, 10 children born, 10 still living, born Germany). daughter Mary Koehn (born Feb. 1880, age 20), son Charles (born July 1881, age 18), daughter Amanda Koehn (born Dec. 1883, age 16), daughter Ida Koehn (born Apr. 186, age 14), son Grover Koehn (born June 1888, age 11), and son George Koehn (born Mar. 1890, age 9). all children were born in Iowa.

1905 Iowa State Census, Volga, Clayton County, Iowa: William Koehn, Mary Koehn, Ida Koehn, Grover Koehn and George Koehn. Post Office address for all was Elkport.

1910 Census: Volga, Clayton County, Iowa; William Koehn (age 62, married 1 time for 40 years, immigrated 1851, own income), Mary Koehn (age 58, married 1 time for 40 years, 10 children born, 9 still living, immigrated 1852), son Grover C. Koehn (age 20), and son George W. Koehn (age 18).

1915 Iowa State Census, Elkport, Clayton County Iowa: William Koehn, age 67, married, County Clayton, Town Elkport, Occupation Retired, Extent of Education: Common 8, can read and write, Birth Place: Germany, value of farm or home $1800, Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E, Church Affiliation: Lutheran, Father's birth place Germany, mother's birthplace Germany, naturalized, Years in U.S. 64, Years in Iowa: 64.

1920 Census: Volga, Clayton County, Iowa; William Koehn (age 71, married immigrated 1848, naturalized, born Germany, retired Farmer), wife Mary Koehn (age 68, immigrated 1851, naturalized, born Germany).

1925 Iowa State Census: Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa: Charles N. Kemp, (age 45), wife Mary Kemp (age 46, born Iowa, Father' name William Koehn, born Germany, Age 77. Mother's name Mary Krieg, born Germany, age 73, parents were married in Elkport). Children Thelma Kemp age 16, and Mildred Kemp age 13).

1930 Census: Jefferson, Clayton County, Iowa: William Koehn (age 82, born Germany, immigrated 1851, Naturalized, Veteran of Civil War ), wife Mary Koehn (age 78, born Germany, immigrated 1853, naturalized).

William Koehn died Oct. 30, 1931 and is buried in Guttenberg City Cemetery, Guttenberg, Clayton County, Iowa

Clayton County Register
Elkader, Iowa-Page Five
Thursday April 21, 1932

Mrs. Wm. Koehn

Mrs. Wm. Koehn, 80, nee Mary Krieg, died in her home in Guttenberg yesterday morning at 6:30. She was born in Wurttemberg, Germany, August 28, 1852. Later she came to America and settled in Volga township.

She married May 11, 1869, in Volga township to William Koehn, who preceded her in death, Oct. 30, 1931. Mrs. Koehn had been in poor health for some time and death came as a relief to her suffering.

Deceased lived in Volga township on a farm for 41 years and for 12 years in Elkport. September, 1921 she moved with her family to Guttenberg where she has since made her home.

She is survived by five daughters and four sons, as follows: Mrs. Wm. Jungblut, Guttenberg; Wm. Koehn, Elkader; Mrs. Chas. Ochsner, St. Louis, Missouri; Charles Koehn, Fort Dodge; Mrs. Chas. Kemps and Mrs. Amanda McSperrin, Dubuque; George, Cedar Rapids; Grover, German Valley, Illinois; and Mrs. Chas. Waterman, Garber. Besides these she is survived by 26 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren, two brothers, Wm. Krieg of Volga and Gus Krieg of Edgewood and three sisters, Mrs. Wm. Witt Sr., Elkader; Mrs. Christine Roach, Eagle Grove and Mrs. John Masters, Dubuque.

Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at the late home at two o'clock and burial will be made in the Guttenberg cemetery with the Rev. D.D. Welch officiating.

Children of William Koehn and Maria Kreig:

  1. Augusta Koehn b: ABT 1870 in Clayton County, Iowa
  2. William H. Koehn b: JUN 1872 in Clayton County, Iowa
  3. Emma Amelia Koehn b: ABT 1875 in Clayton County, Iowa
  4. Friedrich Heinrich Carl Koehn b: 17 NOV 1877 in Volga Township, Clayton County, Iowa
  5. Maria Christiane Augusta Koehn b: 18 FEB 1879 in Clayton County, Iowa
  6. Karl Friedrich Johann Koehn b: 31 JUL 1881 in Clayton County, Iowa
  7. Amanda Koehn b: 24 DEC 1883 in Clayton County, Iowa
  8. Ida C. Koehn b: ABT 1885 in Elkport, Clayton County, Iowa
  9. Grover C. Koehn b: ABT 1887 in Clayton County, Iowa
  10. George W. Koehn b: 10 MAR 1892 in Clayton County, Iowa

Leach, John Milton He was born Sept. 12, 1838 in North Bridgewater, Massachusetts. He was the son of John Leach and Lydia French. (d. Jun 13, 1856). He married Susan Sherman on Oct. 7, 1867 in Clayton County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Frederick Sherman and Minerva Severens/Sevrence.

John Milton Leach

Began his earth-pilgrimage near where the Pilgrim Fathers first landed on the soil of the new world. His birth, in the town of North Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, dates September 12, 1838.

His father was a shoemaker, which trade he taught his son, who was also sent to the common schools of the town until his seventeenth year, when his mother died. This sad event seemed to loosen the ties that bound the family to their native spot; and like many another New England father, Mr. Leach turned his thoughts toward the great West, for the double purpose, in his case, of finding relief from the asthma from which he suffered, induced and aggravated by the cold moist atmosphere of his home, in the dryer air of the upper Mississippi, and at the same time to secure a large field for the opportunities of his three children. This important step was taken on the 26th of March, 1857, two years after the death of the wife and mother, and the family settled in Monona, Clayton County, Iowa, where Mr. Leach resumed his work at the bench and continued it until approaching death, which occurred in November, 1859, two months after our subject had completed his majority.

John M. continued the manufacture of boots and shoes in the same place until the spring of 1862, when he enlisted as a private in Company E of the 27th Iowa Infantry Volunteers. On the 12th of August, 1863, he was discharged from faithful service in this regiment to accept duty as quartermaster-sergeant in the 1st West Tennessee Infantry of African descent. In this position he was brought into direct contact with the entire regiment and at once commanded the respect and confidence of all on account of his thorough efficiency and readiness to oblige. For this he was partially rewarded on the 12th of February, 1864, by appointment of the President as regimental quartermaster with the rank of first lieutenant, in place of J.T. Vincent dismissed for drunkenness. Whatever may have been said, in jest or seriousness, of other quartermasters finding and maintaining positions four miles in rear of the line of battle, certainly never did apply to Lieutenant Leach, who was always with his command on every march and in every engagement, and was there to see that every want was, as far as possible, fully met.

Immediately on his muster-out with the regiment, January 31st, 1866, he, with several other of the officers, went to Tunica County, Miss., and undertook, with but ill success, the cultivation of cotton. Their failure was not from the lack of enterprise or industry. Discouraged by the loss of labor and capital, and the death of two of the number who had tarried in the South, in May, 1867, ten years after the first advent there, he returned to Monona, Iowa, and engaged in general merchandising, in which he continued four years, making many friends but not much money. One became to him more than a friend, and he was married on the 7th of October, 1867. One bright little daughter (Minnie) graces their home.

In January, 1872, he entered the office of the auditor of his county as clerk, where he remained eight years and until his own election on the Republican ticket to office of county auditor and clerk of the board of supervisors for the term of two years from the 1st of January, 1880. His present home is Elkader, Clayton County, Iowa.

-source: A brief sketch of the organization and services of the Fifty-ninth Regiment of United States Colored Infantry : and biographical sketches; by Robert Cowden; Dayton, Ohio: United Brethren Pub. House, 1883; pg. 213-216

-transcribed for Clayton co. IAGenWeb by S. Ferrall

1850 Census: North Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts: John Leach (age 39, shoemaker), Lydia Leach (age 42, born Maine), John M. Leach (age 11), Clara Leach (age 8), David French (age 38, shoemaker, born Maine), John Ellis French (age 20, shoemaker, born Maine), Melvin O. Hamilin (age 20, shoemaker) and Henry Reynolds (age 20, shoemaker)

While in the village of Monona, on the 8th inst., we visited the garden of Mr. John Leach, who is cultivating the celebrated Hubbard squash. We never saw vines ranker than his. This squash if preferable to the marrow, according to the testimony of the best judges in Massachusetts. We would recommend to our readers to secure some of the seeds of Mr. Leach the coming fall. This squash does well, we believe, in Iowa. Let us try the "Hubbard."

source: Dubuque Weekly Times; Dubuque, Iowa;
August 18, 1859

(Note by ejj: I believe this is probably his father John, who died Nov. 1859)

Know ye, That John M. Leach, Quartermaster, Colonel Edward Bouton's 59th Regiment of U.S. Colored Infantry, VOLUNTEERS, who was enrolled on the twelfth day of February one thousand eight hundred and Sixty four to serve Three years, or during the war, is hereby Discharged from the service of the United States, this Thirty first day of January 1866, at Memphis Tennessee by reason of L.O. No 2, Hd Qrs Mil. Div. of Tenn.

[No objection to his being re-enlisted is known to exist.*]

Said John M. Leach was born in North Bridgewater in the State of Massachusetts, is Twenty six years of age, five feet five inches high, fair complexion, hazel eyes, brown hair and by occupation when enrolled a Shoemaker.

Given at Memphis Tenn, this Thirty first day of January 1866.

M. Campbell
Capt. 8th Iowa Inf.
A.C.M. Dept. of Tenn.


[written at top of form:]

Memphis Tenn. Feb. 5th 1866. Paid in full including travel Pay and Allowance, Paymaster U.S.A.

[written at bottom left of form, 3 entries:]

*This sentence will be erased should there be any thing in the conduct or physical condition of the soldier rendering him unfit for the Army.

(A.G.O.No 99)

E. Bouton, Col. 59th U.S.C. Inf. and Bat. Brig. Genl. Comdy Regt.
Filed March 25th 1884, Charles Schecker, Recorder

-source: Soldier's Discharge Record, Volume 1, item 5, 1865-1867, Clayton County, Iowa; LDS film #1516914 #5

-transcribed for Clayton co. IAGenWeb by Sharyl Ferrall

-transcription note: Every effort has been taken to produce a true and accurate transcription, but errors may exist due to the occasional difficulty in reading the microfilm. The researcher should obtain the original record to confirm accuracy.

1870 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa; John Leach (age 31, variety-merchant, born Massachusetts), Susan Leach (age 26, born New York), and Minerva Leach (age 1)

1880 Census: Elkader, Clayton County, Iowa: John M. Leach (age 40, county auditor, born Massachusetts), Susan S. Leach (age 37, born New York), and Minerva Leach (age 11, born Iowa)

1885 Iowa State Census: Boardman, Clayton County, Iowa: John M. Leach (age 46) Susan Leach (age 42), Minerva Leach (age 16), John Leach (age 1) and Frederick Sherman (age 78).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living in Iowa: Name: J. M. Leach, Regiment: 59th Infantry, U.S., Rank: 1st Lieut & QM, Post Office: Elkader. Comments: Civil War.

This statement was in a biography for Henry Meyer (who married the daughter of John M. Leach)

Mr. Meyer married his present wife, formerly Miss Minerva Leach, April 19, 1892. John M. Leach, the father of Mrs. Meyer, settled at an early day in this county, from where he enlisted in the Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteers, and was County Auditor for two terms. At the time of his death, September 29, 1893, he was Postmaster at Elkader. Our subject bears an enviable reputation for uprightness and sterling worth, and has a wide circle of friends and acquaintances who hold him in favorable regard.

source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties; Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894; pg. 418-421

-transcribed by Sandi Coobs

John Milton Leach died Sept. 27, 1893. He is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa (The date of death is per Cemetery Records. The biography above used the date Sept. 29., 1893.)

1900 Census: Boardman, Clayton County, Iowa: Susan S. Leach (born D. 1844, age 55, widowed, 2 children born, 2 still living), son John S. Leach (born April 1883, age 17).

1925 Iowa State Census: Elkader, Clayton County, Iowa: Susan S. Leach, age 81, widowed, father's name: Frederick W. Sherman, born New York. Mother's name: Minerva Severens, born Vermont. Parents were married in New York. (Note: her brother Theodore Sherman lists his parents as Frederick Sherman and Minerva Sevrence)

Susan (Sherman) Leach (born 1842), died May 5, 1927. She is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa .


Lee, John W. He was born about 1836 in Germany.

A Pension was filed on March 6, 1888 for a minor Elizabeth F. Lee et al, in Iowa.


Lewis, Runyon C He was born May 29, 1841 in Painted Post, Steuben, New York. He was the son of Samuel Lewis (Nov. 12, 1810 - May 2, 1898) and Fanny Comptom (Dec. 23, 1819 - Dec. 9, 1857)

1856 Iowa State Census: Pleasant Valley, Scott County, Iowa: Samuel Lewis (age 41, born NY, farmer), Nancy Lewis (age 36, born NY), R. C. Lewis (age 15, born PA), H. M. Lewis (age 14, born PA), M. K. Lewis (age 12, born NY), J. M Lewis (age 10, born NY), F. M. Lewis (age 8, born NY), C. B. Lewis (age 6, born NY0, S. W. Lewis (age 3, born NY) and M. A. Lewis (age 1, born NY). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 1 year.

1860 Census: Pleasant Valley, Scott County, Iowa: Runion Lewis (age 19, farm hand, born New York). He was living with a family named Predmore. He was indexed as Bunion Lewis. The Samuel Lewis family was on the same page.

Runyon C. Lewis died Feb. 7, 1863 and is buried in Corinth National Cemetery, Plot B, 3260 Corinth, Alcorn County, Mississippi

Samuel Lewis, father of Runyon Lewis filed for a pension on July 28, 1890.


McAlpin, William J. He was born Feb. 16, 1838 in Columbia, Whitley, Indiana. He was the son of Robert McAlpin and Eleanor S. Kincaid. He married Emily Euphasia Penhollow on Dec. 6, 1860 in Mallory Clayton County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Richard Penhollow (Jun 24, 1815 - Jan 10, 1892) and Mercy C. Bates (Jan 16, 1821 - Sept. 28, 1894).

McAlpin, William J., farmer, Section 35 (Fairfield township); PO Brush Creek. Born in Columbia Co., Indiana, Feb. 16, 1838; came to Tazewell Bo., Ill., with his parents in 1839; in 1848, he with his parents, settled in Dubuque Co., Iowa near Colesburg. Here he married Emily E. Penhollon Dec. 2, 1860. She was born in Chautauqua Co., Dec. 6, 1843. Enlisted in the 27th I. V. I., Co. E, Aug. 22, 1862; was in the battles of Pleasant Hill, Nashville, siege and capture of Mobile, and others; honorably discharged Oct. 8, 1865. His children are Nettie, born Feb. 21, 1863; Bertha M., born Jan 4, 1868; Ben F., born March 21, 1871; William H., born May 14, 1873 and Mercy E., born Oct. 19, 1866 a nd died May 29, 1877. Is a Republican.

"1878 History of Fayette County, Iowa" Posted by: Dorothy Gosse (9/21/2002) Fayette Biographies (maintained by Constanace Diamond) Page 611

1880 Census: Putnam, Fayette County, Iowa: Wm. J. McAlpine (age 42, farmer, born Indiana), wife Emily E. McAlpine (age 37, born New York), daughter Nettie I. McAlpine (age 17,), daughter Bertha M. McAlpine (age12), son Ben F. McAlpine (age 9), Wm. H. McAlpine (age 7), and Worthy R. McAlpine (age1).

1885 Iowa State Census, Center, Fayette County, Iowa: William J. McAlpin (Township 93, Range 9, Section 10, NW NW, age 46, farmer, born Indiana), Emily E. McAlpin (age 42), Bertha M. McAlpin (age 17, born Fayette County), Benjamin McAlpin (age 13, born Clayton County), Harry H. . McAlpin (age 11, born Fayette County), and Nellie R. McAlpin (age 3, born Fayette County),

List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: Under 27th Iowa: W. J. McAlpin, Rank: Corporal, Company E, Present Post-Office Address: Randalia

William J. McAlpin died Jan 18, 1889 in Randalia, Fayette County, Iowa. He is buried in Reed Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa

His widow Emily E. McAlpin filed for a pension on Jul 11, 1890.

Emily (Penhollow) McAlpin (born Dec. 6, 1842 in Stockton, Chautauqua, New York), died May 17, 1897 in Fayette County, Iowa.

There was a pension filed for a minor in 1897. Leotha M. Lewis was guardian.

Children of William J. McAlpin and Emily Euphasia Penhollow:

  1. Nettie I. McAlpin b: 21 Feb 1866 in Fayette County, Iowa, d. Feb. 19, 1883 in Fayette County Iowa.
  2. Bertha Marcia McAlpin b: 4 Jan 1868 in Fayette County, Iowa
  3. Benjamin F. McAlpin b: 21 Mar 1871 in Clayton County, Iowa
  4. William Harrison McAlpin b: 14 May 1873 in Arlington, Fayette, Iowa
  5. Mercy Eleanor McAlpin b: 19 Oct 1876 in Arlington, Fayette, Iowa, died May 29, 1877 in Fayette County, Iowa
  6. Worthy Ralph McAlpin b: 19 Jan 1879 in Arlington, Fayette, Iowa, died July 1, 1880.
  7. Nellie R. McAlpin b: 7 Dec 1884 in Fayette County, Iowa, died Dec. 1894 in Fayette County, Iowa.
  8. Mervin Dexter "Dock" McAlpin b: 29 Oct 1886 in Fayette County, Iowa

Note: in 1900 Mervin Mcalpin (born Oct. 1886, age 13) was listed in the Iowa Soldier's Orphan's Home in Davenport, Scott County, Iowa.


McGrady, James He was born July 12, 1827 in Grand Isle, Vermont. He was the son of James McGrady and Lucy Sophia White. He married Laura Lane Wallace on Aug. 31, 1854 in Clayton County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Lester and Cynthia Wallace.

1850 Census: North Hero, Grand Isle, Vermont: James McGrade (age 53, shoemaker, born Ireland), Lucy S. McGrade (age 44, born VT.), John McGrade (age 25, born Canada), James McGrade (age 23, born Vermont) and Andrew Hardy (age 49, laborer)

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: James McGrady (age 68, shoemaker, born Ireland ), Sophia McGrady (age 50, born Ireland), John McGrady (age 32, shoemaker), James McGrady (age 31, shoemaker), Laura McGrady (age 23), Cynthia McGrady (age 3), E. E. McGrady (age 3), Hannah McGrady (29), Daniel McGrady (age 7), Sarah McGrady (age 5), Elizabeth McGrady (age 2) and Charles McGrady (age 1/12)

1870 Census: Lake, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa; James McReady (age 43, farmer, born Vermont), Laura McReady (age 33), C. S. McReady (age 14), E.S. McReady (age 13), G. R. McReady (age 7), Mina McReady (age 5), James McReady (age 4), and Blanche F. McReady (age 1). (Note they were living next to his brother John and family)

1880 Census: Grant, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa: James McGrady (age 52, farmer, born VT), wife Laura McGrady (age 44), son George McGrady (age 18), daughter Minnie McGrady (age 16) son James McGrady (age 13), daughter Blanche McGrady (age 11), son Frederick McGrady (age 9), son Gilbert McGrady (age 6), daughter Clara McGrady (age 3), and son John McGrady (age 1).

1885 Iowa State Census: Clear Lake, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa: James McGrady (Township 96, Range 22, Section 8, Ne S E age 58, born VT.), Laura McGrady (age 51, born NY), James McGrady (age 18), Blanch McGrady (age 16) and Frederick McGrady (age 14).

James McGrady died Aug. 7, 1887 in Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. He is buried in Clear Lake Cemetery, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa.

His Widow Laura L. McGrady filed for a pension on Nov. 9, 1887.

1900 Census: Klemme, Hancock County, Iowa: Gilbert McGrady (born Feb. 1876, age 24, married 2 years, carpenter), wife Adeline McGrady (born Dec. 1876, age 24, married 2 years, 1 child born, 1 still living), daughter Ruby M. McGrady (born Nov. 1899, age 8/12) and mother Laura McGrady (born Dec. 1835, age 65, widowed, 9 children born, born New York)

Laura (Wallace) McGrady (born Dec. 1835 in New York), died July 4, 1904 and is buried in Clear Lake Cemetery, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa.

Children of James McGrady and Laura Lane Wallace:

  1. Cynthia Sophia McGrady b: 17 Jul 1854 in Farmersburg Twp., Clayton, IA
  2. Elmira C. McGrady b: 1858 in Clayton, IA
  3. George H. McGrady b: Mar 1862 in Clayton Co. IA
  4. Mina McGrady b: ABT 1864 in IA
  5. James L. McGrady b: 19 Nov 1871 in Clayton Co. IA
  6. Blanche Flora McGrady b: 17 Dec 1867 in Farmersburg, Clayton, IA
  7. Frederick McGrady b: ABT 1870 in Cerro Gordo Co, IA
  8. Gilbert B. McGrady b: 14 Feb 1874 in Ventura, IA
  9. Clara McGrady b: 7 Dec 1876 in Cerro Gordo Co, IA
  10. Joseph John McGrady b: 26 Jan 1878 in Cerro Gordo Co, IA

McKinney, James P. He was born June 10, 1826 in Sharon Township Richland county, Ohio. He was the son of Ross McKinney (1795 - Nov. 1879) and Ann Nelson (1797 - 1850-1860). He married Jennie C. Arny about on Sept. 3, 1856 in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. (Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994).

1860 Census, Washington, Winneshiek County, Iowa: James P. McKinney (age 33, attorney at law, born Ohio), Jennie McKinney (age 27, born Vermont), James C. McKinney (age 8/12, born Ill.) (Cemetery records for Phelps Cemetery show that James Clifford McKinney died in 1863 - the son of J. P. and J. A. McKinney. Tombstone inscription: "Dear Little Ferdy".).

1870 Census; Decorah, Winneshiek County, Iowa: J. P. McKinney (age 42, fire ins. agent, born Ohio), Jenny C. McKinney (age 36), Mabel C. McKinney (age 2), Martha R. Hanson (age 24, domestic servant) and S. Currier (female, age 63, no occupation, born Vermont).

1880 Census: West Decorah Winneshiek County, Iowa: James McKinney (age 53, mail express agent, born Ohio), Jane McKinney (age 47, born Vermont), and Mabel McKinney (age 12, born Iowa) (his first name was indexed as Janns).

1900 Census: Decorah, Winneshiek County, Iowa: James McKinney (born June, 1827, age 72, married 44 years,) wife Jenny C. McKinney (born Oct. 1832, age 67, 2 children born, 1 still living, born Vermont), daughter Mabel A. McKinney (born Oct. 1867, age 42)

James P. McKinney died Dec. 14, 1903, and is buried in Phelps Cemetery, Decorah, Winneshiek County, Iowa.

James P. McKinney is dead at Decorah. He was commissary sergeant of the Twenty Seventh Iowa during the Civil War.

Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette December 29, 1903

His widow Jennie McKinney filed for a pension on Jan. 21, 1904 in Ohio

Jennie (Arny) McKinney died in 1905 and is buried in Phelps Cemetery, Decorah, Winneshiek County, Iowa.


Mackey, Samuel K. He was born about 1833 in Ohio.

Samuel K. Mackey filed for a pension on Oct. 13, 1886.

His mother Maria M. Mackey filed for a pension on Oct. 19, 1892 in Ohio.


Mather, Darius C He was born Dec. 15, 1831 in Union County, Ohio. He was the son of Southworth Mather (March 23, 1800 - Mar. 30, 1861) and Philena Rice (b. Aug. 1, 1808). Darius C. Mather married Amanda H. Mather On Mar. 24, 1853 in Union County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Ebenezer Mather (Sept. 7, 1789 -Dec. 20, 1852) and Elizabeth Reed (b. about 1796). (According to family trees that I found online, Southworth and Ebenezer were brothers, making Darius and Amanda first cousins.)

Southworth Mather was born in New Jersey, and when young moved with his father, Daniel Mather, to Virginia. Thence they came to Ohio. Southworth was married in Union Township, this county, to Philena Rice. About 1831, he removed with his wife and two children to Jackson Township, squatting on a piece of land about a mile west of Essex. He afterward purchased land in Washington Township and lived there for a time. He then removed with his family to Logan County and ultimately to Allamakee, Iowa, where he died. Mr. Mather was one of those restless border spirits, fond of hunting, and only content when dwelling on the extreme frontier.<.p>

Union County, Ohio - 1883 History - Chapter VI - Dover Township

Darius Mather 1850 Census: Dover, Union County, Ohio: Southworth Mathers (age 50, farmer), Philemia Mathers (age 46), Darius Mathers (age 18), Catharine Mathers (age 17), Fortner Mathers (age 14), John Mathers (age 9), Sterling Mathers (age 7) and Squire Mathers (age 11).

1860 Census Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: Darius Mather (age 29), Amanda Mather (age 24), Rosa A. Mather (age 4), Eldora Mather (age 3) and Edmore C. Mather (age 1). Living next to them was: Southmore Mather (age 60, farmer), Philean Mather (age 53), Squire Mather (age 21, farmer), John Mather (age 19), Sterling Mather (age 16),

Darius C. Mather died March 30, 1864. He is buried in Vicksburg National Cemetery, Vicksburg, Warren County, Mississippi. (Note: There is also a memorial at Postville Cemetery Area B, Post Township, Allamakee County, Iowa).

His widow Amanda H. Mather filed for a pension on Aug. 16, 1864. Information from the pension file is extracted below:

April 30, 1864

Inventory of Effects of Darius C. Mather, Company E 27th Regiment Iowa Volunteers who died at Vicksburg, Miss, the 30th day of March, 1864 of Erysipelas to wit:

One Cap. One Great Coat. One Uniform Coat. One Pair of Infantry Trousers. Two Flannel Shirts. Two Vests. One Pair Shoes. One pair socks. Two Blankets. One Haversack. One Knapsack. One Canteen. One Silver Watch. One Gold Chain. 28 dollars in U. S. Currency.

Said Darius C. Mather was last paid to the thirty first day of December 1864 (sic) and had drawn Clothing to the amount of thirty two Dollars and fifty three cts.

He was enlisted on the 14th day of August 1862 at Grand Meadow by T. Allen Olmsted and mustered into the service of the United States by Capt. Geo S. Pierce on the 3rd day of October 1862.

Deceased was 32 years of age. Resided in the town of Grand Meadow, County of Clayton and State of Iowa. Born in State of Ohio.

I certify on honor, that the above is a correct inventory of the effects of the said Darius C. Mather

T. Allen Olmstead
Commanding Co. E. 27th Reg't Iowa Vol. Infantry.

His inventory of effects were furnished me by Geo. E. Kimble, Surgeon U. S. Volunteers in Charge of Hospital No. 3. Vicksburg, Miss.

Signed T. Allen Olmstead, 1st Lieut.


On August 9, 1864 Amanda Mather filed for a Widows Pension. She was aged 28. She married Darius C. Mather on March 24, 1853 in Dover, Union County Ohio. Her maiden name was not stated. They had 4 children: Florence R. Mather, born April 29, 1856; Francis E. Mather, born August 1, 1857; Delmer C. Mather, born March 3, 1859; and Abbie E. Mather, born Nov. 17, 1860.


On Feb. 18, 1869, Amanda H. Rounds filed a Declaration of Minor Children for Pension.

She was 32 years old, a resident of Marion Township, Clayton County, Iowa.

She was the Guardian of Children: Florence R. Mather, born April 29, 1856; Delmer C. Mather, born March 3, 1859; and Abbie E. Mather, born Nov. 17, 1860.

Their father Darius C. Mather died in the service at Vicksburg on the 30th day of March, 1864 of Erysipelsa. (Another record said he died at General Hospital, Vicksburg of Chronic Diarrhea).

Their mother again married to J. C. Rounds on the 5th day of Sept. 1868.

The parents of her wards were married at Dover, Union County, Ohio on the 24th day of March 1853 by James B. Richey, Justice of the Peace. (The marriage record of Darius C. Mather and Amanda H. Mather was in the pension file).


There was a statement by B. H. Hinkley, M. D. dated April 25, 1867, who stated that he was the attending physician at the birth of the children of Amanda Mathers. He listed 4 children:

Florence R. Mather, born April 29, 1856;
Francis E. Mather, born August 1, 1857
Delmer C. Mather, born March 3, 1859;
Abbie E. Mather, born Nov. 17, 1860.

In a statement by Amanda Mather dated March 13, 1867, Francis E. Mather born August 1, 1857, died Oct. 20, 1866.

1870 Census: Marion, Clayton County, Iowa: Jabez C. Rounds (age 51), Amanda Rounds (age 34, born Ohio), Joseph Rounds (age 16), Marion Rounds (age 13), Summer Rounds (age 8), Florence Mather (age 14), Abby Mather (age 10), Delmer Mather (age 12), Hans Peterson (age 26, farm laborer), Peter Larson (age 22, farm laborer), Richard Larson (age 28, farmer laborer) and Anna Larson (age 30, keeping house).

Amanda (Mather) Rounds died June 22, 1875 and is buried in Eno Cemetery, Luana, Clay County, Iowa. (as Amanda H. Rounds).


Mann, John H. He was born May 7, 1831 in Ohio. He was the son of Warner Mann (Feb. 16, 1784 - May 27, 1858) and Amanda Blakeslee (1789 - Aug. 30, 1853).

1850 Census: Plymouth, Ashtabula, Ohio: Amanda Mann (age 61, born Connecticut), Joseph W. Mann (age 20, farmer, born Ohio), John Henry Mann (age 19, farmer, born Ohio)

1860 Census: McGregor, Clayton County, Iowa: John Mann (age 28, teamster, born Ohio). He was living with a family named DeHaven.

1880 Census: Herrick, Deuel, Dakota Territory: John H. Mann (age 50, single, farmer, born Ohio, parents born Connecticut). Based on age, place of birth and place of birth for parents, this appears to be him.

He filed for a pension on May 12, 1888 in Ohio.

1890 Veterans Census: Plymouth, Ashtabula County, Ohio: John Mann, Private, Co. E, 27th Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 5, 1862, Discharged Aug. 8, 1865. Length of Service: 3 years, 3 days, Post Office Address: Ashtabula, Ohio, Disability Incurred: Eyes.

1900 Census: Plymouth, Ashtabula County, Ohio: Wilfred M. Mann (born Mar. 1858, age 42, married 14 years, born Ohio), wife Myra J. Mann (born April 1859, age 41, married 14 years, 4 children born, 4 still living, born Ohio), daughter Grace M. Mann (born (born Nov. 1886, age 13, born Ohio), daughter Ethel L. Mann (born Aug. 1889, age 10, born Ohio), son George K. Mann (born Aug, 1895, age 6, born Ohio), son Lucien W. Mann (born May 1889, age 3, born Ohio - note the year has to be incorrect, not a typo), and Uncle John H. Mann (born May 1831, age 69, single, born Ohio, parents born Connecticut).

I could not find him after 1900 and could not determine when he died or where he is buried. Family Trees say that he died in South Dakota. Many Mann's (including his parents) are buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Ashtabula County, Ohio. But he was not listed on Find a Grave and I could not find a listing for that cemetery. Perhaps he is also buried there.


Mead, Albert A. (He was listed as Meade on the Pension Index Record). He was born about 1841 in Illinois. He was possibly the son of William and Deborah Mead.

It appears from the Pension Index Record that he was married twice. I found two different family trees that seems to match the Pension Index Record Information. I am pretty sure the first one is correct. I am not certain about the second one. If this is correct, it would appear that Amanda was his first wife. They apparently divorced and both remarried.

  1. Albert Mead married Amanda Jane McClintock in 1874 in Jackson County, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of John R. and Eliza McClintock. Albert and Amanda had two children: Zahle Mead born Sept. 1875 and Sarah Elsie Mead born in Nov. 1877. Amanda married Robert Marvin Farrington in Jackson Wisconsin on Nov. 8, 1882. Amanda Jane (McClintock, Mead) Farrington (born May 5, 1848) died Dec. 19, 1907 in Black River Falls, Jackson, Wisconsin.
  2. Albert A. Mead married Flora C. Belden on Nov. 26, 1879. She was the daughter of Nathaniel David Belden and Sarah C. Perry. Albert Mead and Flora Belden had one child: Nellie Mead.

1850 Census: Hartland, Huron, Ohio: William Mead (age 50, Physician, born New York), Deborah Mead (age 45, born New York), Mary Mead (age 19, born New York), Albert Mead (age 9, born Ill), Eunice Meade (age 4, born Penn) and Polly Lockwood (age 77, born Connecticut).

1880 Census: Viola, Mercer, Illinois: Nathaniel Belden (age 63, Restaurant Keeper & Landlord, born New York), Sarah C. Belden (age 53), son Edd Belden (age 18,) daughter Hattie Belden (age 16), Son in law Albert Mead (age 37, miller, born Illinois), daughter Flora Mead (age 20, born Illinois).

1890 Census, Albion, Jackson County, Wisconsin: Veteran's census: Amanda J. Farrington widow, Albert A. Mead, private, Co. E, 27 Iowa Inf, Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, discharged Aug. 8, 1865, length of service 2 years, 11 months, 25 days. Post Office Address: Black River Falls.

His Widow Flora E. Meade filed for a pension on Mar. 8, 1893 in Illinois.

A pension was filed for a minor on Aug. 9, 1888 in Wisconsin. Amanda J. Farrington was guardian.


Meyer, John D. He was born Sept. 1848 in Ohio. He was the son of Henry D. and Margaret Meyer. He married Margaret Schroeder on May 5, 1873 in Crawford, Wisconsin. The marriage record shows his parents as D. H. and Margaret A. Meyer. It shows her parents as Deoderich and Minnie Schroeder. (Wisconsin, Marriages, 1836-1930)

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: D. H. Myer (age 49, merchant, born Hanover), Margaret Meyer (age 38), Margret Myer (age 14), John Myer (age 12), Wm. Myer (age 6), and Henry Myer (age 2)

1870 Census, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Henry D. Meyer (age 59, born Hanover, keeps country store), Margaret Meyer, age 49, born Hanover), John Meyer (age 22, wagon maker, born Ohio), Alex Meyer (age 16, apprentice to turner, born Ohio), Henry Meyer (age 12, born Iowa), Margaret Meyer (age 25, born Ohio, Emma Meyer (age 11, born Iowa), twin Lena Meyer (age 11, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Nashua, Chickasaw County, Iowa: John D. Myers (age 32, wagon maker, born Ohio), Margaret Myers (age 24, born Iowa), daughter Laura Myers (age 3), daughter Manda Myers (age 5), son John Myers (age 1), boarder Thomas Carroll (age 46, blacksmith), Samuel Saul (age 25, boarder, blacksmith), Hattie Saul (age 18),

1900 Census; Beaver, Butler County, Iowa; John D. Meyer (Born Sept. 1848, age 51, married 27 years, born Ohio, wheel wright), wife Margaret Meyer (born Feb. 1855, age 45, married 27 years, 3 children born, 3 still living, born Iowa), daughter Amanda Meyer (born Apr. 1875, age 25, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Beaver, Butler County, Iowa: John D. Meyer (age 61, married 1 time for 37 years, born Ohio, wagon maker, own shop) wife Margaret D. Meyer (age 55, married 1 time for 37 years, 3 children born, 3 still living, born Iowa.)

1915 Iowa State Census: New Hartford, Butler County, Iowa: John D. Meyer, age 66, married, County Butler, Town or Township New Hartford, Occupation Wagon repairer, total earnings for 1914 from Occupation: $1000.00. Extent of Education; Grammar 8, College 2, can read and write. Birth Place Ohio. Military Service; Civil War, Sate Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E, Church Affiliation: Lutheran, Father's Birthplace: Germany, Mother's birthplace Germany., years in Iowa 65.

John D. Meyer died Oct. 3, 1919 at New Hartford, Iowa (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lot 32, Grave 1, New Hartford, Butler Co, Iowa

His widow Margaret Meyer filed for a pension on Feb. 21, 1921 in Iowa.

The records below are two of the children of John D. Meyers and Margaret, showing Margaret's maiden name to be Schroeder.

1925 Census Cedar Falls, Black Hawk County, Iowa: John H Meyer (age 45, fathers name John D. Meyer, mother's name Margaret Schroder, parents married in Wisc.), wife Minnie Meyer (age 40), and daughter Leone Meyer (age 13), mother in Law Alice Bush (age 74, widowed).

1925 Census: Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa; Mark W. Plunges (age 48), wife Laura M Plunges (age 47, fathers name John D. Meyer, mothers' name Margaret Schroeder, parents married in Iowa).

The marriage record for Laura M. Meyer showed grooms name as Mark W. Plummer. They married June 7, 1899 in New Hartford, Butler County, Iowa. Her parents were listed as John Meyer and Margaret Schroder.


Miller, John He was born April 3, 1840 in either Germany or Ohio. He was the son of Jacob Miller and Mary Shufle. He married Jane R. Spickelmier on Dec. 29, 1865 in Elkader, Clayton County, Iowa.. She was the daughter of Jesse Spickelmier and Sarah Veach.

JOHN MILLER, who is in many respects the principal figure of Grand Meadow Township, is a man of wide acquaintance and has many friends wherever he is known. Few men in the county of Cherokee are held in higher estimation than he. John Miller was born in the Buckeye State, Muskingum County, April 3, 1840. His parents, Jacob and Mary (Shufle) Miller, emigrated from Wertemberg, Germany, to this country about 1832; they had six children: Isabel (died at the age of thirty years), Malcolm, John, Jacob, George, and Kate, wife of Fred Schaller. The family settled in Clayton, Iowa, in 1856; the father was a shoe maker by trade, and made that his business until after he came to Iowa. He died in October, 1883, aged eighty-six years, having survived his wife only six months. John remained at home until the outbreak of the Rebellion, when he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Thomas G. Drips, and served three years. His command was first sent to Minnesota to quell the Sioux Indians, and he was in the actions at New Ulm and Mankato, and afterward had the satisfaction of witnessing the execution of thirty-eight Sioux Indians at Mankato, in December, 1862. After this matter was settled the regiment was sent to the South. Mr. Miller participated in the capture of Vicksburg and Little Rock; was with Sheridan on his raid through Mississippi; was with General Banks up the Red River, and in the action of Pleasant Hill and Shreveport; after taking part in the Knoxville and Tupelo battles he was sent to follow Price through Missouri, going as far as Kansas City. After his return to St. Louis he was sent to Nashville to join General Thomas; soon after he reached New Orleans he was sent to Mobile, and assisted in its capture. He reached home August 9, 1865. At the taking of Little Rock his blood became overheated, and every summer he has suffered from the effects. For a year and a half he was detailed as headquarters dispatch carrier for General A. J. Smith. After his return home he resumed farming, and remained in Clayton County for five years. Thence he removed to Fayette County, where he resided ten years. In the fall of 1880 he came to Cherokee County, and after renting land for two years he bought his present farm of 240 acres. Mr. Miller was married December 29, 1865, to Miss Jane R. Spickelmier, a daughter of Jesse and Sarah (Veach) Spickelmier. She was born in Hendricks County, Indiana, July 18, 1842. Seven children have been born of this marriage: Homer Clarence, Justus Asa, David Jacob, Hattie Ann, George B., Benjamin Mack and Freddie Schaller. Homer is a student at Shenandoah Normal School, and Justus is a clerk in the bank at Washta. Mr. Miller affiliates with the Republican party; he has served as township assessor, and is now justice of the peace for Grand Meadow Township; he is also the present secretary of the School Board. He is a man of broad views, and lends a supporting hand to ever moral and intellectual work, being one of the ablest and most liberal men of the community.

Cherokee County Biographical History - 1889

1870 Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa; John Miller, (age 29, farmer, born Wurttemberg) Jane Miller (age 27, born Indiana), Homer Miller (age 2, born Iowa), and Justice Miller (age 4/12, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Bethel, Fayette County, Iowa: John H. Miller (age 40, farmer, born Ohio), wife Jane R. Miller (age 37, born Indiana), son Homer C. Miller, (age 12), son Justus A. Miller (age 10), son David J. Miller (age 6), daughter Hattie A. Miller (age 11), Son Geo. B. Miller (age 2), and Son Benj. Miller (age 3/12, born Feb.)

1885 Iowa State Census; Grand Meadow, Cherokee County, Iowa: John Miller (Township 90, Range 42, Section 30, age 45, farmer, born Ohio), Jane R. Miller (age 42, born Penn.), Homer C. Miller (age 16), Justus A. Miller (age 14), David J. Miller (age 11), Hattie A. Miller (age 9), George B. Miller (age 7), Benjamin Miller (age 4) and Fred. S. Miller (age ?)

1900 Census: Grand Meadow, Cherokee County, Iowa: John Miller (born July, 1842, age 60, married 34 years, born Ohio, farming) wife Jane Miller (born July 1842, age 57, married 34 years, 7 children born, 7 still living, born Indiana), daughter Hattie Miller (born Oct, 1876, age 23) and son Fred Miller (born Sept. 1885, age 14).

Jane R. (Spickelmier) Miller, born July 18, 1842 in Middle, Hendricks, Indiana, died Nov. 4, 1908 in Cherokee County, Iowa.

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Hot Springs, South Dakota: John Miller, MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 11, 1862, National Iowa. Rank Pvt. Company and Regiment; E, 27th Iowa Inf.: Time and Place of Discharge: Aug.. 8, 1865, Clinton, Iowa, Cause of Discharge: Close of War, Disabilities when admitted to the Home: Ch. Art. Rheumatism, heart irritable, general nervousness, Insomnia. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where Born, Germany, age 69, height 5' 6';, Complexion, Dk, Blue Eyes, Gray Hair, can read and write, Religion: Prot. Occupation: Farmer, Residence subsequent to Discharge; Cherokee, Iowa, Widowed, Name and address of nearest relative: Justus A. Miller, Son, Cherokee, Iowa. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension $12.00, Date of Admission: U. S. B. M S. Nov. 20, 09. Date of Discharge 2-1-10. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate No. 984.239

John Miller died January 17, 1913 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Blk 1, lot 57, grave 4, Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa.

There is a discrepancy online regarding when and where John Miller died -- and where he is buried. I found this information first on the Allamakee USGenWeb site: John Frederick Miller, Postville Cemetery Area B, Post Township, Allamakee County, Iowa (Feb 15, 1839 - Jul 24, 1927 DR Co ? IA 27 Inf) I now believe this is an error.

Further research on this soldier turned up this information: (1). The U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers showed that he had a son named Justus A. Miller living in Cherokee County. (2) That led me to the census records showing John with son Justus and wife Jane. (3). The 1925 Census for Justus A. Miller identified the maiden name of his mother. (4), I found the biography for John Miller. That and the information provided in the U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Solders proves that this is the correct John Miller. Last I found several family trees online for Justus Asa Miller, showing his parents as John Miller and Jane Spickelmier. All of the family trees say that John Miller died Jan. 17, 1913 in Cherokee County. That makes sense. I was unable to find him on the 1915, 1920 or 1925 census. (5) I subsequently found Pension Index Records that show his date of death as Jan. 17, 1913. I am now convinced that is the correct date and the record in Allamakee County is an error.)

1925 Iowa State Census: Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa: Justus A. Miller (age 55, father's name John Miller, born Germany, mother' name: Jane Spickelmeir, born Indiana. Parents married in Iowa.), wife Edna (maiden name Pixler), Son Marvin, Son Justus R. and son Max R.


Miller, Silas A. He was born March 19, 1840 in Clinton County, New York. He was the son of William P. Miller (July 8, 1808 - Apr. 18, 1893) and Chloe A. Howard. (July 11, 1810 - Feb. 5, 1892). He married first Mary Biffie in 1865 in McGregor, Clayton County, Iowa. He married second Hattie E. Howland on 4 Sep 1894. She was the daughter of Isaac Benjamin Howland (De. 26, 1827 - July 8, 1908) and Nancy Siddall (Nov. 26, 1837 - Oct. 23, 1900).

S. A. Miller, of W. P. Miller & Son, hardware dealers, and proprietors of the Lime Springs livery; was born in Clinton county, N. Y., March 19, '40. His parents moved to McGregor, Ia., in '48, and settled on government land near that place. In August, '62, he enlisted at Farmersburg, Clayton county, Ia., in the 27th Ia. volunteer infantry, company E., under Capt. Dripps, was in engagements at Corinth, Little Rock, Red River, and Fort Blakely; he was discharged in August '65, and mustered out at Clinton, Ia.; he returned to McGregor and engaged in the grocery business, there for one year. Then came to this place and bought property and established the livery business and in '79, established the hardware business, with his father, W. P. Miller, occupying build-on Main street; they carry a large stock of hardware, tinware, stoves, etc. The livery stable is located on Willard street, and is 24x40 with additional stables on sides, it accommodates fourteen horses-they use ten horses, and rigs for livery purposes, and are doing a flourishing business. Mr. Miller has been deputy sheriff, for several years, and has been city marshal since the town was incorporated, in '76. He was married in '65 at McGregor, to Miss Mary Biffie, and have three children; he is a member of Howard lodge-A. F. & A. M., No. 214.

History of Chickasaw and Howard Counties Iowa
By W. E. Alexander
Decorah, Iowa
Western Publishing Company, 1883
Howard County Biographical Sketches (Vernon Springs Township)

1850 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa; William P. Miller (age 41), Cloe Miller (age 40), William J. Miller (age 17), Alexander Miller (age 15), Charles S. Miller (age 12), Silas A. Miller (age 9), Edward R. Miller (age 3) and Elizabeth Howard (age 87)

1856 Iowa State Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Wm P. Miller (age 51, farmer, resided in Iowa 8 years, born Vt. ), Chloey Miller (age 47, born Vt. ), John Miller (age 21, born Vt. ), Silas A. Miller (age 14, born NY), and Edward R. Miller (age 8, born NY).

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: W. P. Miller (age 51, born Vermont), Cloa Miller (age 50, born Vermont), Herman Miller (age 30, born Vermont), Silas Miller (age 19, born Vermont), E. R. Miller (age 12, born Vermont), Samuel Umpstead (age 18, farm laborer, born New York), Henry Umpstead (age 16, farm laborer, born New York ), and Levi Umpstead (age 14, born New York.).

Silas A. Miller married first Mary Biffie in 1865, at McGregor, Clayton County, Iowa.

1870 Census: Forest Howard County, Iowa: S. A. Miller (age 27, born New York, Livery man), Mary Miller (age 23, born Illinois), A.S. Miller (age 26, born New York.), Charles Miller (age 8/12) and Clause Munson (age 30, saloon keeper, born Norway)

1880 Census Forest City, Howard County, Iowa: S. A. Miller (age 35, hardware dealer, born New York), wife Mary Miller (age 33, born Illinois), daughter Minnie Miller (age 7), son Allen S. Miller (age 4), and son Claude Miller (age 1))

1885 State Census, Lime Springs, Howard County: Silas A. Miller, (Willard Street, age 40, Hardware and Livery) Mary E. Miller, (age 37, keeping house), Minnie C. Miller, (age 11), Silas A. Miller, Jr., (age 9), Claude Miller, (age 5), Hattie E. Howland, (age 20, Housekeeper)

The cemetery listing shows that Mary E. Miller was born 26 Apr 1847 and died 16 Nov 1889. She is buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Howard County, Iowa.

The Cemetery Records for Silas A. Miller showed that he married second: Hattie E. Howland on 4 Sep 1894.

Silas A. Miller DEPUTY SHERIFF

Mr. S. A. Miller, Deputy Sheriff, is one of the early settlers of this County, having made Lime Springs his home since the fall of 1867. He was born in Clinton County, Vermont, in 1843, his parents moving to Iowa and locating in McGregor in '46. He enlisted in Company E, 27th Iowa infantry in 1862 and served to the close of the war, when he returned to McGregor, where he remained till '67. Mr. Miller first embarked in the livery business, which he managed, until the last two years, selling out his interest to Richard Frost in 1892. At different times he has also been engaged in the drug, furniture and hardware business. He is now a member of the firm of grain buyers, Frisbie and Miller. In the fall of '67 Mr. Miller was appointed deputy sheriff under Jerry Powell. He has held this office on and off nearly ever since. He is a staunch Democrat, and has stood by the principles of that party through thick and thin. He is a member of the Masonic Order in high standing and also commander of G. A. R. Post No. 217. A portrait of Mr. Miller appears on another page.

Lime Springs Sun, Lime Springs, Iowa, Friday, January 1, 1897

1900 Census Forest, Howard County, Iowa: Silas Miller, (age 55, married 5 years), Hattie E. Miller, age 37, married 5 years, 2 children, 1 living). son Claudie E. Miller, (age 21), and son Neil M. Miller (age 3).

1910 Census: Forest City, Howard County, Iowa: Silas A. Miller (age 66, married 2 times, currently for 15 years, born New York, own income), wife Hattie E. Miller (age 47, married 1 time, currently for 15 years, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Iowa), son Neil N. Miller (age 13) and niece Hattie D. Owens (age 23, school teacher.).

Silas A. Miller died June 27, 1910 and is buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Lime Spring, Howard County, Iowa.

His widow Hattie E. Miller filed for a pension on Sept. 6, 1910

Hattie E. (Howland) Miller was born 14 Mar 1864 and died 27 Nov 1925. She is also buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery. She is listed under Howland on the Howard County website, But Find a Grave has Hattie (Howland) Miller.


Morgan, Cornelius III He was born May 23, 1833 in Waterford, Caledonia County, Vermont. He was the son of Cornelius Morgan II (Mar. 5, 1784 - Sept. 27, 1872) and Hannah Hartwell (Aug. 11, 1796 - Nov. 11, 1884). He married Mary Roxana Hudson of McGregor, Iowa on Sept. 22, 1859. Mary Hudson was born July 8, 1838 in Steuben, New York. She was the daughter of Washington William Hudson (Aug. 21, 1807 - June 4, 1886) and Roxanna Bagley (July 6, 1818 - July 1, 1899) (Clayton County Marriage Records (Page 121-130) Groom Cornelius Morgan, Bride: Mary Hudson Date: Sept. 22, 1857. By Whom Married: Wm E. McCormack). Her brothers George W. Hudson and Harry H. Hudson also served in Company E, 27th Iowa.

Cornelius Morgan, Postmaster and Justice of the Peace, is one of the prominent, respected and honored citizens of which the town of National boasts. He was born in Vermont, May 23, 1833, and is a self-made man in all that the word implies; whatever success he has met with in life is attributable to his own push and energy, as he has received no legacy from any source whatever. The parents of our subject were Cornelius and Hannah (Hartwell) Morgan, both of whom were natives of Massachusetts. After their marriage they moved to the state of New York and located at Parishvillie, St. Lawrence County, where they resided until their demise. There were eight children born to them, seven of whom are still living. They were earnest members of the Free Will Baptist Church. The grandfather of our subject served in the War of 1812 and figured prominently in the battle of Plattsburg, N.Y.

The subject of this biography was reared on a farm in St. Lawrence County, N.Y. from the time he was three years old until he was twenty-three, when he came to this county and located at McGregor, which then boasted only a few houses. Here he followed the trade of a carpenter and contractor, building houses all over the county and erecting two at Prairie du Chien, Wis.

In the year 1857 he was united in marriage with Miss Mary R. Hudson, a daughter of Washington and Roxana (Bagley) Hudson. This family came from Vermont to this township in the year 1845.

Mr. Morgan enlisted in Company E, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteers, as a private and joined his regiment in Mississippi. He participated in the following engagements: At the charge and capture of the rebel Ft. Du Russy, Pleasant Hill, under General Banks, Kane River, Old Oaks, Lake Chicot, Ark., under Gen. A.J. Smith; the first day's fight at Tupelo and afterward at Old Town Creek; Nashville, under Gen. G.H. Thomas; and after steaming down the Ohio, Tennessee and Mississippi Rivers to Dauphine Island in Mobile Bay, in the battle of Fish River and Ft. Blakely. The regiment was discharged at Montgomery, Ala., and he was transferred to Company E, Twelfth Iowa Volunteers. He remained with this regiment until January 25, 1866, when he was honorably discharged. He was wounded by a bayonet at the charge of Ft. Du Russy, resulting in a running sore, which was a constant annoyance to him.

Mr. and Mrs. Morgan have five children, as follows: George L., Hugh B., Lewis D., Stella E. and James Garfield. Socially he is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. In political belief and action he is a stanch adherent to the Republican party. He has been Justice of the Peace for twenty-four years in a Democratic township; Township Clerk for twenty years; and a member of the School Board almost constantly for twenty-four years. When Harrison was elected President our subject was appointed Postmaster here and has since held that position.

source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties; Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894; pg. 486-487

-transcribed by Sharyl Ferrall

Cornelius Morgan III The following additional information & photo is from Gary Morgan, great grandson of Cornelius Morgan III.

Cornelius Morgan III built the schoolhouse in National, served as town clerk of Farmersburg when it was founded, and he was National's postmaster for years. In later years, he owned the hotel in National. He is buried there, as well. The photo of Cornelius was taken about 1922 on the porch of the hotel in National, by my grandmother, I believe. This would be about two years before he died.

NOTE from Gary Morgan: Cornelius is not listed among the wounded, but according to his son, my grandfather Hugh, he suffered a bayonet wound while serving as color bearer for company E and endured an open wound for the rest of his life. For verification, note that he received a disability pension from the government for wounds in the civil war. I have copies of his pension papers, as well as other written material about him.

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa Cornelius Morgan (age 27, born Vermont Carpenter, Master), Mary Morgan (age 21), George Morgan (age 1) and Leeson Madison (age 25, blacksmith)

1870 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Cornelius Morgan (age 37, Carpenter and Joiner, born New York), Mary R. Morgan (age 33, born New York), George L. Morgan (age 10), Cornelius F. Morgan (age 7), Mary E. Morgan (age 1). (Note: There were 7 other people listed with them with varying occupations. They do not appear to be related).

1880 Census: National, Clayton County, Iowa; Corneleus Morgan (age 47, house carpenter, unemployed 9 months in the last year, born New York), wife Mary Morgan (age 43), son Hugh B. Morgan (age 7), daughter Lucy D. Morgan (age 5), daughter Stella Morgan (age 2) and son Baby Morgan (age 3/365 born May)

1885 Iowa State Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Cornelius Morgan (Township 94, Range 4, Section 15, Farmersburg, age 51, carpenter, born Vermont), Mary R. Morgan (age 46, born New York), George Morgan (age 25), Huey B. Morgan (age 11), Lucy D. Morgan (age 9), Stella E. Morgan (age 7), and James G. Morgan (age 4).

Submitted by Gary Morgan

The Potsdam, NY, Courier & Freeman newspaper from 1898 containing a short interview with Cornelius upon his visit at age 65

PARISHVILLE, Cornelius Morgan, of National, Iowa, is in town on a two months visit with relatives and old friends. He left this place in May, 1856, when but 23 years of age and has not revisited his former home since. He was virtually raised in this town having come here when but three years old, his parents moving to town from Canada. His career in the west, has been somewhat varied, he having engaged in farming; contracting and at present being proprietor of the Morgan House, a thriving hostelry in National. He is also a veteran of our civil war, having served his country faithfully for three years. His coming was a surprise to his relatives in this section, but none the less a happy one. Forty-two years in a long period of absence from one's old home and many changes have occurred. Mr. Morgan informs us that he has kept well posted in happenings in this county, having been a regular subscriber to the Courier and Freeman for over twenty-five years, and he says he looks with eagerness for its weekly visit. Mr. Morgan is a sturdy, well preserved specimen of 65 year old manhood and says sickness is an unknown quantity with him.

He filed for a pension on Jan. 15, 1898.

1900 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa; Cornelius Morgan (born May 1833, age 67, married 43 years, born Vermont, Hotel Keeper), wife Mary R. Morgan (born July 1837, age 62, 9 children born, 5 still living, born New York), daughter Stella E. Morgan (born Nov. 1877, age 22, widowed, 1 child born, 1 still living), son Jim G. Morgan (born May 1880, age 20), and grandson Leland Morgan (born Aug. 1897, age 2).

1910 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Cornelius Morgan (age 76, married 1 time for 53 years, born Vermont, own income), wife Mary R. Morgan (age 72, married 1 time for 53 years, 8 children born 5 still living, born New York, son James G. Morgan (age 29), Grandson Frank B. (age 18), Grandson Meril Morgan (age 16), daughter Viola (age 15), daughter Alma G. (age 13), son Bud X Morgan (age 11), son Harvey V. Morgan (age 9), daughter Mary Morgan (age 7) and daughter Lucy Morgan (age 5). (Note: the census record clearly lists the children as sons and daughters. I highly suspect they are grandchildren)

1915 Iowa State Census; Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: C. Morgan, age 81, married, County: Clayton, Town: Farmersburg, Occupation Retired, Extent of Education: Common 7, can read and write, Birth Place Vermont, Encumbrance on farm or home: none, value of farm or home $800. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State: Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E., Church Affiliation: None. Father's birthplace, Massachusetts. Mothers Birthplace: New Hampshire. Years in the U.S. 81, Years in Iowa 58.

Mary Roxanna (Hudson) Morgan died Feb. 27, 1917 and is buried in National Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa.

1920 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Cornelius Morgan (age 86, widowed) and son James Morgan (age 39).

Cornelius Morgan died July 7, 1924 in McGregor (National) Clayton County). He is buried in National Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa

Children of Cornelius Morgan and Mary R. Hudson:

  1. George Leeman, born Nov. 10, 1859 (also have seen 1858)
  2. Charles
  3. Cornelius F., born 1863, d. Nov. 27, 1951 (in Long Beach, CA, veteran's hospital)
  4. Lucy
  5. Mary, 1869
  6. Hugh, April 10, 1873
  7. Lewis D., Dec. 16, 1874
  8. Stella E., Nov. 5, 1877
  9. James Garfield, May 28, 1880
  10. Isadore A.

Morton, James Baird He was born about 1822 in Lanarkshire, Scotland. (there is a family tree that has his date of birth as Jan 5, 1815). He was the son of Gavin Morton and Janet Gardiner. Another source says he is the son of Robert Morton and Ann Ferguson Connell. He married Louisa B. Flower on June 13, 1850 in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of James L. Flower and Sarah Hewitt (Nov. 23, 1790 - after 1860).

1856 Iowa State Census, Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: James Morton (age 32, born Scotland), Lois Morton Age 27, born NY), Henry Morton (age 2, born Penn), Elizabeth Morton (age 6, born NY?), Mary Morton (age 1/12, born Iowa).

1860 Census, Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: James Morton (age 35, farmer, born Scotland), Lois Morton (age 32, born New York), Elizabeth Morton (age 10, born Pennsylvania), Henry Morton (age 7, born Pennsylvania), Mary Morton (age 5, born Iowa), Sarah Flour (age 67, born Conn.).

1870 Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: James Morton (age 50, farmer, born Scotland), Lois Morton (age 42, born New York), James H. Morton (age 17, born Pennsylvania), Mary Morton (age 14, born Iowa), and Margaret Morton (age 4, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: James Morton (age 57, farmer, born Scotland), wife Lois Morton (age 51, born New York), daughter Mary Engles (age 24, born Iowa), granddaughter Lovena Engles (age 11/12, born Iowa) and daughter Maggie (has ditto under Engles, but probably Morton (age 14, born Iowa).

James B. Morton filed for a pension on May 2, 1881 in Iowa.

1885 Iowa State Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Lois Morton (Twp., 94, Range 4, Section 6, SW NW, age 57, married, born NY), Maggie Morton (age 19, born Clayton County, Iowa). -- Where was James?

1890 Veterans Census: Salem and Benton, McCook County, South Dakota: James Morton, Private, Co. E, 27th Iowa, enlisted Aug. 22, 1862, discharge May 17, 1865, Length of Service: 2 years, 8 months 26 days. Post Office Address: Spencer.

Lois Morton (born Oct. 28, 1827), died June 12, 1896, and is buried in Farmersburg & Wagner Cemetery, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa. Per notes, she was aged 68.

1900 Census, Benton, McCook County, South Dakota: James Morton (born March 1815, age 85, born Scotland, immigrated 1848, in US 52 years, naturalized, farmer), daughter Mary E. Davis (born Aug. 1859, age 40, married 18 years, 2 children born, 1 still living, born Iowa), daughter Reba L. Davis (born Apr. 1894, age 6, born South Dakota). His widowed daughter Sarah Liversage and 5 children were listed on the same page.

James Morton died Oct. 17, 1905 at Spencer, McCook County, South Dakota. He is buried in Spencer Cemetery, Lot 110 Benton Township, McCook County, South Dakota.

Cemetery Record Search (South Dakota State Historical Society)

First Name: James Bard
Last Name: Morton
Death Date: 10/17/1905
Lot Number: 110
City: Benton Township
County: McCook
Cemetery Name: Spencer

Children of James Morton and Lois Flower:

  1. Sarah Elizabeth Morton (born Apr. 13, 1852 in Erie County, Pennsylvania. Died Nov. 5, 1913 at Spencer, McCook County, South Dakota. Married Thomas Liversage.
  2. James Henry Morton, born about 1853
  3. Mary Edna Morton, Aug. 23, 1856,, d. Oct. 6, 1941
  4. Margaret Lillian Morton born Oct. 10, 1866 in Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa, died Feb. 6, 1908.

Nelings, Daniel Austin He was born Nov. 14, 1830 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of James Neling (July 4, 1800 - Apr. 12, 1886) and Ann Cameron (Dec. 5, 1801 - Jan 31, 1885) He married Julia Ann Inman on Jun 2, 1872. She was the daughter of Edward Inman and Laura Swift. His cousins James Nelings and William H. Nelings also served in Company E, 27th Iowa). His sister Martha Josephine Neeling married George W. Hudson, who also served in Company E, 27th Iowa.

I found this posted message that helped to verify the relationship of the three Nelings that were in Company E, 27th Iowa: "The Nelings/Neilings/Neelings family is marked by confusion because of the duplication of given names. William Nelings and Jane McDowell had a number of children, including Daniel Thompson Nelings, James W. Nelings, and William H. Nelings. William and James served in Co. E 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry with their cousin, Daniel Austin Nelings."

1850 Census: Lower Oxford, Chester County, Pennsylvania: James Neelings (age 48), Ann Neelings (age 48), Daniel A. Neelings (age 19), William Neelings (age 17), Margaret A. Neelings (age 12), Sarah E. Neelings (age 9) and Martha J. Neelings (age 6).

1856 Iowa State Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: James Neiling (age 55, farmer), Ann Neiling (age 59), Daniel Neiling (age 23), Sarah Neiling (age 16), Martha Neiling (age 12), Charles Fang (age 24, wagon maker), Lem Goodwin (age 31, blacksmith), O. D. Pettil (age 24, blacksmith) Years in Iowa: 0

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: James Neelings (age 60, landlord, born Penn.), Ann Neelings (age 59, born Penn.), Daniel Neelings (age 22, furman laborer), Josephine Neelings (age 16) and F. Halford (age 21).

1870 Census: Greenwood, Kossuth County, Iowa; Daniel Nelling (age 30), farmer, born Pennsylvania. Living next door was James Nellings (age 69, farm laborer) and Ann Nellings (age 69).

Daniel A. Nelings bought land. Issue Date: March 1, 1876; Acres: 160; State Iowa, County Kossuth, Township 98-N, Range 29-W, Section 36. Authority: May 20, 1862, Homestead Entry Original.

1880 Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa; Daniel A. Neelings (age 40, plasterer, born Pennsylvania), wife Julia A. Neelings (age 24), daughter Lilly M. Nellings (age 7)., Daughter Gertrude Neelings (age 5), daughter Mary Neelings (age 2) and daughter Mina Neelings (age 2/12, born March.). Living next door to them were James B. Neelings (age 79, laborer), and Ann Neelings (age 78).

Daniel A. Neeling died Oct. 19, 1895 and is buried in Greenwood Township Cemetery, Greenwood Township, Kossuth County, Iowa.

Iowa, Cemetery Records: Name: Daniel A. Neeling; Birth: 1830; Death Date: Oct. 19, 1895; Age: 65; Burial Location: Bancroft, Kossuth; Cemetery: Greenwood; General Burial Info: Co. E 29(?) IA Inf.; Source: Grave Records Kossuth County, Iowa; Page Number: 60. (Note: the Company Number was not a typo. That is what the source says, but is obviously an error).

His widow Julia A. Nelings filed for a pension on Nov. 16, 1895. A pension was filed for a minor on June 7, 1900 in Iowa. Julia A. Holcomb was guardian.

Julia A. Inman Neeling married John R. Holcomb on Nov. 25, 1899 in Hancock, Iowa. He was age 39, she was age 45. This marriage record shows her parents as Edward Inman and Sarrie B. Pheasel. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934).

I found some discrepancies with regard to her second marriage. On the 1900 Census, John and Julia Holcomb said they had been married 14 years. I found family trees that said they married in 1886 (perhaps because of the information on the 1900 census) -- and listed several children that were born after 1886 as hers. But in 1910 they said they had both been married 2 times and had been currently married for 10 years, which fits with the marriage record I found. They had an 8 year old son Henry E. Holcomb living with them in 1910. Julia said she was the mother of 8 children. If Henry were her son, that would make 8 (including the 7 children she had with Daniel A. Nelings. I think the children on the 1900 census must have been his from his previous marriage.

Julia Ann (Inman, Nelings) Holcomb (born July 11, 1855), died March 26, 1912 in Howard, Miner County, South Dakota.

Children of Daniel A. Neeling and Julia Ann Inman

  1. Lillie May Neeling b: MAR 24 1873 in Algona, Kossuth, IA
  2. Gertrude Neeling b: AUG 04 1875 in Bancroft, Kossuth, IA
  3. Mattie Adelia Neeling b: NOV 14 1877 in Algona, Kossuth, IA
  4. Mina Neeling b: MAR 28 1880 in IA
  5. Maude Neeling b: NOV 12 1884 in Bancroft, Kossuth, IA
  6. Nettie V. Neeling b: JAN 25 1888 in Bancroft, Kossuth, IA
  7. Ruth Lucille Neeling b: JUL 06 1891 in Baltic, Minnehaha, SD

Nelings, James He was born about 1841 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of William Nelings (? - Sept. 17, 1861) and Jane McDowell. (Note his brother William H. Nelings and cousin Daniel A. Nelings also served in Company E, 27th Iowa)

1850 Census: Sadsburyville Chester County, Pennsylvania: William Nelings (age 48, butcher, born Penn.), Ann Nelings (age 48, born Penn), George L. Nelings (age 19, Carpenter), Daniel T. Nelings (age 18, Plasterer), Sarah A. Nelings (age 16), Mary E. Nelings (age 14), William H. Nelings (age 10), James W. Nelings (age 6), John H. Young (age 17, Butcher) and John Martin (age 21, laborer).

1860 Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: Wm. Nelings (age 59, hotel keeper, born PA), Jane Nelings (age 59, born PA), George Nelings (age 30, Carpenter), Daniel Nelings (age 28, plasterer), Wm. W. Nelings (age 20, farmer), Sarah Nelings (age 26, teacher), Mary Nelings (age 24), James Nelings (age 18, laborer) and Almira Nelings (age 24)

James W. Nelings, died Nov. 29, 1862, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa of typhoid fever.

His mother Jane Nelings filed for a pension on Mar. 6, 1863. Information from the Pension file is extracted below.

Personal Description at enlistment: 21 years of age, a farmer, hazel eyes, black hair, dark complexion, 5 feet 9 1/2 inches tall


Per Pension Statement: He was taken sick while performing duty as a soldier with his company and regiment in Minnesota and traveled with his company on the way to Memphis, Tennessee as far as McGregor Iowa, where owing to his sickness he was left by recommendation of the surgeon and by order of Col. Gilbert, the officer in command of his Regiment, with order to report himself at Headquarters in twenty days, but that during the twenty days, he died of the typhoid fever.


On Jan. 25, 1864, Jane Nelings was aged 61, living in Penningtonville, Chester County, Pennsylvania. She was the widow of William Nelings who died Sept. 17, 1861 in Clayton County, Iowa.


Mary E. Jack and D. T. Nelings made a statement: "That the said James A. Neelings did previous to his enlistment and subsequent to the death of his father William Neelings, aid constantly by his labor in the support of his mother the said Jane Neeling. That when he enlisted he received sixty dollars of Clayton County warrants as a bounty paid for enlistment, all of which he let his said mother have for her support and that he also out of the monies he received from the United States, forty dollars in all, besides clothing let her have twenty dollars to be used by his mother for her support. And which were actually used for that purpose and that the said Jane Neelings after her husbands death, being in limited circumstances depended to a very great extent upon the labor and earnings of her sons James W. Neelings and William Neelings both privates in Company E of the 27th Regiment of Iowa Volunteers for her support at the time of the death of the said James A. Neelings which took place Nov. 29th AD 1862.


Nelings, William Harvey He was born about 1840 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of William Nelings and Jane McDowell. His brother James Nelings and cousin Daniel A. Nelings also served in Company E, 27th Iowa). He married Sarah E. Jack on March 8, 1866 in Elkader, Clayton County, Iowa (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838 - 1934). She was the daughter of David Jack and Jane Curry.

William H. NelingsPhoto Submitted by Lisa Perry. Her Perry Family Website

1850 Census: Sadsburyville Chester County, Pennsylvania: William Nelings (age 48, butcher, born Penn.), Ann Nelings (age 48, born Pen), George L. Nelings (age 19, Carpenter), Daniel T. Nelings (age 18, Plasterer), Sarah A. Nelings (age 16), Mary E. Nelings (age 14), William H. Nelings (age 10), James W. Nelings (age 6), John H. Young (age 17, Butcher) and John Martin (age 21, laborer).1856 Iowa State Census;

1860 Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: Wm. Nelings (age 59, hotel keeper, born PA), Jane Nelings (age 59, born PA), George Nelings (age 30, Carpenter), Daniel Nelings (age 28, plasterer), Wm. W. Nelings (age 20, farmer), Sarah Nelings (age 26, teacher), Mary Nelings (age 24), James Nelings (age18, laborer) and Almira Nelings (age 24)

James Jack was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., on Sept. 19, 1832. His parents, David and Jane Jack, nee Curry, were also natives of the Keystone State, where they were married in 1831. They are still living and have just celebrated their golden wedding. Of eight children born of this union six are living-- David; Lizzie, now the wife of George Crawford, of Hampton, Ia.; Mary M., wife of Harry Miller, of Estherville, Ia.; Sarah E., wife of W. H. Neeling, of Ossian, Ia.; W.W., of the same place, and the subject of this sketch. David Jack, Sr., emigrated to Clayton County in 1856, thence to Winneshiek County in 1866, where he now resides. James Jack was reared on a farm and his educational privileges were those of the common schools. He came West with his parents in 1856, and was employed in a steam mill at National until 1866. He then traveled one year selling patent medicine, and two years selling reapers for Carter Bros. He then was employed as agent by G.B. Dickey and N.W. Williver until 1875, when he sold his property at National and removed to Buena Vista County, Ia., and engaged in farming there a short time, then returned to Clayton County and located in Elkader. He has since been agent for the McCormick Reaper and Mower Co., handling all their goods. He was married in 1854 to Lizzie Hayes, of Brooke County, West Va. She was born Sept. 24, 1832. Of seven children born of this union three are living--Levi M., Vernon S. and Annie J. In 1880 Mr. Jack was appointed county jailer.

source: History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1882, p. 659-660
transcribed by Sally Scarff and Marlene Chaney

1870 Census: Military, Winneshiek County, Iowa: Wm. H. Neelings (age 27, clerk in warehouse, born in Pennsylvania), Sarah E. Neelings (age 26, born Pennsylvania), and Henry E. Neelings (age 2).

1880 Census: Ossian Military Twp., Winneshiek County, Iowa: William Nelings (age 39, dealer in agriculture import, born Penn), wife Sarah E. Nelings (age 36, born Penn.), son Elzci H. Nelings (age 12), and servant Bertha Olson (age 15).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: Wm. H. Nealing, Rank Sergeant, Company E, Present Post Office Address: Ossian

Pension Information Submitted by: Lisa Perry

State of Iowa
County of Clayton

On this 17th day of February AD 1888 personally appeared before me a notary public within and for the county and state aforesaid, William H Nelings a resident of Monona, county of Clayton, State of Iowa, who being duly sworn, according to law says:

My diseases were contracted while on the march to and from Molack or Indian Agency Minn, during the month of October 1862, caused by exposure on said march and bad and improper rations, I had all the symptoms of fever on the latter part of said march. My regt was ordered after the march, to Memphis Tenn where I was taken down with typhoid fever sometime during the first part of November 1862, as near as I can remember, was sick about six weeks and when I recovered from the fever I was left with diarrhea, piles, and rheumatism.

William H Nelings


Original Invalid Claim
William H Nelings
Monona, Clayton Co IA

[form with handwritten notes]

Approvals.
Approved for chronic diarrhea results
Submitted April 16 1888

Enlisted Aug 15, 1862
Discharged Aug 8, 1865
Declaration filed July 15, 1881

Basis of claim:

That at Lake Malock [Lake MilleLacs] Minn, summer of 1862 through hardship and exposure at the Indian Agency at said place while on the march he was taken sick with typhoid fever, diarrhea and resulting piles and rheumatism.

Inf. E. Afft filed Dec 14/82 alleges in addition to above named general debility and inflammation of the stomach, Afft filed____ showing when and where alleged fever, diarrhea, piles and rheumatism were contracted.


State of Iowa
County Clayton

In the claim for original pension of William H Nelings, No 425138, Co E 27th Iowa Vols. On this 25th day of April 1888 personally appeared before me a notary public, and for said county and state aforesaid, duly authorized to administer oaths:

William H Nelings, aged 47 years, whose Post Office address is at Monona Iowa, well known to me to be respectable and entitled to credit and who being by me first duly sworn, deposes and says that he is the claimant in above cited case and stated that his general debility from which he has suffered constantly since his discharge from service is resulting from typhoid fever, chronic diarrhea, piles, rheumatism and inflammation of the stomach and liver, which was contracted at Lake Mulack Indian Agency, Minn during the summer of 1862, from which he is suffering and from which he has suffered year by year since his discharge and returned home from service to present date.

Witness
Lundall Walker


Deposition A

Case of William H Nelings

On this 15th day of October 1889 at Monona Clayton Co IA, personally appeared William H Nelings and says:

I am 49 years old. Hardware merchant. Post office address Monona, Clayton Co Ia.

I am the claimant in this case. I base my claim to pension upon the disability resulting from rheumatism, chronic diarrhea and piles and inflammation of the stomach and liver which I designated in my application as general debility.

I was enrolled at Dubuque, IA Aug 15, 62 and was ordered at once to Lake Malack Min. remained there about two weeks and then was transported to Memphis Tenn. On the latter trip I began taking medicine though I did not give up till I got to Memphis. Then I had a run of fever. Was off duty two months, the diarrhea let up during the fever, just as I was able to move around the piles and rheumatism appeared, immediately afterwards I was distressed with my stomach and liver.

The symptoms of rheumatism were pains and aches in my legs and shoulders and back. Both legs were stiff. I had to use a cane to assist me in walking. The symptoms of inflammation of the stomach, eating food would distress me. I had headaches and bloating of the stomach. When I would stoop down I would be dizzy. I had fullness reaching f rom my right side across toward the left. Had a poor appetite.

Since I got over the fever I suffered from said disabilities, through my [?] and ever since I have never seen a day that I have not suffered from some of them.

I was treated by Dr. Sanborn for the fever. He was also assisted by Dr. Hastings. I received occasional treatment though ever since for said disability. After I recovered from the fever I was detailed as color bearer and my duties were only nominal.

I was not treated in the hosp. The regt was ordered on a march to Tallahatchie bottoms and I was taken along, was transported on an army wagon.

I removed to Ossian Winneshiek Co Iowa in the fall of 1865 and remained there until 1885 when I removed to Monona IA and have resided there ever since.

Well I was stout and rugged. Never knew what sickness was and was never treated by a doctor. I never suffered from either of the disabilities alleged in my declaration.

I have had an attack of diarrhea about ever 2 or 3 days. For the first 6 or 7 or 10 years after discharge I was bothered with a prolapses of the rectum, which I had to replace with my hands. About the time I was cured of prolapses of the rectum, the pile tumors appeared and continue to afflict me yet. They occasionally bleed.

I have had permanent pain and ache and stiffness of my knee joints and left shoulder and occasionally a pain across my hip and small of the back.

As a general thing my appetite has been poor. I have to be careful of my diet. I have had constant dizziness then I would stoop over. Can't work at anything which requires stooping. I have had occasional attacks of the swelling or bloating of my right side.

H. E. Nelings married Katie Webster in 1888 in Winneshiek County, Iowa. (Note this was the son of William and Sarah. He apparently died shortly thereafter, but his wife is on the census with them in subsequent years.).

1900 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa; Wm H. Neilings (born July 1840, age 59, married 34 years, born Penn.) wife Sarah Neilings (born Oct. 1843, age 56, married 34 years, 2 children born, 0 still living, born Pennsylvania), daughter-in-law Kate Neilings (born May 1866, age 34, widowed, 0 children born).

1910 Census: Monona, Clayton County Iowa: William H. Neilings (age 69 married 1 time for 43 years, born Pennsylvania), wife Sarah E. Neilings (age 66, married 1 time for 43 years, 2 children born, 0 still living, born Pennsylvania). Son-in-law Alexander Killen (age 53, married 1 time for 8 years) daughter-in-law Katherine Killen (age 43, married 2 times, currently for 8 years, 1 child born, 1 still living), grand daughter Hellen Killen (age 6). and niece Florence Jack (age 27).

1915 Census: Clayton County, Iowa: Wm Nelings, age 74, married, County Clayton, Town Monona, Occupation: Retired Merchant. Extent of Education: Common 12, can read and write, Birth Place Pennsylvania. Owns own farm or house, no encumbrance. Value of farm or home $6,000. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E. Father's birthplace: Pennsylvania, Mother's Birthplace: Pennsylvania. Years in U.S. 74. years in Iowa 63.

1920 Census: Cedar Falls Ward 4, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Alexander Killen (age 62), wife Katherine Killen (age 53), daughter Helen Killen (age 16), boarder William H. Niling (age 79), boarder Sarah E. Niling (age 77), border Hans H. Handerson (age 25) and boarder Isabella Doy (age 49, widow). Census was take Jan. 6 & 7, 1920.

William H. Nelings died Feb. 22, 1920 and is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa.

His widow Sarah E. Nelings filed for a pension on Mar. 8, 1920 in Iowa.

Sarah E. Nelings died Aug. 23, 1933 and is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa.


Olmstead, Timothy Allen He was born July 28, 1826 in St. Albians, Vermont. He was the son of LeGrande Olmstead and Polly Elliott Soule. He married Aug. 10, 1858, Louisa Amelia Sawyer; b. Mar. 27, 1835: She was the daughter of (Rev.) John D. Sawyer and Elizabeth Borst, of Sand Lake, N. Y.

Timothy Allen Olmstead 1876Photo of Timothy A. Olmstead was submitted by Suzanne Harris.  Source:  History of Palestine Lodge #79 Duluth, MN 1869-1895, February 23, 1895.   Caption: "T. A. Olmstead, Scribe 1876.

1850 Census Monona, Clayton county, Iowa: Phineas P. Olmstead (age 31), Hannah Olmsted (age 35), Eunice Olmsted (age 6), Irwin D. (age 4), Clara (age 2), Esther (age 0), Susan Gilbert (age 15), Bertha A. Cummings (age 11), Orfa M. Cummings (age 9), Timothy A. Olmstead (age 24), Wilaby Welts (age 18).

1860 Census: Monona Clayton County, Iowa: Polly E. Olmstead (age 58, born Vermont, Farming). Allen Olmstead (age 32, born Vermont, farming), Clarissa M. Olmstead (age 24), Henry Bender (servant, age 23) and Liz M. Olmsted (age 1, born Iowa).

1870 Fond Du Lac, St. Louis, Minnesota: Allen Olmstead (age 44, born Vermont, rail road clerk) (note in the margin it says Broadway/Bradley House -- The first word was not clear)

1875 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Duluth Ward 2, St. Louis: T. A. Olmstead (age 48, born Vermont), Louisa A. Olmstead (age 48, born NY), Lizzie M. Olmstead (age 17, born Minn), Gertrude C. Olmsted (age 15, born Iowa), Lula H. Olmsted (age 8, born Iowa).

Names were extracted from "History of Palestine Lodge #79 Duluth, MN 1869-1895, February 23, 1895" by Suzanne Harris: Timothy A. Olmstead, Palestine Lodge, Duluth 3-18-1878 and was listed demitted in 1895. - Keystone Lodge 1871 Secretary, 1877 Treasurer, 1885 Scribe. He was a charter member and the following is listed; Clayton 27, Iowa Chapter (would guess that was his previous lodge), Nov 13, 1895 demitted and 12-8-1899 died.

Recollections of Early Days in Duluth by Jerome E. Cooley, page 22 - T A Olmstead, who inspected the first cargo of wheat shipped into Duluth.

1880 Census: Duluth, Saint Louis, Minnesota: T. Allen Olmstead (age 53, wheat inspector, born Vermont), wife Louisa A. Olmsted (age 45), daughter Lizzie M. Olmsted (age 21, school teacher), daughter Gertrude O. Olmsted (age 19), and daughter H. Lulu Olmsted (age 14).

1885 Minnesota Territorial and State Census: Duluth, St. Louis: T. A. Olmstad, (age 58, born Vermont), Louisa Olmstead (age 50, born NY), Gertrude C. Olmstead (age 24, born Iowa), Hellen L. Olmstead (age 18, born Iowa).

T. Allen Olmstead filed for a pension on Aug. 26, 1892 in Minnesota.

T. Allen Olmstead died Dec. 8, 1899. (St. Louis County MN Death Index 1870-1899, Cert. #551)

His widow Louise A. Olmstead filed for a pension on Jan. 15, 1900 in Minnesota.

Children of Timothy Allen Olmstead and Louisa Amelia Sawyer

  1. Elizabeth Maud; b. Mar. 30, 1859
  2. Gertrude Clara:, b. Oct. 4, 1860
  3. Helen Louisa; b. June 17, 1866

St. Louis County, MN Marriage Index --O--

Book B, Page 17, Lizzie Maud Olmstead married Rueben C. Brophy on Dec. 28, 1881 in Duluth Minnesota

Book D, Page 108, Gertrude C. Olmsted married David A. Strickler on August 24, 1887, in Duluth, Minnesota

Book D, Page 427, Helen Louise Olmsted married William H. McMillan on Oct. 3, 1888 in Duluth, Minnesota


Payne, Augustus L. He was born about 1838 in New York. He was the son of Elisha and Hannah Payne.

1850 Census: Pembroke, Genesee County, New York: Elisha Paine (age 54, farmer, born NH), Hannah Paine (age 45, born NH), Augustus L. Paine (age 12) and Daniel T. Paine (age 7)

1856 Iowa State Census: Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: Elisha Payne (age 69, born NH, Farmer), Augustus Payne (age 18, born NY), Daniel Payne (age 13, born NY). They had been in Iowa for 1/4 year (Note: there is an Elisha Payne buried in Farmersburg-Wagner Cemetery that died 1860 at age 67.).

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Augustus Payne (age 23, Laborer - farmer, born New York) and Daniel Payne (age 19, laborer, born New York). They were listed with a large family named Burnham.

Augustus Payne died Feb. 6, 1867 and is buried in Farmersburg-Wagner Cemetery, Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa

Note: There was also a D. T. Payne, died May 19, 1863, killed at Vicksburg, buried in Farmersburg-Wagner Cemetery. I suspect this is his brother Daniel T. Payne.


Polley, Daniel W. He was born about 1842 in Maine. He was the son of Moses Polley (Feb. 14, 1816 - Jan. 10, 1898) and Hannah C. Ireland (Aug. 14, 1821 - Aug. 21, 1891).

Monona Twp. -- Rev. Moses Polley was born in the town of Bowdoin, Lincoln County, Maine, on Feb. 14, 1816, and was a son of Ashel and Mary Polley, nee Stafford, likewise natives of Maine. His father in his early years led a sea-faring life, and afterward engaged in the lumber traffic and in farming. The parents died in their native State after a long and useful life. The subject of this memoir received his early education in his native State, and after leaving school engaged in milling on the Penobscot River. He was married on May 19, 1841, to Hannah C. Ireland, who was born in Penobscot County, Maine, Aug. 14, 1821. Five children have blessed this union--Daniel W., who enlisted in the Union service in the Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and officiated with his regiment in the North, as guard to a paymaster while paying off Indians, after which he was sent to the South, and there contracted a disease from which he died April 7, 1865, in Monona, Iowa; John F., a graduate of, and now a teacher in the Iowa State University, since which he has accepted the position of principal draughtsman in the Surveyor General's office, at Helena, Mont; Osbert, and two others deceased. Mr. Polley was ordained as a minister in the Christian church in 1840, and in the summer of 1842 was sent to Hampton Falls, N.H., in charge of the Christian church at that place. He preached in various localities in that State until 1857, when he came to Iowa. Prior to locating in Clayton County he preached in Fayette and Allamakee Counties, and in 1864 he moved to Monona, where he often preaches and still resides. He is a man of superior intellectual endowments, and fine oratorical powers. He is widely known throughout the country, and is called for far and near, to administer to dying souls, and to perform the marriage ceremony.

History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1882 p. 1058-1059
Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Company, 1882
Reprinted by: Monona Historical Society, Monona, Iowa
Reproduction by: Unigraphics, Inc., 1401 North Fares Ave, Evansville, Indiana 47711, 1975

1850 Census: Hill, Grafton, New Hampshire: Moses Polley (age 35, Christian Pent. Preacher, born Maine), Hannah C. Polley (age 28, born Maine), Moses W. Polley (age 8, born Maine), John W. Polley (age 3/12, born New Hampshire)

1860 Census: Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: Moses Polly (age 446, Rev, Christian, born Maine), Hannah Polly (age 38, born Maine), Warren Polly (age 17, born Maine), John Polly (age 10, born New Hampshire) and Albert Polly (age 11/12, born Iowa). Note: Even though the names are different, Daniel is listed as the oldest child. No doubt the initial W. stands for Warren. I'm not sure why he would have been listed as Moses in 1850.

Daniel W. Polley died June 12, 1865. He is buried in Monona City Cemetery, Clayton County, Iowa (AKA Monona Eastside).


Port, James C. He was born July 1840 in New York. He was probably the son of Hezekiah and Clarissa Port.

1850 Census: Johnstown, Fulton County, New York: Hezekiah Port (age 36, born NY), Clarissa Port (age 32, born NY), James C. Port (age 10, born NY), Nancy J. Port (age 6, born NY), and Wm. H. Port (age 3, born NY).

1860 Census: Johnstown, Fulton County, New York: Hezekiah Port (age 47, born New York), Clarissa Port (age 42, born New York)., James C. Port (age 20, farm laborer, born New York), Nancy J. Port (age 15), William H. Port (age 12), William Port (age 79)

1870 Census: Elgin, Kane County, Illinois: Hezekiah Port, (age 57, glove maker, born New York), Clarissa Port (age 51, born New York), and James C. Port (age 28, carpenter, born New York). Also in the household was Amos Amy (age 30, day laborer), Mary Amy (age 28) and Wm. Amy (age 8).

1880 Census: Union Creek, Madison County, Nebraska: Hezekiah Port (age 67, farmer, born New York), wife Clarissa Port (age 63, born New York), son James Port (age 32, carpenter, born New York), wife Nellie Port (age 27, born Vermont).

He filed for a pension in Illinois on Aug. 25, 1891.

1900 Census Elgin City, Kane County, Illinois: Mrs. Gerissa (Clarissa?) Port (born July 1817, age 82, widowed, 4 children born 2 still living, born New York), son James C. Port, (Born July 1840, age 59, divorced, born New York).

James C. Port died July 5, 1909 and is buried in Elgin City Cemetery, 945 Bluff City Blvd., Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. (Note Also known as Bluff City Blvd. Cemetery).


Reed, Charles H. He was born about 1844 - 1846 in Ohio. He was the son of William and Pamelia Reed.

1850 Census: Medina, Medina County, Ohio: William Reed (age 30, miller, born NY), Pamelia Reed (age 30, born NY), Charles H. Reed (age 4, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Highland, Clayton County, Iowa: William Reed (age 36, born New York, farmer), Pamelia Reed (age 35, born New York), Charles Reed (age 10, born Ohio), Lura Reed (age 4, born Iowa), Orville R. Parge (age 25, born Vermont, Carpenter). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 5 years.

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Wm. Reid (age 40, farmer, born New York), Pamelia Reid (age 39, born NY), Charles Reid (age 14, born Ohio), Laura Reid (age 8, born Iowa) and Sarah Kirkpatrick (age 23, domestic, born Ill. (Pamelia was indexed as Armelia).

Charles H. Reed died Apr. 11, 1863 and is buried in Corinth National Cemetery, Plot B, 3243, Corinth, Alcorn County, Mississippi

His mother Pamelia Reed filed for a pension on Jan. 29, 1889.

Note: he is buried in Corinth National Cemetery, but there might be a memorial stone in Giard Cemetery, Farmersburg Township, Clayton County, Iowa. The cemetery records show this:

Charles Reed, b. 1846, d. 4/11/1863, age 17 y. in service to his country Jackson, Tennessee

Pamelia Reed, d. 12/2/1892, 72 y. 3m 28 d, wife of Wm, inscription "She done what she could" other names unreadable

Willeroy Reed, d. 11/10/1849 age 6 months, child of William and Pamelia Reed (I wonder if this date is right. From the 1850 and 1856 census, it does not appear that they were in Iowa until about 1851. Another possibility is that it might just be a memorial. I don't think Charles is actually buried in Giard Cemetery either. So maybe whoever had the stone done, listed their dead children too. ejj)

William Reed, d. 4/2/1887 age 67, same stone as Charles, Willeroy and Pamelia

I also found this article online:

There are very few epitaphs on the tombstones at Giard Cemetery and most of them have succumbed to time and weather, but there's one in particular that struck my fancy. The stone reads: Pamelia, wife of Wm. Reed died Dec 2, 1892 aged 72y 3m 28d "She done what she could."

An epitaph is supposed to make you think and this one sure did for me. I wondered what it was she "done", so I went hunting to see if I could find out some more about her or her family. The Reed family wasn't mentioned in the Beimfohr books, so I headed for the internet.

I found her husband, William S. Reed in the 1852 Iowa State Census for Farmersburg Township. They most likely came to Iowa in 1848 or 1849, when the Neutral Ground was opened up for settlement as Willeroy Reed who died in 1849 shares the third side of their tombstone.

They show up next in the 1870 Farmersburg Twp. census and again in the 1880 census.

On Aug 19, 1870, William Reed's next door neighbor, J. E. Corlett, who also happened to be the census taker that year, finally got around to including William and Pamelia in the census. William was 50 and had been born about 1820 in NY, Pamelia was 49 and also born in NY, and their daughter Lura was 18 years old and had been born in Iowa. William's farm was valued at $1,800 and he had a personal estate of $1,106. No one in the family could read or write, but then, neither could their neighbors

I found William on a list of Civil War soldiers. He and his 16 year old brother Charles enlisted on 14 Aug. 1862 at McGregor and joined Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment Iowa on 22 Aug. 1862. William mustered out on 15 July 1865 in Baton Rouge, LA, having fought in numerous battles, including Vicksburg. Brother Charles was killed at age 17 at Jackson, Tenn. and his name is on the fourth side of the stone.

Many say you can find out just about anything about anybody on the web. Considering that Pamelia died 114 years ago I'd say finding this much is pretty amazing. I guess I "done what I could, too.

By the way, both William and Pamelia's parents were born in Vermont.

Source: Mowing the Cemetery, a weekly newspaper column by Bev. Bernhard

Note: by ejj - Charles Reed was in the 27th Iowa. According to the rosters, William Reed that enlisted in Company G, 21 Iowa was 27 years old when he enlisted. He filed for a pension on Sept. 8, 1890 in Wisconsin. He was on the 1890 Veterans Census in LaCrosse County, Wisconsin: William T. Reed, Private, Company G, 21 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 14, 1862. Discharged Aug. 15, 1865, Length of Service: 3 Years. William, father of Charles would have been about 42 in 1862 and he died in 1887. If William enlisted, Charles would have been his son, not his brother. Census records do not reveal a brother named William. So I am certain that William T. Reed in 21st Iowa is a different William Reed.


Reed, Warren R. He was born Oct. 15, 1842 in Ohio. He was the son of John P. Reed and Melinda Asher. He married first Charlotte Sheets on July 15, 1868 in Poweshiek County, Iowa. He was age 25. She was age 18. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). He married second Belle.

1856 Iowa State Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: John P. Reed (age 31, born Ohio, farmer), Malinda Reed (age 51, born Ohio), Tabitha Reed (age 23, born Ohio), Jemiah Reed (age 21, born Ohio), Reuben Reed (age 19, born Ohio), Artamisse Reed (age 16, born Ohio), Warren Reed (age 14, born Ohio), Abi Reed (age 12, born Ohio), Amanda Reed (age 10, born Ohio), Oliv Reed (age 4, born Iowa), Mary Reed (age 1, born Iowa), Anny Reed (age 83, born Pennsylvania) and George Reed (age 21, born Ohio). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 6 years.

1860 Census: Grand Meadow, Clayton County, Iowa: J. P. Read (age 54, born Ohio), Malinda Read (age 53, born Ohio), Warren Read (age 18, born Ohio), Reuben Read (age 23, born Ohio), Abi Read (age 16, born Ohio), Amanda Read (age 13, born Ohio), Olive Read (age 11, born Iowa), Mary Read (age 6, born Iowa), George Read (age 27, born Ohio), Tabitha Read (age 27, born Ohio), John D. Read (age 2, born Iowa), George Read (age 1, born Iowa) and Hannah Read (age 86, born Pennsylvania).

February 24, 1862; U. S. Army, Register of Enlistment: Warren Reed, February 24, 1862. Enlisted at McGregor, Iowa, by Capt. Lewis, Period of 3 years, born Union County, Ohio, age 21, Occupation Farmer, Hazel eyes, light hair, light complexion, 5 feet 4 1/2 inches, Regiment: Co. A, 16th Inf. Discharged March 26, 1865, per ? m.o. at Lookout Mtn, Tenn, a pvt. 2749 A (E.B.R.A.) 1889. (I have no idea what that last series of numbers is indicating.)

(Note: Previous research shows that there was a Francis M. Ganow that also enlisted in Co. A, 16th US Infantry at McGregor in Feb. 1862. He also enlisted in the 27th Iowa and was transferred to the 16th U.S. Infantry. I wonder if there is some connection between the two soldiers.)

1870 Census: Richland, Tama County, Iowa: Warren Reed (age 28, farmer, born Ohio), Charlotte Reed (age 19, born Illinois).

1880 Census: Weld, Colorado: Warren Reed (age 35, widower, farmer, coal miner, born Ohio), daughter Nettie Reed (age 9, born Iowa), son Bertie Reed (age 6, born Colorado), boarder George Hewitt (age 26, coal miner, born Ill), and George Wilson (age 21, born Wisc.).

1885 Colorado State Census, District 1, Chaffee, Colorado: Warren R. Reed (age 43, born Ohio), wife Lubell Reed (age 33, born Ind.). daughter Nettie Reed (age 14, born Iowa), son Burt Reed (age 11, born Col.), daughter Julia E. Reed (born Sept. 1885, age 14, born Colorado).

1900 Census: Clear Creek, Colorado: Warren R. Reed (born Oct, 1841, age 58, married 16 years, born Ohio), wife Belle G. Reed (born Sept. 1853, age 46, born Indiana), son David A. Reed (born July 1873, age 26, born Colorado)

1910 Census: Loveland, Larimer, Colorado: Warren R. Reed (age 68, married 2 times, currently for 26 years, born Ohio, engineer, stationary). wife Belle J. Reed (age 58, married 1 time for 26 years, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Ind.), daughter Julia E. Reed (age 24, born Colorado).

1920 Census, Blue, Jackson County, Missouri, Warren R. Reed (age 77, born Ohio), Elizabeth B. Reed (age 66, born Indiana).

Warren R. Reed died Nov. 24, 1924 and is buried in Mount Washington Cemetery, Independence, Jackson County, Missouri.

Missouri has death certificates online. The death certificate for Warren R. Reed showed: City: Fairmont. Residence: 534 Huttig. He was married. Spouses name: Belle G. Reed. Date of Birth: Oct. 15, 1842. Age 82 years, 1 month, 9 days. Occupation: Retired Stationery Engineer, retired 10 years. Name of Father: John Reed. Name of Mother Mildred Reed. Date of Death Nov. 24, 1924. Cause of death: Cholycistitis, about one year. Buried Mount Washington Cemetery.


Renkie, Frederick W. He was born about 1838 in Germany.

Frederick W. Reinke (Co. E, 27th Iowa) filed for a pension on Nov. 17, 1887 in Illinois.

Report of the Board of Managers of the National Home for Disabled Volunteers(Descriptive List of members admitted to the Illinois Soldiers' and Sailors' Home during the year ending June 30, 1893:

Register No. 622; Name: Fred'k W. Reinke; Company and Regiment: Co. E, 27th Iowa Inf. Rank: Pvt, Length of Service 36 months; Nativity: Germany; Age: 55; Pension per month: $12


Rider, Andrew He was born about 1832 in Germany.

He filed for a pension on Sept. 11, 1890 in Iowa.


Riley, James McMillian He was born Nov. 21, 1821 in Ohio. He was the son of Thomas Riley and Mary Gest. He married Nancy Ann Overly on June 11, 1846 in Elkhart, Indiana. (Indiana, Marriages, 1780-1992). She was the daughter of Martin Overley (May 28, 1803 - July 19, 1878) and Katherine McGuire (May 30, 1796 - April 26, 1843).

1850 census Jefferson, Elkhart County, Indiana: James Riley (age 29, Laborer, born Ohio), Nancy Riley (age 20, born Ohio) and Albert F. (age 1, born Indiana). They were living with a family named Randall.

1856 Iowa State Census, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: James Riley (age 26, born Ohio, laborer), Nancy Riley (age 26, born Ohio), Albert Riley (age 7, born Indiana), Mary Riley (age 34, born Indiana) and Elizabeth Riley (no age, born Iowa). They had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years.

1860 Census in Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: James Riley (age 39), Nancy (age 31), Albert (age 12), May (age 9) and Elizabeth (age 4).

1870 census in Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: James Riley (age 49), Nancy (age 40), Nettie (age 19), Libbie (age 15) and Nellie (age 3).

1880 Census in Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: J. M. Riley (age 59), Wife Nancy A. (age 51) and daughter Nellie B. (age 13).

James M. Riley died in 1880 and is buried at Monona Cemetery, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa.

His widow Nancy A Riley filed for a pension on April 9, 1880.


Roe, Joel R. He was born about 1832 in Ohio. He married Julia Ann Richardson on Oct. 15, 1857 in Clayton County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838 - 1934). He married second Eliza J. Lyons on July 24, 1902 at Kansas City, Kansas (widow's pension application.

1870 Census: Scott, Fayette County, Iowa: Fredk Morehouse (age 42), Jacob Smith (age 60), Joel Roe (age 36, farmer, born Ohio), Julia Roe (age 31, born Michigan), Josiah Roe (age 8, born Iowa), Jenna Roe (age 3, born Iowa), Ross U. Roe (age 1, born Iowa)

1880 Census: Wheeling, Livingston, Missouri: Joel Roe (age 50, farmer, born Ohio), wife Juliann Roe (age 43, born Michigan), daughter Eugenia Roe (age 13, born Iowa), son Lawson E. Roe (age 9, born Iowa), son Joel P. Roe (age 7, born Iowa), daughter Sarah Roe (age 5, born Iowa), daughter Susan Roe (age 3, born MO), and daughter Julia Roe (age 2 m., born Mar. in Mo).

Pension Records were submitted by David Yost

War Department
Adjutant General's Office
Washington, Dec. 30, 1884

Respectfully returned to the Commissioner of Pensions.

Joel R. Roe Badge Joel R. Roe, a private of Company "E" 27th Regiment Iowa Infty Volunteers is reported on our rolls from Oct 3/62 (date of muster in) to Jan. 1/63 Present. Feb. 28/63 Present. (In Hospital #2 Jackson, Tenn. from Jan. 16/63 to Feb. 18/63). April 30/63 Absent. Convalescent at Camp Read Jackson since April 20/63. June 30/63 Present. Rejoined Co. (absent sick) May 3/63. Aug 31/63 present. Oct 31/63 present. Same to April 30/64. June 30/64 Absent. Detached for Pioneer Corps. S.O. No. 17 Hd Qtrs 3d Div. 16 A C. Memphis. June 20/64. Same report to April 30/65. June 30/65 present. Mustered out with Co. Aug 8/65 at Clinton Iowa, a private. Returns for Sept/63 does not report him sick.

Roll Pioneer 3d Div 16 Army Corps June 30/64 reports him Pvt. present. Same report to Oct 31/64. Transferred to 2d Div. 16 Army Corps. Roll Dec 31/64 present. Same report to April 30/65.

Hospital Register 27th Iowa Vols which commence Sept 22d 62 & terminates June 24/64 shows him admitted Feb. 19/63 with remittent fever & sent to Gen'l Hospital at Feb. 19. Returned to duty Mch 14. Morning reports of Comp'y "E" 27th Iowa show him June 5/65 "Returned to company from detached duty" Cause for which in hospital at Jackson Tenn Jan & Feb. 63 & nature of sickness other than Remit Fever not shown. Pioneer Records of 16th Army Corps furnish no information. Records fail to show injury Sept. 1863.

Name Unreadable
Assistant Adjutant General.


DECLARATION FOR ORIGINAL INVALID PENSION

State of Missouri
Livingston County

On this 15th day of June, A.D. one thousand eight hundred and eighty personally appeared before me, a court of the record within and for the County and State aforesaid, Joel R. Roe aged 52 years, a resident of the Wheeling Township, county of Livingston, State of Missouri, who being duly sworn according to law, declares that he is the identical Joel R. Roe who was enrolled on the 14 day of August 1862 in Company E of the 27 Regiment of Iowa Inft, commanded by Col Gilbert and was honorably discharged at Clinton, Iowa on the 8 day of August 1865; that his personal description is as follows; age 30 years; height 5 feet 10 3/4 inches; complexion, dark; hair, brown, eyes, gray. That while a member of the organization aforesaid, in the service and in the line of his duty at Little Rock, in the State of Arkansas on or about the 25 day of September 1863, he while on duty and line of service was injured by a fall from door of guard house backward down a distance of six feet, striking on his head and small of his back. That his head and back was permanently injured. That before that time his feet had been injured at Battle Cross Roads Tenn. and has not recovered. That he was treated at hospitals as follows: He was treated for his feet in Reg. Hospital and command at Hospital Jackson Tenn. in Jan. or Feb. 1863 and for his injury in his head and back in Reg. Hospital at Little Rock in September & Oct. 1863. That he has not been employed in the military or naval service otherwise than as stated above.

That since leaving the service this applicant has resided in the Brush Creek, Fayette Co. in the State of Iowa until Dec. 1875 when we moved to Wheeling. That prior to his entry into the service above named he was a man of good, sound, physical health, being when enrolled a farmer. That he is now disabled from obtaining his subsistence by manual labor by reason of his injuries, above described, received in the service of the United States; and he therefore makes this declaration for the purpose of being placed on the invalid pension roll of the United States.


General Affidavit

State of Iowa
County of Clayton

In the matter of Joel R. Roe, Private of Co. E 27th Reg. of Iowa Infy.

Personally came before me, a clerk of the Dist. Court in and for aforesaid County and State, John Everall, aged 44 years and citizen of the town of Farmersburg, County of Clayton, State of Iowa, well known to me to be reputable and entitled to credit, and who, being duly sworn, declare in relation to aforesaid case, as follows:

I was 1st Sergt. of Co. E 27th Iowa Inft. Knew Joel R. Roe who was a private in said company and Regt. Roe when he entered the U.S. Service in Aug. 1862 was apparently a strong healthy man. He was a good soldier in every particular. I was present with the Regt in a march after Forest in Jan. 1863. Left Jackson Tenn on night of Jan 1st 1863. About the fourth day out remember seeing Roe nearly barefoot feet bleeding and badly swollen from marching over stones and frozen ground. Saw him apply to Capt. T. G. Dripps for permission to leave ranks as he could not march and permission was granted. I was also present with the Regt. at the taking of Little Rock in Aug. or Sept. 1863. Roe was present. I was in Hospital at Little Rock some two weeks and during that time heard from members of the company that Roe was dangerously hurt by a fall striking on his head or back. Know nothing of his treatment but know that he was not as good a man physically afterwards.

And I further declare that I have no interest in said case and am not concerned in its prosecution.

Signed: John Everall.


General Affidavit
State of Iowa
County of Kossuth

In the matter of the invalid pension claim No. 380375 of Joel R. Roe.

Personally came before me, a Clerk of the District in and for aforesaid County and State Dexter H. Hutchins, aged sixty years, a citizen of the town of Algona, County of Kossuth, State of Iowa, well known to me to be reputable and entitled to credit and who, being duly sworn, declared in relation to aforesaid case as follows:

That the said Joel R. Roe was a member of Co. E, 27th Reg. Iowa Vols. of which Co. the affiant was a private in December 1862 and January 1863 . That during that time our regiment marched from Jackson Tennessee to Clifton on the Tennessee River and that during said march the weather some of the time was cold and rainy. And the roads some of the time nearly impassable on account of mud. And further it was current talk in our Company that the said Joel R. Roe marched much of the time barefooted and that he complained to the Captain of his suffering and that for his complaints, the Captain cursed him but afterward wrote and had published in the Clayton County Journal an article applauding his Roe's heroics for marching for days with bleeding feet. And the affiant further says that during the said march he was at the left or foot of the Company and that the said Roe was near the head of the same, and that he the affiant cannot state that he saw the said Roe marching barefoot, but knows from common report. And further that he the said affiant recollects the talk in the company about the said Roe getting badly hurt at Little Rock but has forgotten the particulars and only remembers what was talk at the time.

And he further declares that he has no interest in said case and is not concerned in it prosecution.

Signature of Affiant: Dexter H. Hutchins


Western Div.
No. 325,526
Joel R. Roe
Co. E, 27 Regt IA Inf.

1890 Veterans Census: Wheeling, Livingston County, Missouri: Joel R. Roe, Private, Co. E, 27th Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 7, 1862, Discharged Aug. 8, 1865, Service 3 years and 1 day. Post Office Address: Wheeling, Livingston, MO. Disability Incurred: Injuries in feet & Head & Back. Inflammation of spinal cord and brain. wounded in right leg. Remarks: Incurred in U. S. Service.

Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions, Washington, DC July 29, 1899

Mr. Joel R. Roe
Wheeling, Livingston Co, Mo.

Sir: Will you kindly answer, at your earliest convenience, the questions enumerated below? The information is requested for future use, and it may be of great value to your family.

  1. Are you a married man? If so, please state your wife's full name and her maiden name. Answer: Yes, her maiden name was Julia A. Richardson.
  2. When, where, and by whom were you married? Answer: Married 1857, by Rev. ? Predmore in Garnavillo, Clayton Co., Iowa.
  3. What record of marriage exists? Answer: None
  4. Were you previously married? Answer: No
  5. Have you any children living? If so, please state their names and the dates of their birth. Answer: J. J. Roe, born Aug. 13, 1860: Jennie Roe, born Jan. 18, 1867: Ross U. Roe, born Mar. 2, 1868: Joel P. Roe, born Sept. 2, 1870: Sarah A. Roe, born May 26, 1875: Susie S. Roe, born Nov. 2, 1878:

Date of reply: Aug. 5, 1899, signed Joel R. Roe.

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Leavenworth, Kansas, Western Branch: Joel R. Roe: MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Each Enlistment; Aug. 7, 1863, Garnavillo, IA, Rank P, Company and Regiment: E, 27th Ia. Inf. Time and Place of Discharge; Aug. 8, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. Cause of Discharge: Ex. of Serv. Kind and Degree of Disability: Rheumatism, When and Where Contracted: Sept. 1863, Little Rock Ark. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Ohio, Age 69, Height: 5'6", complexion fair, blue eyes, brown hair, can read and write, Religion: P, Occupation Farmer, Residence Subsequent to Discharge: Brookfield, MO., widowed. Name and Address of Nearest Relative: Ross Roe, Meadville, Linn County, MO. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension $10.00, $12.00. Date of Admission: Feb. 27, 1902, W. B. Date of Death: Sept. 6, 1906. Cause of Death Heart Disease. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate: 325,526. Location of Grave and Remarks: Died at Wheeling, Mo. Sept. 6, 1906.

Joel R. Roe died Sept. 6, 1906. He is buried in Wheeling Cemetery, Livingston County, Missouri.

Record Evidence (Certified Copy of Official Record) To be used by the Custodian of Public Record in certifying to the facts of record touching this claim. NOTICE: Copies of records should be attested by the officer having custody thereof over his seal and signature. if he has no seal by which to authenticate his signature, the attestation should be under oath.

State of Missouri, County of Livingston.

In the Pension Claim of Eliza J. Roe, widow of Joel R. Roe, late of Co. E, 27th Reg't Iowa Vols, W. A. Swope, whose residence and Post Office Address is Wheeling, Missouri do hereby certify that I was the attending physician on Joel R. Roe during his last sickness. And further that the said Joel R. Roe died on September 6, 1906, at Wheeling Missouri and that his age was 73 years, 8 months and 18 days.

In witness whereof, I affix my signature this 7th day of August 1909. W. A. Swope, M. D.


Widow's Application for Accrued Pension
(due Soldier at Date of His Death)

State of Missouri, County of Livingston

On this 24th day of July, 1908, personally appeared Eliza J. Roe, who being duly sworn, declares that she is the lawful widow of Joel R. Roe, deceased; that he died on the 6 day of Sept. 1906, that he was a pensioner of the United States on the roll of the Pension Agency, by Certificate No. 325,526, which is herewith returned (or if not, state why not) with the Western Branch, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers; that the last payment of his pension was made on the 4th day of Aug. 1906, after which date he had not been employed or paid in the Army, Navy, or Marine service of the United States.

That she was married to the said pensioner on the 24th day of July 1902 at Kansas City, Kansas in the State of Kansas; that her name before said marriage was Eliza J. Lyons. that she had (or had not) been previously married, that her husband had (or had not) been previously married; that she hereby makes application to obtain the pension which had accrued to her husband at the date of his death.

She hereby appoints, with full power of substitution and revocation, as her true and lawful attorney, John W. Morris, of Washington D.C. That her post office address is Wheeling, County, Of Livingston, State of Missouri.

Signed Eliza J. (X) Roe (Her Mark)


Scarf, Robert H. He was born August, 1844 in New York. Probably the son of William and Joice Scarf. He married Nellie Cook on March 15, 1873 in Mitchell County, Iowa. (Iowa, Marriages, 1809 - 1992). She was the daughter of John and Charlotte Cook.

1850 Census: Boardman, Clayton County, Iowa: William Scarf (age 25, farmer born England), Joice Scarf (age 29, born Ireland), Robert H. Scarf (age 4, born NY), William J Scarf (age 2, born NY), James H. Scarf (age 1, born Iowa) and George R. Scarf (age 1/12, born Iowa)

1870 Census: Fremont, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Cook (age 21), Charlotte Cook (age 49), Nellie Cook (age 18).

1880 Census: Pipestone, Pipestone County, Minnesota: Robert H. Scarf (age 34, Druggist, born NY), wife Hellen M. Scarf (age 27, born New York), daughter Zilla Scarf (age 6, born Iowa), son Henry Scarf (age 2, born Minnesota), son Ralph H. Scarf (age 7/12, born Oct. in Minnesota), brother George B. Scarf (age 30, druggist, born Kentucky)

1890 Veteran's Census: Pipestone, Pipestone County, Minnesota: Robert Scarf, Priv. Co. E. 27th Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862. Discharge May 30, 1863. Post Office Address: Pipestone, Pipestone County, Minnesota: Disability Incurred: Chronic Diarrhea. Remarks: Unable to perform jobs.

1900 Census: Pipestone, Pipestone County, Minnesota: Robert Scarf (born Aug. 1846, age 53, married 27 years, born Vermont, father born Ireland, mother born England, drug store merchant), wife Nelly Scarf (born Aug. 1852, age 47, married 27 years, 5 children born, 4 still living, born New York, father born New York, mother born New York), son Henry Scarf (born July 1888, age 21, born Minnesota), son Ralph Scarf (born June 1880, age 29, born Minnesota), son Robert Scarf (born Nov. 1889, age 10, born Minnesota) and son Joice Scarf (born Nov. 1892, age 7, born Minnesota), mother Sharlot Cook (born Oct. 1820, age 79, widowed, 4 children born, 3 still living, born New York), (NOTE: Sharlot Cook is identified as mother, but based on where she was born, I would think it more likely, she was his mother-in-law--I found marriage record for Robert Scarf and Nellie Cook in Mitchell County, Iowa. I also found census records in 1870 showing Nellie Cook with mother Charlotte Cook.)

Robert H. Scarf died Oct. 9, 1906 and is buried in Old Woodlawn Cemetery, Block A, Lot 114, Space 3, Sweet Township, Pipestone County, Minnesota

His widow Nellie Scarf filed for a pension on Nov. 19, 1906.

Nellie M. Scarf died July 27, 1922 and is buried in Old Woodlawn Cemetery, Block A, Lot 114, Space 2, Sweet Township, Pipestone County, Minnesota.


Schaller, Philip He was born about January 6, 1838 in Woerth, Alsac Loraine, France. He married Emeline Lucretia Knight on Oct. 5, 1865 at Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa. ( Iowa, Marriages, 1809 - 1992). She was the daughter of Jonathan Knight and Elizabeth Knight. He married second Catherine Fishman on July 12, 1900 in Sac City, Iowa. (Iowa, Marriages, 1809 - 1902).

Phillip SchallerHonorable Phil Schaller was a representative of Sac county to the Twenty-first General Assembly. He moved to Eden Township, Sac county in 1871, and to Sac city in 1878 when he became County Treasurer for eight years. He also served as a county supervisor and was mayor of Sac City for two terms. In 1896 he was a voting delegate to the Republican National convention in St. Louis. Phil Schaller was born in Woerth, Alsac Loraine, in 1838 and came to the United States at the age of 16 and settled in Clayton County, Iowa. He was naturalized at Garnavillo, and in 1862 he enlisted in the Co. E., 27the Iowa Infantry, and served 3 years to the end of the Civil War. He was active in the western battles - Steele's Arkansas expedition, the Meridian campaign, Red River Campaign, Smith's expedition to Tupelo and Oxford, pursuit of Price through Arkansas and Missouri, Battle of Nashville, and Mobile Campaign.

After the war he returned to Clayton County as a wagon maker and soon thereafter married Emeline L. Knight. In 1871, the Schallers with their two daughters, Louisa and Eugenie, came to a farm in Eden township north of Early on Highway 71. His wife's parents, Jonathan Knights, also settled in Eden.

Mr. Schaller worked with the Iowa Railroad Land company and was Right of Way Agent for the Chicago and Milwaukee R.R. when it was built into Sac City. The town of Schaller was named after him in honor of his services.

Phil Schaller, was especially proud of his membership in Gen. W.T. Sherman Post No. 284, Grand Army of the Republic, of which he was state commander. He was active in the Presbyterian Church and the lodges. He helped start the Sac City Institute, and was trustee there as well as of Buena Vista. He had interests in several banks. He was a member of Rose Croix Commandery No. 38, Knights Templar and the Des Moines Consistory and the Shrine, and was grand treasurer of the Grand Lodge of AF and Am of Iowa.

While Phil Schaller came from France, his wife's family came to the United States in 1653, with several descendants serving in the American Revolution. After his first wife's death, he married Mrs. P. Fishman. She continued living in his Main Street home many years after his death. Much of the original interior beauty has been preserved.

Biographical History of Crawford, Ida and Sac Counties, Iowa
Chicago. Lewis Pub. Co.. 1893

"Phil" Schaller, as he was commonly known to his comrades, was of German nativity, but was quite as loyal to the Union Army and to the Grand Army of the Republic as were his native born comrades. Born in the Fatherland on January 6, 1838, he came to America at an early age and in May, 1859, became a naturalized citizen.

He was a sergeant in Company E., Twenty seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry where he served until the close of the war. When he was mustered from service he returned to his former home in Clayton County. In 1872, however, he moved to Sac County and became one of the prominent and substantial businessmen of Sac City. He served on the board of supervisors of Sac County, was county treasurer for eight years, was a member of the Twenty first General Assembly, and served for two terms as Mayor of Sac City.

Mr. Schaller was for many years active and zealous in promoting the interest of the Grand Army of the Republic. He was the "dominating spirit" of the local Post at Sac City, and in 1893 became Department Commander -- an office to which he gave much time and valuable service.

Throughout his long career Mr. Schaller was known for his philanthropic spirit, and his willingness to aid a comrade in need. He died at his home in Earlville, on June 21, 1912, at the age of seventy three.

The Iowa Department of the
Grand Army of the Republic, Page 91

1870 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton county, Iowa: Jonathan Knight (age 60, farmer, born Mass.), Elizabeth Knight (age 53, born New York), Delaven J. Knight (age 16, born New York), Franklin B. Knight (age 8, born Iowa), Philip Schaller (age 30, born France, Fire Insurance Agent), Emeline Schaller (age 26, born New York), Louisa S. Schaller (age 3, born Iowa), and Elizabeth Schaller (age 1, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Jackson, Sac County, Iowa: Phil Schuller (age 42, treasurer of county, born Germany), wife Emeline Schuller (age 36), daughter Louisa S. Schuller (age 13), Eugenie E. Schuller (age 11), mother-in-law Elizabeth Knight (age 61, widowed)

1885 Iowa State Census: Jackson Sac County, Iowa: Philip Schaller (age 47), Emeline Schaller (age 41), Louisa S. Schaller (age 18), Eugenie E. Schaller (age 16), and Mary Livingston (age 30).

U. S. Passport Application No. 34809 issued Jan. 22, 1892

State of Iowa, County of Sac

I, Philip Schaller, a naturalized and loyal citizen of the United States, hereby apply to the Department of State, at Washington, for a passport for myself, accompanied by my wife Emeline L. Schaller, born at Eden, Erie Co., NY on the 27 day of Nov, 1843.

I solemnly swear that I was born at Woerth, Alsace on or about the 6 day of January 1838, that I immigrated to the United States, sailing on board the George A. Hurlbut from Le Havre, France on or about the 12 day of January, 1854. That I resided 38 years, uninterruptedly, in the United States from 1854 to 1892 in Iowa; that I was naturalized as a citizen of the United States before the District Court of Clayton County, at Garnavillo, on the 16th day of May, 1859, as shown by the accompanying Certificate of Naturalization; That I am the identical person described in said certificate; That I am domiciled in the United States, my permanent residence being at Sac City, Sac County, in the State of Iowa, where I follow the occupation of Real Estate; that I am about to go abroad temporarily; and that I intend to return to the United States within one year with the purpose of residing and performing the duties of citizenship therein.

Oath of Allegiance

Further, I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; So Help Me God. Signed: Philip Schaller

Sworn to before me this 18th day of January, 1892
W. S. Hart, Notary Public

Description of Applicant:

Age: 54 Years
Stature: 5 feet, 8 1/2 inches
Forehead: Square
Eyes: Hazel
Nose: Large Nostrils
Mouth: Medium
Chin: Ordinary rounding
Hair: dark with traces of gray
Complexion: Florid
Face: Full

Identification

I hereby certify that I know the above-named Philip Schaller personally, and know him to be the identical person referred to in the within-described Certificate of Naturalization, and that the facts stated in his affidavit are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Jas Miller, Sac City, Iowa.

Applicant desires passport sent to following Address: Phil Scahller, Sac City, Sac County, Iowa.

The Grand Army, at the encampment at Keokuk last week, elected Phil Schaller of Sac County, department commander. He was a member of Company E, 27th Iowa Regiment, and the highest position he attained was second Sgt. He has been a prominent citizen of this section, holding a number of responsible positions, including representative in the legislature. He has always been an active worker in Grand Army matters and as one of his rules in life has been to do well whatever he had to do, we believe he will make a popular and effective commander.

Iowa State Reporter May 4, 1893

This article was in connection with a reunion of 1896. There was another article about the reunion, but nothing specific to the 27th Iowa.

PHIL SCHALLER
Prominent in All G. A. R. Work – – Past Department Commander

Phil Schaller located in Iowa in 1854 and upon breaking out of the war enlisted in Company E, 27th Iowa infantry. His Regiment was in Col. Shaw's brigade and A. J. Smith's Army Corps, 16th. He participated in many of the hardest fought battles of the war, a few which might be mentioned being Pleasant Hill, Yellow Bayou, Lake Chico, Tupelo, the two days engagement under Thomas which resulted in the practical annihilation of Hood's Army. He also took part in the capture of Little Rock and Fort DeRussy. At the latter place he was the first man to reach the top of the fortification. Speaking of this Mr. Schaller modestly disclaimed any superior bravery, but his Army friends all think that was what carried him to the top of the Fort ahead of the others. Mr. Schaller said "I was young and spry and in the excitement forgot danger. It was probably foolish of me and not good soldier soldiership." He admitted, however, that it had a good result, for hundreds followed his example and in a very few minutes the Fort had surrendered. For many years Mr. Schaller has been a resident of Sac City where he is engaged in banking business and other important business enterprises, and is regarded as one of the most enterprising men in this part of the state. No reunion is complete without him. His inexhaustible fund of anecdote and wit make him the life of these events, and if possible he grows more enthusiastic as the years go by. He has been honored with all the important offices, being department commander last year.

Sioux Valley News, June 25, 1896

Emeline Lucretia (Knight) Schaller (born Nov. 27, 1843) died in 1899 and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Sac City, Sac County, Iowa.

1900 Census: Sac City, Sac County, Iowa: Phil Schaller (born Jan 1838, born Germany, immigrated 1859, in US 46 years, Naturalized, Real Estate and Loans.) and Servant Alex McCollum (age 59).

1910 Census: Jackson, Sac County, Iowa: Phil Schaller (age 72, married 10 years, born Germany, immigrated in 1854), wife Catherine Schaller (age 62, married 10 years, born Germany).

Philip Schaller died either July 21, 1911 or June 21, 1912 and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Sac City, Sac County, Iowa Lot 18. (Note: Pension Index Record and Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War says July 21, 1911. His biography says he died Jun 21, 1912).

His widow Catharine Schaller filed for a pension on Dec. 15, 1916.


Schroeder, John Henry He was born May 8, 1842 in New Bremen, Ohio. He was the son of Bernard Frederick Schroeder, Sr (July 4, 1818 - Sept. 1, 1902) and Anna Margaretha Dorothea Mohrmann (Oct. 4, 1824 - Feb. 7, 1896). He married Hannah Rosalia McCallum on Apr. 20, 1870.  She was the daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth McCallum.

Clayton Twp. -- John H. Schroeder, of the firm of Schroeder, Beckman and Sterns, livery feed and sale stables, was born in the town of Celina, Auglaize County, O., on May 8, 1842. He came to Clayton County, IA., with his parents in June, 1849, and settled in Garnavillo Township. In May, 1860, he crossed the plains to Pike's Peak, Col. returning in the fall of that year. He went to work in his fathers and uncle's flour mill, and remaining there until Feb. 19, 1863, when he enlisted in Company E., Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry Volunteers, and served until June 11, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. While in the service he participated in all the battles of his regiment, being with General Banks on the Red River expedition, was wounded at the battle of Pleasant Hill, on Apr. 9, 1864, and engaged in the battles of Nashville, Tenn., Tupelo and Old Town Creek. He returned to Clayton County in 1871, and became a partner in the firm of Beckman Bros., general merchants, and in 1876 engaged in his present business. His marriage to Hannah R. McCallum occurred on Apr. 20, 1870. She was born in Montreal, Canada, Dec. 10, 1844, and came to Clayton County in June, 1859, with her parents, who were natives of Scotland.

History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1882, p. 725-726
Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Company, 1882
Reprinted by: Monona Historical Society, Monona, Iowa
Reproduction by: Unigraphics, Inc., 1401 North Fares Ave, Evansville, Indiana 47711, 1975

1856 Iowa State Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: B. T. Schroeder (age 37, miller), Dorothea Schroeder (age 31), John H. Schroeder (age 14, born Ohio), Mary Anna Schroeder (age 10, born Ohio), Elizabeth Schroeder (age 8, born Ohio), Lucy Schroeder (age 5, born Iowa), Mahala Schroeder (age 3, born Iowa), Heinrich Gurkemyer (age 20) and John Donald (age 30). The family had been in Iowa for 7 years.

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: B. F. Schroeder (age 42), Ann M. D. Schroeder (age 36), John H. Schroeder (age 18), Ann M. Schroeder (age 14), M. E. Schroeder (age 12), L. F. Schroeder (age 9), M W. Schroeder (age 7), B. F. Schroeder (age 4) and G. H. Schroeder (age 1)

1870 Census: Clayton, Clayton County, Iowa: John Schroeder (age 28, clerk in Store, born Ohio), Hannah (age 25, born Canada), Moses Adams (age 21, born Wisconsin), Andrew Adams (age 17, born Wisconsin), Lizzie (?) Schroder (age 21, born Ohio).

1880 Census: Clayton, Clayton County, Iowa: Henry Schroeder (age 38, born Ohio, living stable), wife Hannah Schroder (age 38, born Canada), Servant Minnie Benter (age 17),

1900 Census: Carroll, Carroll County, Iowa: John Schroeder (born May 1842, age 58, married 30 years, born Ohio), wife Hanna R. Schroeder (born Dec. 1844, age 55, married 30 years, 0 children born, born Canada).

John Schroeder died May 7, 1902 and is buried in Carroll City Cemetery, Carroll, Carroll County, Iowa

Obituary was found on Find a Grave

May 7, 1902 - Carroll Herald - One by one the veterans of the Grand Army of the Republic are being silently mustered out of service. Life's dread paymaster enters their names for the last time upon the muster roll and they are dismissed from duty on the world's great battle field. Today the many friends of J. H. Schroeder were grieved to learn that he had obeyed the call into the last grim battle of life and had surrendered to the great enemy of the human race - death.

Monday noon Mr. Schroeder was taken sick and in less than twenty-four hours was so dangerously ill with an affection of the brain that his physicians gave little hope of recovery. He suffered greatly and at times was unconscious of all around him. When the final summons came at 3:45 this morning he was conscious, yet the end came so suddenly that neither the sick man nor the watchers realized it until all was over.

John Henry Schroeder was born sixty years ago on the 8th of May, in New Bremen, Ohio. He came to Iowa in 1849, when but a child seven years old, with his parents who took up their residence in Clayton county. When he was fifteen years of age he joined the Lutheran church, and in 1870 married the lady who now survives him.

Sixteen years ago he moved to Carroll where he has since resided, and where he has been very successful as a business man. He leaves no family excepting the comfortless widow. There are besides, three brothers living and four sisters, of whom Mrs. M.A. Stratemeyer of this city is one. His aged father is eighty-four years old and lives in Emmetsburg, Iowa.

Mr. Schroeder was one of the veterans of the Civil war, having fought as a private in the ranks the last three years of the war. He enlisted with Company E of the 27th Iowa and rendered gallant service in the Red river expedition in Texas. He was always an enthusiastic member of the G.A.R. and was proud of his record as one of Iowa's soldiers.

By his death Carroll loses one of its best citizens. For the past fifteen years he has been in the marble business, though during that time several parties have been sharers in the firm. Kindly, courteous, honest, a sincere denouncer of all shams and hypocrisy, Mr. Schroeder was one of nature's noble men, and the community will miss him as truly as will the inner circle of relatives and friends who were his ardent admirers.

Soon will be ushered in that sad season when America pays tribute to its sleeping defenders, when a great nation does honor to its heroic dead, and on the 30th of May, at the roll call, another soldier's voice will be silent, only to answer "Here!" at the roll call of the great majority who have "crossed the bar," where there is neither war nor strife on battle field or in the heart, and where the dread enemy death has lost its victory.

His widow Hannah Schroeder filed for a pension on May 16, 1908.

Hannah (McCallum) Schroeder died Jan. 9, 1924 and is also buried in Carroll City Cemetery, Carroll, Carroll County, Iowa.

From Find a Grave

Jan 17, 1924 - Carroll Times - Mrs. J.H. Schroeder, whose death as briefly mentioned in The Times last week, was born in Montreal, Can., December 10, 1844, and died at her home January 9, 1924, after being a semi-invalid since the death of her husband 20 years ago.

Before her marriage Mrs. Schroeer was Miss Hannah R. McCallum, of Garnavillo, Ia., and was one of a family of 14 children. Mrs. Schroeder's mother died when Mrs. Schroder was a young woman and she assumed the responsibility of caring for the children. She was married at the Schroeder home in Garnavillo April 20, 1870. Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder moved from there to Auburn, Ia., and In the early 80s came to Carroll where Mr. Schroeder launched into the marble and granite business. Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Schroeder has led a quiet life and for a number of years has had for her constant companion Miss Theresa Buchholtz.

Mrs. Schroeder was a member of the Presbyterian church and was a woman of refinement and culture. She is survived by one brother, Mr. McCallum, of Joplin, MO. She is also mourned by a large number of nieces and nephews, Rialto Stratemeyer and Homer Stratemeyer, of Carroll, being her nephews. Mrs. Schroeder's husband and the mother of the Stratemeyer brothers were brother and sister. J.C. Trainer, of this city, is a brother-in-law.

Funeral services were held at the home Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. W.H. Parker officiating. Burial was made in the Carroll cemetery beside her husband. Mrs. Minnie Walker, of Los Angeles, Calif., who was brought up in the Schroeder home, attended the funeral. Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder had no children of their own but gave Mrs. Walker their loving care when she was a girl.


Schultz, Charles He was born Dec. 1843 in Germany

1890 Veterans Census: St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota: Charles H. Schultz, Private, Co. E, 27th Iowa Ins. Enlisted Aug. 22, 1862, discharged Aug. 8, 1865, Service 2 years, 11 months, 14 days, Post Office Address: 157 Charles St., St. Paul, Minn.

1900 Census: St. Paul Ward 8, Ramsey County, Minnesota: Charles H. Schulz (born Dec. 1843, age 56, married 34 years, born Germany, immigrated 1855, been in US 45 years, traveling salesman), wife Mary E Schultz (born Sept. 1847, age 52, married 34 years, born Indiana)

1910 Census: St. Paul Ward 8, Ramsey County, Minnesota: Charles Schultz (age 66, married 1 time for 43 years, born Germany, immigrated 1858, traveling salesman - milliner), wife Mary E. Schultz (age 61, married 43 years, 0 children born, born Indiana).

Charles Schultz died in June 26, 1919 (Pension Index Record) and is buried in Lakewood Cemetery, 2600 Hennepin Ave. S. Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

His widow Mary E. Schultz filed for a pension on July 18, 1919 in Minnesota.


Selleg, Edgar J. He was born about 1829 in New York. He married first Mary E. He married second Matilda (Wallace) Mason.

1850 Census, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa Alson Wardsworth (age 20), Sarah A. Wardsworth (age 18), Melibs Wardsworth (age 14), Polly Wardsworth (age 10) James B. Wardsworth (age 8) and Edgar Sellack (age 22, farmer, born New York).

1856 Iowa State Census, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Edgar Selleg (age 25, born NY, farmer), Mary E. Selleg age 22, born Tenn) and Willie J. Sellegg (age 0, born Iowa). (I found him on this census after I found the cemetery records. He was indexed as Edgar Selleg Goodman - He was at the very bottom of the page following the Goodman family).

1870 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Edgar J. Selleg (age 41, farmer, born NY), Matilda Selleg (age 43, born Vt.), Effie E. Selleg (age 4), Geo. N. Selleg (age 1) and Claus Elkas (age 20, farm laborer, born Germany).

Edgar J. Selleg died June 26, 1879 and is buried in Giard Cemetery, Farmersburg Township, Clayton County, Iowa.

From the Giard Cemetery Records, it appears that Edgar J. Selleg was previously married to Mary E. Other records in the cemetery have this information: Willie J. Selleg (son of E. J. and Mary E. Sellege) died 9/31/1856. Mary E. Selleg (wife of E.J. Selleg) and Ida May Selleg (infant daughter of E. J. and Mary E. Selleg) both died on May 4, 1858 (Note there is another cemetery (WPA) listing that lists a date of death of 9/3/1862 for Ida May Selleg).

1880 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Matilda Selleg (age 53, widowed, born Canada), daughter Etta E. Selleg (age 14), son George N Selleg (age 11),

His widow Matilda Selleg filed for a pension on Oct. 20, 1882.

Matilda Selleg died February 15, 1893. She is buried in Luana City Cemetery, Monona Township. Clayton County, Iowa.

Matilda Selleg 1824-1893
SELLEG, WALLACE, MASON
Posted By: Sharyl

Died, in Postville, on Wednesday morning, February 15th, Mrs. Matilda SELLEG, aged 69 years. Matilda WALLACE was born Jan. 27th, 1824, in Essex Co., New York. She was married at about 25 years of age to Francis MASON, and came with him to Madison, Wisconsin. But the home they had founded was destined to be short lived. After a few brief years of life together both husband and child were called to the better country. From Wisconsin she came to friends in Clayton Co., Iowa, where she met and married Edgar SELLEG about 30 years ago. Three children were born to them, two of whom, a son and a daughter, are still living. Sister SELLEG was left a widow the second time in 1879. She managed her farm herself until 2 years ago, when she moved to Postville. She was converted and united with the Methodist church during a revival at Luana fourteen years ago. The funeral service was conducted at the Methodist church, Friday afternoon, Feb. 17, by the pastor.

source: Postville Review (Allamakee Co.),
February 25, 1893


Shaw, Charles A. He was born about Aug. 10, 1839 in Monroe County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of John Shaw and Jane Kerr. (I found a small obituary for Mrs. Jane Shaw (nee Kerr), dated March 23, 1854: Died at Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa, on the 5th Inst. Mrs. Jane Shaw, wife of John Shaw, formerly of Cherry Valley, Monroe County, PA., and daughter of Joseph Kerr, of Stroud Township, in the 39th year of her age). Note that on the Register of Enlistment, Charles A. Shaw said he was born in Monroe County, PA). His brother Joseph Kerr Shaw also served in Company E, 27th Iowa. (Note: I computed Charles Shaw's birth date using his age at date of death).

Note: In addition to his service with Co. E, 12 and 27th Iowa, the pension index also showed service with Co. C. 13 U. S. Inf.

U. S. Army, Register of Enlistments: Name: Charles A. Shaw; Where Born: Monroe County Pennsylvania; age: 22 Occupation: Blank; When and Where Enlisted, Oct. 28, 1861, Dubuque, Iowa; By Whom enlisted: Captain Washington; Period: 3 years; Eyes: Grey; Hair: Brown; Complexion: Light; Height: 5 feet 8; Reg. And Company: Company C, 13th IA Inf.; Date of Discharge: May 15, 1862; Cause of Discharge: Disability; Remarks: At Alton, Ill, a Private.

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: John Shaw (age 47, farmer, born Penn.), Martha Shaw (age 38, born Penn.), Charles Shaw (age 20, born Penn), Rachael Shaw (age 15, born Wis.), James Shaw (age 13, born Wisc.), George Shaw (age 11, born Wisc.), Sarah Shaw (age 9, born Iowa), M. A. Shaw (age 6, born Iowa), and Louisa Grace (domestic, age 15)

1870 Census, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Thomas Walker (age 56), Susan Walker (age 50), Margretta Walker (age 17) Lillian Walker (age 14), Edmund Walker (age 12) and Charles Shaw (age 31, farmer, born Pennsylvania).

1885 Iowa State Census, Sibley, Osceola County, Iowa Frank Churchill (age 25, Sarah Churchill (age 21), Charles Shaw (9th Street, age 46, single, laborer, born Pennsylvania) and Ed Huffman (age 25).

He filed for a pension on Aug. 6, 1883 in Iowa.

Charles Shaw died Jan. 23, 1889 in Sibley, Osceola, Iowa. He is buried in Holman Cemetery, Sibley, Osceola County, Iowa. 1886 - 1890 Death Records, Osceola County, Iowa: Surname: Shaw; Given Name: Charles A. Age: 49 y 5 m 13 d Race: White Date of Death: 1/23/1889; Marital Status: Single Birth: Pennsylvania Place of Death: Sibley; Cause of Death: Chronic Pleuropneumonia Death: 1/24/1889; Cemetery: Sibley

His father John Shaw filed for a pension on Jan. 18, 1890 in South Dakota. In addition to his service with Co. E, 12 and 27th Iowa, the pension index also showed service with Co. C. 13 U. S. Inf.


Shaw, Joseph Kerr He was born about 1835 in Pennsylvania (Probably Monroe County - based on where Charles A Shaw was born). He was the son of John Shaw and Jane Kerr. He married Ellen A. Smith on March 3, 1864 in Volga City, Clayton County, Iowa. He was age 29. She was age 22. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was probably the daughter of Dudley B. and Anna Smith. His brother Charles A. Shaw also served in Company E, 27th Iowa.

1870 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Joseph Shaw (age 36, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Ellen Shaw (age 36, born Pennsylvania), Lamonte Shaw (age 2, born Iowa).

He filed for a pension on Apr. 23, 1879.

1880 Census: Wilson, Osceola County, Iowa; Joseph Shaw (age 46, farmer, born Penn.), Ellen Shaw (age 46, born Penn), Lamonte Shaw (age 12).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living In Iowa: Under 27th Iowa: Joseph K. Shaw, Private, Co. E, Present Post Office: Sibley (Note Osceola County)

1885 Iowa State Census: Wilson, Osceola County, Iowa: Joseph K. Shaw, (Township 100, Range 41, Section 18, S. E., age 50, farmer, born Penn.), Ellen A. Shaw (age 50, born Penn.), Lamont Shaw (age 16, born Clayton County, Iowa.).

1895 Iowa State Census, Wilson, Osceola County, Iowa: Joseph K. Shaw (age 61, born Pennsylvania)

1900 Census: Bigelow, Nobles, Minnesota: Joseph K. Shaw (Born Dec. 1833, age 66, married 37 years, born Penn., Pensioner), Ellen Shaw (born March 1834, age 65, married 37 years, 1 child born, 1 still living).

June 7, 1905 Minnesota Territorial and State Census Bigelow, Nobles County, Minnesota: Joseph K. Shaw (age 71, born Pennsylvania, period of Residence: 8 years and 6 months - state and county, farmer), Ellen A. Shaw (age 70, born Penn. period of residence: 8 years and 6 months.), Lamont R. Shaw (age 37, born Iowa, Period of Residence 1 year, 6 months, teacher).

1910 Census: Bigelow Ward 1, Nobles County, Minnesota: Joseph K. Shaw (age 75, married 1 time for 46 years, born Pennsylvania) and wife Elin A. Shaw (age 75, married 1 time for 46 years, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Pennsylvania),

The chapters below are from the 1914 book, Past and Present of O'Brien and Osceola Counties of Iowa and contain histories of the towns and townships of the county.

WILSON TOWNSHIP.

Section 18 was taken by E. A. Frazier, William R. Rood, J. K. Shaw, C. H. Smith and William Boyer. Mr. Shaw now lives in Bigelow, Minnesota. Frazier and Rood were "flitters." Smith and Boyer are both reported dead.

Joseph K. Shaw died Dec. 8, 1917, at Bigelow, Minnesota (Pension Index Record.) He is buried in Ransom Cemetery, Bigelow, Nobles County, Minnesota. There was a note attached to his Find A Grave Memorial that said he was a resident of Minnesota Soldiers Home at Minnehaha Falls, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The person that created his memorial has a Virtual Cemetery for the Minnesota Soldiers Homes. There was a description that said this:

MINNESOTA SOLDIERS HOME 1887-1987
A Virtual Cemetery created by: Lilydale Memorials

Description: Veterans and dependents entered in the 1887-1987 Burial Book for the Minnesota Soldiers Home at Minnehaha Falls in Minneapolis. The home was originally established in 1887 for Civil War Veterans. The Burial Book is in the Minnesota History Center Library in Saint Paul. (Minn State Archives, Loc 106.E.11.5B-2ov)


Smith, Jacob. He was born Nov. 16, 1838 in Rohran, Wurttemberg, Germany. He was the son of George Smith (Death Certificate). He married Catherine Latteman at Monona Clayton County, Iowa on Nov. 4, 1866

1870 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Jacob Smith (age 30, farmer), Catherine Smith (age 260, Ann Smith (age 2), and Fred Smith (age 5/12)

1880 Census; Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Jacob Smith (age 41, farmer, born Wurttemberg), wife Catherine Smith (age 34), daughter Anna Smith (age 12), son Fred Smith (age 10), son Carl Smith (age 8), daughter Etta Smith (age 5), daughter Amy Smith (age 3), and daughter Sarah Smith (age 10/12)

1885 Iowa State Census, Monona, Clayton County, Iowa; Jacob Smith (Township 95, Range 5, Section 35, S E N W, age 47, farmer ), Catharine Smith (age 39), Anna Smith (age 17), Fritz Smith (age 15), Carl Smith (age 13), Etta Smith (age 10), Emma Smith (age 7), Cora Smith (age 4), and Rachel Smith (age 0)

1900 Census: Washington, Chickasaw County, Iowa: Jacob Smith (born Nov. 1838, age 61, married 33 years, born Germany, immigrated 1857, in US 43 years, naturalized, Gen. Mdse), wife Catherine Smith (born Oct, 1845, age 54, married 33 years, 8 children born, 7 still living.), son Fred Smith (born Jan. 1870, age 30, born Iowa, partner to head), daughter Etta Smith (born Aug. 1874, age 25, born Iowa, Clerk in store), daughter Cora Smith (born Oct. 1881, age 18, born Iowa, clerk Gen. Mdse ), Gertrude Smith (born Aug, 1884, age 15, born Iowa, in school), and sister Christina Smith (born May 1849, age 55, born Germany, immigrated 1857)

1910 Census: Henrietta, Lorain County, Ohio: Jacob Smith (age 71, married 1 time, born Germany, immigrated 1857, naturalized, own farm)., wife Catherine Smith, (age 64, married 1 time for 43 years, 8 children born, 6 still living, born Germany, immigrated 1865), daughter Etta Smith (age 35, born Iowa, clerk - store), and sister Christina Smith, (age 64, born Germany, immigrated 1857).

1920 Census: Camden, Lorain County, Ohio: Jacob Smith, (age 81, born Germany, immigrated 1857, naturalized) wife Catherine Smith (age 74, born Germany, immigrated 1853, naturalized in 1866) daughter Cora Wildman (age 37, widowed, born Iowa, Postmistress County Office), granddaughter Myrtle Wildman (age 8, born Ohio), and Sister Christina Smith (age 74, immigrated 1857).

Jacob Smith died April 6, 1921 from a cerebral hemorrhage (death certificate) and is buried in Camden Cemetery, Kipton, Lorain County, Ohio Lot C, Section 19, Grave 2 (between SR 511 and Gifford Road)

April 13, 1921 The Chronicle Telegram

Kipton (Ohio) - Jacob Smith was born in Rohran, Wurttemberg, Germany Nov. 16, 1838, and departed this life April 6, 1921 at his home in Kipton. He came to the United States when a young man. He volunteered in the civil war and August 16th, 1862, reenlisted for three years, or for the term of war, in Co. E, 27th Regiment, Iowa Infantry. He came through the civil war without injury, though at one time there were seven bullet holes thru his clothing and one through his hat. P. S. 91:7

He was married to Miss Catherine Latteman at Monona, Clayton Co. IA. Nov. 4, 1866 and for many years lived in Iowa when they came to make their home in Kipton. He united with the Lutheran church by confirmation in Germany. Eight children were born to this union, six of whom survive, as also does the faithful wife and mother. Dead, Fred D., Carl H., Etta M., Amy R., in infancy, Cora F. and Gertrude M. Besides his wife and children he leaves thirteen grandchildren and one great grand child, and a host of friends. Funeral services were held from the home Saturday afternoon conducted by Rev. S. K. Meek of the Camden Center Church. A quartet sang Lead Kindly Light. Burial was made in the Camden cemetery. The floral offerings were many and beautiful.

Note Obituary was found on Find a Grave

His widow Catherine Smith filed for a pension on Apr. 20, 1921 in Ohio.

Catherine Smith (born Oct. 18, 1845), died May 29, 1928 and is also buried in Camden Cemetery, Kipton, Lorain County, Ohio.


Smith, Jonathan He was born Dec. 6, 1837 in New York. (note: date of birth was computed from tombstone information).

It will be noticed that all the settlements already mentioned came from outside the State of Iowa, while the Clayton County settlers came from within the State of Iowa. Up to the time of the Civil war and later there were many no doubt who had first settled in some other part of Iowa and later moved to Madison County, but there is no single county that ever sent such an immigration as Clayton, and one that has made such an impression upon the people. This wave began about 1864 and lasted until 1873. The cause of this emigration was to find cheaper lands, as the land from where they came had increased in value and they were also seeking a more moderate climate.

Jefferson Township was the favored township for the people from Clayton County, owing to the character of the soil, which resembled that of Clayton County, and also to the smooth undulating surface in the northern part where most of them settled. In 1866 those who came to Jefferson Township were Malcolm McBride, William C. Hazen, Gustavus Hazen, John Kelley, Mrs. Estey, George and John Brooker and John Hartenbower.

In 1867 those who came were William Brewster, Leonidas Renshaw, Lewis Ballou, Enoch Allen, Frank Trunkey, Elliott Cook, Jonathan Smith, John Hutchins, Alfred Pierce, Almon Wright, John Wright, Dewitt C. Wright, Hardy Lockwood, Gudliffe Brooker, Frederick Brooker, Timothy Killam, and John Smith. All these settled in Jefferson Township. Afterwards and prior to 1870 those who settled in this township from Clayton County were Merrill A. Knight, Alexander Miller, Sylvester Renshaw, Silas Angier, William Kelley, Gearhardt Storck, John Westphal, Herman Marquardt, Ferdinand Marquardt, Mr. Steinhouse, Merrill Carty, Harriet Hazen, George Allen and William Buske.

Jonathan Smith, who owned land on section 14, moved to Van Meter and died there a few years ago.

Madison County, Iowa
CLAYTON COMES TO MADISON
by Herman Mueller

Name: Smith, Jonathan, Residence: Section 14, Business: Farmer, Nativity: Essex Co., New York, Came to State: 1850, Post Office: Van Meter. source:

Madison County, Iowa. A. T. Andreas' Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa., published in 1875.

1880 Census: Jefferson, Madison County, Iowa: Jonathan Smith (age 42, born New York), wife Nancy Smith (age 34, born Ohio), Lula Smith (age 12), son Ruben Smith (age 10), daughter Lily B. Smith (age 8),son Alester Smith (age 6), daughter Cora Smith (age 3) and daughter Mary E. Smith (born Dec, age 5/12).

1885 Iowa State Census: Jefferson, Madison County, Iowa; Jonathan Smith (Township 77, Range 27, Section 23, S W S E 1/4/, age 49, Farmer, born New York), Nancy Smith (age 38), Luella Smith (age 16, born Madison County, Iowa), Reuben Smith (age 14, born Madison County, Iowa), Lillie Smith (age 12, born Madison County, Iowa) and Albert (age 10, born Madison County, Iowa) Cora Smith (age 7, born Madison county, Iowa).

1900 Census, Jefferson, Madison county, Iowa: Jonathan Smith (Born Dec. 1834, age 65 married 32 years, born NY), wife Nancy Smith (born May 1847, age 53, married 32 years, 6 children born, 4 still living), Daughter Luetta Short, (born June 1868, age 31, married 4 years, 4 children born, 3 still living) Grandson (Cecil A. Short (born Apr. 1896, age 4), granddaughter Ethel M. Short (born Aug. 1898, age 1) and grandson Carl C. Short (born Mar. 1900, age 9/12).

Jonathan Smith died Dec. 26, 1905 and is buried in Van Meter Cemetery, Van Meter, Dallas County, Iowa.

His widow Nancy M. Smith filed for a pension on Jan 13, 1906 in Iowa.

Nancy M. Smith is also buried in Van Meter Cemetery.


Storck, George He was born June 2, 1843 in Darmstadt, Germany. He was the son of George Storck and Bridget Wencel. He married Henrietta Marquardt in August 1870. She was the daughter of Carl Marquardt (April 1, 1805 - April 11, 1896) and Dorothea Schaetzke (June 9, 1812 - April 13, 1889).

1856 Iowa State Census: Jefferson, Clayton County, Iowa: Bridget Storck (age 45), Gerhardt Storck (age 20, Casper (18), Elizabeth Storck (age 15), George Storck (age 18), and Philipp Storck (age 9). They had been in Iowa for 8 years.

1860 Census: Jefferson, Clayton County, Iowa: Geerheart Storck (age 25), B. Storck (female, age 50), Charles Storck (age 22), George Storck (age 20).

1870 Census: Madison, Madison County, Iowa: George Storck (age 26, farmer, born Baden), Henrietta Storck (age 21, born Prussia).

1880 Census: Madison, Madison County, Iowa: George Storck (age 36, farmer, born Germany), wife Henrietta Storck (age 30, born Germany), daughter Augusta Storck (age 8), daughter Lucy Storck (age 7), son Richard Storck (age 4) and son Arthur Storck (age 2).

1900 Census Earlham Town, Madison County, Iowa: George Storck (born June 1843, age 56, married 30 years, born Germany, immigrated 1848, in US 52 years, farmer), wife Henrietta Storck (born Apr. 1849, age 51, married 30 years, 9 children born, 8 still living, born Germany, immigrated 1859, in US 41 years), daughter Augusta Storck (born June 1871, age 28), daughter Lucy Storck (born Apr. 1873, age 27), son Richard C. Storck (born July 1875, age 24), son Arthur H. Storck (born Feb. 1878, age 22)., son Earnest A. Storck (born Dec. 1880, age 19), daughter Fernanda C. Storck (born Oct. 1886, age 13), son Paul G. Storck (born Jan. 1889, age 11), and son Walter H. Storck (born July 1891, age 8).

1910 Census, Madison, Madison County, Iowa: George Storck (age 66, married 1 time for 39 years, born Germany, immigrated 1848, naturalized, general farm), wife Henrietta Storck (age 61, married 1 time for 39 years, 9 children born, 8 still living, born Germany, ), daughter Augusta Storck (age 38, born Iowa), daughter Lucy Storck (age 37), son Arthur H. Storck (age 32), daughter Fernanda Storck (age 24), son Paul C. Storck (age 21) and son Walter Storck (age 18).

1915 Iowa State Census: Madison, Madison County, Iowa: George Storck (age 71, County, Madison. P. O. Earlham, Township Madison, Occupation Farmer. Total earnings for 1914 from Occupation: 1800. Extent of Education Common 1, can read and write. Birthplace; Germany. Owns own home or farm. Encumbrance on farm or home $9000, value of farm or home 60000. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company E. Church Affiliation German Lutheran. Father's birth place: Germany. Mother's Birthplace: Germany. Years in US 48. Years in Iowa 48. Naturalized.

George Storck died on August 25, 1916. He is buried in German/Trinity Lutheran Cemetery, Madison County, Iowa.

Winterset Madisonian - August 30, 1916
Winterset, Iowa

DEATH CLAIMS GEORGE STORCK

Was Well Known Farmer and Prominent Citizen of County.

George Storck of Madison township passed away last Friday evening, after an illness extending over a period of nearly one year. He was widely known throughout Madison and Dallas counties, and probably no other citizen of either county was held in higher esteem by his neighbors and business associates. He moved from Clayton county to the farm where he died, in 1870. Besides his active and successful operation of his 400 acre farm, he found time to devote to public enterprises, and was an indefatigable worker for the success of the Madison County Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company, which he served as president, and afterward as secretary, since the company was organized in the year 1880. Most predominant of the characteristics that made him an active force in anything he took hold of, and won the confidence and esteem of his fellow men, was his unquestioned honesty, sincerity of purpose and sense of justice in the various relations of life. Funeral services were held on Monday, Aug. 28th, and burial at the German Lutheran church, in which the deceased was an active worker. Surviving members of his family are Mrs. Storck, four sons and three daughters.

Posted by Pat Hochstetler on the Madison County USGenWeb Site.

His widow Henriette Storck filed for a pension on Sept. 18, 1916 in Iowa.

Henrietta Storck (born April 14, 1849), died Feb. 2, 1927 and is buried in Trinity Lutheran Cemetery, Madison County, Iowa.

Children of George Storck and Henrietta Marie Wilhelmina Marquardt:

  1. Augusta Henrietta Storck b: JUN 1871
  2. Lucy W. Storck b: APR 1873
  3. Richard Carl Storck b: 30 JUL 1875
  4. Arthur Hermon Storck b: FEB 1878
  5. Earnest A. Storck b: DEC 1880
  6. Johanna Freidericka Tuselda Storck b: 1883 in Madison County, Iowa
  7. Fernanda C. Storck b: 11 OCT 1886
  8. Paul Gerhardt Storck b: 24 JAN 1889 in Iowa
  9. Walter H. Storck b: 20 JUL 1891

Stratton, Charles He was born April 28, 1822 in Crown Pointe, Essex County, New York. He was the son of Benjamin Stratton and Polly Mansfield. He married Hannah VanAuken in January 1849.

Monona Twp. -- Charles Stratton, one of the enterprising farmers of Clayton County, was born in Essex County, N.Y., April 28, 1822, and was a son of Benjamin and Polly (Mansfield) Stratton. He remained on his father's farm until he was six years old, when he was forced to work out and support himself. In 1846 he went to Washington County, Wis., where he worked as a farm hand and in the pineries. In January, 1849, he married Hannah VanAuken, who was born in Albany County, N.Y., July 27, 1832. Of twelve children born of this union, eight are living--Melissa L., Mary, Charles A., David E., Carrie E., Andrew G. and Maud I. In April, 1856, Mr. Stratton came to Clayton and located in Wagoner Township, where he purchased land and opened up a farm, since which time he has entered and improved five other farms. In 1862 he enlisted in the Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and served nearly three years. After the war closed he returned to Clayton County, and settled on his present farm in Monona Township. He owns 160 acres, valued at $40 per acre. Mr. Stratton came to the county a poor man, but by industry has accumulated a fine property and home, and is one of the well-to-do farmers of the county.

History of Clayton County Iowa 1882, p. 1063
Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Company, 1882
Reprinted by: Monona Historical Society, Monona, Iowa
Reproduction by: Unigraphics, Inc., 1401 North Fares Ave, Evansville, Indiana 47711, 1975

1850 Census: Addison, Washington, Wisconsin: Charles Stratton (age 28, farmer, born NY), Hannah Stratton (age 18, born NY), and Melissa Stratton (age 5/12, born Wisconsin)

1860 Census: Wagner, Clayton County, Iowa: Charles Stratton (age 38), Hannah Stratton (age 27), Melissa Stratton (age 10), James Stratton (age 8), Mary Stratton (age 6), Charles Stratton (age 4), Daniel Stratton (age 1) and David Foot, (age 17).

1870 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Charles Stratton (age 48), Hannah Stratton (age 38), Melissa Stratton (age 20), James Stratton (age 19), Mary Stratton (age 16), Charles Stratton (age 14), Daniel Stratton (age 11), Carrie Stratton (age 5), Andy Stratton (age 2), Rachael VanAuken (age 71) and Thomas Spencer (farm laborer, age 38).

1880 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Chas. Stratton (age 58), wife Hannah Stratton (age 47), daughter Mary Stratton (age 25, born Wisconsin), son C. A. Stratton (age 24, born Iowa), son D. E. Stratton (age 21, born Iowa), daughter Carey Stratton (age 14, born Iowa), son A. G. Stratton (age 12, born Iowa), daughter Maude I. Stratton (age 9, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa: Charles Stratton (Township 95, Range 5, Section 36, S 1/2 NE, age 63, farmer), Hannah Stratton (age 52), David E. Stratton (age 24), Carrie A. Stratton (age 19), Andrew G. Stratton (age 16) and Maud I. Stratton (age 14).

1900 Census: Monona, Clayton County, Iowa; Chas. Stratton (born Apr. 1822, age 78, married 51 years, born New York, Captilist), wife Hannah Stratton (born July 1833, age 66, married 51 years, 12 children born, 6 still living, born new York), son Andrew G. Stratton (born Nov. 1870, age 29, born Iowa).

Charles Stratton died June 20, 1908 (per the pension index card and Find a Grave records). He is buried in Farmersburg-Wagner Cemetery, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa.

His widow Hannah Stratton filed for a pension on July 3, 1908 in Iowa.

Hannah (VanAuken) Stratton (born July 27, 1832), died Jan. 5, 1912 and is buried in Storm Lake Cemetery, Storm Lake, Buena Vista County, Iowa.


Street(s), Calvin He was born March 12, 1826 in Ohio. He was the son of John Streets (Apr 1800- Feb 1865) and Ferby Houston (25 Dec 1803/1804- 25 Jul 1873).

Calvin Streets married first Susan Sloper on Nov. 24, 1850 in Scott County, Iowa. (I believe she was the daughter of Samuel and Huldah Sloper. It appears from an online obituary that Huldah Sloper (wife of Samuel Sloper) died in 1846 from Typhus fever.  Samuel Sloper died June 28, 1849 from Cholera in Davenport, Scott County, Iowa (obituary is also online). Additional information on the Scott County website, "The first settler in the territory now comprising Sheridan Township was a Samuel Sloper, who settled on section 28, in 1840. He was followed by Lyman Osborn, in 1841, who located on section 29."

1850 Census: District 4, Scott County, Iowa; Lyman Osborn (age 37), Lucretia Osborn (age 35), Sylvester Osborn (age 13), Irena Osborn (age 12), Lois Osborn (age 10), Huldah Osborn (age 9), Frederick Osborn (age 7), Josiah Osborn (age 5), Eli Osborn (age 3), Ellen Osborn (age 1), Susan Sloper (age 19), Irena Sloper (age 18), Jackson Sloper (age 21, farmer) Abner Sloper (age 22, farmer) and Calvin Street (age 22, farmer).

1856 Iowa State Census: Pierce, Jones County, Iowa: Calvin Streets (age 27, farmer, born Ohio, had been in the state of Iowa 7 years.), Susan Streets (age 25, had been in the state of Iowa 18 years), Elan Streets (age 5), Hulda Streets 9age 3), Willard Streets (age 2) and Tolbert Streets (age 0).

This information was submitted by Keith.

The pension records state he:

Enlisted on 22 Aug 1862 - Company E, 27th Iowa Infantry Volunteer Regiment; Was a Prisoner of War 1864 - 1865 - kept in prison camp in Alabama - captured Olive Branch, Mississippi 28 Aug 1864. Released 18 Apr 1865. He also mentioned in his pension application he had been wounded at the time of his capture and was attended to after his capture by "a Rebel doctor"; Discharged 7 Jun 1865; After his discharge, he lived in Iowa from 1865-1869, then removed to Cedar Township, Wilson County, Kansas (post office Altoona, Kansas).

1870 Census: Cedar, Wilson County, Kansas: C. Streets (age 42, farmer, born Ohio), Susan Streets (age 40, born Ohio), Willard Streets (age 17, works on farm, born Iowa), T. Streets (age 14, works on farm, born Iowa), F. J. Streets (age 10, born Iowa), D Streets (age 4, born Iowa), I Streets (male, age 2, born Iowa)

Susan Sloper Streets died Dec. 30, 1871. She is buried in Hatler Cemetery, Wilson County, Kansas.

Calvin Streets married 2nd Melissa Stigenwalt on 11 Dec 1872 in Cedar Township, Wilson Co., Kansas. (Note, from posted family trees, it appears that her maiden name was Black. She was previously married to George Stigenwalt).

1875 Kansas State Census: Cedar Wilson County, Kansas: Calvin Streets (age 48, born Ohio, farmer, from Iowa to Kansas), Millissa Streets (age 34), Tolbert Streets (age 18), F. J. Streets (female, age 13), D. Streets (female, age 9), A. Stiginwalt (male, age 9), Ira Streets (age 7), A. Streets (male, age 4).

1880 Census: Cedar, Wilson County, Kansas: Calvin Streets, (age 53, farmer, born Ohio), wife Malissa Streets (age 40, born Ohio), son Willard Streets (age 25, born Iowa), son Tolbert Streets (age 28, born Iowa), daughter Ferbie J. Streets (age 18), born Iowa) daughter Delia Streets (age 14, born Iowa), daughter Abagail Streets (age 9, born Kansas), son Charly Streets (age 4, born Kansas) and son Amos Streets (age 2, born Kansas

Calvin Streets died July 4, 1892 and is buried in Hatler Cemetery, Wilson County, Kansas

Obituary found on Find a Grave

Calvin Streets
Company E, 27th Iowa Infantry
Altoona Journal, Friday, July 15, 1892, Pg. 2
Volume V, No. 31

A Pioneer.

Calvin Street died at his residence in Cedar township, Monday, July 4th, 1892, of paralysis, aged 66. His health had not been good for some years. Last spring he moved to Oklahoma but returned as he grew worse. Two strikes of paralysis brought him to the brink and death was expected. The funeral occurred from the residence Tuesday at 11 a. m. conducted by the Altoona lodge A. F. and A. M. Elder Thos. Miller preached a short and appropriate sermon and the remains were interred in the Hatler cemetery after the rites of the lodge. The deceased was also a member of the G. A. R. and the obsequies were attended and assisted in by members of that organization.

Mr. Street is survived by wife (his second) and ten children, six sons and four daughters, most of whom are grown.

Calvin Street was a native of Ohio, from whence he removed to Iowa. During the rebellion he did service for his country as a member of company E, 27th Iowa Infantry. He enlisted May 22, 1862, and was discharged June 7, 1862, and was discharged June 7, 1865. A year or more of that time he was confined as a prisoner of war at Cohaugah, Alabama.

He was a pioneer of Wilson county. In 1869 he settled in Cedar township on the farm of 160 acres on which he so long resided. He became well situated in this world’s goods, but erstwhile friends left him financially embarrassed in his later years. However, he left his family the provision of $2,000 life insurance. In all his relations with his fellow men he was above reproach. All the old settlers know him and without exception say he was a good man and a generous neighbor.

U. S. Veterans Gravesites: Calvin Streets, Service: U. S. Army; Birth Date: Mar. 12, 1826. Death Date: July 4, 1892; Cemetery: Hatler Cemetery; Cemetery Address: Wilson County, Fredonia, KS 66736.

His widow Melissa Street filed for a pension On April 11, 1894 in Kansas.

National Archives, The National Archives.

"Widow's Application for Pension

Widow - Melissa Stigenwalt (married Calvin on 11 Dec. 1872; Cedar Township, Wilson Co., Kansas) Husband Calvin Street(s) died 4 Jul 1892, at his home at Altoona, Wilson Co., Kansas Military Service - Company E., 27th Iowa Infantry

In application - his widow stated both Calvin Streets and herself had been previously married - Calvin's 1st wife had died on 30 Dec. 1871 - Melissa's first husband had died on 16 Apr 1866.

Children's names of Calvin and Melissa:

Ernest P. Street(s) b. 12 Oct 1881
Nora Bell Street(s) b. 11 Sep. 1883
Luther A. Street(s) b. 3 Apr. 1878

Signed her name as Melissa Streets (with an 's') on the end...
Application dated 5 Apr 1894


Marriage License (copy)

Calvin Street of Wilson Co, Kansas aged 45 years Melissa Stigenwalt of Wilson Co, Kansas aged 30 years Married 11 Dec 1872 at Wilson Co, Kansas (at the Stigenwalt residence) by E. L. Dunbar, Justice of the Peace


Enlisted 22 Aug 1862 - Company E, 27th Iowa Infantry Volunteer Regiment Discharged 7 Jun 1865 Was a Prisoner of War 1864 - 1865 - kept in prison camp in Alabama - captured Olive Branch, Mississippi 28 Aug 1864. Released 18 Apr 1865.


Declaration For Original Invalid Pension (dated 1 Jun 1886)

Lived in Iowa after discharge from 1865-1869; then Cedar Township, Wilson County, Kansas (post office Altoona, Kansas).
Occupation - Farmer."
Civil War Soldier Pension Records.

Children of Calvin Streets and Susan Sloper:

  1. Ellen Streets, born 20 May 1850 in Iron Hill, Jackson, Iowa, USA
  2. Hulda Streets, born 19 Jul 1852 in Iron Hill, Jackson, Iowa, USA
  3. Willard Streets, born 23 May 1854 in Iron Hill, Jackson, Iowa, USA
  4. Tolbert Streets, born 18 Sep 1855 in Iron Hill, Jackson, Iowa, USA
  5. Ferby Streets, born 1862 in Iron Hill, Jackson, Iowa, USA
  6. Adelia Elizabeth Streets, born 25 May 1865 in Altoona, Wilson, Kansas, USA
  7. Ira Streets, born 15 Jan 1869 in Iron Hill, Jackson, Iowa, USA
  8. Susan Abigail Streets, born 1870 in Cedar Township, Wilson, Kansas, USA
  9. Calvin Streets, born 1871 in Wilson, [county], Kansas, USA

Children of Calvin Streets and Melissa Stigenwalt

  1. Charles A Streets, born 1875 in Cedar Township, Wilson, Kansas, USA
  2. Ernest Pearl Streets, born 12 Oct 1878 in Altoona, Wilson, Kansas, USA
  3. Luther Amos Streets, born 2 Apr 1881 in Altoona, Wilson, Kansas, USA
  4. Nora Belle Streets, born 11 Sep 1883 in Altoona, Wilson, Kansas, USA

Melissa (Stigenwalt) Streets (born Feb. 14, 1844) died Mar. 21, 1928.


Thalenhorst, Henry He was born Jan. 16, 1833 in Germany.

1880 Census; Iowa Hospital for the Insane, Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa; H. Thalenhorst, age 45, single, born Germany)

1900 Census: Iowa Hospital for Insane, Page County, Iowa: Henry Thalenhorst (age 48, single, born Prussia).

A pension was filed for him on Aug. 8, 1901 in Iowa, by Guardian

1910 Census: Center, Henry County, Iowa; Mt. Pleasant State Hospital for Insane: Henry Thalenhorst, inmate, age 77, single, born Prussia)

Henry C. Thalenhorst died August 10, 1911 and is buried in Wapello Cemetery, Lot 20, Louisa County, Iowa. Note: He shares a headstone with Rev. Carl Thalenhorst and his wife Wilhelmina. Carl may be his brother. There is only a year's difference in their age, so he is not his father.

Henry County, Iowa State Hospital Deaths, Abstracted from Henry Co. Death Records Book 3: Henry Thalenhorst, age 78 years, single, laborer, born Prussia, died August 10, 1911, buried Wapello, Iowa on August 12, 1911.


Tromblee, Paul He was born about 1828 in New York. He married Nancy Catherine Wadsworth.

June 24, 1885 List of Civil War Veteran in Kossuth County, Iowa: Paul Tromblee, Co. E, 27th Iowa

Paul Tromblee died Jan 10, 1905 and is buried in Pleasant Grove Cemetery, McGregor, Clayton County, Iowa

His widow Nancy C. Tromblee filed for a pension on March 9, 1905.

1905 Iowa State Census, McGregor, Clayton County Iowa: Nancy Tromblee, Louis Tromblee, Melvina Tromblee and Roy Tromblee.


Tyler, Arza Harrison He was born July 19, 1840 in St. Lawrence County, New York. He was the son of Walter Tyler (and possibly Susan Choler). He married Sarah Hunt Dennis on Apr. 25, 1867 in Prairie Du Chein, Wisconsin.

Arza Harrison Tyler Letter
Submitted by Scott T. Grant

Here is the letter from Arza Harrison Tyler. It's to his brother Joseph, when he was at Camp Read, Tennessee, in March of 1863.

I have attached the text. The ???? question marks in the text are where the text was illegible. This was transcribed for our family by a woman who holds the original letter, that her g-g-grandfather Joseph received from Arza. She sent the transcribed text of the letter to us as follows.


Camp Read near Jackson, Tenn March the 28 1863

Dear Brother it is only a few days since I wrote to you, but as I could send a letter up there by Edward Ashline who has got his discharge and is going to start for home Monday I thought I would send a few lines by him to let you know that I am well and hope this will find you the same. I suppose you have seen Sam Benjamin by this time and he can tell you a great deal more than I can write, we had a very heavy rain last night but the weather is fine today we have had some very warm days here, nearly as warm as any we had in Iowa last summer, but the weather is cool now. The fruit trees are in full bloom and the forest is getting quite green the singing of the birds in a clear morning is really delightful. The grass is growing nicely and is large enough so that the cattle can get a good living. The talk is that we are doing to be paid off in a few days but I don't know whether we will or not, we have heard that so often and never seen any money, but I hope it may be true for there are a great many men in our regt. That their families need the money for their support and when men have left their homes and friends and all the comforts and blessings of a peaceful quiet home and offered their service and their lives in defense of their country and her rights, I think they ought to have what little pay is promised them.

There is some talk of our being mounted onto horses but we don't know yet whether we will or not. That would suit the most of the boys but it would not quite suit me ??? I can stand riding better than I used to, you remember about how I could stand riding that time we rode from ??? over to Rufuses last summer.

Joseph it may be that you have some notion of enlisting. If you have I would advise you to keep out of the army but you need not say anything about this advise nor let anyone read it. I can't think of anything more to write this time. I want you to write me a long letter as soon as you get this and write all of the news.

Oly sends his respects to you all.

From Arza H. Tyler

To Joseph Tyler

1870 Census: Mendon, Clayton county, Iowa; Arza Tyler (age 30, born New York), Sarah Tyler (age 25, born New York), Maud Tyler (age 5, born Iowa) and Henry Tyler (age 9/12, born Iowa)

1880 Census: Clayton, Clayton county, Iowa; Arza Tyler (age 40, farmer, born New York), wife Sarah Tyler (age 38, born New York)

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: Under 27th Iowa: A. H. Tyler, Private, Co. E, Post Office: National.

1885 Iowa State Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Arsa H. Tyler (Township 94, Range 4, Section 13, NE NE, age 44, tenant), Sarah H. Tyler (age 41, born New York), Edward Tyler (age 11), Mary Tyler (age 9), Grace Tyler (age 7), and Ralph Tyler (age 5). The children were all born in Clayton County, Iowa.

Arza Tyler filed for a pension on July 29, 1890 in Iowa.

Arza Tyler died Nov. 23, 1892 and is buried in National/Farmersburg Cemetery, Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa

His widow Sarah H. Tyler filed for a pension on Dec. 30, 1892 in Iowa.

1905 U. S. City Directory Cheyenne, Wyoming: Sarah H. Tyler (wid. Arza H.), bds 315 E. 10th.

Sarah (Dennis) Tyler died Jan. 22, 1912 in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Children of Arza Harrison Tyler and Sarah Hunt Dennis:

  1. Currie Tyler b: BEF. 1870
  2. Henry Harrison Tyler b: ABT. 1870 in Clayton Co., Iowa
  3. Edward Walter Tyler b: AFT. 1871
  4. Charles Napoleon Tyler b: 17 MAR 1871 in National, Iowa
  5. Mary Christina Tyler b: AFT. 1872
  6. Grace Udella Tyler b: 12 JUL 1877
  7. Harley Tyler b: AFT. 1880
  8. Ralph Lee Tyler b: 26 OCT 1880 in National, Iowa
  9. Perry Tyler b: AFT. 1881

Tyler, William He was born about 1824 in Vermont. He married Charlotte M. Nichols.

WILLIAM ORANGE TYLER-One of the early settlers in Hall County, was the late W. O. Tyler, who owned and operated a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres, situated in section eight, South Platte township. This farm is well improved and still remains in the possession of the Tyler family.

W. O. Tyler was born in Orion, Michigan, August 3, 1845, and came to Hall County, in 1870. His parents were William E. and Charlotte (Nichols) Tyler, who removed from Michigan to Iowa where the family retained residence until 1871 when removal was made to Hall County. Here Mr. Tyler homesteaded and continued on his land until 1884. W. O. Tyler took up a homestead in Hall County, which he developed, and as long as his state of health permitted, was active in its improvement. In 1881, however, his health broke down completely and he was forced to retire from the farm and finally, as stated above, went to California, where he spent three years. Mr. Tyler died in California, June 17, 1886.

After a short stay in Nebraska, Mr. Tyler returned to Iowa and soon afterword married Miss Mary F. White. Her parents were John and Mary C. (Thrift) White, who were natives of North Carolina. They moved to Indiana in 1863, where they remained until 1867, when they came to Iowa, where Mr. White bought one hundred and sixty acres of land that he developed into a valuable property. Following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Tyler settled in the Hall County and this has been her home ever since. She is well known in this section and is very highly esteemed. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Tyler: Retson, who was born in 1875, is unmarried; and Estella, the wife of Milo Karr. Mr. and Mrs. Karr have the following children: Helen, Lavern, Ada, Glenn and Lloyd, all of whom are attending school except the youngest.

Transcribed by Larry Coates.

Elm Island Grange was organized at the Union school, March 6, 1874, with the following-named members: W. H. Austin, E. J. Morse, Charles Watson, T. J. and Mary Peck, S. Uhrig, William E. Tyler, R. G. Hackett, G. H. and Orilla E. Wilcox, O. F. and Malinda Foote, Ira and Mary A. Wilson, S. W. and Hattie Wilson, George H. and Mary E. Wilcox, J. A. and Mary Mattick, William Lehrich, E. N. and Mary A. Adams, Ira Wilson, Walter and Sarah Miller, James H. and H. M. Sweeting.

1890 History of Hall County, Chapter XXV


The advisory committee of the Hall County Association, appointed at organization in November, 1874, comprised William Stolley, W; H. Platt, Henry Garn, Claus Stoltenburg, James Jackson, Squire Lamb, E. C. Walker, S. M. Walker, G. G. Warner, D. O. Grice, N. S. Dempster, W. W. Mitchell, H. Newton, Henry Streator, J. H. Leonard Varney, George J. Spencer, W. E. Tyler, G. H. Wilcox, W. H. Austin, O, H. Taylor, Martin Skinner, F. E. Smith, D. E. Smith, W. J. Burger, James M. Ply, Theodore Sherzburg, A. J. Leckenby, L. E. Frink, Z. B. Partridge, J. C. Moore, H. Bliss, J. A. Williams, Thomas J. Peck, C. L. Alford, E. A. Edwards, Edward Searson, E. Harris, Martin Ennis, Thomas Francis, R. H. Newcomb, James McCleary, Henry Bonson, M. M. Foote, John H. Powers and B.F. Odell. The appointments were made in the order of school districts, or from No. 1 to No. 47 inclusive.

1890 History of Hall County, Chapter XXV

1850 Census: Oxford, Oakland County, Michigan; William Tilor (age 33, farmer, born NY), Charlotte (age 26, born NY), Elizabeth Tilor (age 10, born NY), Juliann Tilor (age 9, born New York,), William Tilor (age 6, born Michigan) and Malinda Tilor (age 3, born Michigan)

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Wm. Tyler (age 46, born New York), C. M. Tyler (age 40, born New York), Eliza Tyler (age 19, born New York), Julia Tyler (age 15, born New York), Wm Tyler (age 15, born New York), Casius Tyler (age 8, born New York), Welthy Tyler (female, age 6, born New York), Rosaline Tyler (age 2).

1880 Census, Martinsville, Hall County, Nebraska: William Tyler (age 63, farmer, born Vermont), Scharlott Tyler (age 56, born New York), daughter Julia Tyler (age 37, born New York), daughter Rosa Tyler (age 22, born Iowa) and mother-in-law Elsie Nichols (age 80, born Canada).

William E. Tyler filed for a pension on Aug. 15, 1881 in Nebraska (334,851)

1890 Veterans Census: Doniphan, Hall County, Nebraska: William E. Tyler, Private, Co. E, 27th IA Inf. Enlisted Nan 25, 1864, discharged Jan. 25, 1865. Service Length: 11 months, 25 days. Post Office: Doniphan, NE.

There is a conflict in his date of death. The Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War have a date of death of Nov. 13, 1897. The Hall County, Nebraska website has a date of Jan 1, 1897. His Widow Scharlotte (Charlotte) filed for a pension on December 16, 1897, so either of the dates could be correct. I have no way of determining which one is right (I would lean towards the Nov. 13, 1897 simply because most of the widows filed for a pension within a month or so of the soldier's death)..

William Tyler is buried in Cedar View Cemetery, Doniphan, Hall County, Nebraska, Lot 69, Section 18

Charlotte M. Tyler (born March 30, 1823), died Aug. 18, 1899 and is also buried in Cedar View Cemetery, Doniphan, Hall County, Nebraska.


Van Zandt, Samuel He was born Aug. 26, 1842 in New York. He was the son of Isaac Van Zandt and Rachel Norton. He married Mary Elizabeth Chapman.

1850 Census: Potter, Yates County, New York: Isaac Van Zant (age 34, farmer), Rachael Van Zant (age 33), Eleanor Van Zant (age 13), and Samuel Van Zant (age 7)

1865 New York State Census, Town of Potter: Charity Van Zandt 2/124; Isaac M. Van Zandt 2/124; and Samuel N. Van Zandt 2/124

1870 Census, Troy, Geauga County, Ohio: Samuel Van Zant (age 27, farmer, born New York), Lida Van Zant (age 24), Rachel Van Zant (age 52, born New Jersey) and Isaac Van Zant (age 53, born New York)

1880 Census: Troy, Geauga County, Ohio: Samuel M. Van Zandt (age 37, farmer, born New York,), wife, Lida M. Van Zandt (age 34, born Ohio)

1900 Census: Troy, Geauga County, Ohio: Samuel Van Zant (born Aug. 1842, married 30 years born New York), wife Eliza Van Zant (born Sept. 1845, age 54, married 30 years, 0 children born, born Ohio) mother Rachel Van Zant (born Apr. 1818, age 81, Widowed, 1 child born, 1 still living, born New Jersey) (indexed as Vangant)

Samuel Van Zandt died Feb. 2. 1909 and is buried in Troy Township Cemetery, Lot 41, Grave 4, US Route 422, Troy, Geauga County, Ohio

His widow Eliza Van Zandt filed for a pension on Mar. 9, 1909. in Ohio.

Mary Eliza (Chapman) Van Zandt died in 1927. She is buried in Troy Township Cemetery, Lot 41, Grave 3,Troy, Geauga County, Ohio.

Van Zandt Burials in Troy Township Cemetery

Isaac S. VanZandt, father, 1817-1903, Lot 41, Grave 1
Rachel S. VanZandt, mother, 1808-1907, Lot 41, Grave 2 *
Samuel VanZandt, (Aug. 26, 1842 - Feb. 2, 1909), Lot 41, Grave 4, Co .E 27 Regt Iowa, wife Mary Elizabeth Chapman
Mary Elizabeth VanZandt, (1845 - 1927), Lot 41, Grave 3.

*Family tree information on Ancestry.com for Rachel shows a year of birth of 1818 and a maiden name of Norton.


Wallace, Hiram Lester He was born Jan. 30, 1843 In New York. He was the son of Lester and Cynthia Wallace. He married Clara Ann Brain on Oct. 2, 1867 in Elkader, Clayton County, Iowa. She was born Jan 31, 1851 in Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio. She was the daughter of James Brain and Eliza Elsie Sanborn.

1850 Census: Mendon, Clayton County, Iowa: Lester Wallace (age 41, born Canada), Cynthia Wallace (age 43), Dexolancy Wallace (female, age 15), Laura L. Wallace (age 13), Polly L. Wallace (age 10), Hiram Wallace (age 7), and Minerva T. Wallace (age 3). (all children born in New York).

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Lester Wallace (age 51,farmer, born Canada), Cynthia Wallace (age 51, born Canada), Daniel Wallace (age 21, farmer, born New York), Polly Wallace (age 19, born New York), Hiram Wallace (age 17, born New York), June Wallace (age 13, born New York) and Marian Wallace (age 1, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Graham Lake, Nobles County, Minnesota: Hiram L. Wallace (age 34, farmer, born New York), wife Clara Wallace (age 29, born Ohio), daughter Mary Wallace (age 10, born Iowa), son James Wallace (age 7, born Minnesota), daughter Gertrude (age 4, born Minnesota) and father Lester Wallace, (age 72, widowed, born Canada)

Hiram Wallace filed for a pension on July 21, 1891 in Minnesota.

1900 Census: District 25, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington: Hiram L. Wallace (born Jan. 1843, age 57, carpenter, married 33 years, born New York), daughter Gertrude Wallace (born Jan. 1876, age 24, born Minnesota, father born New York, mother born Ohio)

1910 Census: Cle Elum Ward 1, Kittitas County, Washington: Hiram Wallace (age 67, widowed, born New York, laborer, sidework).

Hiram Wallace died Oct. 6, 1913 in Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Laurel Hill Memorial Park, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington.

Note: there is a discrepancy in his date of death: Pension Index record has Oct. 16, 1913. Find a Grave has Oct. 9, 1914. Family trees have Oct. 9, 1913 AND Oct. 9, 1903 (the 1903 date is most likely a typo. He was on the 1910 Census).

Children of Hiram Wallace and Clara Ann Brain:

  1. Mary Jane Wallace, born Oct. 23, 1872 in Alcada, Iowa
  2. James L. Wallace, born Jan 23, 1873 in Grahams Lake, Nobles County, Minnesota
  3. Gertrude M. Wallace, born Jan. 22, 1876 in Grahams Lake, Nobles County, Minnesota.

Walleser, Henry He was born March 23, 1844 (1900 census says Mar. 1845), in Germany. He was the son of Mathew (1818-12/21/1904) and Rosena Reister/Riester (1817 - 10/30/1891). Henry Walleser married Anna Fredericka Dickman. She was the daughter of Herman Heinrich Dickman (Sept. 19, 1816 - Aug. 27, 1893) and Johanna Dorothea Friedrike Winstering (Apr. 20, 1820 - 1870).

Matthias Walleser came to Philadelphia in 1846. He was born Sept.-19-1818 in Schwarzwald, Baden , Germany. His wife was Rosina Reister (Riester) of Munstertal, Baden, Germany, born 7-29-1817. They were married in 1843. Their first son was Henry H. Walleser born Mar-23-1844 in Baden. I picked this info up from a previous researcher who has died and I do not know where they found this information. At the current time there are several Walleser's living in Wieden, Baden, Germany and the surrounding towns which I believe is where Matthias came from. I also believe he was an only son, orphaned at an early age and spent time with an uncle and with a man named Mr. C Schockland and they worked in a Blacksmiths trade. It says he traveled trough Switzerland and returned to his hometown to get married.

Posted 2/5/2001 on the Baden-Wurttemberg-L Archives

Note, Nellie Walleser was the sister of Henry H. Walleser

On the 9th of July, 1884, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Herman C. Kuenzel to Miss Nellie Walleser, who likewise was born and reared at Garnavillo, a representative of another of the 'honored pioneer families of the county. She is a daughter of Matthew and Rosina (Riester) Walleser, both natives of Germany and both now deceased. Of their children she was the seventh in order of birth, and concerning the others the following brief record is consistently entered: Henry is deceased; Frances (Francis?) is a resident of Nashua, Chickasaw county; Emil maintains his home at Garnavillo; Elizabeth is the wife of Theodore J. Krasinsky, of this place; Rosina is the wife of William Schumacher, of Garnavillo, where also resides Joseph, the next in order of birth; and Anna is the wife of Henry Kuenzel, their home being in the city of Dubuque.

Source: History of Clayton County, Iowa; From The Earliest Historical Times Down to the Present;
by Realto E. Price, Vol. II; pg. 234-235, 1916 - submitted by S. Ferral

1856 Iowa State Census, Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Mathas Wallesser (age 37, born Baden, blacksmith), Rosina Wallesser (age 39), Henry Wallesser (age 12), Emanel Wallesser (age 9), Francis Wallesser (age 7), Louisa Wallesser (age 5), Rosina Wallesser (age 2) and Joseph Wallesser (age 1).

1860 Census: Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Mathew Walleser (age 42, black smith, born Baden), Rosena Walleser (age 42, born Baden), Henry Walleser (age 16, born Baden), Emil Walleser (age 13, born Pennsylvania), Frances Walleser (age 10, born Pennsylvania), Elizabeth Walleser (age 9,born Pennsylvania), Rosena Walleser (age 7, born Pennsylvania), Joseph Walleser (age 5, born Iowa), and Hellen Walleser (age 2, born Iowa).

1870 Census; Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa: Herman Dickman (age 43, farmer, born Hanover), Hannah Dickman (age 40), Mena Dickman (age 16), Henry Willaser (age 28, blacksmith, born Penn.), Anna Willaser (age 20), Margaret Willaser (age 6/12) Jacob Berter (or Bieter) (age 77, invalid, old age) and James Hamilton (age 20, farm laborer).

1880 Census; Bradford, Chickasaw County, Iowa: Henry Wallisir (age 36, blacksmith, born Baden), wife Annie Wallisir (age 29), son Henry Wallisir (age 12), daughter Gertie Wallisir (age 10), daughter Martha Wallisir (age 8), daughter Laura Wallisir (age 5), daughter Lizzie Wallisir (age 2), daughter No Name Wallisier (age 1), and Father-in-law Henry Dickman (age 65, farmer, born Hanover

Henry Walleser, proprietor wagon and blacksmith shop, Greenwood, Iowa, established business in '74; was born in Baden in Germany, in '46, at the age of two years he came to America with his parents, and located in Philadelphia, Pa., where he remained until '55, when he removed to Clayton County, Iowa, and in '70, he again moved to Chickasaw County, and located in Nashua, where he was engaged in the foundry for some time. He served in the army one year and four months, in company E, twenty-seventh Iowa volunteer infantry, and was honorably discharged at Montgomery, Alabama, and mustered out there, Was united in marriage to Annie F. Dickerman, a native of Clayton county, and they have six children Henry, Gertie, Martha, Laura, Elizabeth and Joseph.

(History of Chickasaw and Howard Counties, Iowa. By W. W. Alexander, published 1883)

1885 Iowa State Census: Bradford, Chickasaw County, Iowa: Henry Waleser (age 40, blacksmith), Ann F. Walleser (age 36), Henry L. Walleser (age 17), Gertie Walleser (age 15), Martha Walleser (age 13), Laura Walleser (age 11), Lizzie Walleser (age 9), Minnie Walleser (age 5) and Joseph Walleser (age 2).

April 20, 1899 The Walleser Home Burns - The Walleser home is burning down - was a report that sent a thrill of horror through the entire community last Tuesday afternoon. Such a misfortune to this excellent family was felt with sincere regret by everyone in this vicinity. That home and its contents meant years of labor at the forge by the father, and equally as many years of constant toil in the family by the noble wife and mother. It meant months and years of time spent by the girls as teachers in our town and country schools, and the contributions of the boys from their earnings in business. It meant the blowing away in smoke and ashes of the life work of a family who had labored together as families seldom do, and the sight was one to bring tears of regret to those who watched the cruel flames consume that which had been purchased at a price so dear. The fire caught in the upper story and the contents of that part of the home, which included bedding, furniture and the clothing of the family, together with $20 in money belonging to Miss Laura, were entirely consumed. The contents of the lower part of the house were saved by the heroic efforts of neighbors and friends who came quickly to the rescue.

The Nashua Reporter, Nashua, Iowa Bits and Pieces


May 11, 1899 Home and Abroad -- There were some fears among Mr. Walleser's people when their home burned three weeks ago that the insurance had run out. "Hiney" now informs us, after some correspondence, that they will be able to get some $800 insurance, which will be glad tidings to their friends.

The Nashua Reporter, Nashua, Iowa Bits and Pieces

1900 Census: Bradford Chickasaw County, Iowa: Henry Walleser (born Mar. 1845, age 55, married 32 years, born Germany, immigrated 1847, in US 53 years, naturalized, blacksmith), wife Anna F. Waleser (born Sept. 1849, age 50, married 22 years, 11 children born, 10 still living, born Iowa), daughter Lizzie C. Walleser (born May 1877, age 23, born Iowa, school teacher), Mina B. Walleser (born June 1878, age 21, born Iowa, School teacher), son Joe G. Walleser (born Sept. 1881, age 19, born Iowa), son Charles E. Walleser (born Oct. 1883, age 16, born Iowa), son Earnest L. Walleser (born June 1888, age 11, born Iowa), daughter Florence F. Walleser (born Oct. 1893, age 6, born Iowa).

8/8/1907 Family Gathering- There was a family reunion of the Walleser family Sunday at the home of Henry Walleser in honor of the homecoming of their son Joseph G. Walleser. The gathering was principally to bring the family together that they might all have the pleasure of visiting with the son and brother who had been abroad for the past three years and who had so much of interest to tell them. Those who were present aside from Mr. Walleser's family who are at home were the families of R. R. Waite and C. W. Thompson, and Melvin Ellis, of Charles City.

1910 Census: Bradford, Chickasaw County, Iowa: Henry Walleser (age 67, married 1 time for 44 years, born Germany, immigrated 1846, naturalized, blacksmith), wife Anna F. Walleser (age 62, married 1 time for 44 years, 10 children born, 9 still living, born Iowa)) and daughter Florence Walleser (age 17, born Iowa).

Henry Walleser Breaks Leg.

A serious accident befell Henry Walleser last Thursday evening when on his return home from town he fell down on Greenwood bridge and fractured both bones of his right leg.

Mr. Walleser was in town shopping that afternoon and not getting a chance to ride home, started to walk the distance. In crossing Greenwood bridge his foot went through a hole in the plank and he was thrown violently enough to the floor for a compound fracture, which was so bad that the bones protruded just above the ankle. Joe Merritt coming along in a cutter shortly after, noticed his horse pricking up its ears at something in the road, apparently a dog or something. He got out to investigate and found Mr. Walleser on his hands and knees getting toward home as best he could. Joe helped the injured man into his cutter and took him home, summoning a doctor immediately after. Besides the setting of the two bones, several stitches were necessary to close the gash made by the protruding of the bones.

Mr. Walleser has been suffering quite a deal of pain but that doesn't bother him so much as being laid up and not able to work.

Nashua Reporter, February 1, 1912

Henry Walleser died Mar. 7, 1913 and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Nashua, Chickasaw Co, Iowa., Lot 3, Bk. 55

Note, when this newspaper was scanned it was very faint and very difficult to read. I have transcribed it to the best of my ability. I put ? where I simply could not read it. ejj

Henry Walleser

Henry Walleser was born March 23 ? in ? Baden, Germany, the oldest son of Mathias and Rosina Walleser. In 1846 (?) the family came to the United States, living for a few years in Philadelphia and in 1855 removed to Garnavillo, Clayton County, Iowa, where he grew to manhood and married Anna Dickman. He came to Nashua in 1870 (?) and a few years later moved his family to the home in Greenwood where he resided continually until his decease Mar. 7. 1913, caused directly from uremic poisoning.

His widow and family of ten children H. M. Walleser of Charles City, Mrs. R. R. Waite of Nashua, Mrs. John P. Waterbury of Parker, S. Dak, Mrs. Hugh H. West of Elgin, Ill, Mrs. C. W. Thompson of Gary, S. Dak, Mrs. Melvin W. Ellis, Charles City, Joseph G. Walleser, of Grinnell, Charles E. Walleser of Duluth, Minn. Ernest Walleser of Charles City, and Florence Walleser of Nashua survive him and were present at the burial.

For nearly 40 years he carried on his blacksmith business at Greenwood. From out of his shop he could look out upon the public school in which he always took great interest, believing a good school to be the basis of good citizenship and made it the important part of his life work to provide for his children the opportunities of obtaining a good education.

He served as a volunteer in Company E of the 27th Iowa during the last two years of the war of the Rebellion under General A. J. Smith, taking part of the Missouri Campaign and in the battles of Nashville and Mobile. He was a member of the Nashua G. A. R. Post, which participated in his funeral services. The Great Commander had called him and he listened. He was a loving and (?) father and an honorable citizen. Wholly unselfish he toiled and ? for others. His life was a ?, love was everywhere in abundance.

The funeral services were from the home Sunday afternoon at 2:00 conducted by Rev. Whitten, of Charles City. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery.

Nashua Reporter, March 20, 1913.


Resolutions of Condolence

Whereas, Our Devine Ruler has called from our ranks Henry Walleser, late a member of Co. E. 27th Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry, therefore be it

RESOLVED, that we, the members of Geo. W. S. Dodge Post No. 132 Department of Iowa, G .A. R., tender to his bereaved and sorrowing family our sincere sympathy in this, their time of sorrows. Be it further

RESOLVED That these resolutions be published in our weekly papers and placed upon our Post records.

By Order of COMMITTEE.

His widow Anna Walleser filed for a pension on May 14, 1913.

Anna F. (Dickman) Walleser (born Sept. 4, 1849) died Aug. 8, 1916 in Elgin, Illinois.


Welch, Barnabas He was born about July 1846 in Canada.

1870 Census: Bryon, Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin: Barnabas Welch (age 27, born Canada, farm laborer).

1900 Census: San Jose, Santa Clara County, California: Barney Welch, (lodger, born July 1846, age 53, Single, born Canada, immigrated 1852, in US 48 years, naturalized, farm laborer)

He filed for a pension on March. 31, 1904 in California.

1910 Census: San Jose Ward 4, Santa Clara County, California: Barnabas Welch (age 68, single, born Canada, immigrated 1852, naturalized, general work).

1920 Census: San Jose, Santa Clara County, California: Barnabas Welch, (lodger, age 74, single, immigrated 1852, naturalized, born Canada, laborer, Ferret ranch)

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteers Soldiers, Sawtelle, Los Angeles, California, Pacific Branch - Barnabas Welch, MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 14, 1862, Rank P, Company and Regiment: E, 27th Ia. Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: Aug. 8, 1865, Clinton Iowa. Cause of Discharge: M. O. Disabilities when admitted to the home: Pyorrhea. Left eye enucleated-defective vision, chro. bronchitis. Chro. myocarditis. DOMESTIC History: Where born Kansas(?), Age 77, Height 5'8', complexion fair, blue eyes, grey hair, can read and write, religion: prot. Occupation Laborer. Residence subsequent to discharge: San Diego, Calif. Single. Name and address of nearest relative: M. C. Clark. 5805 Carpenter Street. Chicago, Ill. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: $50.00. Date of Admission: Oct. 24, 1923. Date of Death: Nov. 2, 1926. Cause of death: Cerebral Hemorrhage, Gen. Arterio sclerosis. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate: 1-084-245. Location of Grave and Remarks: 51-A-27. Effects: $51.00. Shipped Feb. 7, 1927 to Rhoda W. Hickens, sister.

Barnabas Welch died Nov. 2, 1926 and is buried in Los Angeles National Cemetery, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, Plot 51, 27, R A.


Wilcox, Hiram: He was born Apr. 7, 1833, in Great Valley, Cattaraugus Co., NY. He was the son of Seamour Wilcox (Apr 26, 1808 - Oct. 5, 1887) and Sally C. Sargent (Dec. 28, 1870 - Apr. 7, 1875). He married Ann Dorleska Hinman on Feb. 13, 1856 in Great Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York ( U.S. and International Marriage Records): Hiram Thomas Wilcox, male, born NY, Birth year 1833. Spouse Name: Ann Dorleska Hinman, born NY, Spouse Birth Year, 1835, Marriage Year: 1856. ) She was the daughter of John and Polly Hinman.

Hiram Wilcox Hiram Wilcox Hiram Wilcox Family


The photo on the far left was submitted by Dennis R. Davis. The other two photos of Hiram Thomas Wilcox and his family were found on Find a Grave. Tintype of Wilcox Family: Wife Ann (Hinman) Wilcox, Daughter Alma Wilcox, and Husband Hiram Wilcox.

Hiram Wilcox died Nov. 24, 1862 from Black Measles and Pneumonia. He is buried in Mound City National Cemetery, Mound City, IL. Section E. Site 3944.

His widow Ann D. Wilcox married Alphones Ames on Sept. 29, 1864

D. Ames filed for a pension for a minor on Feb. 19, 1865. Information from the minors pension file is extracted below:

Dorlesea A. Ames a resident of Little Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York, age 29, made an application for the minor child of Hiram Wilcox, Allina Jane Wilcox a minor child under 16 years of age, whose father was a private in Company E, commanded by Capt. Drips in the 27th Regiment of Iowa Volunteers in the War of 1861, and that he died at Cairo Illinois on the 24th day of Nov., 1862. His death was caused by measles.

Dorlesea Ann Wilcox remarried on the 29th day of September, 1864 to Alphonse Ames and that the date of birth of his said ward is as follows:

Allina Jane Wilcox only child left by said Hiram Wilcox was born on the 14th day of July 1858 at Great Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York. She further declares that the parents of his said ward were married at Great Valley NY on the 13th day of February in the year of 1856 by Leroy Chamberlain, a J. P. Her said child Allina Jane Wilcox resides at Little Valley < New York.


U.S. General Hospital
Mound City, Ills., Dec. 8, 1862

Mrs. A. D. Wilcox

By some strange mistake I sent you a receipt for the effects of a stranger to you. Your husband died in this hospital Nov. 24, of pneumonia and was buried in his uniform in the Soldier's Cemetery. Enclosed you will find a receipt for his effects which, if you will sign and return the articles will be sent you by express.

Deeply sympathizing with you in your loss and hoping you may find comfort in the Christian faith, I remain

Yours respectfully
S. S. Morrill, Chaplain


Camp Read, near Jackson, Tenn
Jan 23, 1863

Mrs. Hiram Wilcox

Madam

I hope that you do not consider us unmindful of our duties because we have not before this late day mentioned the sad event of your lamented husband's death. The facts are these: He was taken sick soon after we got to Cairo, but not considered to be dangerous until he had been in the Regimental Hospital two or three days. We then sent a man to take especial care of him and he continued to grow better until the day we were ordered to Memphis. He was then removed to the Mound City Hospital. We were thrown into the field immediately on our arrival at Memphis, and owing to our communications being cut off we did not get a mail until about the 25th of Dec. Then we learned by letter received from my wife that Mr. Wilcox was no more. We immediately wrote to the Director of the Hospital and obtained the following: "Hiram Wilcox entered U.S. Gen. Hospital, Mound City Illinois Nov. 21 and died Nov. 24th of pneumonia". This is all the information that we have been able as yet to obtain. We enclose his descriptive roll which will enable you to collect what money may have been due him from the Government.

Any assistance that you may require of the officers of Co. E will be most cheerfully granted.

I remain your humble friend.
Lieut. T. A. Olmsted
Co. E 27 Regt. Iowa Vol. Infty.


Camp Reed, Jackson, Tenn
April 19, 1863

Mrs. Hiram Wilcox
Dear Madam,

We have forwarded to you in care of my brother at Monona 46.25 dollars. It is a gift from the members of Co. E 27th Regt. Iowa Vol. Inft. a token of respect for their late companion in arms.

Your late husband was loved and respected by every member of the company and we wish you to accept this small sum, not because it is money, but for the sake of those who give it.

I remain respectfully yours,

T. A. Olmsted, 1st Lt.
Company E 27th Iowa

1870 Census: Little Valley, Cattaraugus, New York: Alphonse Ames (age 37), Ann D. Ames (age 34), Frank Ames (age 14), Alna Wilcox (age 11), Ella Ames (age 8), George Ames (age 2), Clark Ames (age 1), (Note from online family trees and an obituary for one of her daughters, it appears that Alna Wilcox married her stepbrother Frank Ames.)

Alphonse Ames died Apr. 28, 1872 and is buried in Monona, Clayton County, Iowa.

Ann D. Hinman, (Wilcox/Ames) married Charles Burnham in 1882.

She died Oct. 23, 1899 in Luana, Iowa from Liver Cancer. She is buried in Monona, Clayton County, Iowa.


Wilkie, George McGiffin He was born about 1825 in Canonsburg, Washington, PA. He was the son of Samuel Wilkie (1894 - July 4, 1839) and Mary Ann McGiffin (Oct. 27, 1805 - after 1870). He married Sarah Elizabeth Funston on Jan 15, 1846 in Harris, St. Joseph County, Indiana. She was born Nov. 7, 1825 and was the daughter of Jesse Funston (Jan. 3, 1787 - April 18, 1868) and Sarah Templeton (May 5, 1797 - June 9, 1864).

George M. Wilkie Photo was found here. Biography & History

Horace T. Wilkie's family group sheet dated 5 May 1978 records that he was a carpenter. His religious affiliation was Presbyterian. He belonged to Company E, 27th Iowa Volunteers in the Civil War.

Horace T. Wilkie recorded information from the following sources: Wilkie-Wilkey Family letters and Wilkie-Funston letters; from a Maude Grey Barkis; Cecil H. Wilkie of Whitter, Calif.; and from the Theodore A.F. Wilkie Bible.

"From the way the Boyd Book winds up about George M. Wilkie, I think that the Funstons and Wilkie's felt that George had deserted Sarah. But from my standpoint, George was the only one of the sons and brothers-in-laws who joined the Union cause. Maybe I would not have, but he followed his convictions."

"In Theodore A.F. Wilkie's Bible there was loose piece of paper on which George McGiffin Wilkie/Wilkey listed the births of his sons thus:

Eugene Ethan Allan Wilkey born May 14th 1848
Theodore Augustus Franklin Wilkey born March 26th 1850
Norman Eddy Wilkie born March 1852 (He was later known as George)

It would seem that the family had used the Wilkey spelling as Grandfather George (1762-1844) had to receive his pension under that name spelling, and George M. and Washington Wilkie agreed to change back to an original spelling about 1851. It is spelled Wilkey on the gravestone of Samuel Wilkey, the father of George McGiffin Wilkie, in Harris Prairie Cemetery.

1850 Census: Harris, St. Joseph County, Indiana; George M. Wilkie (age 27, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah E. Wilkie (age 25, born PA), Eugene E. A. Wilkie (age 2, born Ind.) and Theodore A. F. Wilkie (age 0, born Ind.).

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: G. M. Wilkie (age 34, Master Carpenter, born Penn.), Sarah Wilkie (age 32), Eugene Wilkie (age 11), Theodore Wilkie (age 9), Norman Wilkie (age 7) and Jesse Wilkie (age 4). (NOTE: This census record shows the entire family born in Penn.).

George McGiffin Wilkie died Jan. 15, 1863 in Fort Pickering, Memphis, Tennessee. He is buried in the Army Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee. (Memphis National Cemetery??)

George Wilkie enlisted at McGregor, Iowa in the 27th Iowa Infantry in August of 1862. His regiment was assembled at Dubuque and in October sent up the Mississippi into Minnesota to help quiet some Indians at Mille Lacs. Then they went down the Mississippi to Cairo. From there he went as a guard with a shipload of prisoners to Vicksburg for exchange. Back at Memphis in December he was assigned to help in the Ft. Pickering Hospital, where he died of a sickness contracted there, January 15, 1863.

His widow Sarah E. Wilkie filed for a pension on Sept. 21, 1863. Information from the pension file is extracted below:

Post Hospital, Fort Pickering
Memphis, Tennessee

Mrs. George M. Wilkey

Dear Ladie

I regret to announce to you the death of your dearly beloved husband G. M. Wilkey who died Jan. 15th 1863 about five o'clock in the morning with inflammation on the bowels after being sick five days and I send you his affects by express and I wish you would at leasure(?) send me a rec't for said affects after your grief subsides and may God bless you for your sacrifice.

Yours with Respect

Wm. A. Guyselman, Ward master
Post Hospital, Fort Pickering
Memphis, Tenn.


Fort Pickering, Memphis, Jan. 15th

Mrs. Sarah E. Wilkie
South Bend, Ind.

It is with feelings of regret and sympathy that I so abruptly inform you of the very unexpected death of your husband. He had an attack of bilious cholic six days up today -- This though severe was not considered serious. Yesterday (the 14th) in the morning symptoms of very violent inflammation of his bowels appeared. These continued to increase until this morning at 3 o'clock death terminated his sufferings. During the last 24 hours his pain was quite severe. He was conscious of his danger and said he should not recover. At the time of his first attack he was attending upon the sick in the Fort Hospital. He took a bed in the same room with his patients. The care he received was like that which he bestowed upon others -- Good. He was attended by a very kind and competent surgeon, who took good interest in his charge. These facts I gathered from the patients in the room in which he died -- The nurse and surgeon - I last saw him thirty six hours before he died -- conversed with him on various matters but did not think him in any danger. The men of his company have all rejoined the Regt. The remains of your husband will be buried this afternoon in the burial ground of the Fort with the consideration with which the condition of my detachment and the roughness of the weather will allow. May he rest in peace. If it will subtract anything from the sorrow with which yourself and Mr. Wilkes other friends will receive this hard message, I will say that by his upright and candid conduct and his kindness of heart he won the respect and friendship of all his comrades in the reg. and particularly my own. His loss is greatly regretted by us all. Thus have we all sustained loss in his death. The country a true and patriotic soldier. His companions and acquaintances an obliging and upright friend and yourself and family a faithful and kind husband and father.

I shall as soon as possible send to you by express Mr. Wilkies personal effects. Any inquiries you may wish to make will be cheerfully answered if you will address me at my Reg. via Memphis. His descriptive roll I suppose will be sent to you I suppose by Capt. T. G. Drips, Company E, together with certificate of his death. I received yesterday a number of letters from yourself as I suppose. One of them I was obliged to open in order to ascertain your P. O. Address. I did not receive them in season to allow them to be read by him. Had I known of his dangerous condition -- The no. of letters opened were 8 5 1 2. I enclose all with his clothes with sincere expressions of a stranger's sympathy with you in your bad bereavement.

Very respectfully from obd servt.

H.C. Hemenway
Lt. Co. C 27th Reg. Iowa Vols.

P. S. - 16th Jan.-- I have since writing the above ascertained that Mr. Wilkie left a watch and five dollars in money -- I have made arrangements with the Hospital Steward to send these with all his other things in a box by express. I do not doubt this will be faithfully done as I have procured a box for the purpose. If there is any failure in the matter you will please inform me as above indicated. His descriptive roll came to hand today but as it contained no certification of his death, I sent it back to the Captain. It will be attended to in due time.

H. C. Lt.


Sarah E. Wilkie made a statement on Sept. 17, 1863 at St. Joseph County, Indiana.

  • She is the widow of George M. Wilkie who enlisted in the service of the United States at National, Clayton County, Iowa on the 20th day of August 1862 as a private in Company E,, commanded by Captain Thomas G. Drips in the twenty seventh Regiment of Iowa Volunteer Infantry.
  • That he died of bilious cholic which ran into inflammation of the bowels - in hospital at Fort Pickering, Memphis Tennessee on January 15, 1863.
  • She was married to George M. Wilkie on January 15, 1846.
  • That her name before her said marriage was Sarah E. Funston.
  • The names and ages of her children under age 16: Eugene E. A. Wilkie, born May 14, 1849; Theodore A. Wilkie born March 26, 1851; George N. E. Wilkie, born March 21, 1854 and Jessie S. B. Wilkie, born Dec. 215, 1856. All reside with her in Harris Township, St. Joseph County, Indiana - having removed with her from National, Clayton County, Iowa to her father Jesse Funston's in Harris Tp, St. Joseph County, Indiana.
  • Jesse and Sarah Funston signed as witnesses to her declaration.

State of Indiana
St. Joseph County

I, Norman Kellog of said County do hereby certify that the marriage of George Wilkey and Sarah E. Funston was duly solemnized by me on the 15th day of January A.D. 1846 by authority of a license from the Clerk of the St. Joseph Circuit Court.

Norman Kellogg
Minister of the Gospel


I Herman C. Hemenway certify upon honor that I am Lt. of Company C, 27th Iowa Infantry Volunteers, that I was well and personally acquainted with George M. Wilkie, a private of Company E, 27th Iowa Infantry Volunteers and who died at Post Hospital Fort Pickering Memphis Tennessee on the 15th day of January 1863 of bilious cholic and inflammation of the bowels which disease was contracted by the said George M. Wilkie while in the service of the United States as a solider and in the line of his duty as nurse to sick in same Hospital -- I further certify that the said Wilkie was under my command as officer of a guard detached from my Reg. to guard prisoners of war from the 24th of Nov 1863 till the date of his death-- that at the time his disease was contracted he was upon the above mentioned duty as nurse to other sick of my guard by my orders there being no other attendance. That I saw him daily during his sickness of about one week and saw and examined his body after his death on the 15th day of January 1863. That by my order a detail from my guard dug a grave for the said Wilkie and that I was informed by the Surgeon in charge of said Hospital and Steward of the same that the said Wilkie was there buried on the 16th Jan. 1863.

Given under my hand at Nashville Tenn. this 30th day of Nov. 1864.

Herman C. Hemenway
2nd Lt. Co. C, 27th Iowa Inf. Vols.


I, Gilbert R. Parish, private Co. C, 27th Reg. Iowa Inf. Vols being first duly sworn do depose and say that I was well and personally acquainted with George M. Wilkie, private of Co. E, 27th Iowa Infantry Vols -- That the said George M. Wilkie died in my immediate presence at Post Hospital Fort Pickering Memphis Tenn. Jan. 15, 1863 and that the particular facts relating to his death are as stated in the above certificate of Lt. H. C. Hemenway of my Co., and also that I have no interest direct or indirect in the prosecution of the claim of Mrs. Sarah E. Wilkie for Pension.

Gilbert R. Parish, Private
Co. C, 27th Iowa Infantry Vols.

1870 Census: South Bend Wards 2 and 3, St. Joseph County, Indiana: Sarah Wilkie (age 45, born Penn.), Eugene Welkie (age 21, born Indiana, clerk in store), Theodore Welkie (age 19, born Indiana), George Welkie (age 17, painter, born Indiana) Jessie Welkie (age 15, works on farm, born Wisconsin) and William Kidd (age 25, studying law, born Ohio.).

Fifth, Sarah Elizabeth Funston, the fourth daughter of Sarah Templeton Funston, was also born in Pennsylvania, and married George Wilkie at South Bend, Ind., January 15, 1846, and died here June 2, 1873. Soon after her marriage, they went west, where he soon died, leaving her with four small children. Soon after his death, she returned to her father's home at South Bend. When the children became large enough, she took them and went house-keeping at that place. Their names were Eugene Ethan Allen Wilkie, Theodore Augustus Franklin. In 1884 was in Kansas editing a paper. George Norman Eddie and Samuel Jessie Boyd Wilkie, in the far west as a farmer.

(Source: History of the Boyd Family and Descendants By William P. Boyd (1884)

IGI microfilm #0184732 and #0184246

Birth: "Boyd Family & Descendants" by William P. Boyd 1912. Sarah's younger sister Agnes Hawthorn Funston the family's history for this book.

Birth: "Lineages of Horace T. Wilkie & Floy P. Whiteker" by Horace T. Wilkie 1973

Birth: George McGiffin Wilkie's diary. Entry of 7 November 1857 George records "Saturday November 7th Cloudy this morning and cool wind in the East. Sarah's birthday today. To work today afixing the inside of old log house for Clark." Janice Smerchek Wilkes found this on 12 Sept 1999.

Marriage: Theodore A.F. Wilkie's bible (son of Sarah Elizabeth Clark Funston)

"Lineages of Horace T. Wilkie & Floy P. Whiteker" by Horace T. Wilkie 1973

Death: "Cemetery reading by Maude Gray Barcus and shared with Horace T. Wilkie.

Theodore A.F. Wilkie's bible.

Her husband, George McGiffin Wilkie died from illness during the Civil War. She was left with four sons to raise. She returned to her father's home to live. She lived there probably until 1868 when her father died and his estate was settled. The farm was sold. She moved into South Bend, Indiana buying a small house with her share of the settled. The farm was sold. She moved into South Bend, Indiana buying a small Funston estate. All the sons except Theodore began to wander. He stayed with her until she died in 1873.

Quoting Horace T. Wilkie: "Sarah Elizabeth Funston Wilkie seems to have gone back from National, near McGregor, Iowa, to Grandfather Jesse's farm to live while her husband George McGriffin Wilkie was in the Union Army, in Dec. 1862 with her four boys. They lived there until Grandfather Jesse died. But before Grandfather Jesse died Gene left on his own. Eddy became unruly and was sent to Uncle John at Leighton, Iowa. One of his letters to his mother says; 'Uncle John's old lady kicked me out'. He went over to Robert's temporarily. Then Sarah Elizabeth sent him to his Uncle Washington Wilkie at Fond du Lac, Wisc. He did not last very long there and went back to Iowa on his own. But he left a bad taste in the mouths of the Wisconsin Wilkies for the George M. Wilkie Family.

"After Grandfather Jesse died, and Frank settled the estate, Sarah Elizabeth bought a little house in South Bend, where Theodore A. F. Wilkie already had a job, and they continued to live together. Theodore supported her until she died, but the other sons were already scattered.

"From the way the Boyd Book winds up about George M. Wilkie, I think that the Funstons and Wilkie's felt that George had deserted Sarah. But from my standpoint, George was the only one of the sons and brothers-in-laws who joined the Union cause. Maybe I would not have, but he followed his convictions."

Sarah (Funston) Wilkie died June 2, 1873 in South Bend, Saint Joseph County, Indiana. She is buried in Harris Prairie Cemetery, Harris Prairie, St. Joseph County, Indiana.

Children of George McGiffin Wilkie and Sarah Elizabeth Funston:

  1. Eugene Ethan Wilkie, May 14, 1848 in Harris Prairie, St. Joseph County, Indiana
  2. Theodore Augustus Wilkie, Jan. 26, 1850 in South Bend, Saint Joseph County, Indiana
  3. Norman Eddy Wilkie, Mar 2, 1852 in Harris Prairie, St. Joseph County, Indiana
  4. Jesse Boyd Wilkie, Dec. 24, 1854 in Prescott, Pierce County, Wisconsin

Listed on the Family History Library Website: Private George McGiffin Wilkie, 1825-1863 and Sarah Elizabeth Clark Funston Wilkie, 1826-1873, diary and letters, photographs and genealogical charts, 1841-1897/ Wilkie, Horace Theodore, 1889-1983.


Wilkins, Charles H He was born Sept. 1830 in New York. Possibly the son of Julian and Wealthy Wilkins. He married first Mary Cronan. Charles Wilkins married second Mary Frances Slade before 1880. She was the daughter of Gideon Slade and Catherine Weatherwax. She was previously married to Silas Jacob Winch on Oct. 9, 1857.

1850 Census: Jay, Essex County, New York: Charles Wilkins (age 20) and Mary Wilkins (age 20). Note 2 families over is this family: Julian Wilkins (age 47, born Vermont), Wealthy W. Wilkins (age 42, born Vermont), Abigail Wilkins (age 13), Wealthy Wilkins (age 17), Clarinda Wilkins (age 2) and Perry Wilkins (age 18). (Note: I feel reasonably sure this is his family. There is a Wealthy Wilkins buried in the same cemetery as Charles. She died July 11, 1876, age 67 y, 4m, 21 d. Wife of S.

1856 Iowa State Census: Mendon, Clayton county, Iowa: Charles Wilkins (age 25, born NY), Mary Wilkins (age 25, born Ireland), Charles H. Wilkins (age 5, born NY), Ellen Wilkins (age 4, born NY). They had been in Iowa less than 1 year.

1860 Census: Farmersburg, Clayton County, Iowa: Charles Wilkins (age 30), Mary Wilkins (age 30), C. H. Wilkins (age 9), Ellin Wilkins (age 8) and Almyra Wilkins (age 6).

1870 Census: Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Charles Wilkins (age 40, born New York), Mary Wilkins (age 40, born Ireland), Charles H. Wilkins (age 18, farm labor, born New York), Ellen Wilkins (age 17, born New York), Elmira Wilkins (age 10, born Iowa) About 3 families over was Wealthy Wilkins (age 62, born Vermont)

According to cemetery records, Mary (Cronan) Wilkins died Sept. 18, 1876 at age 46 ye. 2m, 28 d. She is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa.

1880 Census; Lotts Creek, Kossuth County, Iowa; Charles Wilkins (age 48, farmer, born New York), Mary S. Wilkins (age 41, born NY). Living next door was George V. Slade (age 23, born Iowa) and his wife Almira (age 20).

1885 Iowa State Census Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Charles Wilkins (State & Ridgley, age 53, retired farmer, born New York), Mary F. Wilkins (age 46, born New York) and Catherine C. Slade (age 70, born New York).

1888 Iowa State Census, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa: Charles Wilkins (age 57, born NY), Mary Wilkins (age 46, born NY)

Charles Wilkins died March 5, 1889 and is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa.

In 1900 Mary (Slade) Wilkins was living Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa. In 1910 and 1920 she was living in Spokane, Spokane County, Washington with her brother George V. Slade. (Family tree information shows that George V. Slade married Elmira Wilkins -- So it appears she was living with her brother and her stepdaughter).

Mary Slade Wilkins died July 11, 1922 and is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa.


Williams, Garner C He was born about 1833 in New York.

1875 New York State Census, Catskill, Green County, New York: Garner C. Williams, (age 41, born in Monroe County, in the now married column was number 1 - had they been married in the last year - stone dealer), wife Laura M. Williams (age 38) son unnamed Williams (age 2/12, born Green County, New York).

1880 Census: District 71, Catskill, Green County, New York: Garner C. Williams (age 47, stone dealer, born New York), wife Laura M. (age 35, born New York), son George L. Williams (age 5, born New York) and Hellen Williams (age 3, born New York).

1892 New York State Census, Brooklyn, Ward 25, E. D. 16, Kings County, New York), G. C. Williams (age 55, occupation: Blue Stone), L. M. Williams (age 43), George L. Williams (age 17), and Grace Williams (age 15).

Garner C. Williams died Dec. 14, 1895 in Brooklyn, New York. (New York, Kings County Estate Files, 1866-1923 - found on familysearch.org. Widow Lavantia M. Williams, son George L. Williams and daughter Helen Grace Williams.

His widow Lavanta (Laura) M. Williams filed for a pension on April 17, 1896 in New York.