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27th Iowa Top Banner

Notes for the men of Company H, 27th Iowa.

This information is a compilation of information that I have found. I have not attempted to verify any of it. But if I find a discrepancy between sources, I have noted it. All information in this section should be validated with further research. Corrections are welcome.

I use various sources. I start with the Pension Records Index to see if I can determine the spouse's name. Then I check Census records, and Family Trees on Ancestry.com. If I can determine what county/state he was in, I check the USGENWEB site for that particular county. I also use Find A Grave and Iowa Gravestones Photo Project websites. Last I do a general search of the internet.


Abby, Sylvester He was born about 1822 in New York. He married Lenora Everts on Mar. 21, 1852 in White River, Oceana County, Michigan. (Michigan, Marriages, 1822-1995) She was the daughter of Charles G. Everts (born 1799) and Catherine (born 1801).

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Sylvester Abby (age 34, born NY), Lenora S. Abby (age 22, born NY), Jenny Abby (age 2, born Wisconsin) and Nancy Abby (no age, born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years.

1860 Census: Spring Creek, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Sylvester Abbey (age 38, farmer, born NY), Eldora Abbey (age 30, born NY), Jennie Abbey (age 5, born Wisconsin), Nancy Abbey (age 3, born Wisconsin) and Charlotte Abbey (age 1, born Wisconsin).

1870 Census: Solon, Kent County, Michigan: Sylvester Abbey (age 48, carpenter, born New York), Lenora Abbey (age 36, born New York), Jennie Abbey (age 16, born Wisconsin), Nancy Abbey (age 14, born Iowa), Charlotte Abbey (age 11, born Iowa)

James M. Haull and Jennie B. Abby were married Jan. 7, 1872 in Sparta Centre, Kent County, Michigan.

H. W. Brazelton and S. M. Abby were married Jan. 18, 1878 in Franklin County, Tennessee. She was a resident of the county. (Charlotte Abby)

1880 Census, District 14, Franklin, Tennessee Sylvester Forrest (age 34, born Michigan, farmer), wife Nancy E. Forrest (age 24, born Iowa), son Edwin M. Forrest (age 4, born Tennessee), daughter Lenora M. Forrest (age 1, born Tennessee), father-in-law Sylvester Abby (age 59, married, born New York, farm laborer.) (Note: Nancy C. Abby (born Buchanan County, Iowa in 1856), married Sylvester DeForest on Jan. 1, 1874 at Courtland Center, Kent County, Michigan. Witnesses were Sylvester and Lenora Abby. (Michigan, Marriages, 1868-1925)

Sylvester Abby filed for a pension on Oct. 17, 1881 in Wisconsin.

Sylvester Abby's will was written on Feb. 30, 1882 in Franklin County, Tennessee. He mentions his daughter Nancy DeForest, wife of Sylvester Deforest; the widow's dower of his wife Lenora Abby; his daughter, Jennie Hall, wife of James Hall of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and his daughter Charlotte Brazelton, wife of H. W. Brazelton of Sewanee, Tennessee. His son-in-law Sylvester DeForest was appointed Executor of his last will and testament.

The will was presented to the Court and was ordered entered into the record on April 3, 1882. source: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-2R27-P9?mode=g&i=64&wc=M6Q7-T36%3A179634601%2C180031401&cc=1909088

I have not been able to determine where he is buried. 


Adams, Sidney C. He was born about 1838 in Vermont. He married Emma M. Hastings on May 20, 1859 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934)

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Sidney C. Adams (age 22, born Vermont), Emma M. Adams (age 20, born NY) and Mary C. Adams (age 1/12, born Iowa). They were living with a family named Harden). Simons M. Harden (age 45), Margaret M. Harden (age 38), Emerson A. Harden (age 18), Minerva B. Harden (age 16), Allen A. Harden (age 12), Carmilitas Harden (age 3), George Hayslip (age 28) and Mary B. Foot (age 17).

Sidney C. Adams died July 24, 1869 in Falls City, Nebraska. (Pension Index Record). I could not determine where he was buried.

I did not find Emma/Emily in 1870, but I did find a Mary Adams. 1870 Census: Richardson County, Nebraska: Simmons Hardin (age 55), Margery Hardin (age 48), Carminella Hastings (age 13), Arthur Foote (age 4) and Mary Adams (age 9, born Iowa). This appears to be the same Harden family as 1860, so I am pretty sure this is the correct Mary Adams.

Emily M. Adams married G. R. Summers on Mar. 25, 1871 in Richardson County, Nebraska (Nebraska, Marriages, 1855-1995).

1880 Census, Falls City, Richardson County, Nebraska Emily N. Summers (age 40, divorced, born New York, daughter Mary C. Adams (age 20, clerks in Music Store, born Iowa), son John Adams (age 17, works in Printing Office, born Iowa), son Charles D. Summers (age 8, born Nebraska), brother in law Edward C. Adams (age 33, Dry Goods Merchant, born Vermont), and sister-in-law Grace Adams (age 24, born Ohio.

His widow Emily M. Summers filed for a pension on May 6, 1915 in Missouri.


Anders, Daniel He was born Dec. 13, 1826 in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Amariah Anders (Dec. 25, 1801 - June 4, 1861) and Mary (Polly) Imler (Dec. 1808 - May 5, 1887). He married Matilda Herron (another source says Hearn) on Aug 7, 1851 in Tusc Co Vol 4 p 253 by E Greenwald minister (Note one source says they married in Philadelphia. But another source mentions NEW Philadelphia which is in Tuscarawas County Ohio). She was the daughter of Isaiah Herron (Apr. 14, 1799-Mar. 27, 1867) and Sarah Glass (Nov. 1, 1803 - 1899). Daniel's sister Sarah Ann Anders married Charles W. Woolley, who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

BIOGRAPHICAL ALBUM OF FAYETTE CO, IOWA - 1891

AMANUEL JAMES ANDERS, who is engaged in the practice of law in Oelwein, is a native of Ohio. He was born near New Philadelphia, October 11, 1850, and is a son of Amariah and Mary (Imler) Anders, the former born near Baltimore, MD, Dec 25, 1801, of German and Irish descent, and the latter born in Bedford, Bedford Co., PA, in December 1808, of German parentage. The family moved to Indiana in 1853, locating near Muncie, where they resided until 1858, when they emigrated to Iowa, locating in Buchanan Co. The father died June 4, 1861, and the mother subsequently removed to Fayette Co where her death occurred May 5, 1887. They had a family of twelve children, seven sons and five daughters, eight of whom lived to mature years: Daniel, the eldest, married Matilda H. Hearn and died in March, 1889; John wedded Caroline Robinson and died in March, 1869; Sarah is the wife of C W Wooley, of Hoskins, Neb; William married Julia Burch, and resides in Harlan Township; Mary is the wife of Isaac Hearn, of Wetmore, Kan; Elizabeth is the wife of Thomas Wheeler, of Jefferson Twp; Amanuel J. is the next younger; and Franklin Pierce, a widower, resides in Chadron, Neb.

The rest of the biography was about Amanuel James Anders.

1850 Census, Goshen, Tuscarawas County, Ohio: Amariah Anders (age 48, laborer, born MD), Polly Anders (age 39, born PA), Daniel Anders (age 23, laborer, born PA), John Anders (age 17, born PA), Sarah Anders (age 11, born Ohio), Wm. Anders (age 9, born Ohio), Mary A. Anders (age 5, born Ohio), Elizabeth Anders (age 4,born Ohio), and Emanuel J. Anders (age 8/12, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Daniel Anders (age 38, farmer, born PA), Matilda H. Anders (age 28, born Ohio), John Anders (age 7, born Iowa), Isaiah Anders (age 4, born Iowa) and Elnora Anders (age 1, born Iowa). The Amariah and Polly Anders family was listed a couple of pages over.

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Daniel Anders (age 43, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Matilda Anders (age 34, born Ohio), Nora Anders (age 11, born Iowa), Frank Anders (age 8, born Iowa), Settie (Lottie?) Anders (age 3, born Iowa), * Sister Anders (age 10/12, male, born Iowa). *(Note this is what the name looked like on the 1870 census and is also the way ancestry.com had it indexed. He was identified as being a male 10 months old. The name on the Census and age does not match any of the other younger children that appear on the 1880 census, so I can't verify the name).

1880 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Daniel Anders (age 53, farmer, born Pennsylvania), wife Matilda H. Anders (age 45, born Ohio), daughter Nora H. Anders (age 21, born Iowa), son Frank Anders (age 18, born Iowa), daughter Lottie E. Anders (age 12, born Iowa), Jacob Anders (age 8, born Iowa and Archie Anders (age 6, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Daniel Anders (age 58, born Pennsylvania, insane), Matilda Anders (age 49, born Ohio), Lottie Anders (age 17, born Iowa), Jacob Anders (age 13, born Iowa) and Archie Anders (age 11, born Iowa).

Daniel Anders died Feb. 3, 1889 (source: Iowa Deaths and Burials, 1850 - 1990) and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Add 1, Lot 602, Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa

His widow Matilda H. Anders filed for a pension on May 1, 1889 in Iowa.

Mrs. Daniel Anders, of Circleville, Kansas, is visiting A. J. Anders and family. Her husband was Mr. Anders brother and also a member of the 27th Iowa. She hopes to meet a number of her husband's old army comrades at the reunion.

Oelwein Register, August 18, 1892

Mrs. M. H. Anders has purchased lots on Hamilton Street, east of R. N. White's, and will at once proceed to erect a fine residence thereon. It is to be 26 X 28 feet with 18 foot posts and will be a good addition to that part of town. Mrs. Anders came here to attend the 27th Iowa reunion last month and has decided to remain.

Oelwein Register, September 15, 1982

Matilda (Herron/Hearn) Anders died in 1917 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa.


Beckley, Samuel He was born Feb. 4, 1832 in Wheeler, Ohio. He was the son of James (1802 - Mar. 18, 1884) and Catherine (1802 - Dec. 18, 1881) Beckley. He married Chloe M. Avery on Jan. 15, 1882 in Miller, Knox County, Nebraska. His sister Sarah Beckley married Clinton Losure who also served with Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Mohican, Ashland County, Ohio: James Beckley (age 50, farmer, born PA), Catherine Beckley (age 50, born PA), Edward Beckley (age 22, born PA), James Beckley (age 21, born PA). Mary Beckley (age 19, born PA), Samuel Beckley (age 17, born Ohio), Daniel Beckley (age 15, born Ohio), Sarah Beckley (age 12, born Ohio), Elizabeth Beckley (age 10, born Ohio), Catherine Beckley (age 7, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: James Beckley Sr (age 55, born PA, farmer), Catherine Beckley (age 55, born PA), Samuel Beckley (age 22, born Ohio), Daniel Beckley (age 21, born Ohio), Gabriel Beckley (age 20, born Ohio), Sarah Beckley (age 17, born Ohio), Elisabeth Beckley (age 15, born Ohio) and Catherine Beckley (age 12, born Ohio). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years.

1860 Census Records: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Sam Beckley (age 25, laborer, born Ohio) He was living with a family name Stowell.

1870 Census: Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa: Samuel Beckley (age 33, farmer, born Ohio), James Beckley (age 64, without occupation, born Pennsylvania), Catherine Beckley (age 67, born Pennsylvania), Milton Beckley (age 11, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska: Samuel Beckley (age 44, farmer, born Ohio), father James Beckley (age 78, born Ohio), mother Katherine Beckley (age 78, born Ohio), Sister Katie Largen (age 35, born Ohio), Ferdinand Largen (age 9, nephew, born Iowa), nephew Milton Beckley (age 21, born Iowa).

1885 Nebraska State Census: Antelope and Boone, Nebraska: Sam Beckley (age 50, farmer, born Ohio), wife Chloe (age 22, born New York), daughter Maude Beckley (age 2, born Nebraska) and son Sam Beckley (age 1, born Nebraska). Living next door was the Clinton Losure family.

1900 Census: Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska: Samuel Beckley (born Feb. 1832, age 68, married 19 years, born Ohio, day laborer), wife Chloe M. Beckley (born Mar. 1863, age 37, married 19 years, 6 children born, 6 still living, born New York), daughter Maude I. (born Jan 1883, age 17, born Nebraska), daughter Mable I (born Mar. 1886, age 14, born Nebraska), daughter Leah S. Beckley (born Dec. 1888, age 11, born Nebraska), daughter Francis V. (born Feb. 1894, age 6, born Nebraska) and son Clarence B. Beckley (born Sept. 1896, age 3, born Nebraska).

Samuel Beckley died Apr. 28, 1909 and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska, Lot 169, Sect. 1

Obituary was found on Find a Grave

Samuel Beckley Sr. Died

Samuel Beckley, an old resident of Knox county died at his home in this city Wednesday morning at twenty minutes past one. He was seventy-six years and has been in feeble health for some time caused from old age.

Mr. Beckley was a veteran of the Civil War, enlisting in 1862 in Company H. 27th Iowa, under General A.J. Smith and was honorably discharged in 1865.

He has resided in this community the past twenty-five years, a part of that time being on a farm in the Millerboro neighborhood. He was well known and respected by all.

Funeral was held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 from the GAR Hall and under the direction of W.H. Irwin Post GAR, the gray haired veterans paying their last respects to their departed comrade. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Kodjer.

He leaves a wife and five children to mourn his death.

...The Creighton News 30 April 1908

His widow Chloe M. Beckley filed for a pension on May 11, 1908 in Nebraska.


Blank, Absalom He was born Oct. 27, 1832 in Mercer County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Moses Blank (June 12, 1805 - June 24, 1879) and Salome Sara Rumm (June 25, 1809 - Feb. 26, 1891). He married Frances Fidelia Timson on June 17, 1858 in Buchanan County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Robert Timson (June 29, 1796 - Aug. 28, 1872) and Martha E. Perry (Sept. 2, 1799 - Nov. 26, 1856). Her sister Clarissa Maria Timson married Matthew Y. Brown, who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. Absalom's brothers John M. Blank and Joseph Henry Blank also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Hickory, Mercer County, Pennsylvania: Moses Blank (age 45, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Sarah Blank (age 41, born Pennsylvania), Henry Blank (age 23, born Pennsylvania), Jacob Blank (age 22, engine builder, born Pennsylvania), Wm. Blank (age 20, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Absilom Blank (age 18, blacksmith, born Pennsylvania), Joseph Blank (age 17, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Sarah R. Blank (age 11, born Pennsylvania), John M. Blank (age 6, born Pennsylvania), George W. Blank (age 3, born Pennsylvania.)

1860 Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Absalom Blank (age 28, farmer, born PA), Fanny Blank (age 26, born Mass.), Levi Blank (age 1, born Iowa).

1860 Agriculture Census, Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: Absalom Blank, 15 Improved acres. 235 unimproved acres. Cash value of farm: 2500. 1 milk cow, 1 other cattle, 1 swine, value of Livestock: 28. 154 bushels of wheat, 800 bushels of Indian Corn, 145 other bushels.

This information was found in this post.

National Archive Military Record of Absalom Blank, b. 10-27-1832 Private, Co. H, 27 Regt Iowa Infantry Volunteer Enlistment Newton, Buchanan Co., Iowa I, Absalom Blank born in Mercer Co. in the State of Penn. aged thirty three years, and by occupation a farmer do hereby acknowledge to have volunteered this fourth day of January 1864 to serve as a Soldier in the Army of the United States of America for the period of Three Years...

It appears he received a $15 signing bonus Detachment Muster Roll-("B" Permanent Party Draft Rendezvous) Jan & Feb, 1864, at Davenport Iowa-Present Detachment Muster Roll-(Recruits) March & Apr, 1864, at Davenport Iowa-Present Muster Roll, Mar & Apr, 1864 at Camp McClellan, Davenport Iowa Present, money value of clothing drawn since settlement or enlistment $35.46 Company Muster Roll, Co H, 27 Regt Iowa Infantry-May & June, 1864, Present, was paid 2 installment of bounty Muster and Descriptive Roll of a Detachment of U.S. Vols. forwarded, May 15, 1864, Eyes Gray, Hair, Dark, Complexion, Dark, Height 5 ft. 7 in. Company Descriptive Book Co. H, 27 Reg't Iowa remarks-Pd by Maj. Sullivan to April 30, 1864 $100 bounty $200 bounty due. Clothing settled to April 30, 1864 before coming to Regt. Recruit joined co. June 16, 64.

Was in battle of Tupelo, Miss July 14, 64 Engagement at Old Town Creek, Miss July 15, 64 Battles at Nashville Tenn Dec 15 & 16, 64 In the siege and assault on Ft. Blakely Ala Apr 9, 65

Remarks: Capture of Ft. Blakely Ala Apr 9/65 accountable for one shelter tent 1 haversack 1 canteen

Company Muster Roll-July & Aug 1864-Present. Recruit was paid 2d installment of bounty being $40.00. 3rd installment of bounty due $40.00

Company Muster Roll-Sept & Oct, 1864-absent-absent sick since Oct 2/64 Company Muster Roll-Nov & Dec, 1864-Present Company Muster Roll-Jan & Feb, 1865-Present-Recruit 4th installment of bounty due $40.00 Company Muster Roll-Mar & Apr, 1865-Present-4th installment of bounty due. $40.00 recruit Company Muster Roll-May & June, 1865-Present-Has received bounty to the amount of $180.00

M. and D. Roll of Men Transferred from Co. H, 27 Reg't Iowa Infantry to 12 IA Vet Vol Inf. Roll dated Montgomery Ala July 13, 1865. Remarks-Transferred by G.O. No 96 Hd Qtrs Dept of the Gulf dated June 26/65. Battle Pleasant Hill La Apr 9/64, Cruchursville (?) La Apr 23/64 Yellow Bayou La May 18/64 Ditch Bayou, La June 6/64 Tupelo, Miss July 14/64, Old Town Creek Miss., July 15/64 Nashville Tenn Dec 15 & 16/64

Company Muster-out Roll Co. H, 27 Reg't Iowa Infantry dated Clinton, Iowa Aug 8, 1865, Bounty paid $180 due $120. Transferred to 12 Iowa Vet Vol July 13/65 by G. O. 96 Dept. of the Gulf. Des. Roll furnished Bounty paid $100.00, due $200.00

Absalom Blank, Private Co. H, 12 Reg't Iowa Infantry. July & August 1865, Present August 31, 1865 - September 29, 1865 Furlough to return home.

Letter date January 29, 1866 I David C. Hastings of lawful age being duly sworn, do depose and say that on or about the tenth day of September AD 1865 I was called upon to visit Absalom Blank, a Private of Co. H. 12th Regt Iowa Vol Inf (Vet) and found him suffering from Remittent Fever and Diarrhea attended with great emaciation and debility. From that time until the present he has been unfit for any military duty whatever and until quite recently entirely unable to travel so as to return to his Regt. He was absent of a 30 days furlough dated August 19, 1865 & furloughed from August 31 to September 29, 1865. David C. Hastings Late Asst. Surg. 27th Regt Iowa Vol. Inf.

Relieved from the charge of absence without leave by command of Maj. Genl. Pope in S.O. No. 135, Hd. Qtr. Dept. of the Mo., Ft. Leavenworth Kans. June 11/66.

1870 Census: Rose Grove, Hamilton County, Iowa: Absolom Blank (age 36, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Fidelia Blank (age 33, born Vermont), Levi Blank (age 11, born Iowa), Robert M. Blank (age 10, born Iowa), Ruben Blank (age 8, born Iowa), Ellie Blank (age 4, born Iowa), Emma Blank (age 2/12, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Rose Grove, Hamilton County, Iowa: Absolum Blank (age 47, farmer, born Pennsylvania), wife Fannie F. Blank (age 44, born Vermont), son Levi Blank (age 21, farm laborer, born Iowa), son Robert Blank (age 19, farmer laborer, born Iowa), son Rube Blank (age 16, farm laborer, born Iowa) and daughter May Blank (age 1/12, born May, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living In Iowa: 27th Iowa: A. Blank, Private, Company H. Post Office: Blairsburg (Hamilton County)

1885 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Hamilton County, Iowa: Abner Blank (age 52, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Fanny F. Blank (age 49, born Vermont), Reuben L. Blank (age 21, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Mary Blank (age 4, born Hamilton County, Iowa).

Fanny F. Blank (born June 20, 1835) died April 15, 1887 from measles. She is buried in Blairsburg Cemetery, Blairsburg, Hamilton County, Iowa.

Jewell Record April 27, 1887

DIED- At her home in Liberty Township, April 15, 1887, Mrs. Fidelia Blank, wife of Absalom Blank, in her 53rd. year. Her death was sudden and unexpected but although she had been in poor health for some time, no one considered her case dangerous until a few hours before death. Fidelia Timson was born near Brattelborough, Vt., in the year 1835, and in her twelfth year moved from there to Ogle county, Ill., where she remained until 1857, when she moved to Buchanan county, Iowa, and the following year was married. About seventeen years ago, she, with her husband, four children, came to Hamilton county, where they have since resided. She was the mother of nine children, four of whom are still living, three sons and one little daughter. Mrs. Blank was a good kind neighbor always ready to help and sympathize with those in sickness and trouble, and will be greatly missed by all, especially by the young folks who took great pleasure in gathering at her house, where they were always kindly received and welcomed by her. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. Kenyon and the remains were interred in the Blairsburg cemetery. The family have the sympathy of the entire community.

1898 U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Sawtelle, Los Angeles, California, Pacific Branch: Absalom Blank: MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: January 4, 1864 Iowa. Rank: P, Company and Regiment: H, 12 Iowa Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: January 20, 1866, Davenport, Iowa: Cause of Discharge: Close of War. Kind and Degree of Disability: Impaired Vision, Where and When Contracted: 1865, Alabama. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where Born: Penn'a. Age 66, Height 5' 7 1/2", dark complexion, can read and write. Religion: Pro. Occupation: Miner. Residence Subsequent to Discharge: Columbia, Cal'a, widowed, name and address of nearest relative: Mrs. May Cox (daughter), Stillwater, Minn. HOME HISTORY: Date of Admission: Nov. 24, 1898. Date of Discharge: Feb. 2, 05. Cause of Discharge: Dp'd. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate: 585,034

1900 Census: Township 2, Tuolumne County, California. There was an Absalom Blank, listed as a boarder, born June 1833, age 66, widowed, born Pennsylvania.

1910 Census: Redwood, Santa Clara County, California: Abraham Blank (age 77, widowed, born Pennsylvania, no occupation).

Absalom Blank died June 29, 1918 at Los Gatos, Santa Clara County, California (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Los Gatos Memorial Park, San Jose, Santa Clara County, California.

Children of Absalom Blank and Frances Fedelia Timson:

  1. Evi Byron Blank, b. 17 Mar 1859, Buchanan Co., Iowa, d. 02 Sep 1945, Creighton, Knox Co., Nebraska.
  2. Robert Blank, b. 10 Sep 1860, Buchanan Co., Iowa, d. date unknown.
  3. Sarah Blank, b. 05 Jan 1862, Buchanan Co., Iowa, d. 14 Nov 1862.
  4. Reuben Blank, d. date unknown.
  5. Fanney Ellie Blank, b. 22 Oct 1866, d. 06 Dec 1878, Hamilton Co., Iowa.
  6. Emma S. Blank, b. 21 Feb 1870, d. 10 Dec 1878, Hamilton Co., Iowa.
  7. Joseph A. Blank, b. 26 Oct 1871, Hamilton Co., Iowa, d. 21 Dec 1878, Hamilton Co., Iowa.
  8. William A. Blank, b. 30 Apr 1875, Hamilton Co., Iowa, d. 05 Dec 1878, Hamilton Co., Iowa.
  9. May V. Blank, b. 24 May 1880, Hamilton Co., Iowa, d. date unknown.

Blank, John Merdin He was born June 18, 1844 in Hickory, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Moses Blank (June 12, 1805 - June 24, 1879) and Salome Sara Rumm (June 25, 1809 - Feb. 26, 1891). He married Emma Seeley on Oct. 18, 1866 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934) She was the daughter of Sheldon Seeley and Lola Lewis. John's brothers Absalom Blank and Joseph H. Blank also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Hickory, Mercer County, Pennsylvania: Moses Blank (age 45, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Sarah Blank (age 41, born Pennsylvania), Henry Blank (age 23, born Pennsylvania), Jacob Blank (age 22, engine builder, born Pennsylvania), Wm. Blank (age 20, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Absilom Blank (age 18, blacksmith, born Pennsylvania), Joseph Blank (age 17, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Sarah R. Blank (age 11, born Pennsylvania), John M. Blank (age 6, born Pennsylvania), George W. Blank (age 3, born Pennsylvania.)

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Moses Blank (age 55, farmer, born PA), Sarah Blank (age 51, born PA), Henry Blank (age 30, born PA), David Blank (age 24, born PA), John M. Blank (age 15, born PA), Geo. W. Blank (age 12, born PA) and Helen A. Blank (age 8, born PA).

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Blank (age 26, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Emma Blank (age 20, born NY), Carrie Blank (age 1, born Iowa) and Shelden Seeley (age 72, without occupation, born New York).

1880 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: John M. Blank (age 36, farmer, born Pennsylvania), wife Emma M. Blank (age 30, born New York), daughter Carrie L. Blank (age 11, born Iowa), daughter Killie J. Blank (age 7, born Iowa), daughter Leathie L. Blank (age 5, born Iowa), brother-in-law Frank A. Seeley (age 32, painter, born Ohio).

1885 Iowa State Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa Emma Blank (age 33, single, born New York), Joel Blank, (age 12, born Kansas), Lottie Blank (age 9, born Buchanan County, Iowa.

It appears that John and Emma Blank were divorced (or the date of death that is reported for him is incorrect). Emma Seeley Blank married Hugh Hersey on May 28, 1887 in Buchanan County, Iowa. Marriage record showed her age as 37, born 1850 in Rochester, New York. Father's name: Sheldon Sealey. Mother's name Lola Lewis. Her marital status was widowed. (Iowa, Marriages, 1809-1992).

John M. Blank died Dec. 17, 1901 in Baldwin, Randolph County, Illinois. I found another family tree that said he died Dec. 17, 1890 in Percy, Randolph County, Illinois. I do not know which date might be correct.

Children of John Merdin Blank and Emma M. Seeley:

  1. Carrie Lola Blank: Nov. 5, 1868 - Nov. 5, 1941
  2. Jewell Kittie Blank: July 1873 in Kansas - March 13, 1931
  3. Little Louise Blank: Aug. 25, 1875 - March 29, 1962

Blank, Joseph Henry He was born Dec. 8, 1833 in Hickory, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Moses Blank (June 12, 1805 - June 24, 1879) and Salome Sara Rumm (June 25, 1809 - Feb. 26, 1891). He married Margaret Jane Love on Mar. 25, 1858 in Mercer County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Samuel Love and Isabella McConnehey. Joseph's brothers Absalom Blank and John M. Blank also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Hickory, Mercer County, Pennsylvania: Moses Blank (age 45, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Sarah Blank (age 41, born Pennsylvania), Henry Blank (age 23, born Pennsylvania), Jacob Blank (age 22, engine builder, born Pennsylvania), Wm. Blank (age 20, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Absilom Blank (age 18, blacksmith, born Pennsylvania), Joseph Blank (age 17, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Sarah R. Blank (age 11, born Pennsylvania), John M. Blank (age 6, born Pennsylvania), George W. Blank (age 3, born Pennsylvania.)

Joseph H. Blank died Dec. 3, 1863 in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee. He is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan Co., Iowa

A pension was filed for a minor on Mar. 6, 1864. Moses Blank was guardian. Information from the pension file is extracted below:

Moses M. Blank was appointed guardianship of Samuel Blank on January 16, 1864.

On Oct. 2, 1865 in Buchanan County, Iowa, Moses Blank, guardian of Samuel Blank, the only living child of Joseph H. Blank stated:

  • Joseph H. Blank was a corporal in Company H, in the 27th Regiment of Iowa Volunteers and died December 4, 1863 at Memphis Tennessee of chronic diarrhea.
  • The mother of the child died on December 29, 1862.
  • The parents of the child were married in Mercer County, Pennsylvania on March 25, 1858 by Jeremiah Brown, a minister of the Gospel.
  • The child Samuel Blank was born on or about Nov. 7, 1861.

In a statement David Blank and John M. Blank said that they were present at the marriage of Joseph H. Blank and Margaret Jane Love on March 25, 1858 in the county of Mercer, Pennsylvania. The marriage was performed by Jeremiah Brown, a minister of the gospel.


Captain J. M. Miller made a statement and said that "he (Samuel Blank) contracted the disease of chronic diarrhea and spinal complaint while on detached duty guarding prisoners from Cairo Ill to Vicksburg, Miss. That said soldier so injured his back on that trip that he never recovered, that he died of the said diseases at convalescent camp in Memphis, Tennessee on or about the 4th day of December 1863.

On the Certificate of Disability for Discharge: Samuel H. Blank was described as:

Born in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, 29 years of age, 5 feet 8 1/4 inches high, fair complexion, light blue eyes, dark hair and by occupation when enlisted a school teacher. During the last two months the soldier has been unfit for duty 61 days. He states that in December last, while in the discharge of his duty, he hurt his chest, after which he coughed (?) and has been coughing more or less ever since and has never since been fit for duty.

I certify that I have carefully examined the said Joseph H. Blank, and find him incapable of performing the duties of a soldier because of Pulmonary Phthisis. Is unfit for the Invalid Corps. No cause for pension, the disease being hereditary in the family.

Discharged, this fifth day of December, 1863. at Memphis Tennessee. The soldier desires to be addressed at Town Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa.

NOTE: this is dated the day after he reportedly died from chronic diarrhea. They must have been in the process of discharging him.

1870 Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Moses Blank (age 65, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Sarah Blank (age 60, born Pennsylvania), Washington Blank (age 22, born Pennsylvania) and Kittie Blank (age 19, born Iowa). Where is Samuel??? I also could not find him in 1880. I found a family tree that had a date of death of July 12, 1875 for him. I do not know if that is correct.


Blood, Amos Roy He was born June 1832 in New York. He was the son of Asa and Sarah Blood. He married Lydia Marie King in Sioux City, Iowa on August 20, 1862.

1850 Census: Janesville, West Side of Rock River, Rock County, Wisconsin: Asa Blood (age 55, born NY), Sarah Blood (age 47, born NY), Asa Blood, Jr (age 25, born NY), Susan Blood (age 22, born NY), Sarah Blood (age 23, born NY), Amos Blood (age 18, born NY), Annette Blood (age 16, born NY), Andrew Blood (age 14, born NY), Stephen Blood (age 13, born NY), Victoria Blood (age 11, born Wisc.) and Cornelia Hammond (age 19, born NY).

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa; Asa Blood, Jr. (age 29, born NY, Mason), Susan Blood (age 28, born Maine), Ida F. Blood (age 5, born Wisc.), Sarah W. Blood (age 55, born Mass.), Amos R. Blood (age 24, born NY, Painter), Antoinetta Blood (age 22, born NY), Andrew Blood (age 20, born NY, Painter) and Victoria Blood (age 14, born Wisc.) The family had been in the state of Iowa for 4 years, except for Sarah W. Blood. She had been in the state of Iowa for 1 year.

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Asa Blood (age 33, mason born NY), Susan Blood (age 30, born NY), Ida Blood (age 9, born Wisc.), Edward Blood (age 2, born Iowa), Alona Blood (age 11/12, born Iowa), Amos R. Blood (age 27, Painter, born NY), Andrew J. Blood (age 21, painter, born NY),

1870 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Amos R. Blood (age 38, Painter, born New York), Lydia M. Blood (age 28, born Penn.), and Alice N. Blood (age 1, born Iowa). Asa Blood (age 75, carpenter, born NY) and Sarah M. Blood (age 70, born Mass), were living next door to them.

1880 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Amos R. Blood (age 49, painter, born NY), Lydia M. Blood (age 35, born Ohio), Alice Blood (age 11, born Iowa) and Louisa E. Kirkham (age 35, widowed, born Ohio).

1885 Iowa State Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Amos R. Blood (corner ? & Willow, age 53, painter, born NY), Lydia M. Blood age 42, born Penn.), Alice N. Blood (age 15, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Ethel J. Blood (age 3, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

He is listed twice on the 1900 census.

1900 Census: Iowa Soldiers Home, Linn, Marshall County, Iowa: Amos R. Blood (born June 1832, age 67, married 38 years, born New York, Painter).

1900 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Amos Blood (born June 1832, age 67, married 38 years, born NY, Painter), Lydia M. Blood (born Jan 1842, age 58, married 38 years, 4 children born, 2 still living, born PA), daughter Ethel J. Blood (born Sept. 1881, age 18, born Iowa).

Amos R. Blood died Aug. 1, 1902 and is buried in the Iowa Veterans Home Cemetery, Section C, Row 13, Grave 7, Marshalltown, Marshall County, Iowa. (Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans)

His widow Lydia M. Blood filed for a pension August 18, 1902.


Boone, Morgan He was born Jul 13, 1837 in Illinois. He was the son of John Boone (Aug 27, 1806 - May 22, 1881) and Mary Sutton (Apr 15, 1808 - Oct. 27. 1892). He married Aulie King on Jan. 7, 1874 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County, Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Ezra B. King July 28, 1820 - Aug. 12, 1880) and Eliza Ellen Smith (Sept. 7, 1822 - Sept. 28, 1907). Morgan's brother Nelson J. Boone also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. His sister Jane Boone married Emanuel Wardell, who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census, District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Boone (age 43, farmer, born Ohio), Mary Boone (age 40, born Ohio), William Boone (age 19, born Michigan), Nelson Boone (age 20, born Michigan), Susan Boone (age 17, born Michigan), Daniel Boone (age 15, born Michigan), Morgan Boone (age 13, born Illinois), Jane Boone (age 11, born Illinois), John Boone (age 8, born Illinois), Charles Boone (age 5, born Illinois), Benjamin Boone (age 2, born Iowa) and Hellen Boone (age 5/12, born Iowa).

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Boon (age 48, born Ohio, farmer), Mary Boon (age 46, born Ohio), Nelson Boone (age 26, born Michigan, farmer), Daniel Boon (age 21, born Mich., farmer), Morgan Boone (age 18, born Illinois, farmer), Jane Boone (age 16, born Ill.), John Boone (age 11, born Illinois), Benjamin Boone (age 8, born Iowa) and Helen Boon (age 6, born Iowa.) The family had been in the state of Iowa for 10 years.

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Boone (age 53, farmer, born Ohio), Mary Boone (age 50, born Ohio), Daniel Boone (age 25, born Michigan), Morgan Boone (age 22, born Illinois), Jane Boone (age 20, born Illinois), John Boone (age 18, born Illinois), Chas. Boone (age 15, born Illinois), Benjamin Boone (age 12, born Iowa), Ellen Boone (age 10, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa: Morgan Boone (Private, Co. H, Post Office: Independence (Buchanan County).

1900 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Morgan Boone (born July 1837, age 62, married 26 years, born Illinois), Wife Aulie Boone (born Sept. 1853, age 46, married 26 years, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Iowa), son-in-law John J. Bibby (born July 1878, age 21, married 1 year, born Canada), daughter Nellie L. Bibby (born Nov. 1875, age 24, married 1 year, 0 children born, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Independence Ward 1, Buchanan County, Iowa: Morgan Boone (age 72, married 1 time for 36 years, born Illinois, own income), wife Aulie Boone (age 56, married 1 time for 36 years. 1 child born, 0 still living, born Iowa).

Morgan Boone died March 11, 1913 (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Cemetery Record: Name: Morgan Boone, Death Date 11 Mar. 1913, Page #45, Birth Date 13 July 1837. Cemetery: Wilson, Town: Sumner & Washington. Level Info: Buchanan County Burial Records. Notes: (Add. 1, Lot 8, Blk. 6.) (Co. H. 27th IA. Inf. Member of The G. A. R.) (Nellie Buried On This Lot)

His widow Aulie Boone filed for a pension on March 17, 1913 in Iowa.

Aulie C. (King) Boone died Oct. 11, 1928 in Buchanan County, Iowa. She is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.


Boone, Nelson J. He was born July 10, 1830 in Michigan. He was the son of John Boone (Aug 27, 1806 - May 22, 1881) and Mary Sutton (Apr 15, 1808 - Oct. 27. 1892). He married Catherine Solts (Sult) on Feb. 18, 1864 in Spring Creek, Benton County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriage, 1838-1934). (some sources say her first name was Cassandra). Everything I found said Catherine or Kate. She was the daughter of William Sult (May 2, 1814 - Oct. 2, 1882) and Leah (Strauss) Arner (1817 - Jan. 17, 1893). Leah's maiden name was Strauss, she was previously married to Daniel Arner. Nelson's brother Morgan Boone, also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. His sister Jane Boone married Emanuel Wardell, who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census, District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Boone (age 43, farmer, born Ohio), Mary Boone (age 40, born Ohio), William Boone (age 19, born Michigan), Nelson Boone (age 20, born Michigan), Susan Boone (age 17, born Michigan), Daniel Boone (age 15, born Michigan), Morgan Boone (age 13, born Illinois), Jane Boone (age 11, born Illinois), John Boone (age 8, born Illinois), Charles Boone (age 5, born Illinois), Benjamin Boone (age 2, born Iowa) and Hellen Boone (age 5/12, born Iowa).

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Boon (age 48, born Ohio, farmer), Mary Boon (age 46, born Ohio), Nelson Boone (age 26, born Michigan, farmer), Daniel Boon (age 21, born Mich., farmer), Morgan Boone (age 18, born Illinois, farmer), Jane Boone (age 16, born Ill.), John Boone (age 11, born Illinois), Benjamin Boone (age 8, born Iowa) and Helen Boon (age 6, born Iowa.) The family had been in the state of Iowa for 10 years.

1870 Census; Independence Ward 4, Buchanan County, Iowa: Nelson Boone (age 38, carpenter, born Illinois), Catherine Boone (age 27, born Penn), and Charles Boone (age 5, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Nelson Boone (age 38, carpenter, born Illinois), Catherine Boone (age 27, born Penn) and Charles Boone (age 5, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Vinton, Benton County, Iowa: Nelson J. Boone (age 49, Hotel Keeper, born Illinois/Michigan), wife Jennie C. Boone (age 34, born Penn.) and son Charles M. Boone (age 15, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Dysart, Tama County, Iowa: Nelson J. Boone (Lot 24, Block 11, Dysart, age 50, Insurance ?, born Michigan), Katie Boone (age 39, born Penn.) and Charles M. Boone, age 21, dentist, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1895 Iowa State Census, Tama County, Iowa: Nelson J. Boone (age 63, born Michigan, Religion: Methodist E), Kate Boone (age 49, born Penn), Winifred Boone (age 5, born Tama County, Iowa), Eli F. Sult (age 39, born Penn.)

1900 Census: Clark, Tama County, Iowa: Nelson J. Boone (born Jul 1831, age 68, married 35 years, born Ohio), wife Catherine Boone (born Apr. 1845, age 55, married 35 years, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Pennsylvania) and brother-in-law Eli F. Sult (born Dec. 1856, age 43, born Pennsylvania).

Nelson J. Boone died Sept. 2, 1909. He is buried in Dysart Cemetery, Tama County, Iowa.

Iowa Cemetery Records: Name: Nelson J. Boone. Death Date: 2 Sept. 1909, Page #17, Birth Date 10 Jul. 1830. Cemetery: Dysart. Relative: 79. Level Info: Gravestone Records of Tama County, Iowa.

Nelson J. Boone, a resident of Dysart for 25 years, died suddenly Sept. 2nd. He was a soldier of the civil war. The funeral services were held in the Methodist church of that place and the remains laid away in the Dysart cemetery. (obituary found on Find a Grave)

His widow Catherine Boone filed for a pension on Sept. 13, 1909.

1910 Census: Clark, Tama County, Iowa: Catherine Boone (age 64, widowed, 1 child born, 0 still living, born Pennsylvania), brother Eli F. Sult (age 55, born Pennsylvania, Real Estate Agent).

Veterans Administration Card: Shows that Catherine Boone remarried on Nov. 19, 1919 to Andrew J. Winters. Dysart, Iowa. "Sult 3/23/20" was written by her name. Written on the next card was "married 11/19/19 - Winters. vhcr 400. Rocky Ford, Colo. 2/27/20. I don't know what the last entry is indicating.


Booth, Hamilton B. He was born about 1839 in Ohio. He was the son of Jeremiah Booth (Aug. 13, 1816 - Jan. 17, 1892) and Jane Henderson (Mar. 10, 1819 - 1909). Both parents are buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Battle Creek, Ida County, Iowa. He married Rebecca McCaughey on Oct. 4, 1860 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of William McCaughey and Jane Richeson. Hamilton's brother James H. Booth also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

Robert McCaughey 1752 Family Tree by Vernon R. Locke1818rt, Jr. (1988), page 12

They lived on a farm near Walker, IA until 1881 when they moved to Wasioji, MN. They operated a cheese factory there a few years and then took a claim at Pierre, SD. After proving up they sold their claim and moved to St. Paul, MN.

From the biography of his brother James H. Booth

The father, a farmer by occupation, moved to Cass County, Indiana, in 1849, and in 1855 to Rice County, Minnesota, where he cleared a farm. In 1857 he came to Iowa, in 1881 returned to Dodge County, Mn.; and in 1889 came to Battle Creek, Ia. His death occurred in January 1892, and the mother still resided in Battle Creek in 1893. They were parents of 9 children: H. B. of Buchanan County, Iowa; J. H. Booth (the subject of this biography); William (who enlisted in 1861 in Co. H, 14th Ia. Infantry for 3 years and was wounded at Shiloh, died in the field hospital near Corinth in 1862 at 19 yrs.); Isaac of St. Paul, Mn.; Hannah M. (wife of Geo. W. Spetzer of Battle Creek); Sarah (wife of Frank North of Kansas); Nancy J.; George (deceased when young); and Mary (deceased by 1893). H. B. Booth, the eldest child, enlisted in Buchanan County, Ia., in Aug. 1862 in Co. H, 27th Ia. Infantry, and was mustered into service at Dubuque and took part in the Battle of Pleasant Hill. He served principally in Missouri, Mississippi, and Alabama, also in the Tennessee campaign, and after 3 yrs. of service was mustered out at Clinton, Iowa.

(Biographical History of Crawford, Ida and Sac Counties, Iowa. Lewis Publishing Company. 1893)

1857 Minnesota Territorial and State Census, Township 110, Rice County, Minnesota: Jeremiah Booth (age 40, born Ohio), Jane Booth (age 38, born Ohio), Hamilton Booth (age 18, born Ohio), James Booth (age 16, born Ohio), William Booth (age 14, born Ohio), Isaac M. Booth (age 12, born Ohio), Hannah M. Booth (age 6, born Indiana) and Sarah E. Booth (age 6/12, born Minnesota).

1860 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa; Jeremiah Booth (age 42, farmer, born Ohio), Jane Booth (age 41, born Ohio), Hamilton Booth (age 20, born Ohio), Wm. B. Booth (age 16, born Ohio), Isaac Booth (age 14, born Ohio), Hannah Booth (age 9, born Indiana), Sarah Booth (age 3, born Minnesota) and Nancy J. Booth (age 5/12, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Booth (age 31, farmer, born Ohio), Rebecka Booth (age 29, born Ohio) Wilbert Booth (age 7), James Booth (age 29, farmer, born Ohio) and Christina Booth (age 22, born Iowa.

1880 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: H. B. Booth (age 40, born Ohio), wife Rebecca Booth (age 40, born Ohio), son Wilbert F. Booth (age 18, born Iowa) and daughter Julia H. (age 4, born Iowa).

1890 Veterans Census: Waltham, Mower County, Minnesota; Hamilton Booth, Private Co. H., 27 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Sept. 19, 1862. Discharged Aug. 8, 1865. Length of Service 2 years, 10 months, 19 days. Post Office Address: Waltham, Mower County, Minnesota.

1900 Census: Rousseau, Hughes County, South Dakota; Henry Booth (born Aug. 1839, age 60, married 40 years, born Ohio), Rebecca Booth (born Dec. 1839, age 60, married 40 years, 3 children born 2 still living, born Ohio), son Wilbert Booth (born Aug. 1862, age 37, born Iowa) and mother Jane Booth (Born Mar. 1819, age 81, widowed, 9 children born, 5 still living, born Ohio).

1910 Census; St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota: Hamilton H. Booth (age 70, married 1 time for 49 years, born Ohio), wife Rebecca R. Booth (age 70, married 1 time for 49 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born Ohio), son Wilbert L. Booth (age 47, born Iowa, Teamster).

Hamilton B. Booth died Sept. 10, 1910 (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minneosta.

Minnesota Death Index: Name: Hamilton B. Booth. Death Date: 10 Sept. 1910, Death County: Ramsey, State File Number 011127. Certificate Number 022237, Certificate Year: 1910. Record Number 60234.

His Widow Rebecca R. Booth filed for a pension on Oct. 3, 1910 in Minnesota.


Booth, James Henderson He was born Feb. 19, 1841 in Coshocton County, Ohio. He was the son of Jeremiah Booth (Aug. 13, 1816 - Jan. 17, 1892) and Jane Henderson (Mar. 10, 1819 - 1909). Both parents are buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Battle Creek, Ida County, Iowa. He married Christina Lott Peyton on October 21, 1869 in Buchanan County. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934) (note the biography below says they married Oct. 1868). She was the daughter of Philip Peyton (May 18, 1815 0 Feb. 28, 1874) and Lucretia Jane Lott (Nov. 27, 1814 - Dec. 1, 1849). James' brother Hamilton Booth also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

James H. Booth, a Civil War Veteran, was born Feb. 19, 1841, and passed away Aug. 24, 1902. Burial was in the Mount Hope Cemetery, Battle Creek, Ida County, Iowa.

J. H. Booth, a farmer of Section 12, Garfield Twp., Ida County, was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, in 1841, a son of Jeremiah and Jane (Hendersay) Booth, natives also of Ohio. He was reared in Coshocton County, Ohio, until 10 years of age, then in Cass County, Indiana, thence to Rice County, Minnesota, spending his school days in Ohio, Indiana, Minnesota, and Iowa. He came to Buchanan County, Iowa, in 1857, and he has since been engaged at farm labor. In that county in 1861, he enlisted in Co. H, 14th Iowa Infantry for 3 years, or during the war. He was mustered into service at Davenport, and took part in the Battles of Shiloh and Fort Donelson. Mr. Booth was discharged in 1862, on account of ill health, returned to Buchanan County, and December 29, 1862, re-enlisted in Co. H, 27th Iowa Infantry for 3 years, or during the war. He participated in the campaign at Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, where he received a gunshot wound, and was confined in the hospital at Memphis. At Montgomery, Alabama, in 1865, he was honorably discharged, and returned to Buchanan County. He was there engaged in farming until July 1880, when he purchased 80 acres of land on Section 12, Garfield Township, Ida County, Iowa. He erected a good residence 20 x 26 ft, with an L (14 x 14 ft.) has a fine grove and orchard of 2 1/2 acres, and has added to his original purchase until he owned 160 acres. He was engaged in general farming and stock-raising.

In Buchanan County, in October 1868, he was united in marriage with Miss Christiana Peyton, a native of Muscatine County, Iowa, and a daughter of Philip Peyton, a native of Kentucky. To this union were born 3 children, George W., Marion W., and Nancy J. Mr. Booth served as Road Supervisor and a member of the School Board. He was one of the early pioneers of Garfield Township, Ida County, Iowa.

The father, a farmer by occupation, moved to Cass County, Indiana, in 1849, and in 1855 to Rice County, Minnesota, where he cleared a farm. In 1857 he came to Iowa, in 1881 returned to Dodge County, Mn.; and in 1889 came to Battle Creek, Ia. His death occurred in January 1892, and the mother still resided in Battle Creek in 1893. They were parents of 9 children: H. B. of Buchanan County, Iowa; J. H. Booth (the subject of this biography); William (who enlisted in 1861 in Co. H, 14th Ia. Infantry for 3 years and was wounded at Shiloh, died in the field hospital near Corinth in 1862 at 19 yrs.); Isaac of St. Paul, Mn.; Hannah M. (wife of Geo. W. Spetzer of Battle Creek); Sarah (wife of Frank North of Kansas); Nancy J.; George (deceased when young); and Mary (deceased by 1893). H. B. Booth, the eldest child, enlisted in Buchanan County, Ia., in Aug. 1862 in Co. H, 27th Ia. Infantry, and was mustered into service at Dubuque and took part in the Battle of Pleasant Hill. He served principally in Missouri, Mississippi, and Alabama, also in the Tennessee campaign, and after 3 yrs. of service was mustered out at Clinton, Iowa.

(Biographical History of Crawford, Ida and Sac Counties, Iowa. Lewis Publishing Company. 1893)

Note this information was on Find a Grave. It appears from the first paragraph that it might have been his obituary. But the remainder of the information clearly came from the Biographical History.

1857 Minnesota Territorial and State Census, Township 110, Rice County, Minnesota: Jeremiah Booth (age 40, born Ohio), Jane Booth (age 38, born Ohio), Hamilton Booth (age 18, born Ohio), James Booth (age 16, born Ohio), William Booth (age 14, born Ohio), Isaac M. Booth (age 12, born Ohio), Hannah M. Booth (age 6, born Indiana) and Sarah E. Booth (age 6/12, born Minnesota).

1870 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Booth (age 31, farmer, born Ohio), Rebecka Booth (age 29, born Ohio) Wilbert Booth (age 7), James Booth (age 29, farmer, born Ohio) and Christina Booth (age 22, born Iowa.

1880 Census: Maple, Ida County, Iowa: James H. Booth (age 39, farmer, born Ohio), wife Christine Booth (age 31, born Iowa), son George Booth (age 9, born Iowa) and son Marion Booth (age 4, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living in Iowa: James H. Booth, Private, Co. H, Post Office: Battle Creek.

1885 Iowa State Census: Garfield, Ida County, Iowa: James H. Booth (Township 86, Range 41, Section 12, S.W.N.W. 1/4, age 44, farmer, born Ohio), Cristina Booth (age 36, born Muscatine County, Iowa), George W. Booth (age 14, born Muscatine County, Iowa), Marion W. Booth (age 9, born Muscatine County, Iowa) and Nancy J. Booth (age 3?, born Ida County, Iowa).

1900 Census: Garfield, Ida County, Iowa: James H. Booth (born Feb. 1841, age 59, married 30 years, born Ohio, farmer), wife Christina Booth (born Aug. 1848, age 51, married 30 years, 3 children born, 3 still living, born Iowa) and daughter Nancy J. Booth (born July 1882, age 18, born Iowa). George W. Booth (born Nov. 1870, age 30, married 6 years, born Iowa, farmer), wife Eva, daughters, Addy, May and Jo Ella were living next door.

James H. Booth died Aug. 24, 1902. He is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Battle Creek, Ida County, Iowa.

His widow Christina Booth filed for a pension on Oct. 10, 1902.

1925 Iowa State Census, Cushing, Woodbury County, Iowa: Christina Booth (aged 76, widowed, father's name: Philip Peyton. Mother's name: Lucretia Lott.

Christina Booth died Jan. 1, 1933 and is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Battle Creek, Ida County, Iowa.


Bowers, Solomon He was born July 6, 1820 in Bowerstown, Harrison County, Ohio. He was the son of John Bower (Mar. 18, 1795 - Sept. 7. 1863) and Catherine Swinehart (Mar. 28, 1794 - May 10, 1861). He married Susan Ann Lawver on July 5, 1843 in Harrison County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Adam Lawver and Susan Rutherford.

1850 Census: Monroe, Carroll County, Ohio: Sol Bowers (age 30, farmer, born Ohio), S. Bowers (age 26, born Ohio), M. E. Bowers (age 5, born Ohio), Jno. Bowers (age 3, born Ohio) and I. A. Bowers (age 7/12, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Center Point, Linn County, Iowa; Solomon Bowers (age 40, engineer, born Ohio), Susan Bower (age 37, born Ohio), Mary E. Bowers (age 15, born Ohio), John S. Bowers (age 14, born Ohio), Israel A. Bowers (age 12, born Ohio), Sarah C. Bowers (age 8, born Ohio), Margaret J. Bowers (age 6, born Ohio) and David I. Bowers (age 2, born Iowa.)

1870 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: Solomon Bowers (age 50, born Ohio), Susan Bowers (age 47, born Ohio), Mary Bowers (age 24, born Ohio), John Bowers (age 22, born Ohio), Israel Bowers (age 20, born Ohio), Sarah Bowers (age 18, born Ohio), Margaret Bowers (age 16, born Ohio), Margaret Bowers (age 16, born Ohio), David Bowers (age 11, born Iowa), Benjamin Bowers (age 9, born Iowa) and Isaac Bowers (age 3, born Iowa).

Susan (Lawver) Bowers (born Oct. 5, 1823), died Jan. 23, 1896. She is buried in Strawberry Point Cemetery, Strawberry Point, Clayton County, Iowa.

1900 Census: Elk, Clayton County, Iowa: Benjamin F. Bowers (born Mar. 1862, age 38, married 7 years, born Iowa, farmer), wife Leona J. Bowers (born June 1872, age 27, married 7 years, 4 children born, 4 still living, born Iowa), son Roy A. Bowers (born May 1893, age 7), son Alfred F. Bowers (born July 1894, age 4), daughter Mable P. Bowers (born Aug. 1897, age 2), son Arthur J. Bowers (born Aug. 1899, age 9/12) and father Solomon Bowers (born July 1820, age 79, widowed, born Ohio, Engineer Saw Mill)

Solomon Bowers died Apr. 7, 1905. He is buried in Strawberry Point Cemetery, Strawberry Point, Clayton County, Iowa. Remarks: Buried on Gleason & Boers lot. (Note Find a Grave says April 1. All other sources say April 7.)

Children of Solomon Bowers and Susan Lawver:

  1. Mary Ellen Bowers, born Aug. 1845
  2. John Lawver Bowers, born Nov. 1847
  3. Israel Archabold Bowers, born Dec. 13, 1849
  4. Sarah Katherine Bowers, born Mar. 1852
  5. Margaret Jane Bowers, born May 25, 1855
  6. David Thomas Bowers, born Feb. 1859
  7. Benjamin Franklin Bowers, born Mar. 1862
  8. Isaac Newton Bowers, born Oct. 8, 1866.
  9. Lizzie May Bowers, born May 1876.

Bowker, Sylvender W. He was born about 1834 in Canada. He was probably the son of Cushing Bowker (Apr 23, 1795 - Sept. 13, 1870) and Abigail W. Rider. He married Sarah Jane Putnam on Sept. 25, 1858. He was aged 24. She was aged 21. Married by Stephen J. W. Labon, County Judge. (pension file). She was probably the daughter of Aaron V. and Maria/Mary Rose Putnam (based on 1850 census in Plattsburg, Steuben County, New York census).

1856 Iowa State Census; Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Sylvender Bowker (age 22, born Canada, carpenter had been in the state of Iowa less than 1 year).

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Sylvender W. Bowker (age 26, born Canada), Sarah J. Bowker (age 24, born New York) and Griffen S. Bowker (age 8/12, born Iowa).

Sylvender W. Bowker died Sept. 25, 1864 from chronic diarrhea. Per the pension record he was admitted on August 17, 1864 and died on Sept. 25, 1864. He is buried in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery (St. Louis), Mo. Section 34, grave 202.

His widow Jane Bowker filed for a pension on Oct. 14, 1864. Information from the pension record is extracted below:

Licence Issued 24 Sept. 1858 - Sylvender W. Bowker & Jane Putnam. This certifies that on the 25th day of September 1858, I, Stephen J.W. Laban, County Judge united Sylvender W. Bowker, aged 24 years and Jane Putnam, aged 21 years in the Holy Bonds of Matrimony.

Witness my hand at Independence this 26th day of September A. D. 1858, Stephen J. W. Laban


On Feb. 27, 1867, she appeared in Steuben County, New York, and made an application for an increase in pension. She stated that she was a resident of Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa; the widow of Sylvender W. Bowker, Corp. Co. H, 27th Iowa Vols; He was survived by two children: Sylvender Griffin Bowker born Oct. 29, 1859 and Edward Bowker, born Jan 31, 1861; her post office address at present was "Prattsburg, Steuben County New York", but when at my residence, "Independence, Iowa". Witnesses were Lewis Putnam and Cornelia Shults, residents of Steuben County, New York.


On July 25, 1868, George W. Townes appeared at Steuben County, New York and made the following statement: That he was a Justice of the Peace residing at Avoca, Steuben County NY and as Justice of the Peace he did unite in marriage Richard V. Voorhees and Jane Bowker at Avoca on the 28th day of June, 1868; That there is no public record of said marriage, as deponent verily believes; that deponent neither made, nor authorized to be made, any public church record of said marriage; that it was not customary among the people of said County, at the time of said marriage, to record marriages in Town or County records, nor required by the laws of said County or State, as deponent is informed and believes; and that deponent derives the facts of said marriage from "a distant recollection of the time.

A pension was filed for a minor on Aug. 31, 1868. Jane Voorhees was appointed guardian on Oct. 24, 1868 in Steuben County, New York. Minor children were Sylvender Griffin Bowker, born Oct. 29, 1859 and Edward Bowker, born Jan 31, 1861.

On Feb. 11, 1869, Richard Voorhees made a statement: My wife Jane Voorhees the widow of Sylvender Bowker who died in the army leaving my wife surviving and his two children Griffin and Eddy Bowker of whom my wife is guardian and receives a pension from Government for those children.

Now my wife has left me and gone to living with another man and left the children on my hands and I have them to support and she doesn't leave the pension for the benefit of the children. Now I want to know if I can have that pension for the benefit of the children and if so what course shall I pursue to obtain it? Richard Voorhees.

On March 26, 1869 several people (T. A. Steward, S. Peek, H. Hunt and Joseph Eells) appeared in Steuben County New York and made a statement: They were well acquainted with Mrs. Jane Voorhees, guardian of the minor children of Sylvender W. Bowker who was a private in Company H, 27th Regiment Iowa Volunteers. She is a respectable lady and resides by herself in the Village of Avoca, Steuben County, New York, and has with her the two children Sylvender G. and Edward Bowker and takes the best of care of her wards. We suppose the charges made against her was by Richard Voorhees, (who is a worthless fellow) because she would not let him have the pension money, and also as we are informed and believe he wanted her to sell a house in Iowa and give him the proceeds. The said house and lot she holds for the benefit of her wards.


On Oct. 13, 1886, Sarah J. Avery made a declaration for Restoration to the Pension Roll: She was the identical Sarah J. Bowker who was pensioned on the rolls of the Agency at Des Moines, Iowa. Last paid on August 9, 1869. She had since resided at Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa. She had not claimed pension since that date for the following reason: At that time she was married to Martin G. Avery but that such marriage was null and void, as the former wife of said Martin G. Avery was living and that the said Martin G. Avery and Lavina Avery, his former wife, were never divorced. That the said Lavina Avery was married to without having had a divorce granted. That the said Lavina Avery, the former wife of said Martin G. Avery died Nov. 17, 1876 at Homellville, New York. The residence of Sarah J. Avery was Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Rejected on the grounds that claimant's title to pension ceased when she married to Richard Voorhees June 28, 1868 and the legality or illegality of her subsequent marriage to Martin E. Avery has no bearing upon the claim application for arrears or the results thereof.

The grounds on which claimant declares her marriage to Avery is not usable for the reason that his former wife has, as claimant alleges, another husband living when she married him, therefore her marriage to him was illegal, and no bar to his marriage to claimant. Se claimant's claim #293.966 as widow of Martin E. Avery G 64 NY & C 179 NY Inf.


On June 13, 187 in Independence Iowa, she made a statement that her first husband was Sylvender W. Bowker. Company H, 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He died at Jefferson Barracks Mo in 1864 and she married Martin Avery on Aug. 9, 1869 and that she had not been married to anyone else - and that she had no husband living when she married M. G. Avery.

Note the date on this statement was as written above: June 13, 187. It would appear to me (based on the information above) that the year should probably be 1887.

1870 Census; Coffins Grove, Delaware County, Iowa: Martin G. Avery (age 46, carpenter), Sarah J. Avery (age 35) and Edward Bowker (age 9, born Iowa). Note: There is a Griffin S. Bowker, (age 10, born Iowa) listed with another Bowker family in Kingston, Dekalb County, Illinois.

1880 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Martin Avery (age 56), wife Sarah J. Avery (age 42), Stepson Sylvender Bowker (age 20), stepson Edward Bowker (age 18). (Note: The rest of the children are listed as "Bowker" but probably should be Avery): son Arlington Bowker (age 8), son Rockwell Bowker (age 6), daughter Stella H. Bowker (age 3) and son Luther P. Bowker (age 1).

Sarah (Putnam, Bowker, Voorhees) Avery died March 17, 1890 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa. (Buchanan County Cemetery Records).


Brown, Matthew Young. He was born Jan. 18, 1835 in Mercer County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of John Brown and Mary Young. He married Clarissa Maria Timson on Dec. 31, 1860 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934) She was the daughter of Robert Timson (June 29, 1796 - Aug. 28, 1872) and Martha E. Perry (Sept. 2, 1799 - Nov. 26, 1856). Her sister Frances Fidelia Timson married Absalom Blank, who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Hickory, Mercer County, Pennsylvania: Mary Brown (age 50, born Pennsylvania), George Brown (age 20, born Pennsylvania), Anne H. Brown (age 18, born Pennsylvania), Matthew Y. Brown (age 15, born Pennsylvania), John Brown (age 13, born Pennsylvania), Joseph Y. Brown (age 12, born Pennsylvania), Mary Brown (age 10, born Pennsylvania) and James W. Brown (age 8, Born Pennsylvania.

1860 Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Wm. Blank (age 27, farmer, born Pa), Ann Blank (age 28, born PA), Mary E. Blank (age 7, born PA), Moses F. Blank (age 5 born PA), Sarah A. Blank (age 3, born Iowa), Malissa B. Blank (age 1, born Iowa) and Mathew Y. Brown (age 24, born PA). Note: William Blank has three brothers (Absalom, John M. and Joseph Henry) who also served with Co. H, 27th Iowa. They were also from Hickory, Mercer County, Pennsylvania.

1870 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Young Brown (age 35, born Pennsylvania), Clarissa Brown (age 28, born Vermont), John Brown (age 8, born Iowa), Joseph Brown (age 6, born Iowa), Russell Brown (age 4, born Iowa), Charley Brown (age 1, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Matthew Y. Brown (age 45, farmer, born Pennsylvania), wife Clarice Brown (age 37, born Vermont), son John H. Brown (age 18, born Iowa), son Joseph L. Brown (age 16, born Iowa), son Russel H. Brown (age 13, born Iowa), son Charles M. Brown (age 11, born Iowa), daughter Almira H. Brown (age 9, born Iowa), son Mark Brown (age 4, born Iowa), daughter Ellen R. Brown (age 2) and son Robert S. Brown (age 9/12, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Matthew Brown (Township 88, Range 7, Section 32, NE. NW, age 49, farmer, born Illinois?), Clarissa M. Brown (age 42, born Penn.), John H. Brown (age 22, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Joseph L. Brown (age 20, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Russell A. Brown (age 18, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Almira A. Brown (age 14, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Mark Brown (age 9, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Ellen R. Brown (age 7, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Robert S. Brown (age 5, born Buchanan County, Iowa), and Mary M. Brown (age 3, born Buchanan County, Iowa),

1900 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Matthew Brown (born Jan., 1835, age 65, married 39 years, born Pennsylvania, Capitalist), wife Clarrissa Brown (born July 1842, age 57, married 39 years, 9 children born, 8 still living, born Vermont), son Robert F. Brown (born Aug. 1879, age 20, born Iowa) and daughter Mary Brown (born Oct. 1881, age 18, born Iowa)

Matthew Y. Brown died Nov. 24, 1907 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

Iowa Cemetery Records: Name: Matthew Y. Brown, Death Date: 24 Nov. 1907, Page #57. Birth Date: 18 Jan, 1835. Cemetery Quasqueton, Town Liberty. Level Source: Buchanan County Burial Records.

His widow Clarissa Brown filed for a pension on Dec. 20, 1907.

Clarissa (Timson) Brown Died Dec, 11, 1912 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa. (Note: Obituary says Greenwood Cemetery).

Bulletin Journal Independence, Iowa December 19, 1912

Mrs. Clarissa Brown, for many years a respected resident of this place, died at her home here Wednesday, December 11, at 11:30 p.m., after but a few moments illness with heart trouble, and her passing was a shock to the entire community. She spent the afternoon with neighbors, returning home at 5 o'clock. She remarked to a friend that she felt better that day than she had for a long time. Several hours after retiring she became very ill with pain in the region of her heart. Her son Robert, who lived with her, summoned a physician, but she lived but twenty minutes after he arrived.

Clarissa M. Timson was born in Vermont, July 10, 1842. She came to Quasqueton, Iowa with her parents in 1859. She was united in marriage to Matthew Young Brown on December 31, 1860. They were the parents of nine children, Charles M. died October 18, 1881, aged 13 years; the following survive; John H., Luke, Russell A., Mark, Robert S., and Mrs. Ruth Polk, of this vicinity; Mrs. Angelina Gardner, of Creighton, Neb., and Mrs. Marie Berry of Waterloo. The family lived on a farm until 1897, when they moved to town. Mr. Brown passed away November 24, 1907. Mrs. Brown was a good woman in every relation in life, and her many friends were sorry to learn that her life was ended. Several years ago, she became a member of the Baptist society and was ever a faithful, sincere Christian. The funeral service was held at the Baptist Church Saturday at 10:30 a.m., and there was a large attendance of relatives and sympathizing friends. Rev. H. Bellman had charge of the service, giving a comforting talk. Friends contributed beautiful flowers. The remains were born to their last resting place in the family lot in Greenwood cemetery by the following gentlemen: W.W. Moore, C. J. Walter, Fred Daubenberger, E. T. Clark, E. L. Plank and H. S. Walton.

Children of Matthew Young Brown and Clarissa Maria Timson:

  1. John H. Brown, Jan. 13, 1862 - 1936
  2. Joseph Luke Brown, Feb. 12, 1864 - 1935
  3. Russell A. Brown, July 16, 1866 - Feb. 16, 1937
  4. Charles A. Brown, Nov. 16, 1868 - Oct. 13, 1881
  5. Angina Elmira Brown, Sept. 16, 1870 - Feb. 25, 1944
  6. Mark Young Brown, Sept. 11, 1875 - Jan. 21, 1951
  7. Ellen Ruth Brown, Aug. 14, 1877 - Feb. 22, 1946
  8. Robert S. Brown, Aug. 23, 1879 - April 11, 1910
  9. Marie M. Brown, Oct. 25, 1881 - Sept. 1948

Brownson, Mark He was born about 1820 in Vermont. Mark Brownson married Ellen M. Ayrault on Feb. 13, 1857 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Buchanan County Marriage Book 1, 1848 - 1858)

1850 Census: Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts: Mark Bronson, (age 30, born VT), Mary F. Bronson (age 28, born Mass.), Mary L. Bronson (age 5, born Mass) and Ellen Bronson (age 0, born Mass).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Mark Bronson (age 40, farmer, born Vermont), Ellen Bronson (age 27, born NY), Mary L. Bronson (age 15, born Mass.), Betsey E. Bronson (age 10, born Mass. and Edward A. Bronson (age 10/12, born Iowa). (Since I know that Mark Brownson and Ellen Ayrault were married in 1857, the 1850 census must be him with a first wife. The first two children would have been from that marriage).

Mark Brownson filed for a pension on June 24, 1863.

Mark Brownson is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Lot #175. Liberty Township, Buchanan County, Iowa. I could not determine his date of death. It is not mentioned in the pension records that are online.

(Note: I found a Mark Brownson, born July 21, 1818 in Sunderland, Bennington County Vermont, died Feb. 25, 1865 (does not say where). He was the son of Gideon Brownson (Jan 29, 1784 - Feb. 2, 1861) and Lamira Evarts Hawley (Dec. 24, 1783 - Feb. 12, 1855). However, this family consisted of 12 children who all died in Vermont with the exception of 1 who died in Newfoundland, and Mark Brownson with no place of death listed. I suppose he could have been the only child to leave the area, but on the other hand this may not be the correct Mark Brownson. The date of death does correlate with when the pension was filed.

His widow Ellen M. Brownson filed for a pension on May 2, 1865. Two children were listed in the pension records: Edward Brownson, born Oct, 7, 1859 and James W. Brownson, born Oct. 19, 1861. (note the dates in the pension record was actually the date they would have turned 16. I computed their birth date from that date).

On Aug. 16, 1878 a pension was filed for a minor. James P. Ayrault was guardian. (Note: I am note sure who this pension would have been filed for. Both the children were over 16 by that time.)

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Ellen Brunson (age 37, born New York), Ada Brunson (age 34, born New York), Eunice Brunson (age 32, born New York) and Willard Brunson (age 8, born Iowa). (Note: although Ada and Eunice are listed as Brunson, they are Ellen's sisters Ada and Eunice Ayrault. James P. Ayrault was her brother - Information was obtained from the 1850 Census in Pike, Wyoming County, New York. All four (plus other siblings) are listed with parents Lyman and Elizabeth Ayrault).


Buch, John He was born about 1827 in Pennsylvania. He married Mary Spickler on August 19, 1848 at Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

1850 Census: Warwick, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania: John Buch (age 22, carpenter, born Pennsylvania), Mary A. Buch (age 21, born Pennsylvania), Edwin Buch (age 2, born Pennsylvania), Amos Ressler (age 21, carpenter, born Pennsylvania) and Elias Grube (age 17, carpenter, born Pennsylvania).

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Bugh (age 32, carpenter, born PA), Mary Bugh (age 27, born PA), Edwin Bugh (age 11, born PA), Matilda Bugh (age 9, born PA) and Frank Crane (age 24, farmer, born NY).

John Buch died at Moscow, Tennessee, July 22, 1863, from an accidental gunshot wound received while on picket duty.

Another letter from the Twenty-seventh tells of their skirmishes with the guerrillas, but no casualties had taken place. John Buck of Independence had accidentally shot himself in the leg, shattering the bone and compelling amputation. It was feared the wound would prove fatal.

History of Buchanan County, Iowa, and its people, Volume 1
By Harry Church Chappell, and Katharyn Chappell

His widow Mary Buch filed for a pension on Dec. 29, 1863. Information from her pension file is extracted below:

In her pension application she stated:

  • She was a resident of Mount Joy Borough, State of Pennsylvania
  • She was aged 35
  • She was the widow of John Buch, a private in Company H, commanded by O. Whitney in the 27th Regiment of Infantry, Iowa Volunteers.
  • His death was caused by an accidental gunshot wound while on duty.
  • She was married to John Buch on the 19th day of August, 1847 at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, by Rev. William Beates, Lutheran Clergyman.
  • The names of her children under sixteen years of age: Edwin, born March. 10, 1848 and Matilda born May 27th, 1851, and their residence was Oregon, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

Jan. 12, 1864 statement: He is reported Private "Died June 22, 1863 in Regt. Hospital by accidental gunshot wound June 21, 1863 requiring amputation of leg."


Marriage record:

Married John Buch of Manheim Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, to Mary Spickler, of Warrick Township, same county and state on the 19th day of August. A. D., 1847 by Rev. William Beates, Pastor of the German Lutheran Church, of Lancaster City, Pennsylvania.


Payment was made to include 5 March 1878. Pensioner died March 5, 1878, paid Jacob D. Libhart, claimant for arrears due $24.53 on May 28th 1878. (NOTE: there was an application made by Matilda Libhart (only child & daughter of Mary Buch for arrears due to her). Per 1880 census record, Jacob was her husband). 1900 census shows that she had no children.)

Moscow, June 4, 1863

Mrs. Buch

Dear Madam

I have the painful task of informing you that your husband Mr. John Buch has passed away from among the living. This happened at a little before 11 o'clock A. M. of the 22 inst.

The accident which caused his death cannot be explained. He was habitually very careful in handling his gun & he says he thought of being very careful at the time the accident occurred. He with three other of his company was doing picket duty & had what is called a wedge tent to sleep in & some boards on the ground. The boards were raised perhaps 8 or 10 inches from the ground.

It had come Mr. Buch's turn to stand guard & he had got up & was standing at the edge of the tent as he reached in & took up his gun by the mussel & drew it towards him when it discharged with the fatal result. He stood still for an instant exclaiming "My God I am shot" & then fell. He would have fallen instantly if he had been bearing any weight upon the leg at the time. His shock of course was very great & he was immediately in great pain. One of his first expression if not the very first after saying he was shot was "What will my poor wife say now? This will kill her."

His first & last thought were of you & the children. It is very unusual for one to suffer as he did immediately after the accident. Usually when the large bones are shattered so there is a numbness for some time & not much suffering until there is a reaction. The wound was received about 2 o'clock A. M. of the 21st inst. & he was in great pain for four or five hours when the suffering became much less. He was unconscious when the amputation was performed which result was produced by chloroform. I think he did not fully recover from the effects of the chloroform. At any rate he was kept insensible to pain by powerful narcotics. It is the practice among army surgeons to let the wounded die as easily as possible.

I think the surgeons from the first had but little or no hope of his recovery. The surgeons of this Regt. did not take the responsibility of acting unadvisedly, but sent to La Grange for advice. Three surgeons came & assisted or rather performed the operation. One of the gentleman is on Gen. Oglesby staff. They understood their business well & did the best they could for Mr. Buch.

He died easily like falling asleep. We buried him with military honors. His limb which had been previously buried was taken up & deposited in the coffin, so that his whole body is buried in the same grave. He sleeps by the side of other soldiers who have fallen in this dreadful war.

He has given his life to his country & I trust his country will honor him for the noble sacrifice. Many many others, but few as brave, must yet fall in their countries cause. Let it be some little consolation to know that their memory will be cherished with respect and affection while that of the traitor will be forgotten in obloquy & shame.

If you should wish to make any enquires please do so & I will answer immediately.

Yours sc.

O. Whitney, Captain. Co H, 27th Iowa.


Bunce, Thomas Shipman He was born June 9, 1811 at Hartford, Connecticut. He was the son of Hezekiah Bunce (Dec. 15, 1781 -?) and Julie E. Shipman (June 19, 1790 -:?) He married Amanda Osborne, Dec. 21, 1841.

Hezekiah Bunce born 15 Dec 15, 1781, Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, married 9 Sep 1810, in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, Julia E. Shipman who was born 19 Jun 19, 1790. Their children (total of 9):

Note: The names of the following children were provided by Joseph Hart in an email dated 2Jan 2003, which he said was from family Bible records:

  1. Thomas Shipman Bunce, born 9 Jun 1811, Hartford, Connecticut; married ?? died 18 Aug 1877 Otterville, Buchanan Co., Iowa; had one known child, Rufus O. Bunce, married ??, who in turn was the father of Harry Vivian Bunce. Harry married Flora Alice Hackett and had Harry Donald Bunce, born 29 Oct 1901, Beloit, Rock Co., Wisconsin.
  2. Lucy Ann Bunce, born 23 Apr 1813, Hartford, Connecticut.
  3. Elizabeth L. Bunce, born 8 Oct 1815, Hartford, Connecticut.
  4. Mary Bunce, born 17 Feb 1818, Hartford, Connecticut.
  5. Julia Bunce, born about 1820, died Dec 1822, Hartford, Connecticut.
  6. Hezekiah Bunce, Jr., born 6 Jun 1823, Hartford, Connecticut.
  7. George Clapp Bunce, born 16 Mar 1826, Hartford, Connecticut.
  8. Mary Ellen Bunce, born 6 Jul 1829, Hartford, Connecticut.
  9. William Rufus Bunce, born 4 Jun 1834, Hartford, Connecticut.

I found this information posted on Genforum:

Thomas Shipman Bunce married an Amanda Osborne Dec 21, 1842. They had a daughter Mary Eliza Bunce born April 15, 1845. This was actually the 2nd Mary Eliza, the first died as an infant. If you would like more info just e-mail me at Grniz001@aol.com

This is as far back as the tree goes but I can get you information through present. Mary had a brother, Rufus O. Bunce. That is my gg grandfather. There was also another brother, Francis Thomas.

1850 Census: Williamsburg, Kings County, New York: Thos S. Bunce (age 38, engineer, born Connecticut), Amanda Bunce (age 37, born New York), Mary E. Bunce (age 5, born Connecticut), Rufus Bunce (age 5, born Connecticut), William Bunce (age 2, born Connecticut), and Chas. Bunce (age 1, born Connecticut). This family was indexed as Bunse.

1860 Census, Superior, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thos. S. Bunce (age 49, farmer, born Connecticut), Amanda Bunce (age 36, born New York), Mary E. Bunce (age 18, born Connecticut) Rufus O. Bunce (age 13, born Connecticut), and Emetine Osborn (age 38, born New York).

1870 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Mary E. Chaffer (age 25, born Conn.), Thomas Bunce (age 59, farm laborer, born Conn), Rufus O Bunce (age 24, born Conn.) and Frances T. Bunce (age 8, male born Iowa). The family was indexed as Bann. (This appears to me to be Thomas S. Bunce with a married daughter and two sons.).

Thomas S. Bunce died Aug. 18, 1877 and is buried in Otterville Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.


Burco, Mathias. He was born about 1830 in Pennsylvania. He married Maria Clow on Apr. 28, 1855 in Defiance, Ohio. (Ohio, Marriages, 1800 - 1958). She was the daughter of Malachi Clow and Juliana Shrimplon,

I actually had quite a bit of difficulty trying to find anything on this soldier. I did find this posted online in Nov. 2009

1860 Census Lawrence Co., PA, Little Beaver Twp.
Abraham BURKO 65, wife LEAKE B. 56; children include Mathias 23. County boundaries were redrawn between 1840 and 1860. I could not find the family in 1850. It is possible that THIS Mathias married and moved to Iowa in time to serve in the Civil War by 1862 and be the Mathias BURCO there.

However, Iowa records show a Mathias BURCO b. PA, a Civil War Vet who received a pension and after his death in 1893 his wife Maria received that pension. He is buried along with Maria in Hazelton, Buchanan Co., Iowa and a tree on ancestry gives Maria's maiden name as CLOW. I cannot tell if these are the same Mathias or not. In 1860 there is a Mathias BURES 25, in Liberty, Buchanan Co., IA, with a wife Maria 21, and a daughter Sarah E. aged 2. This could be a different man entirely.

I also checked the Bercaw and Burcaw message boards. No one seems to have researched Mathias.

Complicating this is of course the spellings of the surname. I found it as Birkey, Burkey, Birky, Burky, Berkey, Bercau, Bercaugh among others. The message boards seem to indicate that it may also have changed into Brokaw.

Good luck in this complicated search.

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Mathias Bures (age 25, farm laborer, born PA), Maria Bures (age 21, born Ohio), and Sarah E. Bures (age 2, born Iowa).

1870 Census, Rockford, Pottawattamie County, Iowa: Mathias Burkho (age 40, born Wales, farmer), J. Burkho (age 30, born Wales), Ella Burkho (age 13, born Iowa), George Burkho (age 10, born Iowa), Nelson Burkho (age 8 born Iowa), Joseph Burkho (age 6, born Iowa), Julia Burkho (age 4, born Iowa) and Evia Burkho (age 1, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living Iowa: Mathias Busco, Private, Co. H. Present Post Office Address: Hazelton.

1885 Iowa State Census, Hazelton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Mathias Burco (Township 80, Range 9, Section 14, NE, NW, age 51, farmer, born PA), Mariah Burco (age 48, born Ohio), Margaret Burco (age 14, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Dellia Burco (age 8, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Mary Burco (age 7, born Buchanan County, Iowa.)

He died Sept. 10, 1898 and is buried in Fontana Cemetery, Add. 2, Lot #149, Hazelton, Buchanan County, Iowa. Remarks: GAR Marker, Post #63. (There is a discrepancy in his date of death. The obituary below says he died "Last Saturday". Using the date of the newspaper of Sept. 15, 1898, "Last Saturday" would be Sept. 10, 1898. But his tombstone clearly says died 1893. AND his widow filed for a pension on June 3, 1895 and that is clearly written on the Pension Index Card. So I am wondering whether the date was not clear when the obituary was transcribed. Maybe the date should be Sept. 15, 1893?

Mathias M Burco
Posted By: Raven Thomas

OBITUARY: (Independence Conservative 15 Sept 1898)

M. Burco, whose sickness we announced last week, died at his home one mile east of town, last Saturday p.m. The funeral services were held at the M.E. church, conducted by Rev. Platts. He was born in Pennsylvania, and while young moved to Defiance county Ohio, where he married Miss Maria Clow, and in the spring of 1857 he moved with his family to Iowa and settled in Buchanan county, where he spent the remainder of his life. He leaves a wife and seven children, five girls and two boys. He was a soldier the 17th reg. Iowa inf. vol. for one year. The family have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in this their sad bereavement.

Note: "Last Saturday" from Sept. 15, 1898 would be Sept. 10, 1898. I do wonder about the "17th Reg. Iowa Inf. I wonder if that is a typo, or if I have the wrong Mathias Burco.

His widow Maria Burco filed for a pension on June 3, 1895 in Iowa. (Note: cemetery records say he died in 1893).

Maria Burco, born 1835, died June 19, 1909 and is buried in Fontana Cemetery, Add. 2, Lot #149, Hazelton, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Oelwein Daily Register Obituary:

Obituary Notice of Mrs Maria Burco:

Maria Clow was born in Holmes County, Ohio, August 10 1835, and died in Oelwein June 19 1909, aged seventy three years, ten months, and nine days. In 1854 she was united in marriage to Mathias Burco while yet a resident of Ohio, and two years later they came to Iowa and located on a farm near Independence. They resided on the farm and near Hazleton up to the time of his death which occurred in 1898.

To them were born seven children, of whom four are living--Mrs Bert Bigelow, Fayette; Mrs Emmett Edom; Oelwein, Mrs Marie Rockwell; St. Paul, Minn, and Nelson Burco, Aurora, who attended the last serviced which occurred from the Methodist church in Hazleton, June 21 at 2:30 p.m.

She has been a member of the Methodist church for many years and lived a true, Christian life. This was evidenced by the love and esteem in which she was held by her associates. She had done well her part in life, and had lived more than the allotted period of life when she was called and willingly laid down the burden of life. She had been a true wife and mother, and went to join her husband and three children who had preceded her to that bourne from which no traveller returns. Her children have the sympathy of friends in their loss.

Posted By: Raven Thomas

Marriage records in Buchanan County Iowa, for Nelson Burco (born 1862), Julia A. Burco (born 1858), and Della Burco (born 1864) all list their parents as Mathias Burco and Mariah Clow.

1925 Iowa State Census, Putnam, Fayette County, Iowa: Nelson Burco (age 61, father's name: Mathias Burco, born PA. Mother's name: Maria Clough, born Ohio. Parents married in Iowa), wife Martha (Pipelow) Burco, son Don R. Burco, son Melvin V. Burco and son Verle E. Burco.


Caldwell, Columbus E. He was born about Oct. 17, 1844 in Jefferson County, Iowa. He was the son of Barton Warren Caldwell (Nov. 13, 1821 - Mar. 13, 1900. and Jane Wimberly. He married Marion H. Stockhouse on Oct. 17, 1869 in Benton County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). His brother Thomas Caldwell also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census, Sangamon, Illinois Barton Caldwell (age 37, laborer, born Indiana), Mary Caldwell (age 28, born Indiana), Columbus Caldwell (age 6, born Illinois), Thomas Caldwell (age 5, born Illinois), John Caldwell (age 2, born Illinois), Alfred Meyers (age 21, laborer, born Illinois).

1860 Census, Harrison, Benton County, Iowa: Barton Colwell (age 38, farmer, born Ind.), Mary Jane Colwell (age 38, born KY), Columbus Colwell (age 15, farmer, born Iowa), Thomas O. Colwell (age 13, born Iowa), John W. Colwell (age 12, born Illinois), James A. Colwell (age 6, born Illinois).

1870 Census, Cedar Rapids Ward 2, Linn County, Iowa Barton Colwell (age 48 , Keeper Bd. home, born Ind.), Mary J. Colwell (age 47, born Kentucky), Thos. Colwell (age 23, born Iowa), Angus Colwell (age 14, born Ill). Columbus Colwell (age 26, laborer, born Ind.), Minnie Colwell (age 21, born Virginia). Other people are listed that appear to be boarders and unrelated to them.

1880 REUNION OF BENTON COUNTY VETERANS OF THE CIVIL WAR  

Held at Vinton, Iowa, September 14-15, 1880
Roll of Soldiers Reported to the Secretary  

27th Iowa Infantry

Caldwell, C. E., Co. H
Henry, J. W., Co. F

 

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living in Iowa, 27th Iowa: Edwin Caldwell, Private, Co. H. Present Post-Office Address Rowley.

1885 Iowa State Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: Edwin Caldwell (Township 87, Range 8, Section, 29, NW NW, age 46, farming, born Jefferson County, Iowa), Helen Caldwell (age 37, born Wisconsin), John Caldwell (age 12, born Kansas), Myrtle Caldwell (age 7, born Iowa) and Nettie Caldwell (age 3, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers: Leavenworth, Kansas, Western Branch: Columbus Caldwell: MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Each Enlistment: August 11, 1862, Independence, Iowa. Rank Pvt. Company and Regiment: H, 27th Ohio* Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: Aug. 8, 1865, Clinton Iowa. Cause of Discharge: Order War Dept. Kind and Degree of Disability: Chr. Diarrhea, Piles. When and Where Contracted: Oct. 1862, Mississippi River bet. Dubuque IA and Ft. Snelling, Minn. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Iowa, Age: 53. Height 5-10, Complexion: Dark, black eyes, brown hair, can read and write, Religion: P, Occupation: Farmer. Residence subsequent to Discharge: Winslow, Ark. married. Name and Address of Nearest Relative: wife Minnie H. Caldwell, Winslow, Ark. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: 12.00, Date of Admission: Oct. 11, 1898, Date of Discharge: March 26, 1903. Cause of Discharge: His req. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate: 170905

*Even through the record says OHIO, it clearly should have been Iowa. The pension certificate matches.

1900 Census: Leavenworth Ward 2, Leavenworth County, Kansas: Columbus Caldwell (born Oct, 1844, age 55, married 30 years, born Iowa), wife Minnie Caldwell (born June 1849, age 51, married 30 years, born Wisconsin), son John A. Caldwell (born Feby 1873, age 27, born Kansas) and daughter Myrtie Caldwell (born Nov. 1877, age 22, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Winslow, Washington County, Arkansas: Columbus E. Caldwell (age 65, married 1 time for 40 years, born Iowa), wife Ellen M. Age 61, married 1 time for 40 years, 5 children born 3 still living, born Wisconsin), son John Caldwell (age 37, born Kansas), and Daughter Laura M. Caldwell (age 33, born Iowa).

C. E. Caldwell (age 70), married Martha E. Murphy (age 54) on May 30, 1915 in Blackburn, Washington County, Arkansas. (Arkansas County Marriages Index, 1837-1957)

1920 Census: Carthage Ward 4, Jasper County, Missouri: Columbus E. Caldwell (age 75, widowed, born Iowa), son John Caldwell (age 46, born Kansas, laborer).

Columbus Caldwell died Dec. 1, 1927 at Winslow, Arkansas. (Pension Index Record). Arkansas Death Record Index says Dec. 2, 1927 in Washington County.

Children of Columbus Caldwell and Marion H. Stockhouse:

  1. Mary L. Caldwell b: 7 May 1871 in Ray Co., MO
  2. John Angus Caldwell b: 19 Feb 1873 in Osage City, Kansas
  3. Laura Myrtie Caldwell b: 1 Nov 1877 in Linn Co., Iowa
  4. Irene Caldwell b: 19 Feb 1879
  5. Nettie M. Caldwell b: 28 Jin 1881 in Buchanan Co., Iowa

Caldwell, Thomas He was born May 25, 1847 in Iowa. He was the son of Barton Warren Caldwell (Nov. 13, 1821 - Mar. 13, 1900. and Jane Wimberly. His brother Columbus Caldwell also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census, Sangamon, Illinois Barton Caldwell (age 37, laborer, born Indiana), Mary Caldwell (age 28, born Indiana), Columbus Caldwell (age 6, born Illinois), Thomas Caldwell (age 5, born Illinois), John Caldwell (age 2, born Illinois), Alfred Meyers (age 21, laborer, born Illinois).

1860 Census, Harrison, Benton County, Iowa: Barton Colwell (age 38, farmer, born Ind.), Mary Jane Colwell (age 38, born KY), Columbus Colwell (age 15, farmer, born Iowa), Thomas O. Colwell (age 13, born Iowa), John W. Colwell (age 12, born Illinois), James A. Colwell (age 6, born Illinois).

1870 Census, Cedar Rapids Ward 2, Linn County, Iowa Barton Colwell (age 48 , Keeper Bd. home, born Ind.), Mary J. Colwell (age 47, born Kentucky), Thos. Colwell (age 23, born Iowa), Angus Colwell (age 14, born Ill). Columbus Colwell (age 26, laborer, born Ind.), Minnie Colwell (age 21, born Virginia). Other people are listed that appear to be boarders and unrelated to them.

1895 Kansas State Census: Wichita Ward 5, Sedgwick County, Kansas; Barton S. Caldwell (age 73, born Indiana), Mary J. Caldwell (age 73, born Kentucky), Thomas O. Caldwell, (age 49, born Iowa, from Iowa to Kansas, Military Record: Co. H. 27th Iowa Inft.) Carrie A. Caldwell (age 19, born Iowa), and Edith Caldwell (age 50, born Illinois)

1900 Census: Scandia, Republic County, Kansas: Mary Caldwell (born Apr. 1821, age 79, widowed, 6 children born, 4 still living, born Kentucky), son Thomas Caldwell (born Apr. 1845, age 55, divorced, born Iowa)

1905 Kansas State Census: Scandia, Republic County, Kansas: T. O. Caldwell (age 58, born Iowa, mail carrier), Clara Caldwell (age 43, born Sweden) and Mary J. Caldwell (age 85, born Kentucky).

1910 Census, District 52, Grandview, Ford County, Kansas: Kansas State Soldiers Home: Thomas Caldwell (age 63, married 3 times, currently for 7 years, born Iowa), Clara Caldwell (age 48, married 1 time for 7 years, 0 children born, 0 still living, born Sweden.).

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kansas, Western Branch: Thomas Caldwell: MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Each Enlistment: Feb. 29, 1864, Independence, Iowa. Rank: Pri. Company and Regiment: H, 27th Iowa Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: Oct. 26, 1864, Jeff. Bks, MO. Cause of Discharge: Disability. Disabilities when Admitted to Home: Prostate Hyper. Lumbago, Naso pharyngeal catarrh, gastritis chronic, cardiac hypertrophy, myalgia, chr. rhinitis. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Iowa, age 67, height: 5-9, Complexion light, brown eyes, gray hair, can read and write: Religion: Prot. Occupation: teacher. Residence subsequent to Discharge: Wichita, Kansas, married. Name and Address of nearest relative: Mrs. Dolly Caldwell, Wichita, Kansas. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: 12.00 Admitted Apr 3, 1912, Discharged May 22, 1912. Rate of Pension: 15.50. Readmitted Sept. 28, 1914, Discharged Marc. 22, 1915. Rate of Pension 19.00 - 22.50 Readmitted March 13, 1916, Discharged June 26, 1916. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate 523902

Thomas Caldwell died May 26, 1917 at the National Home, Kansas (Pension Index Records). He is buried in the Iowa Veterans Home, Marshalltown, Iowa.

Thomas Caldwell, age 70, died at the soldiers home of paralysis. He was admitted from Marion, Iowa, last October. He served in Company H, 27th Iowa infantry.

Lytton Star, June 7, 1917


Campbell, Erastus He was born July 26, 1826 in Binghamton, Broome County, New York. He was the son of Erastus Campbell (Mar. 16, 1797 - April 4, 1889) and Martha (June 4, 1802 - Feb. 13, 1866). He married Susanna Shaw. (source for maiden name of Susanna is the death record for their son Lewis S. Campbell who died Oct. 17, 1923 in Ellsborough, Murray County, Minnesota.)

1850 Census: Downers Grove, DuPage County, Illinois: Erastus Campbell (age 24, laborer, born NY), Susanna Campbell (age 22, born Penn), John A. Campbell (age 6/12, born Ill.)

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Erastus Campbell (age 30, born NY), Susanna Campbell (age 27, born Penn), Alexander Campbell (age 7, born Ill.), Tamson Campbell (age 5,born Ill) and Charles Henry Campbell (age 2, born Ill.) The family had been in the state of Iowa for less than 1 year.

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Erastus Campbell (age 34, teamster, born NY), Susana Campbell (age 31, born Penn.), Alex Campbell (age 10, born Ill,), Tamsen Campbell (age 9, born Ill), Chas. Campbell (age 6, born Ill.). Frank Campbell (age 4, born Iowa), Edgar Campbell (age 1, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Erastus Campbell (age 45, born NY), Susana Campbell (age 42, born Penn), Charles Campbell (age 16, born Illinois), Tonna Campbell (age 19, born Illinois), Frank Campbell (age 14, born Illinois), Edward Campbell (age 12, born Iowa), Erastus Campbell (age 9, born Iowa), Lewis Campbell (age 7, born Iowa) and Nettie Campbell (age 5, born Iowa).

Campbell, Erastus, came to Norton county from Nebraska in 1875 and settled on Long Branch. He died some years ago. (page 53) (Some of the Norton County Pioneers A-C)

He filed for a pension on Jan. 16, 1880.

1880 Census: Rock Branch, Norton County, Kansas: Erastus Campbell (age 55, farmer, born NY), wife Susannah Campbell (age 52, born Penn), son Frank Campbell (age 25, born Iowa), son Erastus Campbell (age 21, born Iowa), son Lewis Campbell (age 19, born Iowa), and daughter Nettie Campbell (age 14, born Iowa).

1885 Kansas State Census Collection: Center, Norton County, Kansas: E. E. Campbell (age 60, born NY, From Iowa to Kansas, Honorably Discharged from the Volunteer military service of the United States? Yes, Name of State in Which enlisted: Iowa. Letter of Company: H. Name of Regiment: 27 Iowa Volunteer Infantry), Susie Campbell (age 57, born Penn.), E. D. Campbell (male, age 24, born Iowa).

1895 Kansas State Census Collection, Crystal, Norton County, Kansas: Erastus Campbell, (age 69, born NY, from Nebraska to Kansas, Honorably Discharged from the Volunteer military service of the United States? Yes, Name of State in Which enlisted: Iowa. Letter of Company: H. Name of Regiment: 27 Iowa), Susan Campbell, (age 66, born Pennsylvania, from Nebraska to Kansas).

1900 Census: Crystal, Norton County, Kansas: Erastus Campbell (born July 1826, age 74, married 50 years, born NY, farmer), wife Susan Campbell (born Mar. 1830, age 70, married 50 years, 8 children born, 7 still living, born Penn.),

1905 Kansas State Census Collection: Crystal, Norton County, Kansas: E. Campbell, age 80, born NY, Honorably Discharged from the Volunteer military service of the United States? Yes, Name of State in Which enlisted: Iowa. Letter of Company: H. Name of Regiment: 27 Iowa), Susan Campbell (age 76, born Penn.), Charles Campbell (age 50, born IA), M. Campbell (female, age 42, born Iowa).

Susan Campbell died May 7, 1908 and is buried in Norcatur Cemetery, Norton County, Kansas

1910 Census: Lincoln, Decatur County, Kansas: Urastus Campbell (age 89, Widowed, born New York, lives on income).

Erastus Campbell died Sept. 27, 1913 at Norcatur, Kansas (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Norcatur Cemetery, Norton County, Kansas.


Campbell, James. He was born Oct. 25, 1827 in Ireland. He married Louisa Hartman on July 31, 1866 in Franklin County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934)

1870 Census: Clinton, Franklin County, Iowa: James Campbell, (age 39, farmer, born Ireland), Louisa Campbell (age 26, born Penn.).

1880 Census: Ross, Franklin County, Iowa: James Campbell (age 50, farmer, born Ireland), wife Louisa Campbell (age 37, born Pennsylvania), son Jacob J. Campbell (age 5, born Iowa), and son Samuel M. Campbell (age 3, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa, 27th Iowa: James Campbell, Private, Co H, Present Post Office Address: Hampton.

1893 Iowa State Census: Hampton, Franklin County, Iowa: James Campbell (age 64), Louisa Campbell (age 45), Jacob Campbell (age 17) and Samuel Campbell (age 18)

1900 Census: Hampton, Franklin County, Iowa: James Campbell (born Oct. 1826, age 73, married 34 years, born Ireland, immigrated 1850, in US 40 years, farmer), wife Louisa Campbell (born Jan 1846, age 51, married 34 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born Penn), son Jacob Campbell (born July 1876, age 23, born Iowa, painter), son Samuel Campbell (born Jan 1877, age 23, born Iowa, Teacher).

1905 Iowa State Census: Hampton, Franklin County, Iowa: James Campbell, Louisa Campbell, J. J. Campbell, and S. E. Campbell.

James Campbell died Jan 26, 1905 and is buried in Hampton Cemetery, Hampton, Mott Twp. Franklin County, Iowa.

His widow Louisa Campbell filed for a pension on March. 2, 1905 in Iowa.

Louisa Campbell died Sept. 18, 1917 and is buried in Hampton Cemetery, Hampton, Mott Twp., Franklin County, Iowa.

In the 1925 Iowa State Census, Jacob J. Campbell, born about 1876, listed his parents as James Campbell and Louise Hartman.


Casebeer, William He was born Dec. 1845 in probably Goshen Twp., Tuscarawas County, Ohio. He was the son of Josiah Casebeer (May 3, 1817 - 1890) and Elizabeth Mosher (1825 - 1904). He married Harriet Taylor on Jul 3, 1872 in El Dorado, Kansas. She was the daughter of Robert Lackey Taylor (Jan. 16, 1829 - Jan. 26, 1878) and Jennie Jane Weir (Aug. 12, 1832 - Feb. 3, 1912). William's sister, Mary Casebere, married William Morgan, who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Goshen, Tuscarawas County, Ohio: Josiah Casebeer (age 33, farmer, born PA), Elizabeth Casebeer (age 25, born NY), Mary Casebeer (age 6, born Ohio), Wm. Casebeer (age 4, born Ohio), George Casebeer (age 3, born Ohio), and Edwin Casebeer (age 1, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census; Spring, Buchanan County, Iowa: Josiah Casebeer (age 39), E. Casebeer (age 31, born NY), M. J. Casebeer (age 12, born Ohio), Wm. Casebeer (age 11, born Ohio), Geo. Casebeer (age 9, born Ohio), E. Casebeer (age 7, born Ohio) and Jac. Casebeer (age 0, born Iowa).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Josiah Catesbear (age 44, farmer, born Ohio), Elizabeth Catesbear (age 35, born NY), Mary Catesbear (age 16, born Ohio), Wm. Catesbear (age 15, born Ohio), George Catesbear (age 13, born Ohio), Edwin Catesbear (age 12, born Ohio), Jacob Catesbear (age 4, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Towanda, Butler County, Kansas: Jason Casebeer (age 53, farmer, born Ohio), Elisabeth Casebeer (age 45, born New York), William Casebeer (age 26, born Ohio) and Edwin Casebeer (age 21, born Ohio.)

1875 Kansas State Collection Census: Sedan, Howard County, Kansas: Harriet Casebeer (age 24, born Indiana), Wm. Casebeer (age 29, farmer, born Ohio), and female infant (age 7/12, born Kansas).

1880 Census: Belleville, Chautauqua County, Kansas: William Casebeer (age 34, farmer, born Ohio), wife Harriet Casebeer (age 29, born Indiana), daughter Eunice Casebeer (age 3, born Kansas) and son Josiah Casebeer (age 1, born Kansas). Indexed as Casebure.

William Casebeer filed for a pension on July 29, 1890 in Minnesota.

1890 Veterans Census: Rich Hill, Bates County, Missouri: William Casebeer (private, Co. H, 27 Iowa Infty. Enlisted Aug 11, 1863, discharged Aug. 8, 1865, Length of Service: 2 years.

1900 Census: Precinct 3, Otero County, Colorado: William Casebeer (born Dec. 1845, age 54, married 28 years, born Ohio, Grocer), wife Harriet Casebeer (born Jan. 1857, age 49, married 28 years, 7 children born, 5 still living, born Indiana), daughter Eunice Casebeer (born April 1878, age 22, born Kansas). Arthur Casebeer (born Jan. 1879 (age 21, born Kansas), son Erban Casebeer (born June 1884, age 15, born Missouri), and daughter Anna Casebeer (born Jan. 1886, age 14, born Missouri).

1910 Census: Rocky Ford, Otero County, Colorado: William Casebeer (age 65, married 1 time for 36 years, born Ohio, Own Income), wife Harriet Casebeer (age 58, married 1 time for 36 years, 7 children born, 4 still living, born Indiana), son Ervin Casebeer (age 25, born Missouri, salesman).

William Casebeer died Mar. 5, 1911. He is buried in Valley View Cemetery, Block 8, Lot 7, Space C, Rocky Ford, Otero County, Colorado.

His widow Harriet A. Casebeer filed for a pension on Mar. 9, 1911 in Colorado.

Harriet Casebeer died in Sept. 1939 and is buried in Valley View Cemetery, Block 8, Lot 7, Rocky Ford, Otero County, Colorado. (city record date was 9/10/1939.)

Children of William Casebeer and Harriet Taylor:

  1. Ida Casebeer, April 17, 1873 - Oct. 10, 1874
  2. William Henry Casebeer, Sept. 30, 1874 - April 30, 1951.
  3. Harriet Eunice Casebeer, April 30, 1877 - Jan. 16, 1962.
  4. Arthur Josiah Casebeer, Jan. 26, 1879 - Jan. 11, 1957.
  5. Ahna Elizabeth Casebeer, Jan. 4, 1881 - Aug. 25, 1881.
  6. Erban Winfred Casebeer, June 18, 1884 - Feb. 20, 1950.
  7. Ervin Casebeer, 1885 - 1910
  8. Anna Jane Casebeer, Jan. 10, 1886 - Feb. 4, 1909

I find this list of children suspect. In 1900 and 1910, Harriet reports being the mother of 7 children (with 5 living in 1900 and 4 living in 1910). The first two on this list are not specifically listed in the census records. So one of them could be an error.


Chase, Moses He was born Jul 21, 1841 in Ellicottville, Cattaraugus County, New York. He was the son of James Porter Chase (1817 - Jan 4, 1853) and Lucina Collins (Feb. 1828 - June 4, 1918). He married Eliza Elvira Lemon on Jan 2, 1866 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934) She was the daughter of Edmund Paddock Lemon (Nov. 28, 1808 - Apr 29, 1884) and Sarah Eliza Elizabeth Collins (1815 - 1885). His brother Warren Chase also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Great Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York: Porter Chase (age 32, born VT), Lucy Chase (age 23, born NY), Moses Chase (age 8, born NY), Warren Chase (age 6, born NY), Perry Chase (age 4, born NY), Mary Chase (age 2, born NY) and Anita Chase (age 72, born unknown).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Bradford Lewis (age 26, carpenter, born PA), Lucy Lewis (age 32, born New York), Moses Chase (age 18, born NY), Warren Chase (age 16, born NY), Jas. P. Chase (age 14, born NY), Lucinda Chase (age 9, born NY), Bradford Lewis (age 5, born NY) and Frank Lewis (age 1, born Iowa). (Notes: Lucy Lewis is his mother (remarried after the death of James Porter Chase).

1870 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Moses Chase (age 28, farm laborer, born New York), Elvira Chase (age 22, born New York), George Chase (age 4, born Iowa), and Albert Chase (age 1, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Moses Chase (age 38, farmer, born New York), wife Eliza E. Chase (age 32, born New York), son George F. Chase (age 13, born Iowa), son Albert O. Chase (age 11, born Iowa), daughter Lucy E. Chase (age 9, born Iowa) and daughter Ella M. Chase (age 2, born Iowa.

Moses Chase filed for a pension on Apr. 26, 1883 in Iowa.

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living In Iowa: 27th Iowa; Moses Chase, Private, Co. H, Present Post Office Address; Quasqueton

1885 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Moses Chase (age 43, farmer, born New York), Eliza Chase (age 34, born NY), George Chase (age 18, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Albert Chase (age 16, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Lucy Chase (age 13, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Ella Chase (age 6, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Moses R. Chase (age 2, born Buchanan County, Iowa). They were living next door to Bradford and Lucina Lewis. He was indexed as Mores Clase

1900 Census; Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Moses Chase (born July 1841, age 59, married 34 years, born New York, farmer), wife Eliza Chase (born Mar. 1849, age 51, married 34 years, 5 children born, 5 still living, born New York), son Albert Chase (born Apr. 1869, age 31, married 10 years, born Iowa, day laborer), daughter-in-law Emma Chase (born Apr. 1876, age 24, married 10 years, 2 children born, 2 still living), grandson Albert Chase (born Apr. 1894, age 6, born Iowa), and grandson Walter Chase (born Nov. 1899, age 6/12, born Iowa).

Eliza Elizabeth (Lemon) Chase (born Mar. 14, 1849), died May 2, 1908. She is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1910 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Moses Chase (age 68, widowed, born New York), daughter in law Emma Chase (age 34, married 1 time for 17 years, 3 children born, 3 still living), grandson Eugene Chase (age 15), grandson Walter Chase (age 10), and grandson Ralph Chase (age 8)

Moses Chase died April 7, 1913 (Pension Index Records). He is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Add 1, Lot 115, Liberty Township, Buchanan County, Iowa,

Iowa, Cemetery Records: Moses Chase. Birth Date: July 121, 1841; Death Date: April 7, 1913; Age: 71; Burial Location: Liberty, Buchanan; Cemetery: Quasqueton; General Burial Information: (add. 1, lot 115) (Co. H 27th IA Inf.) Eliza buried on this lot. Source: Buchanan County Burial Records. Page Number: 76.

Children of Moses Chase and Eliza Elvira Lemon:

  1. George F. Chase, Jan 1866 - 1936
  2. Albert O. Chase, Apr. 1869 - 1920
  3. Lucy E. Chase, 1871
  4. Ella Mae Chase, 1878
  5. Moses R. Chase, 1883

Chase, Warren Collins He was born Oct. 14, 1843 in Ellicottville, Cattaraugus County, New York. He was the son of James Porter Chase (1817 - Jan 4, 1853) and Lucina Collins (Feb. 1828 - June 4, 1918). He married Azora Hannah Eaton on Oct. 14, 1863 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Samuel Eaton (1813- Aug. 11, 1887) and Chloe Gilder (Oct. 8, 1809 - Aug. 11, 1881). His brother Moses Chase also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. (Note I had previously found information that he married Azora Upson, daughter of Daniel and Emily Epson. Several family trees have that information. But marriage records on familysearch.org proves to me that the correct last name is Eaton.)

Warren C. Chase

Warren Collins Chase (1908). Photo found here

Warren Chase was born October 14, 1843, in Ellicottsville, Cattaraugus County, New York. In 1856 he immigrated to Iowa, stopping over at Sandwich De Kalb County, Illinois, arriving at Waucon, Allamakee County in 1857. Here he followed the life of a laborer. His education was acquired at the schools of Waucon and Independence. In February, 1859, he came to Quasqueton, where he farmed for himself for two years. In 1866 he bought one hundred and sixty acres, unimproved in Cone township. After farming this and improving fifty acres, he sold it, returned to Quasqueton, and engaged in teaming and carrying in effect a mail contract to Anamosa. In 1870 he finished a contract on the asylum and several bridge contracts, and in 1871 commenced well-drilling, in which he continued until 1875. February 26, 1876 he was admitted to the bar at Independence, since which time he has engaged in the practice of law. On the eighth day of August, 1862, he enlisted in Company H, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, serving in Minnesota, his regiment going up among the Chippewas, paying them off, etc.. He then went south, his regiment serving in western and northern Mississippi. He was discharged at Moscow on August of 1863. October 14, 1863, he was married at Quasqueton. He has six children: Charles, born Oct. 29, 1864; Anna M. born February 1, 1866; Fred, born Sept. 20, 1867; Minnie, born August 11, 1869; Chloe, born June 21, 1872; Myrta, born Sept. 29, 1877. In politics he was a Republican until 1872, when he became an Anti-monopolist, and is now allied with the Greenbackers.

History of Buchanan County, Iowa, with illustrations and biographical sketches. page 309

1850 Census: Great Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York: Porter Chase (age 32, born VT), Lucy Chase (age 23, born NY), Moses Chase (age 8, born NY), Warren Chase (age 6, born NY), Perry Chase (age 4, born NY), Mary Chase (age 2, born NY) and Anita Chase (age 72, born unknown).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Bradford Lewis (age 26, carpenter, born PA), Lucy Lewis (age 32, born New York), Moses Chase (age 18, born NY), Warren Chase (age 16, born NY), Jas. P. Chase (age 14, born NY), Lucinda Chase (age 9, born NY), Bradford Lewis (age 5, born NY) and Frank Lewis (age 1, born Iowa). (Notes: Lucy Lewis is his mother (remarried after the death of James Porter Chase).

Warren Chase filed for a pension on Aug. 27, 1866.

1870 Census: Independence Ward 2, Buchanan County, Iowa: Warren Chase (age 26, Day Laborer, born NY), Azora Chase (age 26, born Ohio), Charles Chase (age 5, born Iowa), Anna Chase (age 4, born Iowa), Frederick Chase (age 2, born Iowa) and Minnie Chase (age 11/12, born Iowa.).

1880 Census: Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Warren Chase (age 36, attorney at law, born NY), wife Azora H. Chase (age 36, born Ohio), daughter Annie M. Chase (age 14, born Iowa), son Freddie W. Chase (age 12, born Iowa), daughter Minnie B. Chase, born Iowa), daughter Chloe M. Chase (age 7, born Iowa) and daughter Myrtie Chase (age 3,born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living In Iowa: 27th Iowa; Warren Chase, Private, Co. H, Present Post Office Address; Quasqueton

1885 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Warren Chase (age 44, lawyer, born NY), Azora Chase (age 44, born Ohio), Charles F. Chase (age 20, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Annie M. Chase (age 18, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Fredrick W. Chase (age 17, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Minnie V. Chase (age 15, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Chloe M. Chase (age 11, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Myrta A. Chase (age 7, born Buchanan County, Iowa.

1900 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Warren Chase (born Oct. 1843, age 56, married 36 years, born New York, Lawyer), wife Zaria Chase (born Aug. 1843, age 56, married 36 years, 7 children born, 6 still living, born Ohio), daughter Arvilla Chase (born May 1886, age 14, born Iowa) and daughter Grace Chase (born June 1885, age 15, born Iowa).

Azora (Eaton) Chase (born 1843, died 1908). She is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Lot 67 Liberty Township, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1910 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Bradford S. Lewis (age 76, married time for 52 years, born Penn.), wife Lucy Lewis (age 83, married 3 times, currently for 52 years, 9 children born, 7 still living, born New York), stepson Warren Chase (age 66, widowed, born New York, attorney).

Warren Chase died Jan. 27, 1911 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Lot 67, Liberty Township Buchanan County, Iowa.

Iowa, Cemetery Records, Warren Chase, Birth Date: Oct. 14, 1843; Death Date: Jan. 27, 1911; age 67; Burial Location: Liberty, Buchanan; Cemetery: Quasqueton; General Burial Info: (Old orig. lot 67) (27th IA Inf. Co. H): Source: Buchanan County Burial Records; Page: 76.

Children of Warren Collins Chase and Azora Hannah Eaton:

  1. Charles F. Chase, Oct. 29, 1864 - 1923
  2. Anna May Chase, Feb. 1, 1866 - 1946
  3. Frederick Warren Chase, Spt. 20, 1867 - 1937
  4. Minnie V. Chase, Aug. 11, 1869 - Sept. 7, 1896
  5. Chloe Melissa Chase, June 21, 1872 - 1943
  6. Myrtle Arvilla Chase, Sept. 29, 1877 - 1947

Colburn, Benton F. He was born about 1832 in New York. He married Delia Augusta Spear on Sept. 20, 1854 in Buchanan County, Iowa (Buchanan County Iowa Marriages 1854-1910 (License 15 Sep 1854) - Book 1, #44) She was the daughter of Nathaniel S. Spear (Dec. 14, 1803 - Mar. 22, 1876) and Lois Thayer. (Oct. 11, 1800 - Nov. 15, 1858)

1856 Iowa State Census, West Point, Butler County, Iowa: B. F. Colburn (age 24, male, married, resided in the state 1 year, born NY, farmer, native voter, militia), Delia Colburn (age 23, female, married, resided in the state 1 year, born Mass), George B. Colburn (age 0, male, born Mass?)

1880 Census, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Benton F. Colburn (white, male, age 55, married, peddler, born New York, father born "don't know", mother born Vermont), wife Delia Colburn (white, female, age 50, married, keeping house, born Mass, father born Mass, mother born Mass.), son Henry A. Colburn (white, male, age 22, single, farming, born Iowa, father born New York, mother born Mass), adopted daughter Annetta Colburn (white, female, age 13, single, at school, born Iowa, father born New York, mother born Mass.), son David Colburn, (white, male, age 11, single, at school, born Iowa, father born New York, mother born Mass).

1890 Veterans Census: Frederick, Brown County, South Dakota: Benton F. Colburn (Sargent, Co. H. 27 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 15, 1862, Discharged Aug 10, 1865. Length of Service 2 years, 11 months, 25 days. Current Post Office: Frederick, Brown County, SD. Disability Incurred: Chronic Diarrhea and leg cramps.

Benton F. Colburn died Dec. 4, 1893 and is buried in Columbia Cemetery, Columbia, Brown County, South Dakota.

The following information was submitted by David Didreckson

Columbia, the ex-county seat, has a genuine sensation.

Last night at 8:30 o'clock one "Jimmie" Garrington, a man 60 or more years of age and of a decidedly bad reputation, went up town from his rooms in the James block - the old-time county building - and reported that B. F. Colburn, an old soldier who had been making his headquarters with him, had fallen down stairs and was dead from injuries. Several excited people immediately hastened to the premises and found Colburn at the foot of the stairs, as indicated, with his neck broken and a long iron rod - such as might have come from the rear end of a lumber wagon - penetrating his forehead in the region of one of his temples and running from thence to a point in his neck underneath his chin where it found egress and entered the chest just below. One supposition is, of course, that the injured man fell down the stairs and upon the rod, but at this writing it is not well understood how the rod came to be in such a position that it could enter the body with such force and violence as to bury the greater part of its length in the bone and tissue. The wounds were found to be of a frightful and harrowing character, sufficient to inflict instant death.

Coroner Cronyn, of Houghton, was immediately notified and reached the scene early this morning. A coroner's jury, consisting of A. Loomis, Frank Warren, Sam Jaquis, August Ramharter, E. S. Jenne, and I. B. Matthews, all residents of Columbia or vicinity, was impanneled and is now holding an inquest. The iron rod was removed from the body by Dr. Smith, of Columbia, who is one of the witnesses.

Colburn, the dead man, was a resident of Frederick for several years and a member of Gen. Rowley Post, G.A.R., of that place. He was well known by Sheriff Haasze, H. Van Slyck and other present residents of Aberdeen who agree that he was about 68 years of age and a peculiar character in many respects, but honorable in all his dealings and the possessor of several hundreds of dollars in gold and other currency. He always had considerable money about him while in Frederick and there is good reason to believe that he took much or all of it away with him. In October last he left Frederick, saying he was going by slow stages to Iowa where he had a son. He stopped at Westport several weeks and then went on to Columbia where he fell in with Garrington and made his home temporarily with Garrington, or in rooms adjoining. He was a great trapper and almost daily was seen in and about the Elm and Jim engaged in trapping the mink, muskrat and other fur bearing animals. It is learned that he was divorced from his wife some years ago and has a son living in Kansas in addition to one in Iowa.

Garrington, who was associated with the deceased during his last days, bears a very unsavory reputation and has been in trouble of some kind during much of his residence here. He served several terms in the county jail for various offenses and is given a very hard character by those who know him best. From these facts and also that he must have discovered that Colburn carried his money about him, some very ugly suspicions have arisen and been given circulation. In other words, there are those who are inclined to think that Garrington knows more of the terrible affair than he is wont to reveal. He has been a noted character in the vicinity of Columbia for many years, and without any regular and remunerative employment has steadily in some manner succeeded in supplying his wants. Columbia people in the city today, as well as former residents of that place now living here, give him a very bad name.

The coroner's jury will doubtless thoroughly sift the matter and report accordingly. This will be awaited with the greatest interest.

Aberdeen Daily News, page 5
Tuesday, December 5, 1893


The coroner's jury in the matter of the violent death of B. F. Colburn at Columbia Monday night, brought in a verdict of death by accidental means. No facts of circumstances were found to justify the charge or insinuation of foul play on the part of anyone. The jury consisted of A. Loomis, the well known banker, E. S. Jenne and August Ramharter. Five of six witnesses were examined and the premises were examined and the premises where the accident occurred were thoroughly searched for any evidence that might throw light upon the affair.

The iron rod which entered the body of Colburn was run through and attached to a small wheel which at some time had been used in a hand or wheelbarrow. There was evidence going to show that the children of Columbia were accustomed to roll this about the streets and sidewalks. Garrington testified that seeing the wheel and rod lying about, apparently serving no good purpose, he took and placed them near the spot where the body of Colburn was found with the intention of some time converting the wheel to his own use. It was shown that the wheel could easily have been in such a position that the rod would have been at an angle of 45 degrees or thereabouts and that a man in falling down the stairs could easily have struck it as Colburn appeared to have done. This rod came in contact with the forehead near the left eye, glanced from the bone and entered the socket of the left eye, running down through the mouth and neck into the thorax, stopping in the region of the heart. That portion which entered the body was measured and found to be over eighteen inches in length.

The evidence respecting the financial condition of the dead man was conflicting. But $6 was found upon his person which, in connection with the statements of a number of individuals that Colburn was in the habit of carrying several hundreds of dollars about him, added weight to the theory that his death was not altogether accidental. Jesse Bean, one of the witnesses, swore that he had seen Colburn only a few days ago handling several gold pieces of the denomination of $20 and less. Other testimony, however, went to show that the deceased was short of funds and had expressed the fear that his money would not hold out until the receipt of his pension which he received at the rate of $8 per month. A thorough search of the premises and the effects of the deceased failed to reveal the presence of any money but the $6 mentioned.

Arrangements for the funeral have not been concluded. Efforts are being made to reach various relatives of the deceased in Iowa and Kansas.

Aberdeen Daily News, Page 3
Wednesday, December 6, 1893


At 4:30 this afternoon James Garrington, indicted for the murder of B. F. Colburn at Columbia, was arrested by Deputy Sheriff Granger and lodged in jail. Garrington treated the matter as an everyday occurrence.

Aberdeen Daily News, Page 3
Tuesday, December 12, 1893


The Columbia G.A.R. has completed arrangements for the burial today of the late B. F. Colburn.

Aberdeen Daily News, Page 4
Thursday, December 14, 1893


A son of Benton F. Colburn, who is said to live in the vicinity of Mitchell, has arrived for the purpose of taking up and removing his father's remains to his home. Father and son had not met for eleven years.

Aberdeen Daily News, Page 3
Thursday, December 21, 1893


The jury in the case of the State vs. Garrington returned a verdict of not guilty at the reconvening of court this morning. Agreement was reached, it is stated, at 6 o'clock this morning, after the jury had been out an even twelve hours. The evidence was taken up and discussed in its entirety and there were, of course, many theories to be examined and elucidated. The results, however, was generally anticipated, though some thought the length of time consumed by the jury for deliberation at least portended a disagreement. The first ballot, it is said, stood six to six.

Aberdeen Daily News, Page 5
Friday, December 22, 1893


The people were surprised at the verdict in the Garrington case. They looked for a disagreement of the jury or conviction. States Attorney Jenkins did all any man on earth could do, and has made many friends up here. We understand Garrington will move to Aberdeen at once.

Aberdeen Daily News, Page 4
Wednesday, December 27, 1893


Frederick Free Press: A married son of B. F. Colburn living near Mitchell was interesting himself last week in finding his father's money. He will not remove his father's remains from Columbia. He is of the opinion, like many others, that Garrington knows where his father's money is. The decision of the jury acquitting Garrington meets with little favor with Frederick citizens.

Aberdeen Daily News, Page 3
Saturday, December 30, 1893


NOTE:

James A. Garrington was arrested in Sioux Falls, December 7, 1897, charged with the murder of a young man by the name of Alford “Roy” Erickson, the motive, robbery. December 16, 1897 Garrington admits to killing Erickson in self-defense. He claimed Erickson attacked Garrington with a hammer and Garrington struck him with an ax and killed him.

The trial began January of 1898. During the trial, it was discovered that Garrington’s real name was James McManus from Monroe, Wisconsin. He apparently took the name Garrington after a notorious crook that had robbed people near his home place. Garrington was decided guilty in February, 1898 and sentenced to hang on April 14th of that year.

Garrington petitioned the state Supreme Court for a second trial, and was granted the second trial which began in January, 1899. The second trial also came back with a guilty verdict, but this time he is sentenced to life in prison.

James A. Garrington died June 10, 1915, in Sioux City, Iowa. His obit in the Sioux City Journal states that Garrington was pardoned by Governor Byrne the winter of 1914, and moved from Sioux Falls to Sioux City in January of 1915.

Compiled by: David Didreckson
#48148437

Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans, 1879-1903: Colburn, Benton F. Pvt., Co. H., 27th Regt Iowa Inf., Cemetery: Columbia At: Columbia, S.D., Date of Death: Dec. 4, 1893, Headstone supplied by: Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont, Contract dated Aug. 25, 1902.

An Old Crime Recalled

Independence Bulletin–Journal: E. B. Abbott, attorney for Mrs. Delia A Colburn, received notice Wednesday that the lady had been granted a widow's pension of eight dollars per month, dating from August 28, 1894. This brings to mind a tragedy that shocked the people of this county in 1893. Benton F. Colburn was a resident of Liberty Township who enlisted in the Twenty-seventh Iowa and served during the war. In 1893 he went to South Dakota to look at the country with a view of investment. He had some money with him. He was found dead one morning in a stairway, an iron rod being driven through his throat. His money was gone. Later an arrest was made for the crime, but the defendant got clear on the plea of his lawyer that Colburn had probably fallen downstairs and killed himself. As the same man was later convicted and hanged for another murder, it was undoubtedly a miscarriage of justice. Because of the circumstances surrounding the death, the case was referred to a special examiner after Mr. Abbott filed the application, who traveled many thousands of miles and collected evidence in several states. Of course his widow got arrears from the date mentioned, amounting to nearly $600, and as she is not in prosperous circumstances it will be a windfall to her.

Waterloo Daily Reporter, May 12, 1900


Coleman, Charles H. He was born about 1842 in Illinois. He was the son of Charles L. and Catherine Coleman.

1850 Rockford, Winnebago County, Illinois: Charles L. Coleman (age 36, mason, born England), Catherine Coleman (age 32, born NY), Lydia Coleman (age 10, born NY), Charles H. Coleman (age 8, born Illinois), Lewis Coleman (age 6, born Illinois), Ellen Coleman (age 1, born Illinois) and Charles Bligh (age 25, born unknown).

1856 Iowa State Census: Julien, Dubuque County, Iowa: Charles Colman (age 49, stone mason, born England), Catharine Colman (age 36, born NY), Louisa Colman (age 17, born NY), Charles H. Coleman (age 18, born Ill.), L. Coleman (age 13, born Ill.), Elizabeth Coleman (age 7, born Ill.), Jane Coleman (age 5, born Illinois), Mary Coleman (age 3, born Ill.)

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles L. Coleman, age 45, master stone mason, born England, Catherine Coleman (age 38, born New York), Lydia A. Coleman (age 20, born NY), Chas. H. Coleman (age 19, born Ill.), Lewis Coleman (age 16, born Illinois), Ella Coleman (age 12, born Illinois), Josephine Coleman (age 9, born Illinois), and Melissa Coleman (age 6, born Illinois).

Charles H. Coleman died Oct. 14, 1862, of congestion of the lungs, and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Charles L. Coleman, a member of the Twenty-seventh, died at home on Tuesday night, October 7, 1862. He was taken sick at Camp Franklin and his father brought him home and he died the next day. He had only enlisted about seven weeks before.

History of Buchanan County, Iowa, and its people, Volume 1
By Harry Church Chappell, Katharyn

His father Charles L. Coleman filed for a pension on April 9, 1879.


Congdon, Francis M. He was born about 1844 in Illinois. He married Harriet Huntley on Feb. 25, 1867 in Boone County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934).

1880 Census, West Bend, Palo Alto County, Iowa: F. M. Congdon (age 41, farmer, born Illinois), Wife Harriet L. Congdon (age 42, born New York), step son George Basset (age 16, born Illinois). Is this him??

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living In Iowa, 27th Iowa: F. M. Congden, Private, Co. H, Present Post Office: West Bend (Kossuth County, Iowa).

He filed for a pension on Feb. 18, 1889 in Missouri

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Leavenworth, Kansas, Western Branch: Francis M. Congdon: MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Each Enlistment: Aug. 14, 1862, Independence, Iowa, Rank P, Company and Regiment: H, 27th Iowa Inf. Time and Place of Discharge; Aug. 8, 1865, Clinton Iowa. Cause of Discharge: Close of War. Kind and Degree of Disability: Inj. to Shol'd. & Ht. dis. When and Where contracted: Not Said. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: Illinois. Age 63, Height 5' 4, Complexion Fair, Hazel Eyes, Brown Hair, can read and write, Religion: Prot, Occupation, Farmer. Residence subsequent to Discharge; Busch, Oklahoma., widowed. Name and Address of Nearest Relative; May Patterson, Busch, Okla. (adopted daughter). HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: $12. Date of Admission: May 5, 1904, (W.B). Date of Discharge: Oct. 5th 1905. Cause of discharge; own request. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate 811705.

Francis M. Congdon died Nov. 20, 1907 and is buried in Iowa Veterans Home Cemetery, Section C, Row 23, Grave 2, Marshalltown, Marshall County, Iowa. (Source for his date of death is the Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards (found on familysearch.org).


Conlon, Charles He was born about 1841 in Ireland. He was the son of Andrew and Ann Coudery. His brother James Conlon also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

Charles Conlon died of wounds May 18, 1864, Dead Oaks, La.

His mother Ann Conlon filed for a pension on June 22, 1864. Information from her pension is extracted below:

His mother Ann Conlon made a statement on June 15, 1864:

  • She was a resident of Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa.
  • She was aged 45
  • She was the widow of Andrew Conlon.
  • She was the mother of Charles Conlon who was a private in Company H, commanded by Captain O. Whitney in the 27th Regiment of Iowa Volunteers. He was killed at Bayou Glaize, LA on the 18th day of May 1864. The cause of death was gunshot near the heart while in battle.
  • Her son, upon whom she was in part dependent for support left no widow or minor child.
  • She was married to Andrew Conlon on or about the 25th of December, 1839 at County South Ireland by one Rev. John Soughlen, a clergyman.
  • She had seven children named Charles, Mary, Catherine, James, Bridgett, Thomas & William,, aged respectively: Charles when killed 24 years, Mary 22, Catherine dead, James 16, Bridget 13, Thomas 11, William dead. She cannot give the exact dates of birth of her children.
  • Her son Charles contributed to her support by his labor, in at least three fourths of the support of the family.

Statement made by P. M. Dunn and Thomas Donley on Dec. 21, 1864.

Andrew Conlon, the husband of the claimant Ann Conlon and father of the said soldier, Charles Conlon is dead. That he died in Ft. Hamilton, Long Island, NY on or about the 15th day of January 1858.

Charles contributed to the support of his mother before entering the service by ranching and working in the county, by contributing the entire profits of each labor to the support of his mother and the other minor children, reserving only sufficient to cloth himself. That since entering the service he has contributed to her support by regularly sending her portions of his wages. That after his fathers death he acted always as the head of the family. That the rents and clothing for his mother and family here paid for by the proceeds. That the only means of support which she has, is the labor of her hands, one yoke of oxen, two cows, three calves - all of the value of about $200.00. That she has no other means of support, that she has no real estate, nor rents or profits, nor monies, nor any relatives able or capable of rendering her support.


State of Tennessee
County of Shelby

I, W. G. Donnan do hereby certify that I am First Lieut. of Company H, 27th Regt Iowa Vols. That I was well acquainted with Charles Conlon, who was a member of my company - that he was killed from gunshot by the enemy at Bayou De Glaize in the State of Louisiana on the 18th day of May, 1864 while in line of duty and engaged in battle, that I was near said Conlon when he fell and know personally the facts above stated.

Signed this 22nd day of June 1864 at Memphis Tennessee

W. G. Donnan
1st Lt. Co. H, 27th Regt Iowa Vol Inf.


Conlon, James He was born Nov. 25, 1846 in Ireland. He was the son of Andrew Conlon and Ann Coudery. His brother Conlon also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

Note: the information below has been pieced together by me. ejj I feel pretty certain that it is correct. I am certain he is the brother of Charles Conlon who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. I had initially thought they were brothers, but then realized that James Conlon mentioned in the pension records above was age 16 in 1864. The James Conlon that enlisted in the 27th Iowa in 1864 was aged 18. So, I started with the fact that James Conlon filed for a pension in 1903 in Illinois. I searched the 1900 census in Illinois and found the information below. That led me to the 1880 census - which seems to fit the information in the 1900 census. Then I found the Illinois death record. Last I found the Veteran's Administration Pension Payment Card - which confirmed that the James Conlon that died Feb. 14, 1910 is the one that served in the 27th Iowa. It appears to me that James Conlon is the son of Andrew and Ann Conlon (who were also the parents of Charles Conlon listed above). Although there is a discrepancy in the age reported for James in 1864 by Ann Conlon in the pension records above -- this would not be the first soldier that I have found that lied about his age.

1880 Census, Saint Louis, Missouri James Conlon (age 32, Carpenter, born Ireland), wife Elizabeth Conlon (age 27, born St. Louis), son James Conlon (age 2 1/2, born St. Louis). Servant Ellan Krumholz (age 19, born Missouri). (Note that this information fits well with the information on the 1900 census.)

1900 Census, Chicago Ward 34, Cook County, Illinois: James A. Conlon (Born Nov. 1846, age 53, widowed, born Ireland, immigrated 1848, in the US 51 years, naturalized. Real Estate Agt), son James A. Conlon (born Nov. 1877, age 22, born Missouri, Tallyman, Board of Trade), Daughter Virginia I. Conlon (born Sept. 1880, Age 19, born Missouri, Bookkeeper), Housekeeper Frances Park (age 23, born Canada) and servant Bessie McKenzie (age 22, born Wisconsin).

James Conlon filed for a pension on June 29, 1903 in Illinois. (Certificate No. 1072644)

James Conlon died Feb. 14, 1910 and is buried in Saint Johns Catholic Cemetery, Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa. Plot 3, Block 23, Lot 3.

I found a death record for James Conlon in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. Information from the Death Record: James A. Conlon, died Feb. 14, 1910. Death Place: Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. Male, age 63 ye 2 m 20 d. Birth Date: Nov. 25, 1846. Birthplace: Ireland. Father's name: Andrew Conlon, born Ireland. Mother's name: Ann Coudery, born Ireland. Occupation: architect, real estate. Address: 6421 Drexel Ave., 7 Ward, Chicago, Cook County. Illinois. Burial Place: Independence, Iowa. Burial Date: Feb. 17, 1910. GS Film Number: 1239849. Digital Folder Number 4004699. Image Number: 366. Reference ID: cn 4005. (Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1922)

I confirmed that this is the right James A. Conlon using the Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards (familysearch.org): James A. Conlon, Certificate No. 1072644, Army Invalid. Service: P H 27 and H 12 IA Inf. Died Feb. 14, 1910.

Note: On Find a Grave, he is connected to his "spouse" ANN, who died Sept. 2, 1890. She is also buried in Saint Johns Catholic Cemetery (in the same plot as James). I believe this might be his mother, not his spouse. According to the pension records above Ann Conlon was aged 45 in 1864. Making her year of birth about 1819. On Ann Conlon's Find a Grave memorial is a date of death of Sept. 2, 1890. Inscription says Aged 74 years (making her year of birth about 1816). That would make her too old to be the spouse of James Conlon. So I feel certain she is his mother. I have requested a correction through Find a Grave.


Cordell, Albert He was born about 1841 in Ohio. He was the son of John Cordell and Catherine McDonough. He married Mary L. Fisher on Nov. 24, 1865 in Buchanan County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Pardon H. Fisher (July 28, 1817 - Aug. 30, 1907) and Phebe Thorp (May 11, 1822 - May 4, 1909). He married second: Julia Cottrell. She was the daughter of Sylvanus Cottrell (1832 - 1875) and Sarah Jane Preston (Aug. 15, 1834 - Apr. 6, 1922). His brother Alfred Cordell also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Cordell (age 54, farmer, born VA), Catharine Cordell (age 47, born MD), Sarah Ann Cordell (age 17, born Ohio), John Cordell (age 15, born Ohio), Alfred Cordell (age 11, born Ohio), Albert Cordell (age 9, born Ohio), and William Hulk (age 26, laborer, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Perry, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Cordell (age 57, born VA, farmer), C. Cordell (age 52, born Maryland), S. A. Cordell (age 23, born VA), J. Cordell (age 21, born Ohio), A. Cordell (age 21, born Ohio), A. Cordell (age 14, born Ohio) and Wm. Hult (age 33, born Ohio). The family had been in the state of Iowa of 13 years.

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Cordell (age 24, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah A. Cordell (age 22, born ?) Alfred Cordell (age 20, born Ohio), Albert Cordell (age 17, born Ohio), Benj. H. Reece (age 4, born Iowa) and Alfred H. Stanford (age 20, born New Jersey). Note Alfred K. Stanford also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1870 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: Robert Winn (age 30, farmer, born England), Harriet Winn (age 26, born New York), Emma Winn (age 2, born Iowa), Otis Cordell (age 3, born Iowa) and Albert Cordell (age 27, farm laborer, born Ohio). Living next to them was The Pardon and Phebe Fisher family. Included with that family was Mary Cordell (age 21, keeping house, born Michigan) and Albert Cordell (age 4/12, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Township 121, Range 47, Grant County, Dakota Territory: Albert Cordell, (age 34, works on farm, born in Ohio), wife Julia (age 19, born Wisconsin).

Albert Cordell died Jan. 15, 1890 in Columbia, South Dakota. (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Columbia Cemetery, Columbia, Brown County, South Dakota.

Headstones provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans: Name: Albert Cordell, Pvt, Co. H. 27th Regt., Iowa Inf. Cemetery: Columbia at Columbia, S. D. Date of Death: Jan. 15, 1890.

His widow Julia Cordell filed for a pension on Aug. 4, 1891 in Arkansas.

Children of Albert Cordell and Mary L. Fisher:

  1. Otis Cordell (Jan. 29, 1867 - Apr. 16, 1924)
  2. Albert Cordell Jr. (1870)

Child of Albert Cordell and Julia Cottrell:

  1. Maud Cordell

Cordell, Alfred He was born about 1841 in Ohio. He was the son of John Cordell and Catherine McDonough. His brother Albert Cordell also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

Note: Served in Iowa 27th Infantry during Civil War. He lost his right eye and survived his wound. He was discharged 26 May 1865 at Davenport, IA.

1850 Census: District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Cordell (age 54, farmer, born VA), Catharine Cordell (age 47, born MD), Sarah Ann Cordell (age 17, born Ohio), John Cordell (age 15, born Ohio), Alfred Cordell (age 11, born Ohio), Albert Cordell (age 9, born Ohio), and William Hulk (age 26, laborer, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Perry, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Cordell (age 57, born VA, farmer), C. Cordell (age 52, born Maryland), S. A. Cordell (age 23, born VA), J. Cordell (age 21, born Ohio), A. Cordell (age 21, born Ohio), A. Cordell (age 14, born Ohio) and Wm. Hult (age 33, born Ohio). The family had been in the state of Iowa of 13 years.

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Cordell (age 24, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah A. Cordell (age 22, born ?) Alfred Cordell (age 20, born Ohio), Albert Cordell (age 17, born Ohio), Benj. H. Reece (age 4, born Iowa) and Alfred H. Stanford (age 20, born New Jersey). Note Alfred K. Stanford also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1870 Census Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Miller (age 38, born England), Eliza Miller (age 23, born England), Mary Miller (age 1, born Iowa) and Alfred Cordell (age 30, farmer, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Waterloo, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Alford Cordell (age 35, miller, born Ohio), wife Elphia Cordell (age 30, born PA).

List of Pensioners on the Roll Jan 1, 1883, Black Hawk County, Iowa: No. of Certificate: 53,885, Name of Pensioner: Alfred Cordell, Post Office Address: Waterloo, Cause for which pensioned: lss. rt. eye and sight lt. impd., Monthly Rate: $8.00

1885 Iowa State Census: Waterloo, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Alfred Cordell (10th & Mulberry, age 40, born Virginia), Elphia Cordell (age 33, born NY).

1900 Census: East Waterloo, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Alfred Cordell (born Oct. 1844, age 56, married 26 years, born Virginia, Miller), wife Elphia Cordell (born Feb. 1854, age 46, married 26 years, 1 child born, 1 still living), son Ray Cordell (born Nov. 1885, age 14, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Waterloo Ward 4, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Alfred Cordell (age 61, married 1 time for 37 years, born West Virginia), Wife Elfeen Cordell (age 60, married 1 time for 37 years, 4 children born 1 still living, born New York), son Ray J. Cordell (age 24, married 1 time 0 years, born Iowa), daughter-in-law Anna M. Cordell (age 19, married 1 time 0 years, born Wisconsin).

1915 Iowa State Census: Waterloo, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Alfred Cordell (age 75, married, County: Black Hawk, 1212 Mulberry, Town: Waterloo, Ward 4. Occupation: Retired, Extent of Education: Common 8, can read and write, Birth Place Virginia, Value of Farm or Home: $6500. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27th, Company H. Church Affiliation: Presbyterian. Father's birthplace: France. Mother's birthplace: England., Years in Iowa: 62.

Alfred Cordell died April 15, 1918. (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, Iowa, Blk 18 Lot 181.

Waterloo Evening Courier and Reporter
Monday, April 15, 1918

Alfred E. Cordell, veteran of the Civil war and for 38 years a resident of Waterloo, died at his home, 1212 Mulberry street, shortly after 1 p.m. today. He had been ill for some time.

Mr. Cordell was born in Buchanan county, 79 years ago. He came to Waterloo 38 years ago and became connected with the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Union Mill company. He was with that concern for 33 years, retiring about five years ago.

He is survived by the widow, one son and two nieces.

The body was take to the mortuary of Hileman & Gindt pending completion of funeral arrangements.

From Find A Grave Contributor Chuck: Census records and Civil War records list him as Alfred. (as opposed to Alford as shown on his marker) Alfred's Civil War record lists him as serving in Company H, 27th Iowa Infantry Regiment, as shown on the marker.

His widow Elphenn Cordell filed for a pension on May 3, 1918 in Iowa.


Cornick, Devolson D. He was born Apr. 15, 1838 (per obituary) in Broome County, New York. He was the son of Henry Cormick and Philanda Walker (note Philanda's maiden name was found on the second marriage record of Henry H. Cornick - Devolson's brother). Devolson D. Cornick married Henrietta Brown on April 27, 1867 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was most likely the daughter of George and Jamima Brown. The Browns were in Linn, Walworth County, Wisconsin in 1850 and 1860. In 1870, they were in West Bend, Palo Alto County, Iowa. Her sister Ann Brown, married Devolson's brother Henry on the same date. Henry H. Cornick also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Chenango, Broome County, New York: Henry Cornick (age 48, farmer, born New York), Philinda Cornick (age 47, born NY), Edward W. Cornick (age 17, born New York), Stephen Cornick (age 15, born New York), Sarah I. Cornick (age14, born New York), D. D. Cornick (age 12, born New York), Clarissa Cornick (age 7, born New York) and Harbeck Cornick (age 4, born New York).

1860 Census: Omaha, Douglas, Nebraska Territory: Asa Hunt (age 46), Margaret Hunt (age 34), William Hunt (age 11), Charles Hunt (age 9), Matilda Hunt (age 7), Devolsin Cornick (age 21, born New York), Charles L. Goodrich (age 17) and Israel Conant (age 50).

1870 Census: West Bend, Palo Alto County, Iowa: Henry H. Cornick (age 23, farmer, born New York), Annie Cornick (age 23, born Wisconsin), Walson D. Cornick (age 31, farmer, born New York), Henrietta Cornick (age 22, born Wisconsin) and Edith C. Cornick Age 9/12, born Iowa.

1880 Census Perry, Tama County, Iowa: Devolson D. Cornick (age 39, livery keeper, born New York), wife Henrietta Cornick (age 30, born Wisconsin), daughter Edith C. Cornick (age 10, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa, 27th Iowa: D. D. Cormick, Drummer, Co. H. Post Office: Rolfe.

1885 Iowa State Census: Powhatan, Pocahontas County, Iowa: Donaldson D. Cornick (Township 93, Range 32, Section 25, SW SE, age 45, farmer, born New York), Henriet Cornick (age 37, born Wisconsin), Edith C. Cornick (age 15, born ?bolt County, Iowa)

1900 Census: Powhatan, Pocahontas County, Iowa: Devolson D. Cornick (born Apr. 1839, age 61, married 32 years, born New York, farmer), wife Henrietta Cornick (born Nov. 1847, age 52, married 32 years, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Wisconsin), adopted son Earl C. Cornick (born Nov. 1885, age 14, born Iowa), granddaughter Charline Button (born Dec. 1889, age 10, born Iowa) and mother-in-law Jennie Brown (born Oct. 1822, age 77, widowed, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Connecticut.)

1905 Iowa State Census: Powhatan, Pocahontas County, Iowa: D. D. Cornick, Post Office: Rolfe. Mrs. D.D. Cornick, Post Office: Rolfe. Earl Cornick Post Office: Rolfe.

1910 Census: Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa: Devolson D. Cornick (age 72, married 1 time for 43 years, born New York, wife Henry E. Cornick (age 62, married 1 time for 43 years, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Wisconsin).

1915 Iowa State Census: Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa: Devolson D. Cornick (age 76, married, County: Polk, P. O. 1761 Des Moines, Town: Des Moines, Ward 7, Occupation: Retired, Extent of Education Grammar 8, can read and write, Birth Place New York. Value of Farm: 2500, Military Service: Civil War: Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company H. Church Affiliation: Methodist, Father's Birthplace: New York, Mother's Birthplace: New York., Years in Iowa: 54.

CELEBRATED GOLDEN WEDDING ANNIVERSARY

Friends Unite to Assist Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Cornick Celebrate 50th Anniversary

Monday afternoon, at the home of their daughter, Mrs. A. G. Spillman, and her husband, about 40 friends and neighbors gathered to congratulate Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Cornick on reaching the 50th milestone in their married life.

Mr. and Mrs. Cornick have lived on a homestead north of Burns for the past three years, but are now making their home in Des Moines, Iowa, having come out to Wyoming for the purpose of celebrating this event in their lives at their daughter's home.

Mr. Cornick was a member of the drum corps of the 27th Iowa infantry during the Civil War, and just previous to coming out here was on a trip with the remaining members of that corps over Iowa on a campaign for recruits for the present war. His entire summer will be taken up with like engagements after leaving here.

The Spillman home was beautifully decorated in white and gold. Festoons in these colors were draped from corners, with large wedding bells hung from the ceiling. Yellow jonquils and white narcissus added the one touch necessary, while the color scheme was carried out in the two course luncheon, which were served by four girls.

The four girls serving a luncheon where the Misses Lupkes and the Misses Farver, each girl being dressed in white, with yellow caps and aprons.

After luncheon, Mrs. S. H. Sibley very appropriately sang "My Task," and "Silver Threads Among the Gold," and Margaret Bundy gave several readings. Stephen H. Sibly made remarks befitting the occasion; then all sang "Put on Your Old, Gray Bonnet," before leaving for their respective homes.

Mr. and Mrs. Cornick will visit for several weeks with their daughter and granddaughter before leaving for their home in Des Moines.

Mrs. H. D. Smith, a sister of Mrs. Cornick's, from Cedar Rapids, Iowa was the only out-of-town guest present – Burns (Wyoming) Harold

Rolfe Arrow, May 17, 1917

1920 Census: San Diego, San Diego, California: Devolson Cornick (age 81, born New York), Wife Henrietta Cornick (age 71, born Wisconsin) and daughter Edith Spillman (age 50, born Iowa).

Devolson D. Cornick died Nov. 18, 1925 at Chico, California (Pension Index Records). He is buried in Chico Cemetery, Chico, Butte CA.

DRUMMER DIES AT AGE OF 87

Chico, November 18 – (AP) – Devolson De Wain Cornick, 87 years old, drummer boy in Company H, 27th Iowa Regiment, during the Civil War, died at his home here today. He participated in many of the bloodiest battles of the war, but came out without having been wounded.

During the world war Cornick, then 80 years old, was enlisted by the government to travel throughout the state of Iowa with the drum he used during the Civil War, for the purpose of stimulating enlistment.

Reno Evening Gazette, Reno Nevada, Wednesday, November 18, 1925

Civil War Comrade Dead

Veterans of the Civil War received word recently of the death of Devolson De Wain Cornick, 87, at his home in Chico, California. Cornick was drummer boy in Company B, 27th Iowa, the Regiment of which William N. Loy of the city, was a member. Jesse Wroten, formerly of the city; M. E. Stutson, Winthrop, and David Wheeler, a brother of Judson Wheeler, this county, were also comrades of Cornick. Mr. Wheeler died at Jackson, Tennessee, in 1863. Many of the old veterans of those days still have a keen memory of the exploits in which they took part in.

Waterloo Evening Courier, Friday, November 27, 1925

Note: the newspaper article clearly said he was in Company B. However, he was in Company H.

D. D. Cornick Dies in California

The following obituary of D. D. Cornick from the Daily Enterprise at Chico, California, will be of interest to many readers as deceased was a familiar character in this section in early times. For many years he lived Northwest of Rolfe.

Devolson De Wain Cornick, aged 87 years and seven months, a native of New York and a resident of Chico for the past three years, passed away at 5:00 PM November 18, 1925 at his home at 151 Laurel St. following an illness of three months. Born at Page Brook, Broom County, New York, April 15, 1838, deceased moved to Iowa with his parents 1860.

In 1862 he enlisted with Company H 27th Regiment, as drummer, and served in many of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War, but was mustered out at the close of the war without having been wounded. In 1867 he was married to Miss Henrietta Brown of Geneva, Wisconsin, the couple making their home in Iowa until 1922, when they located for a short time at Los Molinos, Tehama County, later they moved to Chico, which Mr. Cormack frequently characterized as the most beautiful place he had ever lived.

For years he was president of the Iowa Division of the National Drum Corps, and at the outbreak of the world war, the government used the old veteran, then 80 years of age, to travel throughout the state of Iowa, using the same drum he had used through the Civil War, literally to drum up inspiration on the part of young men of the state to enlist for overseas service. The drum which is carefully preserved in the possession of the family today, was also used by Mr. Cornick at the state fairs of Iowa where he appeared as a drummer for 20 consecutive years. Deceased was a member of Kinsman Post, G. A. R., Des Moines, Iowa, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since boyhood.

Mr. and Mrs. Cornick celebrated their golden wedding anniversary on April 15, 1917, at the home of their daughter, Mrs. A. G. Spillman, Burns, Wyoming, and shortly after a picture was taken showing four generations of the family. Mr. Cornick is the last of the family of 10 children.

Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Henrietta Cornick, of Chico; a daughter Mrs. A. G. Spillman of Inglewood; a granddaughter, Mrs. Charlene V. Lyon of Burns, Wyoming, and three great-grandchildren, Edith, Lewis, and De Wain Lyon also of Burns, Wyoming.

West Bend Journal, West Bend Iowa, Thursday, December 10, 1925

His widow Henrietta Cornick filed for a widow's pension on Nov. 30, 1925 in CA.

Henrietta Cornick died in 1931 and is also buried in Chico Cemetery, Chico, Butte County, California. (Her tombstone is a matching military style tombstone. I have never seen that for a spouse before.)


Cormick, Henry Harbeck He was born about 1846 in New York. He was the son of Henry Cormick and Philinda Walker. He married Anna Brown on April 27, 1867 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was most likely the daughter of George and Jamima Brown. The Browns were in Linn, Walworth County, Wisconsin in 1850 and 1860. In 1870, they were in West Bend, Palo Alto County, Iowa. Her sister Henrietta Brown, married Henry's brother Devolson Cornick on the same date. Devolson D. Cornick also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Chenango, Broome County, New York: Henry Cornick (age 48, farmer, born New York), Philinda Cornick (age 47, born NY), Edward W. Cornick (age 17, born New York), Stephen Cornick (age 15, born New York), Sarah I. Cornick (age 14, born New York), D. D. Cornick (age 12, born New York), Clarissa Cornick (age 7, born New York) and Harbeck Cornick (age 4, born New York).

Source: The Medical and Surgical History of the Civil War, Volume VII

Case-- Private Hugh H. Cormack, Co. H. 27th Iowa Volunteers, aged 18 years. Nashville, Tennessee, December 16th, 1864. Conoidal musket ball. Treated at Cumberland and Jeffersonville hospitals, and returned to duty February 25, 1865. His name does not appear on the list of pensioners.

1870 Census: West Bend, Palo Alto County, Iowa: Henry H. Cornick (age 23, farmer, born New York), Annie Cornick (age 23, born Wisconsin), Walson D. Cornick (age 31, farmer, born New York), Henrietta Cornick (age 22, born Wisconsin) and Edith C. Cornick Age 9/12, born Iowa.

1880 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry H. Cormick (age 33, farmer, born New York), wife Anna Cormick (age 32, born Wisconsin), daughter Leonie M. Cormick (age 8, born Iowa), son Leon R. Cormick (age 1, born Iowa. John Fuller (age 50, laborer, born England), B. in Law, George Brown (age 23, laborer, born Wisconsin).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living In Iowa: 27th Iowa: H. H. Cormick, Private, Co. H., Post Office Address: Livermore

1885 Iowa State Census: Livermore, Howard County, Iowa: H. H. Cormick (age 38, farmer, born NY), Anna Cornick (age 37, born Wisconsin), Lulu M. Cormick (age 12, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Leon Cormick (age 6, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1895 Iowa State Census, Humboldt County, Iowa Henry H. Cornick (age 48, born New York), Religion Presbyterian, Soldier in the War of the Rebellion: Co. H, 27 Iowa Vol. Inf.), Anna Cornick, (age 47, born Wisconsin), Leon R. Cornick (age 16, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1900 Census, Humboldt, Humboldt County, Iowa Harbert H. Cornick (born Aug. 1848, age 51, married 30 years, born New York, farmer), wife Anna Cornick (born May 1849, age 30, 0 children born, born Wisconsin). (Note the number of children born seems to be incorrect. There are two children on the 1880 census).

Anna Cornick died in 1910. She is buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa.

1910 Census: Des Moines Ward 4, Polk County, Iowa: Henry H. Cormick (age 63, widowed, born New York, retired), son Leon R. Cormick (age 27, married 1 time for 6 years, born Iowa), daughter-in-law Celia B. Cormick (age 27, married 1 time for 6 years, 0 children born, born Iowa.)

H. H. Cormick married Ida Boyd on Mar. 8, 1911 at Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. The marriage record shows that he was aged 65, his place of birth was Broom County New York. His fathers name was Henry Cormick. His mother's name was Phalinda Walker. Ida was aged 38. Her parents were Silas H. Boyd and Nancy Atwater. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934)

Henry Cornick died Aug. 20, 1911 at Des Moines, Iowa (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa.

Iowa Cemetery Records: Henry H. Cornick: Death Date 1 Sept. 1911, Page #108. Birth Date 1846, Cemetery Laurel Hill, Town, Des Moines. Level Info: Iowa Graves Registration Survey WPA Polk County, Iowa.

His widow Ida L. B. Cornick filed for a pension on Aug. 8, 1929 in Iowa.


Crum, William He was born Apr 25, 1844 in Chippewa, Wayne County, Ohio. He was the son of Abraham Crum and Sarah Fry. He married Mary Elizabellet (Isabella) Megonigle on Dec. 6, 1866 in Bethel Church, Buchanan County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Hamilton Megonigle (1807 - 1867) and Mary Barklay Roop (1807 - 1896). She was the sister of the McGonigil brothers (Alvi Curtis and Bartimeus) that served with Company H, 27th Iowa. Two of her sisters married men that served in Company H, 27th Iowa: Her sister Vironica C. Megonigle married Emanuel Miller. Her sister Nancy Jane McGonigle married Benjamin Miller

William Crum William Crum

Photos of William L. Crum and Biography was found here.
William was born to Abraham and Sarah Crum (Krum) in Chippewa County, Ohio on April 25, 1844. He grew up in Iowa with foster parents (names unknown) who moved there from Ohio when Abraham had them take care of him while he made a circuit ride for the Methodist church. Sarah died when William was very young and thus no one else was available to care for William. Abraham tried to find William and finally located him in Iowa and pledged to come and get him after his current circuit ride was complete. He died of a heart attack before he could pick William up. On August 18, 1862 at the age of 18 William enlisted in the Civil War effort with Millers and Megonigles. His unit was the 27th Infantry (company H) of the Iowa Volunteers formed by Jacob Miller. This unit served under General Sherman. They marched to Lexington but arrived after Sherman had defeated the Rebel troops. They stayed in Jackson, Tennessee for awhile and then were engaged in battle near Memphis. In 1864 their unit was engaged in the battle of Vicksburg. His brothers, Nelson and Wilson were also enlisted in the Civil War. It is believed that Wilson served directly under General Grant. They only saw each other twice during the war. William mustered out (was discharged) on August 8, 1865 after nearly 3 years of service. On December 6, 1866 he married his hometown sweetheart, Isabell (Belle) Megonigle. They lived in Linn County Iowa and had seven children. In August of 1878 they traveled by covered wagon and drove their stock 22 days to Creighton, Nebraska where they homesteaded a farm about 5 miles west of town. William died of a Cerebral Hemorrhage on March 17, 1900 at age 56. Isabella and their youngest son, Clifford Frank, continued to run the farm. Occasionally Raz Megonigle would come at harvest and help out. William is buried in Greenwood Cemetery in Creighton, Nebraska.

1850 Census, Chippewa, Wayne County, Ohio: Abram Krum (age 33, carpenter, born Ohio), Sarah Krum (age 33, born PA), Wilson S. Krum (age 10, born Ohio), Leah Krum (age 8, born Ohio), Wm. L. Krum (age 6, born Ohio), Maria Krum (age 2, born Ohio), and Math L. Krum (age 1, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Root, Adams County, Indiana: John Miller (age 54, farmer, born PA), Catherine Miller (age 53, born PA), William Crum (age 15, farm laborer, born Ohio).

1870 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: William Crun (age 26, farmer, born Ohio), Isabella Crun (age 24, born Iowa) and Emerson Crun (age 2, born Iowa.

1880 Census Records: Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska: William Crum (age 36, farming born Ohio), wife Isabella Crum (age 34, born Iowa), son Emerson Crum (age 12, born Iowa), daughter Mary Crum (age 9, born Iowa), daughter Evie Crum (age 6, born Iowa), son Marvin Crum (age 4, born Iowa) and son Lee Crum (age 1/12, born April, born Nebraska).

1885 Nebraska State Census Collection; Keith, Keya Paha and Knox: Wm Crum (age 41, farmer, born Ohio), wife Eribel Crum (age 39, born Iowa), son Emerson Crum (age 17, born Iowa), daughter Mary Crum (age 14, born Iowa, daughter Eva Crum (age 11, born Iowa), daughter Mary Crum (age 9, born Iowa), son Lee Crum (age 5, born Nebraska) and son Clifford Crum (age 1, born Nebraska).

1890 Veterans Census: Logan and Miller, Knox County, Nebraska: William Crum, Private Co. H. 27 Iowa Inft. Vol. Enlisted Aug. 16, 1862, Discharge Aug. 8, 1865, Length of Service: 2 Years, 11 months, 22 days. Post Office Address: Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska. Disability Incurred: Sun Stroke, heart disease, hearing.

William Crum died Mar. 17, 1900 and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska, Lot S 1/2 56, Section 4.

Old Settler Stricken

CREIGHTON, Neb. March 17 (Special) - William Crum, an old settler of this county, and a highly respected citizen, living about seven miles west of Creighton, was stricken with paralysis, while unhitching a team from the wagon at his home last night. He is now lying in an unconscious condition, and at this writing there is but little hope held of his recovery. Mr. Crum is an old soldier and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, about fifty-five years old.

The Nebraska State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Mar. 18, 1900.

Death at Creighton

CREIGHTON, Neb., March 18 (Special). Mr. William Crum who was stricken with paralysis a day or two ago, died at his home six miles west of here this morning. He will be buried tomorrow at two o'clock. He is an old soldier, one of the oldest settlers of this part of Knox county, and leaves a wife and three girls and three boys. He was fifty-five years old.

Nebraska State Journal )Lincoln, Nebraska) March 19, 1900.

His widow Isabella Crum filed for a pension on May 28, 1900.

1900 Census: Miller, Knox County, Nebraska: Isabella Crum (born Nov. 1854, age 54, widowed, 6 children born 6 still living, born Iowa, farmer), daughter Marvie L. Crum (born Apr. 1876, age 24, born Iowa), son Lee Crum (born Apr. 1880, age 20, born Nebraska) and son Clifford F. Crum (born Dec. 1883, age 16, born Nebraska).

Isabella Crum died Nov. 6, 1936 in Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska. She is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska.

The obituary was found on Find A Grave.

Mrs. I. Crum on Homestead 58 Years Passes Away Tuesday

Mrs. Isabelle Crum, pioneer resident of the Creighton community, passed away at her home west of town late Tuesday afternoon. Mrs. Crum, who would have been 91 Nov. 11, suffered a broken right leg two weeks ago and has been bedfast since. The injury occurred when she suffered a momentary fainting spell and fell.

Mrs. Crum, with her husband, William Crum and four children moved from Iowa to the homestead seven miles west of here 58 years ago, and she has continuously resided there since.

Surviving children are Mrs. Harry Kimble of Brunswick, Mrs. Emil Bonge and Mrs. Lute Riley, both of Valentine. Emory Crum of Malaca, Minn. Lee Crum of Phillips, S. D. and Clifford Crum at home.

Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 1:30 at the Methodist church here, with the pastor, the Rev. Minar Gerrard, Officiating.

Creighton News, Nov, 5, 1936.

Children of William L. Crum and Isabella Megonigle:

  1. Emerson Fredrick Crum, Oct. 25, 1867 - Oct. 28, 1944
  2. Mary Ethel Crum, Mar. 14, 1871 - Nov. 24, 1861
  3. Ava Phenella Crum, Oct. 2, 1873 - Jan. 17, 1939
  4. Marvie Luell Crum, 1876 - 1949
  5. Lee Crum, April 26, 1880 - Nov. 29, 1956
  6. Clifford Frank Crum, 1883 - Nov. 29, 1956

Diehl, Henry Emmanuel Absalom He was born Oct. 1, 1843, in Henry County, Indiana. He was the son of Henry Adrian Diehl (June 1, 1809 - Jan. 28, 1881) and Mary Ann Smyser (Mar 19, 1809 - Sept. 28, 1885). He married Mary E. Smyser on Nov. 8, 1866 in Buchanan County. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She is most likely the daughter of John and Leah Smyzer. (On the 1860 Census in Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa was the family of John and Leah Smyzer, which included Mary Smyzer, age 19). If this is the correct, then it appears that her brother George Wesley Smyser also served in Company H, 27th Iowa Infantry.

Henry E A Diehl

This image was found here

1850 Census: Henry, Wayne County, Indiana; Henry Deal (age 41, born PA), Mary A. Deal (age 41, born PA), Celitia Deal (age 15, born PA), Eliza Deal (age 12, born PA), Daniel Deal (age 9, born Ind.), Henry Deal (age 6, born Ind.), John Deal (age 4, born Ind. and Alexander Deal (age 1, born Ind.).

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry Diehl (age 47, born PA), Mary A. Diehl (age 47, born PA), Cecilia Diehl (age 21, born PA), Eliza Diehl (age 18, born PA), Daniel Diehl (age 16, born PA), Henry Diehl (age 13, born Indiana), John Diehl (age 10, born Indiana), Alexander Diehl (age 8, born Indiana) and Newton Diehl (age 4, born Indiana). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 3 years.

 

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry Diehl (age 50, laborer, born PA), Mary A. Diehl (age 51, born PA), Danl Diehl (age 19, born PA), Henry Diehl (age 16, born Ind.), Alexander Diehl (age 11, born Ind). and Newton Diehl (age 7, born Ind.).

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry Deihl (age 26, farmer, born Indiana), Mary Deihl (age 28, born Ohio), Luther Stoneman (age 30, born Ohio).

Mary E. (Smyser) Diehl died Oct. 12, 1874 at age 33 years, 9 months, 11 days. She is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa. Also buried in Oakwood Cemetery is Ellen G. Diehl died Nov 1, 1874 at age 1 month. And Elmer Diehl died Oct. 20, 1874 age 26 days. I suspect she died from complications of childbirth. It appears that she had twins and they did not survive either. Also buried in Oakwood cemetery is Lillie Grace Diehl that died Mar. 1, 1881 at age 9 years, 9 m. 11 days. Lillie G. Diehl (age 8) was living with Leah Smyser (age 66) on the 1880 census. She is listed as the Granddaughter of Leah Smyzer, so she was undoubtedly the child of Henry and Mary (Smyser) Diehl.

1880 Census: Clarion, Wright County, Iowa: H. E. A. Diehl (age 36, widowed, Clerk in Store, born Ind.).

He filed for a pension on Aug. 20, 1901 in Iowa.

1910 Census: School District 5, Custer County, South Dakota: Henry E. A. Diehl (age 66, widowed, born Indiana, General Farmer.)

1915 Iowa State Census: Hazleton, Buchanan County, Iowa; Henry E. A. Diehl (age 72, widowed, County: Buchanan, P. O. Box Hazleton. Town Hazleton. Occupation Retired. Extent of Education: Common 8, can read and write, Birthplace: Indiana. Military Service Infantry 27th Iowa Company H. Church Affiliation: Not any. Father's birthplace: Pennsylvania. Mother's Birthplace: Pennsylvania. Years in US 71. Years in Iowa: 61.

Henry Diehl died May 27, 1915 at Hazleton, Iowa (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Hazleton Cemetery, Add 1, Lot 10, Hazleton Township, Buchanan County, Iowa. (Cemetery Records, US Veterans Administration Payment Card and family tree records say May 17, 1915).


Donnan, William G. He was born June 30, 1834 in West Charlton, New York. He married Mary E. Williamson on Oct. 5, 1857 in Delaware County, Iowa. He was age 22, she was age 19. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of John and Sarah B. Williamson.

William G. Donnan William G. Donnan Image found on Find A Grave

Among the thousands of Iowans who served in the Civil War was William G. Donnan, a native New Yorker who moved to Independence, Iowa, in 1856. He was admitted to the Iowa bar that same year and began practicing law. He also served as treasurer and recorder of Buchanan County from 1857 until 1862 when he joined the 27th Iowa Infantry. After the war he would serve in the Iowa Senate followed by two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives (1871-1875)

When he joined the 27th Iowa Infantry he was mustered in as a second lieutenant. He was later promoted to first lieutenant and was brevetted captain and major before being mustered out in August, 1865. Donnan kept up a voluminous correspondence with his wife Mary for at least the first two years of his service. The correspondence that has survived continued until April, 1864, although he served until the end of the war. His letters home included observations from the mundane to the sublime, from petty personal annoyances to shrewd analysis of the political and military objectives of the war and the growing moral sense among Unionists of the necessity to sustain the pursuit of those objectives. The value of his correspondence does not lie in military valor or heroism on the battlefield because Donnan saw little front line duty. Rather his letters home cast light on many other aspects of military life during the Civil War that remain largely unnoticed today but which were nevertheless just as important to our understanding of the war as fighting pitched battles.

Donnan reported first to Camp Franklin near Dubuque thinking that he would be assigned to the 21st Iowa Infantry. When he arrived he found 1,800 other soldiers in camp, many of whom were being assigned to the 21st Iowa. The surplus recruits, including Donnan, were then assigned to the 27th Iowa Infantry. Donnan shared the initial optimism and sense of excitement of new recruits for the cause of the Union. While still in camp he wrote to Mary that "I believe I shall like the life of the soldier." He also chafed under the lack of activity while in camp from late August until late October and lack of orders as to when the 27th Iowa would head out of Dubuque and toward the fighting.

Throughout his service Donnan remarked to Mary about how his own health was quite good and even at times complained about how he was gaining weight. However, he was not at all insensitive to the suffering of other soldiers. He made many references to the large number of men suffering and dying from disease as well as on the battlefield and keenly observed that many more men died of disease than of battle injuries. He told Mary of how one of the hardiest men in the regiment became sick and eventually died in the hospital.

Donnan frequently exhibited a visual reaction to his surroundings. In November, 1862, he traveled through Cairo, Illinois, as most Iowa troops did at one time or another, while being sent down to the Vicksburg area. He was not particularly impressed. "Cairo is a nasty muddy, unhealthy place and we feel as though more than half our men will be sick if we remain 2 weeks longer." A few days later he found Memphis, Tennessee, a refreshingly different place, remarking on the beauty of the city with its stately oak and magnolia trees. The following August, he was posted at Clarendon, Arkansas, and remarked wistfully how the prairie land there reminded him of Iowa. His keen eyes also observed people. He gave Mary a detailed description of General Grant who he saw at Fort Pickering in mid-January, 1863, as "a very fine looking man he is, but very plain, farmer-like -- rather broad face -- pleasant eye -- but of heavy, slow movement."

Donnan was stationed at various headquarters in Tennessee, Arkansas, and Louisiana including Fort Pickering near Memphis, Camp Reed near Jackson, Tennessee, at Moscow, Tennessee (a short distance east of Memphis), at Clarendon, Arkansas and Little Rock, and at Alexandria, Louisiana. While at Moscow he ran the Provost Marshal's Office. An episode that was both comic and serious occurred when, in June, 1863, he was appointed to serve on a court martial board. Apparently, reports got back home that he was being court-martialed, and he wrote a letter to Mary that started off very bluntly and emphatically that she needed to tell everybody at home that he was on the court martial board and that he was most certainly not being court martialed.

Also, like many other soldiers writing home, he told Mary of his loneliness and desire to be home. At one point, he wrote to Mary that he had decided that he was afraid to ask for leave because it would make him think about it so much that he would be overwhelmed with homesickness and that it would simply be better to remain on duty.

Donnan also commented on war strategy repeatedly in his letters to Mary. Through the winter and spring of 1863 he commented in many letters of the strategic importance of capturing Vicksburg. He believed that if Vicksburg could be taken, the rebellion would collapse in short order. Even before Vicksburg was taken, he believed the rebellion was ripe for collapse. In a letter dated February 5, he cited three reasons for an early end to the war: (1) Confederate hopes for foreign intervention were lost (it was actually still possible though deteriorating at this point because Lincoln's recent Emancipation Proclamation was moving public opinion in England and France more in favor of the Union); (2) widespread destitution and hunger if Vicksburg is taken (this did occur although the rebellion continued for the better part of two years; and (3) slaves were more unmanageable (this was true in areas close to the fighting but not always true elsewhere.) On July 22, several weeks after the fall of Vicksburg, he wrote to Mary that he felt the days of the rebellion were drawing to a close. Also, in a letter of May 17, he commented to Mary that the Confederate loss of Generals Jackson and Van Dorn would also hurt the Confederate cause.

Until the Civil War, blacks were never allowed to serve in the United States armed forces, but this became an issue as the conflict became more severe and casualties were mounting. By 1862 it was apparent to the Confederacy, and a year later to the Union, that neither of them had enough volunteers and might have to turn to conscription. While Confederates resisted enlisting blacks until almost the very end of the war out of sheer fear of arming former slaves, the Union began to consider the possibility. Even then, many Unionists opposed it because of the nearly universal belief among whites at that time in the racial inferiority of blacks. During the lame duck session of Congress in the winter of 1863, a conscription bill was debated and then adopted on March 3. Donnan favored allowing blacks to enlist, suggesting in a letter to Mary that from what he had seen and experienced, they were as capable of bearing arms as whites, although white prejudice at that time thought otherwise. He also saw this as a new source of enlistments to help the Union cause.

Although Donnan saw little direct military action he was still close enough to it to see its effects firsthand. As stated, he saw directly the suffering of the troops from disease during the 27th Iowa's first year in the field and suffering from battlefield duty during the disastrous Red River Expedition under General Nathaniel Banks in the spring of 1864. Donnan initially went with the expedition but was sent back to Memphis before the main encounters the expedition had with the Confederates. He heard quickly of the "temporary" repulse and casualties in Memphis in mid-April and noted in a letter to Mary a few weeks later that nearly everyone was "really disgusted with General Banks."

There are no more known letters from Donnan to Mary after May, 1864, although he served to the end of the war. A likely possibility is that he continued writing to her but the later letters have been lost. After he was mustered out of service at Clinton, Iowa, on August 8, 1865, he returned to Independence and resumed the practice of law. In 1867 he was elected to the Iowa State Senate and re-elected in 1869. In 1870, he was elected to the U.S House of Representatives as a Republican and was re-elected in 1872. In 1874, he chose not to run for re-election and resumed his law practice in Independence. However, he remained active in Republican Party politics, serving as a delegate to the Republican national convention in 1884 and as chairman of the Republican state central committee from 1884-1886. He also served again in the Iowa State Senate from 1884 to 1886. He lived on at Independence until his death on December 4, 1908, at age 74. He was interred at Oakwood Cemetery at Independence.

Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress, 1774-1989. U.S. Government Printing Office, 1989, p. 920.

Logan, Guy E., Roster and Records of Iowa Troops in the Rebellion. State of Iowa, 1911. See 27th Iowa Infantry.

The letters can be found in the Iowa State Archives in the State Historical Building in Des Moines. They were donated to the Historical Department in 1929 by his son Don Donnan.

DONNAN, William G., 1834-1908

Guide to Research Collections

State Historical Society of Iowa
Des Moines, IA
Papers: Civil War and 1886-1899. 1 folder.
Letters written during Civil War and miscellaneous congressional papers.

Donnan, William G., representative, was born in West Charlton, N.Y., June 30, 1834. He removed to Independence, Iowa, in September, 1856, was graduated at Union college, Schenectady, N.Y., in 1857, and was admitted to the bar the same year. He was treasurer and recorder of Buchanan county, Iowa, 1857-62; enlisted as a private in the Iowa volunteers in 1862, was promoted 1st lieutenant in the 27th Iowa regiment; was brevetted captain and major for gallant and meritorious services, March 13, 1865; and was mustered out, Aug. 8, 1865. He was a state senator, 1868-70, and a Republican representative in the 42d and 43d congresses, 1871-75.

American Biographical Library

DONNAN, William G., a Representative from Iowa; born in West Charlton, N.Y., June 30, 1834; attended the district schools and Cambridge Academy; was graduated from Union College, New York, in 1856; moved to Independence, Iowa, in 1856; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1856 and commenced practice at Independence in 1857; treasurer and recorder of Buchanan County 1857-1862; entered the Union Army as a private in Company H, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, in 1862; promoted to the grade of first lieutenant and brevetted captain and major; was adjutant on the staff of Gen. James J. Gilbert; member of the State senate in 1868 and 1870; elected as a Republican to the Forty-second and Forty-third Congresses (March 4, 1871-March 3, 1875); declined to be a candidate for reelection in 1874 to the Forty-fourth Congress; resumed the practice of law at Independence; delegate at large to the Republican National Convention in 1884; chairman of the Republican State central committee 1884-1886; again a member of the State senate 1884-1886; died in Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa, December 4, 1908; interment in Oakwood Cemetery.

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Wm. G. Donnan (age 24, lawyer, born New York), Mary Donnan (age 23, born KY), Wm Donnan (age 10/12, born Iowa.) and Martha Mahony (age 15, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Independence Ward 3, Buchanan County, Iowa: William G. Donnan (age 36, lawyer, born NY), Mary E. Donnan (age 35, born Kentucky), William W. Donnan (age 10, born Iowa) Donald D. Donnan (age 7, born Iowa), Sarah B. Williamson (age 70, born South Carolina) and Joseph H. Williamson (age 30, born Kentucky), (There was a James B. Donnan family living next door).

Third District – Nomination of William G. Donnan

The Republican convention of the Third Iowa District which met at Charles City on the 24th inst, nominated on the 107th ballot, William J. Donnan, of Buchanan County, for Congress. The other candidates supported in the convention were Thomas Updegraff, of Clayton, E. E. Cooley, Winneshiek; H. O. Pratt, Chickasaw; William B. Larrabee, Fayette; John E. Burke, Bremer; J. W. Thomas, Allamakee; N. C. Deering, Mitchell.

On the 43rd ballot the vote stood. Donnan, 35 1/2; Updegraff, 25 1/2; Cooley 10 1/2; Pratt 22 1/2; Larrabee 16 1/2; Burke 15 1/2; Thomas 18 1/2 and Deering, 14 1/2. On the 107th ballot Dubuque County, which had divided it vote between the candidates, concentrated on Donnan and gave him a majority, the last ballot standing Donnan 97, Updegraff 65, Larrabee 4.

William G. Donnan is 35 or 36 years of age, a lawyer by profession, and a native of the state of New York. He has been 13 years in Iowa and was brevet major of the 27th Iowa infantry. In 1867 he was elected to the State Senate by the Republicans of Buchanan County, and during the sessions of 1868 and 1870 he was a prominent member of that body. He was especially fortunate in securing the location of the second Hospital for the Insane at his town of Independence – an achievement that made for him quite a local reputation. He is a man of fine personal address, as well as of fine abilities, an indefatigable worker, a radical Republican, a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a high-toned, honorable gentleman. He will make an active, reliable, and in due time an influential member of Congress, worthily taking place so long and ably filled by his predecessor, Honorable William B. Allison.

Burlington Hawk-Eye, Burlington Iowa, Saturday Morning, August 27, 1870

W. G. Donnan (former Lieutenant in Company H, 27th Iowa) was running for Congress. There were apparently many men of the 27th Iowa that was opposed to him being elected. It does appear that, in spite of this, he was elected.

HONORABLE W. G. DONNAN

EXAMINATION INTO HIS WAR RECORD

Supplying the Rebels with Ammunition

Depriving Sick Soldiers of Their Rations to Satisfy His Own Demands

His Own Soldiers on the Stand against Him

To the public:

As the Honorable Mr. Donnan and some of his honorable friends are telling the voters of this district of the deeds of valor performed, and the great aid he rendered the great rebellion and as he and his friends claim for him that the vote of all the soldiers and civilians are due him on account of his unequalled sacrifice for the good of this bleeding country, it might not be out of place to add to the record some of the points which he has evidently forgotten, as he makes no reference to them in his addresses to the people. It is but doing justice to him and to the voters that they should have the whole record, and if after they see fit to give him their suffrage, they cannot claim that they were ignorant, and he can claim with confidence that the people endorse his record. According to a report of one of his speeches his rule for the guidance of the voter is: "if an office holder don't steal or appropriate more than 1/6 of all money coming into his hands, you are bound to endorse him and say to him, "well done thou good and faithful servant," or words to that effect. If he said this he probably had his own case under advisement. Below will be found something which it would possibly be appropriate to take into consideration in connection with the statement:

The following are a part of the charges and specifications which were preferred against W. G. Donnan in December, 1863 or January, 1864, at Memphis Tennessee:

Charges and specifications against W. G. Donnan, First Lieutenant, Company H, 27th Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry.

Charge 1st, "Larceny,"

Specification 1st. In this, that the said W. G. Donnan, First Lieutenant, Company H, 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, did take a large amount of cartridges, the property of the United States, and did separate powder, caps and lead, and sell the same to a citizen or citizens of Memphis, Tennessee, whose names are unknown, for the sum of about $75, and did appropriate the money to his own use. This at Fort Pickering, Memphis, Tennessee, on or about 10 December, 1862.

Specification 2. In this that the said W. G. Donnan, First Lieutenant, Company H, 27th Regiment Iowa Volunteers, did take, secrete, and dispose of one harness, knowing the same to have been stolen from a citizen of Tennessee, and did receive the proceeds therefore and appropriate the same to his own use.

This at Memphis, Tennessee, sometime in November or December, 1862.

Charge 2. Embezzlement, and misapplication of military stores, the property of the United States.

Specification 1, In this that on or about the 10th day of December, 1862 at Memphis, Tennessee, he the said W. G. Donnan, the Second Lieutenant, Company H 27th Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry, did appropriate to his own use a quantity of provisions, the property of the United States, to wit, a quantity of dried fruit, flour, rice and other articles of subsistence stores.

Charge 3. Exciting mutiny and sedition.

Specification 1. In this, that the said W. G. Donnan, First Lieutenant, Company H, 27th Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry, did on or about the 23rd day of October, 1863, and while he was an adjutant of said Regiment write and circulate among the line officers of said Regiment and urge them to sign the same, a paper or petition, which stated in substance that Lieutenant Colonel Jed Lake of the said 27th Regiment of Iowa Infantry Volunteers, had caused much disturbance in said Regiment among the officers, and that they despaired of unity of action while he was in the Regiment, and asked the major general commanding to dismiss him, the said Lieutenant Colonel Jed Lake, from the service. The said Lieutenant Colonel Jed Lake, being at that time in command of the said 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and the said W. G. Donnan, first Lieutenant and acting adjutant of the said Regiment, and in order to assure the said line officers that they would have nothing to fear from said Lieutenant Colonel Jed Lake said "we," meaning himself and – – (two other officers of said Regiment) "are bound to drive him, Lieutenant Colonel Jed Lake out of the Regiment, and if a court-martial will not dismiss him, we are bound to hound him until he resigned."

List of witnesses: J. C. Glass, George Beeman, John Butler and 22 other officers and enlisted men of the 27th Iowa Infantry.

It is supposed both that he was not tried for the reason that about two or three weeks after they were preferred and before the court-martial reached them in their orders the Regiment was ordered down the River to Vicksburg, and from that time until the war closed was so constantly on the move that no opportunity was offered to have them tried. Probably Mr. Donnan himself can throw some light on the matter as to why commanding officers did not make an effort in the direction of trial during the two or three weeks between the preferment of the charges and the moving of the Regiment. Ask him.

His friends, some of them, say that Mr. Donnan admits that he sold the ammunition, but excuses it on the grounds that it was damaged. But it was not, for the day before it came into his care, it was good enough to issue to the Regiment, which was to start out to meet the enemy; but suppose it had been damaged, he had no right whatever to disobey orders and instead of turning it over to the ordnance Department of storing it with the camp equipage broke it off and sell it. – – He had it in trust only, for the company commanders, and they were pecuniarily responsible to the U.S. for the same until they could show that it was legitimately used or turned over to some officer authorized to receipt for it or make a false certificate, just whichever they chose.

These charges have been pronounced a lie, and only got up for personal spite. There are many who believe this, but Mr. Donnan is not one of them, I do not think. We believe the fact that the articles of war prescribed the penalty of dismissal from the service, for every offense charged, and in aggravated cases, death even; will be sufficient to show to every thinking man that they were no trifle. There are those who probably who would like to think them so for "no rogue ere felt the "halt r draw" with the good opinion of the law."

With regard to the truth of the same there were two or more witnesses at that time with the Regiment, who could and would testify under oath to every charge and specification, except to probably two specifications only one witness could testify. For proof of a part and to show how he felt for his comrades and why every soldier especially, should hurry to the polls, to vote for him, we call careful attention to the affidavit of J. C. Glass, below. It will be of no use for Mr. Donnan's friends to say that this affidavit amounts to nothing, for there were more soldiers living who were with him in Fort Pickering those bleak, cold, rainy days, and who have not forgotten it.

Affidavit of a Soldier Concerning W. G. Donnan

I, J. C. Glass, being duly sworn, do dispose and say I was a private in Company C, 27th Regiment Iowa volunteers, and that in the month of December, 1862, W. G. Donnan then being a Lieut. in the 27th Regiment, Iowa volunteers, stationed at Ft. Pickering, Memphis, Tennessee, with the sick man of said Regiment and while the Regiment was on the march, did to my knowledge take cartridges belonging to said Regiment left with him to turn over to the ordnance department, and separate the balls from the powder and did then take the powder in the city, and I was informed and verily believe did then sell them to the citizens of Memphis.

At the same time many of the soldiers left in his charge at said Ft. Pickering were suffering for clothing, shoes, etc., and the said Lieut. Donnan although frequently asked, absolutely refused to draw anything for them or us, or do anything to help relieve our suffering, although it was winter and very cold weather, and although there was nothing required of him but to sign a requisition and see that the said clothing and shoes were distributed to the men. I further state that there were some dried fruit and some flour left by the Regiment, and Lieut. Donnan did order the commissary to not distribute them to the sick man, but kept them for himself and other officers.

James C. Glass, of Independence, Iowa


I certify that the foregoing was signed in my presence by the same James C. Glass and was sworn to before me by him, this 27th day of September 1867.

James Jamison, Notary Public

As to the charge of inciting mutiny and sedition, his anxiety to get the Lieutenant Colonel out of the service might be considered as fully explained when we say that it was well understood by a part, at least of the officers of the Regiment that this man of military record was at that time a candidate for the majors commission as soon as a vacancy should occur or should be made to occur. Lieutenant Colonel had just been tried on charges prepared, we believe in the handwriting of Mr. Donnan and had not been dismissed as was expected, by him; therefore, like the energetic man that he is, and full of expedients, he tried the same tactics that work so well in the day of civil service reform; in a political way. That he failed was not for lack of persistent effort on his part. So certain that he would succeed that it was said to have been reported in his own town that he had actually been promoted to major over the heads of 10 captains and six first lieutenants, all his seniors in rank, a promotion which had he obtained it would probably have been sufficient to gratify his vanity and satisfied his ambition for a time at least. But, "the deep laid schemes of mice and men gang aft aglee."

S. W. Hemenway, formerly Captain, Company B 27th Iowa infantry

Dubuque Herald, Oct. 30, 1872

1880 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Wm. G. Donnan (age 45, lawyer, born NY), wife Mary E. Donnan (age 44, born Kentucky), William W. Donnan (age 20, bank clerk, born Iowa), son Donald D. Donnan (age 17, born Iowa), adopted daughter Grace H. Donnan (age 5, born Iowa) and servant Mary Lawless (age 20, born Ireland).

1885 Iowa State Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: William G. Donnan (age 49, lawyer, born NY), Mary E. Donnan (age 48, born Kentucky), and Grace W. Donnan (age 9, born Iowa).

1900 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Wm. G. Donnan (born June 1834, age 66, married 42 years, born NY, Lawyer), Wife Mary E. Donnan (born June 1834, age 64, married 42 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born Kentucky), and servant Sophie Moore (age 49, born Ohio).

INDEPENDENCE BOY KILLED BY TRAIN

Independence, July 6 (special) – the entire community was saddened by the tragic death of Reynolds Donnan, only son of the late W. W. Donnan, who was killed at Manhattan, Kansas on Friday. The funeral services were held Sunday from the home, conducted by Reverend Mr. Fahs of Cedar Falls, an old friend of the family. Many friends paid their last respects to the dead and all are doing what is possible to relieve the mother, who is completely prostrated by her son's sudden demise.

The deceased, who was a young man 23 years of age, had been in Kansas for the past two years employed with a railroad bridge gang. As he was a bright young man, he had advanced steadily until he has been placed in charge of a large bridge gang. They were working four miles west of Manhattan, Kansas and owing to washouts, it was impossible to continue work, so the young foreman ran ahead to flag a train which was due soon. He sat down on the track and evidently fainted or fell asleep, for though his companions, noticing his danger, called to him and almost came near enough to arouse him, he did not hear. He was struck by the train and his neck was broken. Roy Miller, a former Independence boy, who was working with Mr. Donnan, accompanied the remains home, the grandfather having also gone to meet them. Deceased had one sister, Miss Rena Donnan, a teacher. Reynolds Donnan had always lived in Independence until he went west two years ago. His father was formally cashier of the First National Bank. He died last year after having been an invalid for a number of years. W. G. Donnan, grandfather of the deceased, was formerly congressman from this district. He is now president of the First National Bank.

Waterloo Daily Courier July 6, 1908

William G. Donnan died Dec. 4, 1908 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Add 1, Lot 500, Buchanan County, Iowa.

The news was received here today of the death of W. G. Donnan, president of the First National Bank in independence. Mr. Donnan was well and favorably known here and his death came as a shock to his numerous friends here.

Cedar Rapids evening Gazette, December 5, 1908

WILLIAM G. DONNAN was born at West Charleston, New York, on the 30th of June, 1834. He lived on a farm in boyhood and was educated at Cambridge Academy. He entered Union College later and graduated in 1856. In September of the same year he came to Iowa and located at Independence where he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1857. In September he was elected recorder and treasurer of the county and served until 1862, when he enlisted in the Union army and was elected lieutenant. He won rapid promotion in the service until he reached the rank of major before the close of the war. In 1867 he was elected to the State Senate on the Republican ticket, serving four years. He was largely instrumental in securing the establishment of the Hospital for the Insane at Independence. In 1870 he received the Republican nomination for Representative in Congress for the Third District and was elected by a majority of 4,964. He was reelected in 1872, serving two terms, declining a third. In 1884 he was a delegate to the Republican National Convention and voted for the nomination of President Arthur.

IOWA IN THE CIVIL WAR
Biographies and Obituaries of Civil War Veterans

Iowa Cemetery Records: Name: William G. Donnan. Date of Death: Dec. 4, 1908. Page #116. Birth Date: June 30, 1834. Cemetery Oakwood. Town: Washington. Level Info: Buchanan County Burial Records.

Mary E. Donnan (born 1835), died April 21, 1909 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

FRAIL WOMAN FINALLY DIES

MRS. W. G. DONNAN OF INDEPENDENCE WAS AGE 73

Descendent of Penn Colonist, and Wife of Leading Lawyer

Independence, April 23 – (special) – an indomitable will and a vitality that surprised even her physicians prolonged the life of Mrs. W. G. Donnan far beyond the period expected when she suffered a paralytic stroke several years ago. Though her life has been despaired of since that time and her loved ones had been summoned to her bedside, this remarkable woman survived her husband, who died only recently, her son and grandson. But the death angel came Wednesday, April 21, to call her to the loved ones who had gone on before, and her funeral services were held this afternoon from the Presbyterian Church, of which organization she and her husband had been staunch supporters and among the founders. She was 73 years, 10 months and seven days old.

Descendent of Colonist

Mary Elizabeth Williamson was a native of Kentucky, being at Elkton, June 14, 1835. The first Williamson of her progenitors in this country came over with William Penn. One of his sons, expelled from the church in Pennsylvania for dancing, settled in the Tidewater country in the state of Virginia. His son John Williamson, father of Mrs. Donnan, spent his early life in that state, married there and reared a family of eight children. After the death of his first wife he determined to move "West," as it was then called. He located in Elkton, Kentucky, and there married Sarah B. Haddon. He was a large plantation owner and an extensive slaveholder, but bowing to the will of his wife, who was opposed to the slavery system, he sold all of his slaves and removed to Iowa, settling at Rossville, in Delaware County.

Decedent was united in marriage with the late William G. Donnan, October 1, 1857, and has since made her home in Independence. Mrs. Donnan was much like the southern woman, frail in body but strong in will. Her husband sacrificed what meant a great deal to him in withdrawing after his first enlistment for Civil War service. When the youngest son was seven days of age, he marched away with Company H 27th Iowa infantry as second lieutenant. Twice during the war did Mrs. Donnan make trips to the front to see her husband, suffering the hardships that only those of the war period can fully realize.

During her long residence in Independence, Mrs. Don won a host of friends, all of them sincerely sympathize with the bereaved relatives. Her death is the more sad because of the fact that her brother, the late J. H. Williamson, also a prominent resident of the city, was laid away only a few weeks ago, and within the past two years seven of her near and dear relatives have journeyed to that other shore.

Mrs. Donnan leaves to mourn her death two brothers, T. A. Williamson, of Albion, Nebraska, and J. T. Williamson, of Faulkton,, South Dakota, a son, Don E. Donnan, and a granddaughter, Miss Rena May Donnan, both of this city.

Waterloo Semi Weekly Courier April 27, 1909


Eddy, Levi Henry He was born Aug. 20, 1835 in Syracuse, New York. He was the son of Myron Eddy (1807 - Dec. 11, 1866) and Louisa French. He married Maria Smith on Oct. 2, 1859 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Lee Smith and Amanda Bancroft (6/21/1821 - 9/26/1885 Buchanan County Iowa). Her brother Joel S. Smith, served in Company C. 27th Iowa. Levi's brother Nelson W. Eddy, also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. His sister Arvilla Eddy married William S. King, who served in Company C, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Belvidere, Boone County, Illinois: Myron Eddy (age 36, carpenter, born VT), Louisa Eddy (age 37, born NY), Nelson Eddy (age 17, farmer, born NY), Levi Eddy (age 14, born NY), Laura Eddy (age 13, born NY), and Arvilla Eddy (age 9, born NY).

1860 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Levi H. Eddy (age 24, farmer, born New), Maria Eddy (age 17, born New York), and Joel Smith (age 14, born New York).

Miscellaneous information dated 1863 from the papers of Samuel O. Smith.

Headqrs Detachment 27 Iowa Vol. Inf. Medon Tenn. May 8th 1863

To Saml O. Smith
2d Lt. Co B. 27 Iowa

Sir:

You are hereby detailed as a member of a Garrison Court Martial to meet at the office of the Prov. Marshall in Medon Tennessee May 8th 1863 or as soon as practicable for the trial of Levi H. Eddy a private of Co H. 27th regt. Iowa Vol. Inf and such other prisoners as may be brought before it.

By Order of Maj. G.W. Howard. Comd. Post
M.G. Dorman. A.Adj.

Levi Eddy filed for a pension on Dec. 5, 1865.

1870 Census: Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa: Levi Eddie (age 35, born NY), Maria Eddie (age 37, born Michigan), Myron (age 9, born Iowa), George Eddie (age 7, born Iowa), Furlough Eddie (age 5, born Iowa), Delbert Eddie (age 2, born Iowa) and Alexandria Eddie (age 8/12, born Iowa.)

1880 Census: Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa: Levi Eddy (age 45, farmer, born New York), wife Maria Eddy (age 37, born New York), son Myron Eddy (age 19, farming, born Iowa), son George Eddy (age 17, born Iowa), son Hurlon Eddy (age 14, born Iowa), son Delbert Eddy (age 12, born Iowa), son Elick Eddy (age 10, born Iowa) and son Joy Eddy (age 8, born Iowa)

Maria Smith Eddy died March 26, 1883. She is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1885 Iowa State Census: Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa: Levi Eddy (Township 87, Range 8, Section 29 SW SW, age 49, farmer, born NY), Alex Eddy (age 14, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Joy Eddy (age 12, born Buchanan County Iowa.)

1890 Census: Norfolk, Madison County, Nebraska: Levi H. Eddy, Private Co. H, 27 H Iowa Infty. Enlisted Aug. 18, 1862. Discharged June 27, 1865. Length of Service: 2 years, 10 months, 9 days. Current Post Office: Norfolk, Neb. Disability Incurred: Rheumatism.

Levi H. Eddy died July 10, 1903 in Norfolk, Nebraska due to a fall from a hay mow. He is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Iowa Cemetery Records, Name: Levi H. Eddy. Death Date: July 10, 1903, Page #123. Birth Date: Aug. 29, 1835. Cemetery: Wilson, Town Washington. Level Info: Buchanan County Burial Records.


Eddy, Nelson William He was born Aug. 23, 1832 in New York. He was the son of Myron Eddy (1807 - Dec. 11, 1866) and Louisa French. He married Sarah Ackley. Nelson's brother Levi H. Eddy also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. His sister Arvilla Eddy married William S. King, who served in Company C, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Belvidere, Boone County, Illinois: Myron Eddy (age 36, carpenter, born VT), Louisa Eddy (age 37, born NY), Nelson Eddy (age 17, farmer, born NY), Levi Eddy (age 14, born NY), Laura Eddy (age 13, born NY), and Arvilla Eddy (age 9, born NY).

1860 Census: Lyons, Clinton county, Iowa: Nelson W. Eddy (age 28, black smith, born New York,, Sarah Eddy (age 26, born New York), Sara Eddy (age 6, born Michigan), and Franklin Eddy (age 3, born Ill.).

1870 Census: Garden Plain, Whiteside, Illinois: Nelson Eddy (age 37, carpenter, born New York), Sarah Eddy (age 35, born New York ) and Franklin Eddy (age 12, born Illinois).

1880 Census: Albany, Whiteside County, Illinois: Nelson W. Eddy (age 47, laborer, born New York), wife Sarah Eddy (age 45, born New York), son Franklin L. Eddy (age 22, laborer, born Illinois) and daughter-in-law Mary E. Eddy (age 21, born Minnesota).

1885 Iowa State Census: Willow, Cherokee County, Iowa: Nelson Eddy (Township 40, Range 41, Section 32, SE SW, age 52, farmer, born NY), Sarah Eddy (age 50, born NY), and James Welch (age 2, born Iowa).

1900 Census: Willow, Cherokee County, Iowa: Nelson Eddy (born Aug. 1832, age 67, married 47 years, born New York, Janitor of Church), wife Sarah Eddy (born Oct. 1834, age 65, married 47 years, 4 children born, 2 still living, born New York).

Nelson Eddy died Feb 9, 1905 and is buried in Sunset View Cemetery, Washta, Cherokee County, Iowa.

His Widow Sarah Eddy filed for a pension on March 1, 1905.

Sarah Eddy died in 1908 and is buried in Sunset View Cemetery, Washta, Cherokee County, Iowa.


Evans, Charles Wesley He was born about 1842 in Ohio. He was the son of Hamilton (1818 - 1902) and Diana Evans. He married Damaris Langley on Aug. 26, 1868 in Benton County, Iowa. She was the daughter of John E. Langley and Degenira McMurray. (Note: His father Hamilton Evans also served with Co. H. of the 27th Iowa Infantry).

1850 Census, Johnstown, Licking County, Ohio; Hamilton Evans (age 32, cooper, born Virginia), Diana Evans (age 27, born Ohio), Charles W. Evans (age 8, born Ohio), Angeline Evans (age 6, born Ohio), Emily Evans (age 4, born Ohio), William Evans (age 2, born Ohio) and Lucy Janett (age 16, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa Census: Bryon Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Evans (age 38, farmer, born VA), Ruth Evans (age 27, born Ohio), Westley Evans (age 13, born Ohio), Angaline Evans (age 11, born Ohio), Emily Evans (age 8, born Ohio), and Osker Evans (age 3, born Ohio). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years.

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Evans, (age 41, farmer, born Virginia), Ruth D. Evans (age 29, born Ohio), Charles W. Evans (age 18, born Ohio), Oscar W. Evans (age 8, born Ohio), Joseph W. Evans (age 4, born Iowa), Geo W. Evans (age 2, born Iowa) and Margaret J. Evans (age 3/12, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Hartford County, Iowa: Charles Evans (age 29, Minister, born Ohio), Dame Evans (age 25, born Ohio) and Cora Evans (age 5/12, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Fayette, Linn County, Iowa: Charles W. Evans (age 38, minister, born Ohio), wife Damaris Evans (age 33, born Ohio), daughter Cora D. Evans (age 10, born Iowa), son Frank W. Evans (age 8, born Iowa) and son Ernest C. Evans (age 6, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Wilton, Muscatine County, Iowa: Charles W. Evans (5th St. North Side (age 43, Minister of Gospel, born Ohio), Dame C. Evans (age 38, born Ohio), Cora L. Evans (age 14, born Iowa), Frank W. Evans (age 12, born Cedar County, Iowa), Ernest C. Evans (age 10, born Cedar County, Iowa) and Gay D. Evans (age 3, born Benton County, Iowa).

Charles W. Evans filed for a pension on June 21, 1897 in Iowa.

1900 Census: Prairie, Davis County, Iowa: Charles W. Evans (born Dec. 1841, age 58, married 31 years, born Ohio, Minister), wife Damaris Evans ( married 31 years, 4 children born, 3 still living, born Ohio, milliner).

1910 Census: Fort Lee, Bergen, New Jersey: Ernest Sibley (age 32, married 10 years, born Missouri, architect building), wife Gabrielle (age 28, married 10 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born Iowa), daughter Maxine Sibley (age 7, born Iowa), son Ernest Sibley (age 3, born New Jersey), father-in-law Charles Evans (age 67, married 42 years, born Ohio, minister), mother-in-law Demarris Evans (age 62, married 42 years, 4 children born 3 still living, born Ohio).

1920 Census: Fort Lee, Bergen County, New Jersey: Charles W. Evans, age 78, born Ohio), wife Damaris Evans (age 72, born Ohio).

Charles W. Evans died March 11, 1921 at Palisade, Bergen County, New Jersey (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Brookside Cemetery, Englewood, Bergen County, New Jersey.

His widow Damaris C. Evans filed for a pension on March 21, 1921 in New Jersey.

Damaris C. Evans died June 6, 1924 (United States Veterans Administration Payment Card.)


Evans, Hamilton He was born Oct. 1817 in Virginia.(He was the father of Charles W. Evans - who also served in Co. H of the 27th Iowa Infantry). He married first Diana. He married second Ruth Bantriger on June 24, 1855 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). Alternate spelling is Bontrager. Find a Grave has her name as Ruth O Brabt Evans.

1850 Census, Johnstown, Licking County, Ohio; Hamilton Evans (age 32, cooper, born Virginia), Diana Evans (age 27, born Ohio), Charles W. Evans (age 8, born Ohio), Angeline Evans (age 6, born Ohio), Emily Evans (age 4, born Ohio), William Evans (age 2, born Ohio) and Lucy Janett (age 16, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa Census: Bryon Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Evans (age 38, farmer, born VA), Ruth Evans (age 27, born Ohio), Westley Evans (age 13, born Ohio), Angaline Evans (age 11, born Ohio), Emily Evans (age 8, born Ohio), and Osker Evans (age 3, born Ohio). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years.

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Evans, (age 41, farmer, born Virginia), Ruth D. Evans (age 29, born Ohio), Charles W. Evans (age 18, born Ohio), Oscar W. Evans (age 8, born Ohio), Joseph W. Evans (age 4, born Iowa), Geo W. Evans (age 2, born Iowa) and Margaret J. Evans (age 3/12, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Swan City, Saline County, Nebraska: Hamilton Evans (age 52, born Virginia, farmer, born Virginia), Ruth Evans (age 42, born Ohio), Oscar A. Evans (age 18, born Ohio), Joseph Evans (age 14, born Iowa), George Evans (age 12, born Iowa), Margaret Evans (age 10, born Iowa), McClelland Evans (age 8, born Iowa), Willie Evans (age 4, born Iowa and David E. Evans (age 2, born Iowa).

1880 Census, Pleasant Hill, Saline County, Nebraska: H. Evans (age 61, farmer, born Virginia), wife Ruth Evans (age 51, born Ohio), son Joseph Evans (age 23, born Iowa), son J. M. Evans, age 17, born Iowa), son Willie Evans (age 12, born Iowa), son Elmer D. Evans (age 11, born Nebraska) son Albert Evans (age 9, born Nebraska) and son Eddie Evans 9age 7, born Nebraska).

1885 Nebraska State Census: Pleasant Hill Village, Saline County, Nebraska: Hamilton Evans (age 67, farmer, born Old Virginia), wife Ruth Evans (age 57, born Ohio), son Jas. M Evans (age 22, farmer, born Iowa), son William Evans (age 18, farmer, born Iowa), son Elmer Evans (age 16, born Nebraska), son Albert Evans (age 14, born Nebraska), and son Eddie Evans (age 11, born Nebraska).

1890 Veterans Census: Pleasant Hill, Saline County, Nebraska: Hamilton Evans, Private, Co. H. 27th Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 18, 1862, discharged June 15, 1865, Length of Service: 2 years, 10 months 3 days. Post Office Address: Pleasant Hill, Nebraska. Disability Incurred: Prisoner in Cahaba 8 months).

Ruth D. Evans died March 10, 1893 and is buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Saline County, Nebraska.

1900 Census: Pleasant Hill, Saline County, Nebraska: Hamilton Evans (born Oct. 1817, age 82, widowed, born Virginia)

He was a member of GAR Post 107, Dept. of Nebraska

Hamilton Evans died Sept. 20, 1902 and is buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Dorchester, Saline County, Nebraska Lot 191


Fleming, William Burdett He was born about 1839 in New York. He was the son of James Fleming (Aug. 8, 1809 - Apr. 4, 1882) and Pamelia Robinson (Aug. 12, 1817 - Oct. 23, 1870). William Burdett Fleming married Elizabeth McFarland on Oct. 21, 1863 in Buchanan County,Iowa. He was 28, she was 19. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934)

1850 Census: Paris, Kenosha County, Wisconsin: James Fleming (age 40, farmer, born Mass.), Permelia Fleming (age 33, born NY), Oman Fleming (age 12, born NY), Lavina Fleming (age 14, born NY), William B. Fleming (age 11, born NY), Frances M. Fleming (age 5, born Wisconsin, Bushrod W. Fleming (age 3, born Wisconsin) and child not named (age 1, female, born Wisconsin).

1856 Iowa State Census: Prairie, Buchanan County, Iowa: James Flemming (age 46, born Mass.), P. Flemming (age 38), L.E. Flemming (age 19), W. B. Flemming (age 17, Thos. Flemming (age 14), F. M. Flemming (age 12), B .W. Flemming (age 10), A. E. Flemming (age 8), M. E. Flemming (age 6), G.W. Flemming (age 4) and E. T. Flemming (age 1). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 1 year.

1860 Census: Fremont, Buchanan County, Iowa: James Flemming (age 50, farmer, born Mass.), Pamelia Flemming (age 43, born NY), Wm. B. Flemming (age 21, born NY), Thos. Flemming (age 19, born Wisc.), Francis Flemming (age 17, born Wisc.), Bushrod Flemming (age 15, born Wisc.), Elphina Flemming (age 12, born Wisc.), Mary C. Flemming (age 10, born Wisc.), Emma J. Flemming (age 6, born Iowa) and Colonel F. Flemming (age 3, born Iowa.)

WPA Records says William B. Fleming, born 1850, died Dec 3, 1867. He is buried in Fleming/Fremont Cemetery, Add 1, Lot 5. Fremont Township, Buchanan County, Iowa. Remarks: ADD. 1, LOT 5; CO. H. 27TH IA. INF.; NO G.A.R. MARKER (The year of birth appears to be incorrect. The roster and census records indicates that he was born about 1839).

His widow Elizabeth Fleming filed for a pension on Feb. 4, 1868.


French, Henry He was born about 1835 in New Hampshire. Henry French married Mary M. Older on April 28, 1859 in Buchanan County, Iowa. He was age 25. She was age 16. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She is probably the daughter of Augustus Harry Older (Dec. 7, 1816 -1880 and Margaret Todd (1816-1885). In 1850, the Augustus Older family was in Bad Ax, Crawford county, Wisconsin and included Mary Older (age 6, born NY). In 1860, the Augustus Older family was in Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa - No Mary - but she was on the 1860 census in Buchanan County, Iowa as Mary M. French. In a family tree for Augustus Older there is a note about Mary Older that said "she married a Gray". So I even though it does not mention Henry French, I am pretty certain I have the right family for her. See the rest of my notes below.

1860 Census: Homer, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry French (age 25, farm laborer, born NH), Mary French (age 16, born NY), unnamed (male) French (age 7/12, born Iowa).

Henry French was killed in railroad collision July 15, 1864, near Point Lookout, Md.

Henry French's widow Mary M. French filed for a pension on Aug. 29, 1864. On Jan 15, 1865 a pension was filed for a minor. Mary M. Gray was the guardian.

Mary M. French married Stephen Gray on Dec. 17, 1864. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934).

1870 Census, Independence Ward 1, Buchanan County, Iowa Stephen Gray (age 26, day laborer, born Indiana), Mary M. Gray (age 30, born New York), Henry G. Gray (age 4, born Dakota), Livern Gray (age 3, born Iowa) and Clark French (age 11, male, born Iowa).

1880 Census, Plattsmouth, Cass County, Nebraska: Stephen Grey (age 36, laborer, born Indiana) wife Mary M. Grey (age 39, born NY), stepson Clark L. French (age 20, teamster, born Iowa), son Henry A. Grey (age 14, born Dakota Territory), daughter Livra M. Grey (age 13, born Iowa), and brother James L. Grey (age 29, stone mason, born Indiana).


Frink, John S. He was born Dec. 9, 1822 in New York. (Note date of birth is based on the tombstone inscription, He was the son of Thomas Frink (Feb. 9, 1793 - Aug. 7, 1864) and Mary Saunders (1798 - Jan. 19, 1887). He married Mary Gell/Gill. His brother George Frink served in Company C, 27th Iowa.

1856 Iowa State Census: Jefferson, Buchanan County, Iowa: John S. Frink (age 33, born NY, merchant), Mary Frink (age 30, born NY), Aaron Frink (age 7, born Illinois), Jane Frink (age 5, born Iowa), and Nevada Frink (age 2, born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 3 years. (HOWEVER, I note that Jane is age 5 and stated to have been born in Iowa. So either she was not born in Iowa, or they had been in Iowa at least 5 years.)

1860 Census: Jefferson, Buchanan County, Iowa: Mary J. Frink (age 34, born NY), Aaron A. Frink (age 11, born Illinois), Mary J. Frink (age 9, born Iowa), Nevada Frink (age 6, born Iowa), Hattie A. Frink (age 3, born Iowa) and Ida May Frink (age 1, born Iowa). Living next door was Thomas Frink (age 69, farmer, born Mass.) Mary Frink (age 62, born Mass.), George Frink (age 25, born NY), Leroy Frink (age 32, born NY). I did not find John S. Frink in 1860.

1870 Census, Jefferson, Buchanan County, Iowa: John S. Frink (age 47, farmer, born NY), Mary J. Frink (age 44, born NY), Aaron Frink (age 21, born Illinois), Nevada Frink (age 16, born Iowa), Hattie Frink (age 13, born Iowa), Ida Frink (age 11, born Iowa) and Lawson Frink (age 9, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Jefferson, Buchanan County, Iowa: John S. Frink (age 56, farmer, born NY), wife Mary J. Frink (age 53, born NY), son Lawson T. Frank (age19, born Iowa) and daughter Ida M. Frink (age 21, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Perry, Buchanan County, Iowa: John S. Frink (6th Street, age 61, no business, born New York), Mary J. Frink (age 58, born NY), and Lawson Frink (age 23, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

John S. Frink died June 4, 1885 and is buried in Brandon Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa, Add. 2, Lot 120; Co. H. 27th Reg. Ia. State Vol.; member of G.A.R. Aged 62 Yrs, 5 M 28 D.

Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans: John J. Frink, Private, Co H., 27th Regt, Iowa Infy. Cemetery Brandon at New Jesup, Iowa. Date of Death: June 3, 1885.

His widow Mary J. Frink filed for a pension on Jul 25, 1885 in Iowa.

On the 1925 Iowa State census is a Dodson Frank. But when I looked at the actual census record. I believe this is Lawson Frink. He lists his parents at John S. Frink and Mary Gell. He was born about 1863 in Illinois.

Marriage record for Lawson T. Frink lists her name as Mary Gils and Mary Gill. Marriage record for Ida May Frink lists her name as Mary Jane Gill. Marriage Record for Hattie Frink lists her name as Mary Gill.


Gaylord, George G. He was born Dec. 22, 1831 in Ohio. He was most likely the son of Elihu Smith Gaylord (Nov. 25, 1785 - Oct. 22, 1854) and Parthenia Bartholemew (1790 - July 1834). He is listed as George Granger Gaylord in family trees. George G. Gaylord married Belle Remington on Sept. 24, 1881 in Ashtabula County, Ohio. (Ohio Marriages, 1800 - 1958) I can't tell if it is the right George G. Gaylord - but I have not been able to find another one - and he was in Ashtabula County, Ohio in 1850.

1850 Census, Jefferson, Ashtabula County, Ohio Benjamin B. Gaylord (age 37, Merchant, born Ohio), S. Matilda Gaylord (age 31, born Mass), Emma Jane Gaylord (age 6, born Ohio), Paul Gaylord (age 3, born Ohio), George G. Gaylord (age 18, Tailor, born Ohio), Delos W. Benjamin (age 28, tailor, born Ohio), Emeline S. Benjamin (age 26, born New York), Florida Benjamin (age 6 m, born Ohio) and Elihu S. Gaylord (age 63, farmer, born Conn.).

1860 Census, Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Jacob Price (age 31), Amelia Price (age 26) Silas Price (age 3), Suan Aakster (age 17), Fred S. Avery (age 30), Jed Lake (age 29), M. C. Marriott (age 30), Geo Gaylord (age 27, born Ohio), and Christopher Price (age 18).

Company G, 3 H. Arty. George G. Gaylord, 2d Lt. # Reg't U. S. Col'd H. Arty. Appears on Regimental Descriptive Book of the regiment names above.

Rank 2nd Lieut.

Date of appointment: May 27, 1863

Remarks: Promoted from private 27 Iowa Infy. Discharged on the adverse report of a military board by S. O. No. 340 W E. Oct. 10, 1864.

This Organization subsequently became CO. K, 3 Reg't U. S. Co'ld Heavy Artillery.


Company G, 3 H Arty. George G. Gaylord, 2 Lt, # Reg't U. S. Col'd H. Arty.

Age 30 years.

Appears on an Individual Muster-in Roll of the organization named above. Roll dated Memphis, Tenn. Dec. 27, 1863. Muster-in Date: Nov. 23, 1863. Joined for duty and enrolled When May 27, 1863. Where: Memphis, Tenn. Period 3 years. Remarks: Promoted from Private Co. H. 27 Iowa Vols. pursuant to Gen. Order No 69 dated Hd. Qrs. 16th Memphis Tenn May 29, 63.


Independence Iowa, Oct. 21, 1863.

Col.

Immediately on my arrival home I was taken with a fever (Typhoid Pneumonia) which has left me quite weak and emaciated.

I believe that I shall recover rapidly now that I am on my feet once more, so that I shall be able to report in person at an early date.

I am, Colonel
Very Respectfully, Sir
Your Obt. Servt.
Geo. G. Gaylord.

Note: if this is his handwriting, he had VERY nice handwriting.


Company Muster roll for May and June 1864 shows remarks: sick in offices Hospital Memphis Tennessee since June 25, 1864.


Company Muster Roll for Nov. and Dec, 1864 shows remarks: Discharged by S. O. No. 337 War Dept. Dated Oct. 17, 1864. Final Settlement made.


Hospital 3rd U. S. Col'd Art. Heavy
Fort Pickering Tenn, Aug. 7, 1864

George G. Gaylord, 2nd Lieutenant of Co. K, 3rd Regt U. S. Col Art. (Hy) having applied for a certificate on which to ground a resignation, I certify that, having carefully examined this officer, I find him to be suffering from chronic diarrhea, whereby he has been rendered unfit for duty. And in consequence of which he is, in my opinion at this time unfit for duty. And I further declare my belief that he will not be fit for duty within any reasonable period.

H. H. Hood.
Surg. 3d U. S. Col Art. (Hvy)


Headquarters 3 W. S. Col Arty Hvy
Fort Pickering Tenn Aug. 31, 1864

Respectfully forwarded append. Since June 21, 1864 Lt. Gaylord has reported sick 52 days. Since becoming a commissioned Officer he has never been in command of a company nor in any way become responsible for any Government property of any description. J. P. Hasper, Lt. Col.


Brig Gen L. Thomas

Sir, I have the honor herewith to render my resignation as 2d Lieutenant in the 3rd Regiment U. S. Colored Arty. Heavy, on account of my impaired health.

I certify on honor that I am not indebted to the United States on any account whatever, and that I am not and have not been responsible for any Government property. That I was last paid by Major Conder to include the 30th day of April 1864.

Very Respectfully Sir,
Your Obedient Servant
George G. Gaylord
2d Lieut 3 Regt Col'd Arty. Hy.


Special Order No. 337. War Department, Adjutant General's Office.
Washington, Oct. 7, 1864

2d Lieutenant G. G. Gaylord, 3d U. S. Colored Troops, having been examined by a Military Board, and an adverse report thereof, in his case, having been approved by the President, he is hereby discharged the service of the United States, in accordance with Section 10, of the Act of Congress approved July 22d, 1861, with condition that he shall receive no final payments, until he has satisfied the Pay Department that he is not indebted to the Government.

By order of the Secretary of War:
E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General

Note Special Order No. 240, amended the above statement to read: 2nd Lieutenant G. G. Gaylord, 3d U. S. Colored Artillery, (Heavy),

He filed for a pension on Nov. 3, 1888 in Ohio. His pension index card indicated service with D 3 U. S. C. H. A. and H 27 Iowa Inf.

1900 Census: Perkins Township, State Soldiers & Sailors Home, Erie County, Ohio: George G. Gaylord (born Dec. 1831, age 68, single, born Ohio)

George G. Gaylord died Jan. 22, 1904 and is buried in Ohio Soldier's & Sailors' Home Cemetery, Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio, Lot 12, Section H, Grave 3.

VETERAN

At the Home Failed to Answer Call – Died in His Bed

George G. Gaylord, an inmate of the home, was found dead in his bed in his cottage about 4:30 Friday afternoon. He had been in poor health for some time suffering from a complication of diseases and usually lay for a short time before each meal. When his comrades called him late in the afternoon, he did not answer, and they discovered that he was dead. Coroner McClelland was called to view the remains. It is supposed death resulted from uremic poisoning, due to kidney trouble.

Gaylord was about 72 years of age. His home was near Birmingham, this county, but he had no relatives here. Some distant relatives lived near Cleveland.

Sandusky Evening Star, Saturday, January 23, 1904

The following was a report for the soldiers home that covered 50 admissions from number 4301 to 4350. I extracted the information that pertained to George G. Gaylord.

There were, in this number, 16 deaths and 30 were discharged and dropped. Two "Dis. Dis." are recorded. All but two deaths occurred in the hospital, George G Gaylord, number 4305, Company H, 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry was found dead in his bedroom cottage on the morning of January 22, 1904. Heart failure was given as the cause. He was admitted from Erie County, January 3, 1899.

The Sandusky Star – Journal, Tuesday, July 4, 1916


Gill, Isaac. He was born about 1843 in Ohio. He was the son of David Gill (Mar. 16, 1816 - May 20, 1900) and Nancy Miller (Apr. 27, 1818 - Apr. 10, 1891).

1850 Census: Plain, Wayne County, Ohio: David Gill (age 34, carpenter, born PA), Nancy Gill (age 32, born PA), Catharine Gill (age 12, born Ohio), Susanna Gill (age 11, born Ohio), Isaac Gill (age 7, born Ohio), Priscilla Gill (age 5, born Ohio and Jane Gill (age 2, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Spring, Buchanan County, Iowa; David Gill (age 40, born PA, joiner), Nancy Gill (age 38, born PA), I Gill (age 13, born Ohio), P. Gill (age 10, born Ohio), J Gill (age 8, born Ohio), Isaiah Gill (age 4, born Iowa), R. Gill (age 1, born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 5 years.

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: David Gill (age 44, farmer, born PA), Nancy Gill (age 43, born PA), Isaac Gill (age 18, born Ohio), Priscilla Gill (age 16, born Ohio), Jane Gill (age 14, born Ohio), Isaiah Gill (age 11, born Iowa), Rebecca Gill (age 8, born Iowa), David Gill (age 1, born Iowa).

Isaac Gill died Sept. 8, 1863, Brownsville, AR

His mother Nancy Gill filed for a pension on July 31, 1890 in Iowa.

Nancy (Miller) Gill died Apr. 10, 1891 in Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa.

His father David Gill filed for a pension on Mar 5, 1896 in Iowa. David Gill died May 20, 1900 in Chester County, Ohio.


Glass, Jacob He was born January 1, 1833 in Ohio. He was the son of Martin Glass (Jul. 28, 1809 - Jan. 26, 1901) and Nancy Belek (Apr. 11, 1816 - May 5, 1870).

1850 Census: District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Martin Glass (age 40, farmer, born Ohio), Nancy Glass (age 34, born Ohio), Jacob Glass (age 16, laborer, born Ohio), Sarah Glass (age 14, born Ohio), Elisabeth Glass (age 13, born Ohio), Mary Glass (age 11, born Ohio), John Glass (age 9, born Ohio), Joseph Glass (age 7, born Ohio). Reason Glass (age 4, born Ohio and Isabell Glass (age 1, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: M. A. Glass (age 44, farmer, born Ohio), N. Glass (age 40, born Ohio), J. Glass (age 27, born Ohio), E. Glass (age 18, born Ohio), M. Glass (age 16, born Ohio), I. Glass (age 14, born Ohio), I. Glass (age 12, born Ohio), J. Glass (age 12, born Ohio), R. Glass (age 10, born Ohio), I. Glass (age 7, born Ohio), I Glass (age 7, born Ohio, S. Glass (age 4, born Iowa), M. L. Glass (age 1, born Iowa) and E. Glass (age 76, born PA). The family had been in the state of Iowa of 6 years, except for E. Glass (widowed) who had been there 2 years.

1860 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: Martin A. Glass (age 49, farmer, born Ohio), Nancy Glass (age 45, born Ohio), Jacob Glass (age 27, born Ohio), Elizabeth Glass (age 22, born Ohio), Mary Glass (age 20, born Ohio), John Glass (age 18, born Oho), Joseph Glass (age 16, born Ohio), Rezen Glass (age 14, born Ohio), Isabell Glass (age 11, born Ohio), Susanna Glass (age 8, born Iowa), and Martha Glass (age 3, born Iowa) Martin Glass (age 5, born Iowa) and Eve Glass (age 82, born PA).

Jacob Glass died Feb. 15, 1863 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa. His parents and grandmother are also buried in Quasqueton Cemetery.


Hammond, Isaac Newton He was born about 1833 in New York.

1860 Census: South Fork, Delaware County, Iowa: Newton Hammond (age 27, laborer, born New York), Marrilda Hammond (age 18, born NY), and Margaret Hammond (age 3, born Iowa).

Isaac Newton Hammond died before Aug. 18, 1864 and is buried in Hopkinton Cemetery, Hopkinton, South Fork, Delaware County, Iowa

His widow Marilda Hammond filed a pension on Aug. 18, 1864. She subsequently filed for a pension for a minor named Marvin on June 30, 1880.)


Harrigan, Michael He was born about 1842 in New York. He was the son of Jeramiah Harrigan and Catharine Devert or Devereaus).

HARRIGAN
Smith/Fenner associated families

(Submitted by Leanne Kay Harrison,
President of Buchanan County Historical Society)

Margaret (Harrigan) Smith parents were Jeramiah and Catharine (Devert or Devereaus) Harrigan, both natives of Ireland. Crossing the Atlantic, they landed in New York, where Margaret was born Jan. 1, 1850. (they also had four sons, James, John, Michael and William.) Afterward, 1854, they made their way to Buchanan County, Iowa where Jeramiah purchased a farm of 240 acres; which he had purchased in 1850. In his early years he was, a man of nerve, mind and ability. He showed great ability in the purchase of land etc., but, in about one year after this purchase, he became perfectly insane, the result of a years' severe illness. Though he passed through 34 years of this affliction, he was yet a stranger to his family. His wife, Catharine, had unsurpassable patience in caring for him during all those years.

June 29, 1861 James Harrigan (b. NY 7/10/1843) enlisted as a private in Company E 5th Iowa Volunteer Infantry with Capt. D. S. Lee of Independence as Captain. His enlistment records shows mustered in Burlington, Iowa July 15, 1861 for a period of 3 years, age 18. At age 21 his Medical Descriptive List shows admission December 15, 1863 and discharged from service on a medical March 16, 1864.

Michael enlisted as a private in Company H 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, his enlistment records show born Oneida, NY age 20, enlisted for 3 years; blue eyes, dark hair, fair complexion 5 ft 3 3/4 in.., occupation harness maker. Mustered in Oct. 3, 1862 at Dubuque, Iowa.

John also enlisted in Company E. James served his country two years eight months, being wounded in the Red River Campaign and the Battle of Pleasant Hill, returned to help operate the family farm. John was killed in the army near Little Rock, Arkansas in 1865.

Catherine passed away 5/6/1881 and is buried in St. John's Catholic Cemetery. Jeramiah passed away 7/12/1884 at the I.H.I. (Iowa Hospital for Insane) of "manical exhaustion". In politics he was an active Democrat and his religious belief was that of the Catholic Church. He is buried next to his wife in St. John's Cemetery Independence, Iowa.

On 7/28/1918 William Harrigan (a son) passed away of "valvular heart disease" and had been sexton of the Church Cemetery. The picture shows him standing on grave.

When Jeramiah died his holdings were E half of NW quarter of Section 20 Twp. 89 range 9 which was sold for $40 per acre ($1600.) and NE of the NW Section 20 Twp. 89 range 9 which was sold for $30 acres ($1200) in 1886 when the estate was settled. (Homer Dilts and Gerald Appleby were the owners of this land in 1972-near Otterville, Iowa).

At the time Jeramiah died James was listed as one of the heirs, age 42, living County of Leavenworth, State of Kansas; Mike, age 45, living Spirit Lake, Iowa; Margaret (Harrigan) Smith (Trevor's gg grandmother) age 36 insane; and William, age 33, living Independence, Iowa.

William Harrigan, b. NY7/7/1852 was a familiar figure in Independence, in which vicinity he had made his home for so many years. For a number of years he was employed in railroad surveying in Utah and Colorado. He became sexton of Wilson Cemetery in 1900 and served in that capacity until his death in 1918. (his house was on the edge of the cemetery). He was one of those quiet, unassuming men whom everyone liked and the more thoroughly one became acquainted with him the more he thought of the man.

1850 Census: Belvidere, Boone County, Illinois: Jeremiah Harrigan (age 30, farmer, born Ireland), Catherine Harrigan (age 33, born Ireland), Michael Harrigan (age 8 born New York), James Harrigan (age 6, born New York), John Harrigan (age 4, born New York ), Margaret Harrigan (age 2, born New York and William Harrigan (age 0, born New York).

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Catharine Harrigan (age 40, born Ireland), Michael Harrigan (age 18, farmer, born New York), John Harrigan (age 15, born New York), Margaret Harrigan (age 13, born New York and Wm. Harrigan (age 11, born New York).

1870 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Michael Harrigan (age 29, harness maker, born New York), Mary Harrigan (age 24, born Illinois) and Emma Wilson (age 14, born D. C.).

1880 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Michael Harrigan (boarder in a hotel, single, harness maker, born New York).

He filed for a pension on Jan 29, 1880.

When his father passed away in 1884, he was living in Spirit Lake, Dickinson County, Iowa.


Haskins, James C. He was born January 12, 1835 in Henry, Illinois. He was the son of Harvey B. Haskins (Sept. 3, 1805 - Sept. 22, 1868) and Lydia Ann Sutton (Apr. 20, 1805 - Feb. 26, 1900). He married Sarah Elizabeth Killdale on Dec. 23, 1869 in Monmouth, Warren County, Illinois. His sister, Isabella Jane Haskins married Alfred K. Stanford, who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Harvey B. Haskins (age 45, farmer, born VT), Lydia Haskins (age 44, born PA), Jessie T. Haskins (age 17, born Illinois), Andrew J. Haskins (age 14, born Illinois), James C. Haskins (age 12, born Illinois), Isabell I. Haskins (age 9, born Illinois) and Charity Ann Kindrick (age 4/12, born Iowa).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry B. Haskins (age 56, farmer, born VT), Lydia Haskins (age 54, born PA), Andrew J. Haskins (age 23, born PA), Jas. H. Haskins (age 21, born Ill., Isabel J. Haskins (age 18, born Ill.)

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa; James Haskins (age 31, farmer, born Illinois), Sarah Haskins (age 19, born Illinois), Lyddie Haskins (age 64, born Pennsylvania), Jessie Haskins (age 38, born Illinois), Eliza Haskins (age 33, born Illinois), Alvin Haskins (age 5, born Illinois) and Mary Haskins (age 2, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Ten-Mile, Douglas County, Oregon: James C. Haskin (age 49, farmer, born Ill), wife Sarah E. Haskin (age 29, born Ill), son John G. Haskin (age 10, born Illinois), son David A. Haskin (age 8, born Iowa), daughter Lydia A. Haskin (age 6, born Iowa), daughter Lillian I. Haskin (age 4, born Oregon), son Harry B. Haskin (age 2, born Oregon) and son James M. Haskin (age 1/12, born May, born Oregon).

1890 Veterans Census: Looking Glass, Douglas County, Oregon: James C. Haskins, Private, Co. H. 27th Ia Inf. Enlisted Aug. 14, 1862, discharged Aug. 8, 1865. Length of Services, 2 years, 11 months, 7 days. Post Office Address: Looking Glass, Oregon. (Indexed as Huskins).

1900 Census: Pass Creek, Douglas County, Oregon: James C. Haskins (born Jan. 1834, age 66, married 31 years, born Illinois, farmer), wife Sarah E. Haskins (born Dec. 1850, age 49, married 31 years, 11 children born, 11 still living, born Illinois), son John E. Haskins (born Jan 1871, age 29, widowed, born Illinois), son Harry B. Haskins (born Dec. 1877, age 22, born Oregon), son James M. Haskins (born May 1880, age 20, born Oregon), son Charley H. Haskins (born Mar. 1882, age 18, born Oregon), Daughter Roxia M. Haskins (born Nov. 1883, age 16, born Oregon), daughter Lucy A. Haskins (born Sept. 1885, age 14, born Oregon), daughter Mary J. Haskins (born Nov. 1887, age 12, born Oregon), son William Haskins (born Dec. 1889, age 10, born Oregon).

1910 Census, Willamette, Lane County, Oregon: James C. Haskin (age 76, married 1 time for 40 years, born Illinois, no occupation), wife Sarah E. Haskin (age 60, married 1 time for 40 years, 11 children born, 11 still living, born Illinois), son John G. Haskin (age 39, widowed, born Illinois), son Harry B. Haskin (age 36, born Oregon), son James M. Haskin (age 26, widowed, born Oregon), son Charles H. Haskin (age 24, born Oregon), son William H. Haskin (age 20, born Oregon) and granddaughter Violet Haskins (age 4, born Oregon).

1920 Census: Willamette, Lane County, Oregon: James C. Haskin (age 87, born Illinois), wife Sarah E. Haskin (age 68, born Illinois), son John G. Haskin (age 48, widowed, born Illinois), son Charles H. Haskin (age 38, born Oregon), daughter Lucy Birdwell (age 31, widowed born Oregon), and granddaughter Violet Haskins (age 14, born Oregon).

Sarah Elizabeth (Killdale) Haskins died Oct. 20, 1920 in Coburg, Lane County, Oregon.

1930 Census: Cottage Grove, Lane County, Oregon: Jim C. Haskins, age 96, widowed, age 28 at first marriage, born Illinois), Son John Haskins (age 58, divorced, born Illinois, laborer, odd-jobs), son Chas. Haskins (age 48, single, born Illinois, lumber camp), daughter Mrs. Lydia Martin (age 57, widowed, born Iowa), son David Haskins (age 56, divorced, born Iowa). Living next door to them was Wm. Birdwell (age 45), wife Lillian Birdwell (age 40, born Oregon) and brother-in-law James Haskins (age 41, single, born Oregon).

OLDEST RESIDENT HAS ANNIVERSARY

Cottage Grove, Ore., Jan 11 (1932) (Special). Veteran of the Civil and Indian Wars and participant in the gold rush to California in 1849, James C. Haskins, Cottage Grove's oldest resident, will celebrate his ninety-seventh birthday Tuesday. Mr. Haskins was born in 1835 in Hanely County, Illinois. His birthplace was one mile from the home of Thomas Lincoln, father of Abraham Lincoln.

When but 14 years old he crossed the country in an emigrant train with his father. The trip included Indian attacks, four years in the gold fields and a return voyage around Cape Horn.

From 1858 to 1860 Mr. Haskins fought in the Indian Wars in the Dakotas, as a member of Company B, 13th U.S. regulars.

He served in the Civil War in the *37th Iowa Regiment and the third division of the 16th army corps. He participated in the battles of Pea Ridge, Lookout Mountain, Nashville, Murfreesboro and the surrender of Vicksburg.

He married Sara Hilldon in December, 1869. They again came to the Pacific coast in 1875, settling in Coos County, Ore. Four years later the Haskin family moved to Lorane and lived there until 1916 when they moved to Coburg. On the death of his wife, Mr. Haskins moved to Cottage Grove.

Mr. Haskins has 11 children. Three of them, Mrs. Lydia Martin, Charles and John Haskins live at Cottage Grove with their father.

*I think "37th" is a typo. I did some quick research on the 37th Iowa. "From the date of its organization, it came to be generally known and designated as the "Graybeard Regiment." Special authority was obtained from the Secretary of War to organize one regiment, composed of men who were over forty-five years of age, but who were in good physical condition, and therefore able to perform the duty of soldiers. " Since James C. Haskins was only 23 when he enlisted, it is unlikely that he was in the 37th Iowa.

James C. Haskins died April 16, 1933 at Cottage Grove, Oregon (pension index record). He is buried in Fir Grove Cemetery (AKA Masonic Cemetery, Cottage Grove Cemetery and IOOF Cemetery), Cottage Grove, Lane County, Oregon.

Oregon Death Index: James Haskin, County: Lane, Death Date: Apr. 16, 1933, Certificate 182, Spouse: Sarah.

Children of James C. Haskins and Sarah Elizabeth Killdale:

  1. John G Haskins b: 18 JAN 1871
  2. Lydia Ann Haskins b: 21 DEC 1871 in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk Co, IA
  3. David A Haskins b: 19 AUG 1872 in IL
  4. Lillian Irene Haskins b: 4 JAN 1876 in IA
  5. Harry B Haskins b: 29 DEC 1877 in OR
  6. James Martin Haskins b: 8 MAY 1880 in OR
  7. Charles H Haskins b: 22 MAR 1882 in OR
  8. Roxie May Haskins b: 14 NOV 1883 in OR
  9. Lucy Ann Haskins b: 9 SEP 1885 in OR
  10. Mary Jane Haskins b: 22 NOV 1887 in OR
  11. William Henry Haskins b: 28 DEC 1889 in OR

Hathaway, George W. He was born June 6, 1844 in Illinois. He was the son of Henry Hathaway (Sept. 23, 1791 - 1847) and Hester Haines (1798 - Sept. 15, 1885).

1850 Census, District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hester Hathaway (age 50, born PA), Isaac F. Hathaway (age 30, farmer, born Ohio), Huldah Hathaway (age 28, born Ohio), Clarissa Morgan (age 23, born Ohio), Henry Hathaway (age 26, laborer, born Ohio), Susan Hathaway (age 18, born Ia), James A. Hathaway (age 16, laborer, born Ia), Benjamin F. Hathaway (age 14, born Ia), Malinda Hathaway (age 12, born Ia), Louisa Hathaway (age 9, born Ia) and George Hathaway (age 6, born Ill).

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hester Hathaway (age 57, widowed, born PA), Henry G. Hathaway (age 25, farmer, born Ohio), James F. Hathaway (age 23, born Ind.), Benjamin Hathaway (age 9, born Ind.), Malinda Hathaway (age 17, born Ind), Louisa Hathaway (age 15, born Ind.), George Hathaway (age 12, born Ind,) and Isaac Hathaway (age 88, widowed, born New Jersey) The family had been in the state of Iowa for 9 years, except for Isaac, who had been there 7 years.)

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hester Hathaway, age 60, born PA), Henry G. Hathaway (age 30, farmer, born Ohio), Malinda Hathaway (age 21, born Ohio), Louisa Hathaway (age 19, born Ind.) and George Hathaway (age 16, born Ill.).

George W. Hathaway died of disease Dec. 22, 1862, at Holly Springs, Miss.

Hester Hathaway married Manassa Reeves on Oct. 9, 1864 in Buchanan County, Iowa. She was aged 53. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934)

His mother Hester Reeves filed for a pension on June 30, 1880.


Hayes, Ezekiel Jr. He was born about 1836 in Hamburg, New York. He was the son of Ezekiel Hayes and Asia Harris. He married Sarah A. Sayre on August 24, 1862 at Buffalo Grove, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1850 Census: Quincy, Branch County, Michigan: Ezekiel Hays (age 59, farmer, born Conn.), Asia Hays (age 48, born Mass), William Hays (age 29, born NY), John Hays (age 27, born NY), George Hays (age 25, born NY) Ezekiel Hays (age 18, born NY), Amarilla Hays (age 13, born NY) and Sally Hays (age 12, born NY).

1860 Census: Madison, Buchanan County, Iowa: Earl K. Jenks (age 34), Malvina Jenks (age 36), Rodalphus Jenks (age 10), Emeline Jenks (age 7), Rosell Jenks (age 11), Munson Jenks (age 2), Ezekiel Hays (age 26, farmer, born NY) and Joseph Jenks (age 60).

According to this source Ezekiel Hays died Sept. 10, 1863, and is buried in Buchanan County. I could not determine which cemetery he is buried in.

His widow Sarah H. Hayes filed for a pension on June 15, 1864. Information from the pension file is extracted below:

Sarah Ann Hayes made the following statement on June 7th, 1864:

  • She was a resident of Buffalo Grove, Buchanan County, Iowa.
  • She is aged 24 years
  • She is the widow of Ezekiel Hayes, Jr, who was a private in Company H, commanded by Captain Otis Whitney of the 27th Regiment of Iowa Volunteers.
  • He enlisted at Independence, Iowa on or about the 15th day of August, 1862 for the term of three years and continued in actual service in said war for the term of 11 mo & 15 days and was discharged at Memphis Tennessee on or about the first day of August 1863 & died the 10th day of September 1863. Cause of his death was chronic diarrhea contracted while in the service of the United States.
  • She was married to Ezekiel Hayes Jr on the 24th day of August 1862 at Buffalo Grove, Buchanan County, Iowa, by S. H. Spangler, a Justice of the peace. That her name before her said marriage was Sarah A. Sayre.

Discharge papers described him as: born in Hamburg, New York, twenty eight years of age, 5 feet, 10 1/2 inches high, fair complexion, blue eyes, brown hair, and by occupation when enlisted a farmer. During the past two months the solider has been unfit for duty for 61 days. Was taken sick Dec. 12, 1862 with Diarrhea & piles and in February last he suffered from Pneumonia and was never entirely clear of cough since, has brought up a great deal of blood "by spells".


Statement by Robert W. Wright, M. D. dated June 18, 1864:

I, Robert W. Wright, of Buchanan County, Iowa say that I am a practicing physician by profession, that I was the attending physician on the last illness of Ezekiel Hays, Private of Co. H, 27th Regt. Iowa Vols. That he died at Buffalo Grove in said County on the 10th of September, 1863 of chronic diarrhea contracted in the service of the United States in line of duty. I further certify that I am in no way interested in the claim of Sarah A. Hayes for Pension.

R. W. Wright, M. D.


Statement by J. M. Miller on June 9, 1864.

I, J. M. Miller of Independence Iowa, being duly sworn depose and say that I was Captain of Company H, 27th Regiment Iowa Volunteers, that I was well acquainted with Ezekiel Hays. That he was a member of my company. That on or about the 3rd day of November 1862, while on duty with a boat load of prisoners from Cairo to Vicksburgh for exchange was attacked with chronic diarrhea, followed in January 1863 by typhoid fever. In hospital for 2. Jackson, Tennessee where he remained some time, diarrhea continuing after he which he was removed to Memphis where he remained till time of his discharge. Had the chronic diarrhea at time of his discharge and never recovered from same. I am knowing of his death as stated in declaration.

J. M. Miller,
Formerly Capt. Co. H
27th Regt. Iowa Vol. Inf.


Statement by R. W. Wright M. D. on Nov. 11, 1864:

I Robert W. Wright of Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa do hereby certify that I was the family physician of Ezekiel Hays, deceased. That he was in good & sound health before he entered the service of the United States, that he was in no wise predisposed to the consumption at the time he entered service.

R W. Wright, M. D.


Statement by Sarah A. Hayes on Nov. 13, 1864

I Sarah Ann Hays widow of Ezekiel Hays dec., being duly sworn do depose and say that I have no child or children by Ezekiel Hayes, my late husband.

Sarah A. Hays.


Heath, George W. He was born Sept. 26, 1829 in Middlebury, Addison, VT. He was the son of Samuel L. Heath (Aug. 15, 1788 - Aug. 25, 1854) and Susan P. Spafford (Jan. 10, 1797 - Dec. 3, 1839). He married first Zylphaette Bruce. He married Eliza Jane (Allensworth) Sisson on Sept. 15, 1883 in Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa. The marriage record showed him aged 54. His father as Samuel L. Heath and his mother as Susan Stafford. Eliza was aged 43. Her father was Mathias Allensworth. Her mother: Nancy Brownfield. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). Note George's birthdate came from pension records, and was confirmed by information from Myrtle Baldwin.

1850 Census: Castleton, Rutland County, Vermont: Samuel Heath (age 62, miller, born Vermont), Mary Heath (age 62, born Connecticut), and George W. Heath (age 20, blacksmith, born Vermont).

1856 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Geo. W. Heath (age 25, born Vermont, Teamster), Z. E. Heath (age 26, born Vermont) and E. A. Heath, (age 1, born Ill). The family had been in the state of Iowa for less than a year.

1860 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: Geo. Heath (age 30, farmer, born Vermont), Zilphaette Heath (age 31, born Vermont), Ellen A. Heath (age 5, born Ill.) and Geo. B. Heath (age 1, born Iowa).

At enlistment, 5 ft 10-1/2 in. tall, fair complexion, blue eyes, red hair. Iowa 27th Infantry, Co. H.

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: George Heath (age 41, stone mason, born Vermont), Zilphaett Heath (age 41, born Vermont), George Heath (age 12, born Iowa) and Charles Heath (age 3, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa: George W. Heath (age 50, stone mason, born Vermont), wife Zilphia E. Heath (age 50, born Vermont), son George B. Heath (age 21, born Iowa), Charles L. Heath (age 12, born Iowa) and mother-in-law Rachael L. Bruce (age 71, born Vermont).

Zilphaette (Bruce) Heath died April 28, 1882 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa.

George W. Heath married Eliza Jane (Allensworth) Sisson on Sept. 15, 1883 in Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1885 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: George Heath (age 55, merchant, grocer, born Vermont), Eliza Heath (age 45, born Ohio), Charles Heath (age 17, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1900 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: George Heath (born Sept. 1829, age 70, married 17 years, born Vermont), wife Eliza Heath (born Mar. 1843, age 57, married 17 years, born Ohio).

George W. Heath died June 12, 1908 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa.

His widow Eliza Jane Heath filed for a pension on June 30, 1908 in Iowa.


Henderson, Joseph S. He was born Oct. 1844 in Illinois. He was the son of John Henderson (Nov. 20, 1810 - ?) and Elizabeth Jane Ohaver. (May 8, 1813 - July 9, 1894). He married Henrietta Wallace on Aug. 14, 1873 in Cass County, Iowa. He was aged 29 and she was aged 20. Marriage record says Joseph A. Henderson. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934).

1860 Census: Jefferson, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Henderson (age 49, wagon maker, born Mo), Betsy J. Henderson (age 47, born Mo), Mary K. Henderson (age 12, born Iowa), Joseph S. Henderson (age 15, born Ill), and Martha A. Henderson (age 10, born Iowa)

1880 Census: Atlantic, Cass County, Iowa: Joseph Henderson (age 39, laborer, born Iowa), wife Henrietta Henderson (age 26, born Illinois), son Sherman Henderson (age 5, born Iowa) and son John Henderson (age 2, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Atlantic, Cass County, Iowa: Joseph Henderson (age 59 ?, laborer, born Mich), Henrietta Henderson (age 30, born NH), Richard L. Henderson (age 9, born Cass County, Iowa), John L. Henderson (age 7, born Cass County, Iowa) and William K. Henderson (age 0, born Cass County, Iowa)

1895 Iowa State Census, Cass County, Iowa, Joseph S. Henderson (age 50, born Illinois, farmer, Religion: ME, Soldier in the War of the Rebellion: Company H, 27th Iowa Inf.), Henryetta Henderson (age 40, born Illinois), Richard S. Henderson (age 19, born Cass County, Iowa), John L. Henderson (age 17, born Cass County, Iowa), William H. Henderson (age 10, born Cass County, Iowa), Cora V. Henderson (age 10, born Cass County, Iowa), Jessie B. Henderson (age 5, born Cass County, Iowa).

1900 Census: Exira, Audubon County, Iowa: Joseph S. Henderson (born Oct. 1844, age 55, married 27 years, born Illinois), wife Henrietta Henderson (born Dec 1852, age 47, married 27 years, 9 children born, 5 still living, born Illinois). son Richard S. Henderson (born Jan. 1876, age 24, born Iowa), son John L. Henderson (born Apr. 1878, age 22, born Iowa), son William H. Henderson (born Sept. 1883, age 16, born Iowa), daughter Cora V. Henderson (born Apr. 1886, age 13, born Iowa) and daughter Jessie B. Henderson (born Jan. 1890, age 10, born Iowa).

Joseph S. Henderson died Oct. 18, 1909 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Anita, Cass County, Iowa

His widow Henrietta Henderson filed for a pension on Nov. 5, 1909 in Iowa.

4 of their children: Jessie, Cora, Richard and John L. were still living in Cass County, Iowa on the 1925 census. They all list their father as Joseph Henderson and their mother as Henrietta Wallace.


Hoover, Adam He was born July 2, 1839 in Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio. He was the son of Charles Hoover (Dec. 23, 1810 - April. 30, 1895) and Martha Rogers (April 17. 1814 - Nov. 1, 1898). He married Lydia Melissa Coats on July 14, 1867 in Prairie du Chein, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of Ransom Coats (1810 - Feb. 10, 1886) and Margaret McDonald (Oct. 23, 1813 - 1898). His brother Charles Hoover also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

Charles and Martha Hoover Sr.'s 4th child, Adam, was born in 1839, Harrison County, Ohio. During the Civil War, Adam Hoover served in Company H, 27th Iowa Infantry, Union Army. He married Lydia Melissa Coats in 1867, and they had 6 children. Adam lived most of his life in Cedar Rapids, and died, age 76, in 1915 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Adam Hoover was born the son of Charles Hoover Sr. and Martha Rogers. Because of the slavery issue he and his siblings were denied going to school. After the death of their grandfather, John Hoover, the family moved to different area's. Charles and Martha Hoover and children moved to Buchanan County, Iowa and are buried here. Adam was a soldier in Company H, 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry (Civil War). Adam was married to Lydia Melissa Coats on July 15, 1867 in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. They farmed around the Hoover community near Quasqueton, Iowa and eventually moved to Lisbon, Iowa. They were parents of 6 children: Bertha (Nettie) G_____ Hoover Swayze; Joseph Henry Hoover; Laura E____ Hoover Dilts Attwood; William Sylvester Hoover; Ray Ransom Hoover; Lillian Lucretia Hoover _____.

1850 Census: Franklin, Harrison County, Ohio: Charles Hoover, (age 39, farmer, born Ohio), Martha Hoover (age 36, born Ohio), Nancy Hover (age 14, born Ohio), Samuel Hoover (age 12, born Ohio), Lane Hoover (age 11, born Ohio), Adam Hoover (age 9, born Ohio), James Hoover (age 7, born Ohio), Charles Hoover (age 6, born Ohio) and Joseph Hoover (age 10/12, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles Hoover, (age 45, farmer, born Ohio), Martha Hoover (age 42, born Ohio), Samuel Hoover (age 19, born Ohio), Adam Hoover (age 16, born Ohio), James Hoover (age 13, born Ohio), Charles Hoover (age 11, born Ohio), William Hoover (age 5, born Ohio), Martha A. Hoover (age 3, born Iowa) and Isabelle M. Hoover, (age blank, born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 3 years.

1860 Census, Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Saml Hoover (age 49, farmer, born Ohio), Martha Hoover, (age 46, born Ohio), Adam Hoover (age 20, born Ohio), James Hoover (age 17, born Ohio), Chas. Hoover, Jr. (age 13, born Ohio), Wm. Hoover, (age 9, born Ohio) and Isabel M. Hoover, (age 4, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Adam Hoover (age 40, farming, born Ohio), wife Lydia M. Hoover, (age 37, born Ohio), daughter Bertha G. Hoover, (age 12, born Iowa), son Joseph H. Hoover (age 9, born Iowa), Daughter Laura E. Hoover, (age 7, born Iowa), and son William S. (age 6/12, born Nov. born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Adam Hoover, (Township 87, Range 7, Section 19, SW NE, age 45, farmer, born Ohio), Lydia M. Hoover, age 41, born Ohio), Bertha J. Hoover (age 16, born Clayton County, Iowa), Laura E. Hoover (age 13, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Joseph H. Hoover, (age 14, born Buchanan County, Iowa), William s. Hoover, (age 5, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Ray R. Hoover, (age 1, born Buchanan County, Iowa)

1900 Census: Franklin, Linn County, Iowa; Adam Hoover (born July 1839, age 60, married 33 years, born Ohio, Land Lord), wife Lydia M. Hoover (born May 1843, age 57, married 33 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born Ohio), daughter Lucretia L. Hoover (born Aug. 1885, born Iowa) and son Joseph H. Hoover (born Aug, 1870, age 29, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Franklin Township, Linn County, Iowa; Adam Hoover, (age 70, married 1 time for 43 years, born Ohio, own Income), wife Lydia M. Hoover (age 67, married 1 time for 43 years, 6 children born, 5 still living, born Ohio), son Joe. H. Hoover (age 39, born Iowa) and daughter Crete L. Hoover, (age 25, born Iowa).

1915 Iowa State Census: Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa: Adam Hoover (age 75, widowed, County: Linn, P. O. 215 No. 5th, Town: Cedar Rapids, Ward 1, Occupation: retired farmer, Extent of Education: Common 8, can read and write, Birthplace: Ohio, Church Affiliation: Methodist, Father's Birthplace: Ohio, Mother's Birthplace: Ohio, Years in Iowa: 63).

Adam Hoover died Dec. 2, 1915 at Shovel Lake, Minnesota (Pension Index Record). He is buried at Lisbon Cemetery, Lisbon, Linn County, Iowa.


Hoover, Charles He was born June 20, 1844 near Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio. He was the son of Charles Hoover (Dec. 23, 1810 - April. 30, 1895) and Martha Rogers (April 17. 1814 - Nov. 1, 1898). He married Susannah Marie Curtis on Feb. 14, 1866 in Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa. His brother Adam Hoover, also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

Charles Hoover Charles Hoover and Susanna Marie Curtis Charles F. Hoover and his wife Susanna Marie Curtis, submitted by Daphne Hoover.

Charles Hoover Jr. was born the son of Charles Hoover Sr. and Martha Rogers. They moved to Iowa from Ohio when he was seven years old. They are buried in Circle Grove Cemetery. Charles Hoover Jr was married to Susan Miranda Curtis on February 14, 1866 in Independence, Iowa. She is buried in this cemetery. They were parents of four children.

History Book-Charles Hoover Jr., one of the early residents of Buchanan County, was born in Harrison county, Ohio, where he lived till he was seven years of age, when he came west with his parents and settled in Newton township. He has always followed farming as an occupation with the exception of three years of army life. He enlisted August 4, 1862, in the Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, and was sent to Minnesota against the Indians; though he remained there but three weeks, when he went to Memphis, Tennessee. He was a participant in some of the hardest engagements of the Rebellion-was with Sherman on his raid to Holly Springs, also at Little Rock and Meridian and on the Red River expedition under General Smith. Mr. Hoover was wounded on this expedition, and carries a rebel ball in his body, even to this day. He was sent to the hospital at Jefferson Barracks, thence to Keokuk, where he remained eight months, then returned to his regiment, and was present at the capture of Mobile. He was mustered out of service August 8, 1865, and returned to Iowa. His farm contains one hundred and sixty acres of good land. He was married February 14, 1866, to Miss Susan Curtis, of Independence. They have four children-Frank Wayne Hoover born July 22, 1869; Jesse Brockway Hoover born March 29, 1873; Arthur Levi Hoover born April 24, 1877; Flora Ann Hoover born October 14, 1879. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover are members of the Wesleyan Methodist church. In politics Mr. Hoover is a Republican, and well spoken of by his neighbors.

1850 Census: Franklin, Harrison County, Ohio: Charles Hoover, (age 39, farmer, born Ohio), Martha Hoover (age 36, born Ohio), Nancy Hover (age 14, born Ohio), Samuel Hoover (age 12, born Ohio), Lane Hoover (age 11, born Ohio), Adam Hoover (age 9, born Ohio), James Hoover (age 7, born Ohio), Charles Hoover (age 6, born Ohio) and Joseph Hoover (age 10/12, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles Hoover, (age 45, farmer, born Ohio), Martha Hoover (age 42, born Ohio), Samuel Hoover (age 19, born Ohio), Adam Hoover (age 16, born Ohio), James Hoover (age 13, born Ohio), Charles Hoover (age 11, born Ohio), William Hoover (age 5, born Ohio), Martha A. Hoover (age 3, born Iowa) and Isabelle M. Hoover, (age blank, born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 3 years.

1860 Census, Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Saml Hoover (age 49, farmer, born Ohio), Martha Hoover, (age 46, born Ohio), Adam Hoover (age 20, born Ohio), James Hoover (age 17, born Ohio), Chas. Hoover, Jr. (age 13, born Ohio), Wm. Hoover, (age 9, born Ohio) and Isabel M. Hoover, (age 4, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles Hoover (age 26, farmer, born Ohio), Susan Hoover, (age 25, born Indiana), Frank Hoover (age 1, born Iowa) and Susinda Davis (age 19, teaching school, born Pennsylvania.

1880 Census; Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles Hoover (age 35, farmer, born Ohio), wife Susannah Hoover (age 35, born Indiana), son Frank W. Hoover, (age 10, born Iowa), son Jessie B. Hoover (age 7, born Iowa), son Arthur L. Hoover (age 3, born Iowa), daughter Flora A. Hoover (age 6/12, born Dec. born Iowa), and Laura Crowder (age 19, teaching school, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles Hoover (Township 87, Range 7, Section 7, SE SW, age 40, farmer, born Ohio), Susann H. Hoover (age 39, born Indiana), Frank W. Hoover, (age 15, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Jessie B. Hoover, (age 11, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Arthur L. Hoover (age 7, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Flora A. Hoover (age 5, born Iowa). Charles Hoover (age 74) and Martha Hoover (age 71) were living next to them.

1900 Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles Hoover (born June 1844, age 56, married 34 years, born Ohio farmer), Wife Susan M. Hoover (born Feb. 1845, age 55, married 34 years, 4 children born, 3 still living, born Indiana) son Arthur L. Hoover (born April. 1877, age 23, born Iowa), daughter Flora A. Hoover (born Oct. 1879, age 20, born Iowa.)

1910 Census: Grant, Linn County, Iowa: Chas. Hoover (age 65, married 1 time for 44 years, born Ohio) wife Susan M. Hoover (age 65, married 1 time 44 years, 4 children born, 2 still living, born Indiana), daughter Flora H. Smith (age 30, widowed, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Iowa), granddaughter Jane Smith (age 8, born Iowa).

1915 Iowa State Census, Walker, Linn County, Iowa: Chas. Hoover (age 70, married, County: Linn, Town, Walker, Occupation: farming. Total earnings from 1914: 500.00, Extent of Education: Grammar 8, can read and write), Birth Place: Ohio. Value of farm or home: 8000. Military Service: Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment: 27, Company H. Church Affiliation: Presbyterian. Father's Birthplace: Penn. Mother's Birthplace: Ohio. Years in US: 70. Years in Iowa: 64.

1920 Census: Grant, Linn County, Iowa: Charles Hoover (age 75, born Ohio, farmer, general), wife Susan Ann Hoover (age 74, born Indiana), daughter Flora H. Smith (age 40, widowed, born Iowa) and granddaughter Jean Smith (age 18, born Iowa).

Susan (Curtis) Hoover died Nov. 11, 1921. She is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa

Charles Hoover died March 23, 1925 at Grinnell, Iowa. He is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa.


Hunt, Hiram H. He was born about 1823 in Maryland. He married Almira Salter on Dec. 9, 1852 in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. (Ohio, Marriages, 1800 - 1958).

1856 Iowa State Census: Spring, Buchanan County, Iowa; Hiram H. Hunt (age 33, born Maryland, doctor), Almira Hunt (age 24, born Ohio), W. P. Hunt (age 2, born Iowa), A. R. Hunt (age 1, born Iowa) and Jacob Sherman (age 28, born Germany).

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hiram H. Hunt (age 36, physician, born Maryland), Almira Hunt age 28, born Ohio), Wilson P. Hunt (age 5, born Iowa), Abby R. Hunt (age 4, born Iowa) and Mary E. Hunt (age 3, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Independence Ward 1, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hiram H. Hunt (age 47, physician, born Maryland), Almira Hunt (age 38, born Ohio), Peter W. Hunt (age 15, born Iowa), Abbie R. Hunt (age 14, born Iowa), Mary C. Hunt (age 12, born Iowa), Hiram H. Hunt (age 3, born Iowa) and Emma Sprague (age 53, born Penn.

1880 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hiram H. Hunt (age 56, physician, born Maryland), wife Almira Hunt (age 48, born Ohio), son Hiram H. Hunt, Jr., (age 12, born Iowa) and servant Mary Montpleasure (age 27, born Pennsylvania).

1885 Iowa State Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa; Hiram H. Hunt (age 61, physician, born MD), Almira Hunt (age 53, born Ohio) and Hiram H. Hunt (age 18, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Susan Smith (servant, age 22, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

Hiram H. Hunt died Sept. 24, 1896 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans: Name: Hiram H. Hunt. Asst. Surg, 21 Regt, Iowa Inf. Cemetery: Oakwood, at Independence, Iowa. Date of Death: Sept. 24, 1896.

His widow Almira Hunt filed for pension on Dec. 5, 1896 in Iowa.

On the 1925 Iowa State Census, Hiram H. Hunt listed his parents as H. H. Hunt and Almira Salter/Sallie.

The death record for H. H. Hunt lists her name as Almira Salters.

The marriage record for their son Hiram H. Hunt lists her name as Alvara Saliter.


Irwin, Jeremiah He was born Aug. 15, 1825 in Cambria County, Pennsylvania. He married Elizabeth Clark.

E. F. Irwin, conducting a profitable hardware business at Quasqueton, has built his success upon the sure and safe foundation of close application, indefatigable industry and thorough reliability in all trade transaction. Born in this county in 1862 he a son of Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Clarke) Irwin. The father, who was born in Ohio in 1823, passed away in 1884, and the mother whose birth occurred in Pennsylvania in 1827, died in 1898. In early life Jeremiah Irwin followed general farming in the Buckeye state and on coming west to Iowa settled in Newton township, Buchanan County. He was drafted for service in the Civil war in 1863 and became a member of the Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, with which he was on duty for about nine moths, being most engaged in provost duty. When the war was over he returned to Quasqueton and while living in the town engaged in farming. He filled the office of justice of the peace and other local positions and was an active, earnest advocate of the republican party and its principles. He was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church and passed away in that faith, his death occurring in Quasqueton, where for some time he had made his home.

E. F. Irwin was a district school pupil in Buchanan county and when eighteen years of age began work as a farm hand. He was twenty-two years of age when his father died and upon him fell the responsibility of managing and settling the latter's affairs, which were badly involved. He eventually discharged all indebtedness, however, and prospered in his undertakings, engaging in general farming from 184 until 1912, when he disposed of his place of one hundred and eighty four acres in Liberty township and retired. The success which has come to him is attributable entirely to his own well directed industry, energy and perseverance. Indolence and idleness are utterly foreign to his nature and the year following his retirement from farm work he embarked in the hardware business in Quasqueton, now devoting all of his time and attention to the management of his store. He carries a large and carefully selected line of shelf and heavy hardware and his business has reached gratifying proportions, returning to him a substantial annual income.

In November, 1895, Mr. Irwin was united in marriage to Miss Martha Johnson, of Cono township, a daughter of Lewis and Matilda (Paige) Johnson, natives of Ohio, the father born in 1836 and the mother in 1840. In early life Mr. Johnson was a blacksmith and after the war came to Iowa.  He enlisted from Ohio and did valiant duty on a number of hotly contested battlefields. Following his arrival in this state he carried on general farming in Cono township until the time of his retirement from active business life, having in the meantime acquired a comfortable competence. He now makes his home in Quasqueton. For a long period of time he was active in township affairs. He has filled the office of Justice of the peace and he served as postmaster of Quasqueton under President McKinley - a fact which indicates his allegiance to the republican party. His wife has been married three times, and Mrs. Irwin was born of the third marriage. She is well known in the social circles of the city, is an active club woman and takes an equally helpful interest in church work. To Mr. and Mrs. Irwin have been born four children: Gladys, who is a graduate of the Quasqueton high school and is now a teacher of music; Wilda and Wilbur, who are attending school and E. F., who was born in 1911 and completes the family.

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Irwin has voted with the republican party and has never wavered in his allegiance thereto. On various occasions he has been called to public office, for his fidelity and progressiveness in citizenship are well known. He served as township assessor for four years and is now township trustee. He was a member of the board of supervisors for six years and prior to his marriage was made a school director, in which position he continued for fifteen years, doing much to further the interest of the schools in his locality. He is now one of the trustees, also a steward and the treasurer of the Methodist Episcopal church of Quasqueton and his life largely exemplifies the Golden Rule. Every movement for the benefit and upbuilding of the city and county receives his endorsement and support and his name carries with it a weight of influence that secures the allegiance of other. He is a prominent Mason and a past master of the lodge at Quasqueton, belongs also the Modern Brotherhood of America, of which he is the president, and to the Modern Woodman of America, while both he and his wife hold membership in the Eastern Star. Mr. Irwin being a past worthy patron of the chapter. Theirs is one of the finest homes in Quasqueton, built in modern attractive style of architecture and supplied with all the latest improvements and conveniences. It is tastefully furnished and one of its greatest charms is the spirit of warm-hearted hospitality which there reigns supreme.

History of Buchanan County, Iowa, and Its People, Volume 2, By Harry Church Chappell, Katharyn Joella Allen Chappell, page 593 - 595.

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Jeramiah Irwin (age 47, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Elizabeth Irwin (age 42, born Pennsylvania) and Emery Irwin (age 7, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Jeremiah Irwin (age 56, farmer, born Penn.), wife Elisabeth Irwin (age 52, born Penn.) and son Emery T. Irwin (age 17, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census Record: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Jeremiah Irwin (age 64, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Elizabeth Irwin (age 56, born Pennsylvania) and Emery Irwin (age 22, farmer, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

Jeremiah Irwin died April 11, 1885 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

Iowa Cemetery Records: Name: Jeremiah Irwin. Death Date: Apr. 11, 1885, page 209. Birth Date Aug. 15, 1825. Cemetery: Greenwood, Town Liberty. Level Info. Buchanan County Burial Records.

His widow Elizabeth Irwin filed for a pension on June 21, 1891.

Per the 1925 Iowa State census for Emery F. Irwin: His father's name was Jeremiah Irwin. His mother's name was Elizabeth Clark. His parents married in Pennsylvania.


Kautz, Charles - He was born about 1823 in Germany. He married Nancy E. Kendrick on Aug. 23, 1870 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa County, Marriages 1838-1934). Since Delarkas Kendrick is listed as a 17 year old stepson in 1880, I would assume she was previously married to a Kendrick.

1860 Census, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa George Kautz (age 34, farmer, born Baden), Catherine Kautz (age 41, born Baden), Chas. Kautz (age 32, born Baden) and Christopher Kautz (age 12, born Baden).

He filed for a pension on June 14, 1880. Pension Index Card says Karl Kantz.

1880 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles Kautz (age 58, laborer, born Baden), wife Nancy Kautz (age 45, born Virginia, illness during the last year: cancer), stepson Delarkus Kindrick (age 17, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census, Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa Karl Kautz (Township 88, Range 9, Section 18, NW SW, age 60, widowed, laborer, born Germany). He was again living with the family of Wilbur Curtis.

1895 Iowa State Census, Buchanan County, Iowa Carl Kautz (age 73, widowed, born Germany, Religion: None. Soldier in the War of the Rebellion, Company H, 27 Iowa.

1900 Census, Sumner Township, Buchanan County, Iowa: Karl Kautz, boarder, born Nov, 1821, age 79, widowed, born Germany, laborer). He said he immigrated in 1849 and had been in the US for 51 years, naturalized. He was listed in the household of Wilbur Curtis.

Charles Kautz is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Add 1, Lot 445, Buchanan County, Iowa.


Keller, Henry W. He was born about 1846 in Illinois. He married Clara Fail on Oct. 3, 1872 in LaPorte County, Indiana. (Indiana Marriage Collection: Henry W. Keller, Spouse: Clara Fail. Marriage Date: Oct. 3, 1872. Marriage County: Laporte, Source Title 1: Laporte County, Indiana. Source Title 2: Index to Marriage Records Letters I-M, Volume III. Source Title 3: W. P. A. Compiled by Indiana Works Progress Administration., Book R-G. OS Page 173)

Henry W. Keller died Nov. 9, 1898 and is buried in Kimball Cemetery, 625N175W, Valparaiso, Liberty, Porter County, Indiana.

Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans: Henry W. Keller, Private, Co. H. 27 Regt. Iowa Inf. Cemetery Kimble, at Valparaiso, Ind. Date of Death: Nov. 9, 1898.

His widow Clara Keller filed for a pension on Nov. 19, 1898. She filed for a minor child (George C. Keller) on Apr. 19, 1917 in Indiana.

1900 Census: Wayne, Allen County, Indiana: Clara Keller (born Aug. 1854, age 45, widowed, 6 children born, 6 still living, born England, immigrated 1858, in US 42 years, boarding house keeper), son George C. Keller (born Sept. 1873, age 26, born Indiana, day laborer), son Charles E. Keller (born Sept. 1880, age 19, born Indiana, R. R. Callen?), daughter Sadie M. Keller (born Mar. 1884, age 16, born Indiana), and son Frank M. Keller (born Dec. 1890, age 9, born Indiana).

TOMBSTONES OF VETS ARE FOUND

Tombstones for two Civil War veterans were found this morning under the south steps of the court house by employees of the Foster Lumber & Construction company demolishing the steps for the installation of new ground entrances to the building.

The stones contain the names of Joseph Barnes, Co. C., 15th Indiana Infantry, and H. W. Keller, Company H, 27th Iowa Infantry.

They were removed to the firm's office, near the Grand Trunk. Persons interested in them may call there for further information.

The Vidette Messenger, Valparaiso, Indiana, Thursday, January 14, 1937.


Kendrick, William J. (Alias William J. Kindrick). He was born about 1827 in Tennessee. He was the son Solomon Kendrick and Nancy Hutchinson. He married Mary Elizabeth Bowsman on Oct. 15, 1857 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (I do wonder if this was a second marriage: I note that there is a James Kendrick on the 1860 and 1870 census that is too old to be the child of Elizabeth and was born about 5 years prior to their marriage date -- of course, the 1860 and 1870 do not show relationship, so he could be related in another way.--He is not listed in any of the online family trees).

1850 Census: Buena Visa, Schuyler, Illinois: Solomon Kindrick (age 48, farmer, born Tennessee), Nancy Kindrick (age 43, born Tennessee), William J. Kindrick (age 21, laborer, born Tennessee), John W. Kindrick (age 18, laborer, born Tennessee), Katherine Kindrick (age 14, born Ill), and Susan S. Kindrick (age 1, born Ill).

1860 Census: Jefferson, Buchanan County, Iowa: Wm. Kendrick (age 30, farm laborer, born Tennessee), Mary E. Kendrick (age 19, born Virginia), James M. Kendrick (age 8, born Ill.) and Jessee H. Kendrick (age 9/12, born Iowa)

1870 Census: Bainbridge, Schuyler, Illinois: William Kendrick (age 44, laborer, born Tennessee), Elizabeth Kendrick (age 33, born VA), James Kendrick (age 17, born Ill), Jess Kendrick (age 11, born Ill), Rebecca Kendrick (age 5,born Ill), Josephine Kendrick (age 3, born Ill), Dora E. Kendrick (age 1, born Ill) and Susan C. Kendrick (age 21, born Ill.)

1880 Census: Lee, Brown County, Illinois: Wm. Kendrick (age 53, corn laborer, born Tennessee), wife Eliz. Kendrick (age 49, born VA), son Jessie Kendrick (age 21, farm laborer, born Ill.), daughter Rebecca Kendrick (age 15, born Ill.), daughter Josephine Kendrick (age 13, born Ill), daughter Dora Kendrick (age 11, born Ill), daughter Hollie Kendrick (age 10, born Ill), son Jasper Kendrick (age 5, born Ill) and daughter Jennie Kendrick (age 4, born Ill.).

I found a birth record for a Margaret Kendrick (born July 5, 1880 at Mound Station, Brown County, Illinois. Her father's name was Wm. Jackson Kendrick. Her mother's name was Mary Eliz Bossman.

He filed for a pension on Jan. 3, 1890 in Illinois.

His widow Elizabeth Kindrick filed for a pension on Nov. 10, 1898 in Illinois.


Kirkham, George He was born about 1832 in New York. He married Clara Sherwood on July 5, 1857 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934) and (Buchanan County Marriages, Book 1, F-L, 1848-1858)

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Samuel Sherwood (age 35, millwright, born VT), Hulda M. Sherwood (age 34, born Ohio), Chester Sherwood (age 5, born Iowa), Clara Sherwood (no age, born Iowa), George Kirkham (age 23, born NY, laborer). Obed Sherwood (age 59, born VT, millwright) and Aaron Sherwood (age 57, born VT, laborer. George Kirkham had been in the state of Iowa for 2 years.

1860 Census, Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: George Kirkham (age 24, teamster, born NY), Clara Kirkham (age 23, born VT), Geo. B. Kirkham (age 2, born Iowa) and Wm. Kirkwood (age 20, born NY).

1870 Census: Manchester, Delaware County, Iowa: Robert C. Whitford (age 35), Clara Whitford (age 33) and Geo. B. Kirkum (age 12, born Iowa). (I believe this is the wife and son of George Kirkham).

1890 Veteran's Census: Sheridan, Madison County, Montana: George Kirkham, Private, Co. H. 27. Ia. Inf. Enlisted ?/6/1862. Discharged ?/9/1865. Length of Service 3 Years. Post Office: Sheridan, Montana.

1900 Census: Brandon, Madison County, Montana: George Kirkham (born July 1833, age 62, single, born New York, farmer).


Laird, James Alexander He was born Feb. 24, 1832 in Mercer County, Pennsylvania. (Note: Roster says Pennsylvania. Most online family trees say Ohio - Census records are about half and half). He was the son of Matthew Laird (June 4, 1800 - May 17, 1868) and Martha Moates (Aug. 11, 1809 - June 8, 1894). He married Sarah Jane Humphreys on Jan. 15, 1852 in Ashland, Ohio. (Ohio, Marriages, 1880-1958) She was the daughter of Andrew Humphreys (1784- Mar. 21, 1848) and Mary Humphreys (1787 - 1857).

James A. Laird The image of James Alexander Laird was found here.

1860 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Jas Laird (age 28, farmer, born PA), Jane Laird (age 28, born Ohio), Martha Laird (age 7, born Ohio), Mary M. Laird (age 5, born Ohio), and Arminda Laird (age 3, born Iowa).

1870 Census: New Albany, Story County, Iowa: James A. Laird (age 39, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah J. Laird (age 39, born Ohio), Matty (age 16, born Ohio), Arminda Laird (age 13, born Ohio), Willis Laird (age 9, born Iowa), Curtis Laird (age 3, born Illinois), and Lester Laird (age 1, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa: James A. Laird, Sergeant, Co. H, Post Office Address: Newton.

1885 Iowa State Census: Newton, Jasper County, Iowa: James A. Laird, (Lamb & Kennedy, add 1B2, age 51, Insurance Agent, born Ohio), Sarah J. Laird (age 51, born Ohio), Curtis B. Laird (age 18, born Ill.), John L. Laird (age 15, born Story County, Iowa)

1900 Census, Newton, Jasper County, Iowa: James A. Laird (born Feb. 1843, age 67, married 49 years, born Penn), wife Jane Laird (born Oct 1833, age 66, married 49 years, 8 children born, 6 still living.) (NOTE: his year of birth does not match his age. Also her year of birth was originally written as 1843, but then crossed through and replaced with 1833. I suspect they should have done the same with his year of birth).

Jasper County, Iowa Anniversaries

Laird, James A. & Jane Humphreys ~
Laird - Humphreys - 50th
Married: January 15, 1852

There was a jolly time over at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Laird on West Marion Street, last Wednesday evening, according to a program which Mr. and Mrs. L. had but little to do in the arranging. It was their fiftieth wedding anniversary, and it had been their idea to have all their children home with them on the occasion; but sickness, distance, etc., prevented the coming of all but Curtis and his wife and baby, Marion, of Des Moines - enough to ensure a merry celebration of the golden anniversary, anyway. But they were not allowed to have it all their own way. In the early evening, a company of neighbors and friends appeared on the scene, and demanded admittance, which was immediately granted. Well, there was a jolly crowd of about twenty-five, and they had one of the merriest time on record - the happiest ones in the crowd being the bride and groom of fifty years ago. Their children remembered them with four bright 20 dollar gold pieces, Jim got from his other friends a fine gold-headed cane, and Mrs. Laird a beautiful gold brooch and other pretty souvenirs.

James A. Laird and Jane Humphreys were married near Hayesville, Ohio, January 15, 1852, the groom not yet reached his twentieth birthday, and the bride a few months younger; they loved, and the matter of age was not allowed to stand in the way of the consummation of their bright young dream. Their half-century of married life has had its full measure of happiness and sunshine, with enough only of the shadows of sorrow to make them fully appreciate the blessing showered upon them. They have been blessed with eight children, six of whom are living; Mrs. Barnet Brouhard, Colo, Iowa; Mrs. Mary Elwood and Mrs. Alf Miller, Gresham, Neb.; W. S. Laird, Atlantic; C. E. Laird, Des Moines; J. Lester Laird, Fremont, Neb.

Well, we all hope that the future will be as bright for Mr. and Mrs. Laird as the past fifty years have been.

~ The Newton Record, Thursday, January 23, 1902, Page 1, Column 2

Sarah Jane Laird (born Oct. 11, 1832) died Feb. 27, 1905 and is buried in Newton Union Cemetery, Lot 12, Block 6, Grave 6.

Laird, Sarah Jane (Humphreys) 1832-1905
Posted By: Barbara Hug

Sarah Jane Humphreys was born in Ashland County, Ohio, October 11, 1832, and died in this city February 27, 1905.

In 1852 she was married to James A. Laird and came with her husband to Buchanan County, Iowa, where they lived until about 1861, when she returned to her home in Ohio and Mr. Laird went to the war. At the end of three years he returned home and the family moved to Warren County and later to Story County, Iowa, where after residing about eight years, in 1877 they removed to this county, and a few years later to this city where they have since resided.

For several years Mrs. Laird has not had good health, but was taken seriously ill a week ago Saturday, and suffered greatly until the end came. She was a member of the Congregational Church, a lovely Christian woman, a most devoted wife and mother.

Besides her husband she leaves six children who have been with her and have given her such care and attention during her last illness as only loved ones can give. Mrs. Martha Brouchard of Colo, Iowa, Mrs. Mary Elwood and Mrs. Armeda Miller from Gresham, Neb., Curtis of Des Moines, William of Atlantic and Lester from Minneapolis, Minn.

~ The Newton Daily News, Newton, IA, Tuesday, February 28, 1905, Page 1, Column 4

1910 Census (April 20, 1910): Newton Ward 2, Jasper County, Iowa: James Laird (age 78, widowed, born Pennsylvania, own income)

James A. Laird died June 16, 1910, from Chronic Nephritis and is buried in Newton Union Cemetery (North Division), Lot 12, Block 6, Grave 3, Newton, Jasper County, IA

Note Also buried in Newton Union Cemetery is Nellie Laird, age 6, died March 18, 1880, daughter of J. A. and Jane Laird.


Lanfear, Walter B. He was born March 4, 1833 in Lorain, Jefferson County, New York. He was the son of Orrin Lanfear (July 30, 1804 - June 30, 1877) and Rhoda Keeler (Nov. 12, 1812 - June 30, 1877). He married Mary Jane Dodds on Jan 7, 1852 at Gerard, Erie County, Penn. (Pension Records). She was the daughter of Hiram Dodds and Mary Corell. (I find the dates of death for Orrin and Rhoda Lanfear to be a little suspect. The same date is reported for both of them. He died in Pennsylvania. She died in Michigan. I could be wrong, but I suspect the date of death is wrong for one of them.)

1850 Census: Giard, Erie, Pennsylvania: Orrin Lamfear (age 49. born New York), Rhoda Lamfear (age 38, born Canada), Richard Lamfear (age 21, born New York), Walter Lamfear (age 17, born New York), Joseph Lamfear (age 15, born New York), and Flora Lamfear (age 13, born New York.)

1860 Census: Elk, Delaware County, Iowa: Walter Lanfear (age 27, farmer, born New York), Mary J. Lanfear (age 27, born New York), Earnest Lanfear (age 7, born Pennsylvania) and Arthur Lanfear (age 1, born Iowa)

Walter Lanfear died Jan., 8, 1863, Cairo, Ill., of chronic diarrhea.

His widow Mary J. Lanfear filed for a pension on Jan. 28, 1863.

Mary Jane Lanfear married second Fordyce H. Griswold on April 9, 1867.

A pension was filed for a minor on Feb. 25, 1868. Mary J. Griswold was guardian. Information from the pension file is extracted below:

On Feb. 11, 1868, Mary Jane Griswold made a statement:

  • She was a resident of Marshalltown, Marshall County, Iowa.
  • She was age 33
  • She was the guardian of Ernest Deveor Lanfear and Arthur Orren Lanfear
  • Their father was a private in Company H, commanded by J. M. Miller in the 27th Regiment of Iowa Volunteers.
  • Walter B. Lanfear died at Cairo, Illinois on January 8, 1863 of measles and chronic diarrhea contracted while in the service of the United State.
  • The mother of the children again married, being now the wife of Fordyce H. Griswold on April 9, 1867.
  • The dates of birth of the said wards are: Ernest D. Lanfear, born on September 8, 1853 and Arthur Lanfear, born on May 23, 1859.
  • The parents of said wards were married at Gerard, Penn. on Jan. 7, 1852 by one Maynard, a Justice of the Peace.
  • The maiden name of their mother was Mary Jane Dodds.

William S. Maynard, a resident of Berrian County, Michigan made a statement: that in 1852, he was an acting Justice of the Peace in the township of Gerard, in the County of Erie, in the State of Pennsylvania. That on the seventh day of January, 1852, he solemnized the marriage of Walter B. Lanfear to Miss Mary Jane Dodds.

1870 Census: Marshalltown Ward 2, Marshall County, Iowa: Fordyce Griswold (age 55, shoemaker, born Vermont), Mary Griswold (age 35, born NY), Ernest Griswold (age 16, born Iowa) and Arthur Griswold (age 10, born Iowa).


Laughlin, James Henry He was born about 1842 in New York. James H. Laughlin married Jennie A. Burris on Dec. 23, 1869 in Buchanan County, Iowa. He was aged 29, she was aged 28. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934) She was the daughter of James Burris (Aug. 28, 1800 - Feb. 12, 1873) and Sussanah Bunting (May 17, 1809 - Apr. 3, 1889). Her brother William B. Burris served in Company C, 27th Iowa.

1870 Census: Jefferson, Buchanan County, Iowa: James Laughlin (age 35, farmer), Jane Laughlin (age 35).

1880 Census: Westbury, Buchanan County, Iowa: James H. Laughlin (age 39, farmer, born NY), wife Jane A. Laughlin (age 39, born Ohio).

James Henry Laughlin died Jan 30, 1890 and is buried in Brandon Cemetery, Add 3, Lot 357 Jefferson Twp, Buchanan County, Iowa

His widow Jane A. Laughlin filed for a pension on April 30, 1890.

Jane A. Burris Laughlin married John Tennant on April 15, 1897 in Buchanan County, Iowa. She was aged 57. Her father's name was James Burrhus. Her mother's name was Susana Bunting. John Tennant was aged 65. His father's name was William Tenant. His mother's name was Jessie Camp. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934)

1900 Census, Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa John Tennant (born Feb. 1832, age 68, married 3 years, born Canada), wife Jane A. Tennant (born Dec. 1840, age 59, married 3 years, 0 children born, born Ohio). No first name Laughlin adopted daughter, born Feb. 1881, age 19, born Iowa.)

1915 Iowa State Census, Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa Jane A. Tennant (age 74, widowed, born Ohio, Methodist. Father and mother born in Penn).

1920 Census, Santa Rosa, Ward 4, Sonoma, California Thomas Burris (age 75, born Ohio), Wife Ella Burris (age 64), son-in-law Allen Schrock (age 31), daughter Fern Schrock (age 30), grandson Wallace Schrock (age 6/12) and sister Jane A. Tennant (age 79, married, born Ohio).

1925 Iowa State Census, Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa Jane Tennant (age 84, widowed, 8th grade education, father's name James Burris, born Penn. Mother's name Susan Bunting, born Penn. Parents married in Ohio).

Family tree records says Jane A. Laughlin Tennant died Jan. 4, 1930. She is buried in Brandon Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.


Lee, Isaac He was born Nov. 8, 1824 in Reading, Berks Count, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Jeremiah Lee (Sept. 11, 1787 - June 29, 1842) and Mary Elizabeth Tea (? - Feb. 3, 1828). He married Mary Caroline Hazzard in January 1850. He married Adaline Hedrick on Mar. 7, 1852 in Marshall County, Indiana. (Indiana, Marriages, 1811-1959)

1850 Census, My Division, Marshall County, Indiana David Hazzard (age 57, M.D. born Delaware), Sophia Hazzard (age 57, born Maryland), Joseph Hazzard (age 13, born Ohio), William Hazzard (age 11, born Ohio), Lemuel Hazzard (age 9, born Ohio), Isaac T. Lee (age 25, farmer, born Penn.), Robert Kirk (age 16, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Medicine, Wayne County, Iowa: Isaac T. Lee (age 31, farmer, born Penn.), Adaline S. Lee (age 24, born Ind.), Jerome Lee (age 2, born Ind.), no name (female, no age, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Cedar, Mahaska County, Iowa: I. T. Lee (age 40, farmer, born Pennsylvania), A. Lee (age 34, born Ind.), J. Lee (age 14, male, born Indiana), M. C. Lee (age 13, female, born Ind.), T. Lee (age 12, male, born Iowa), T. Lee (age 9, male, born Iowa), E. Lee (age 7, female, born Iowa), L. Lee (age 6, male, born Iowa), E. E. Lee (age 2, female, born Iowa),

1880 Census: Platt, Hamilton County, Nebraska: Isaac T. Lee (age 53, farmer, born Pennsylvania), wife Adaline Lee (age 48, born Ind.), son Thomas Lee (age 20, born Ind.), daughter Mary C. Lee (age 22, born Iowa), son Lemiel Lee (age 17, born Iowa), son Fredy Lee (age 13, born Iowa), daughter Emma Lee (age 18, born Iowa), daughter Ida Lee (age 8, born Iowa) and son jess Lee (age 6, born Iowa.)

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Living In Iowa: 27th Iowa: Isaac Lee, Private, Co. H. Present Post Office Address: Jolley. (Calhoun County).

1885 Iowa State Census: Garfield, Calhoun County, Iowa: Isaac T. Lee (Township 88, Range 34, Section 12, Garfield Township, (age 64, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Adaline L. Lee (age 54), Fred Lee (age 19, born Linn County?, Iowa), Ida Lee (age 17, born Mahaska County, Iowa), Jesse Lee (age 16, born Mahaska County, Iowa).

1900 Census: Union, Nodaway County, Missouri: Isaac Lee (born Nov. 1824, age 75, married 44 years, born Pennsylvania, farmer,) wife Adaline Lee (born Sept. 1831, age 68, married 44 years, 9 children born, 8 still living, born Indiana), daughter Emma Vorse (born July 1863, age 36, widowed, 3 children born, 3 still living, born Iowa), grandson Lenard Vorse (born Feb. 1885, age 15, born Nebraska), grandson Clarence Vorse (born Mar. 1887, age 13, born Nebraska) and granddaughter Mina Vorse (born Dec. 1889, age 10, born Nebraska).

Adaline L. Lee (born Sept. 4, 1832), died June 25, 1900 and is buried in White Oak Cemetery, Row N - S, Pickering, Nodaway County, Missouri.

Isaac T. Lee died Dec. 25, 1901 and is buried in White Oak Cemetery, Row N-S, Pickering, Nodaway County, Missouri.

Children of Isaac T. Lee and Adaline Hedrick:

  1. George Lee (May 8, 1850 - 1852)
  2. Jerome T. Lee (June 2, 1855 - Mar. 7, 1900)
  3. Mary Caroline Lee (Mar 16, 1857 - about 1938)
  4. Jeremiah Richard Lee (Mar. 18, 1858 - May 30, 1927)
  5. Thomas Penrose Lee (Apr. 2, 1861 - Dec. 9, 1949)
  6. Wilhemina Emma Lee (July 22, 1863 - Apr. 21, 1932)
  7. Lemuel L. Lee (Mar. 22, 1865 - Nov. 17, 1945)
  8. Frederick C. Lee (Mar. 25, 1867 - Jan. 24, 1938)
  9. Ellen Lee (July 9, 1868 - 1871)
  10. Jesse Lee (Feb. 8, 1874 - Oct. 21, 1936).

Note, there may be an error in this list. On the 1900 census, Adaline said she was the mother of 9 children with 8 still living. If you count Jerome, in 1900 there are 3 deceased children on this list.


Lewis, Charles H. He was born Oct. 17, 1839 in Collins Center, Erie County, NY. He was the son of Oren Lewis (May 11, 1803 - April 11, 1884) and Elizabeth "Betsey" Nichols ( Apr. 30, 1803 - July 12, 1843). He married Emma E. Kellogg on March 31, 1866 in Buchanan County, Iowa (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Hymeneus C. Kellogg and Elizabeth E. Wheeler.

1850 Census, Caledonia, Boone County, Illinois Orin Lewis (age 47, clergyman, born VT), Mary Lewis (age 37, born VT), Volnay Lewis (age 20, choir master, born NY), William Lewis (age 17, born NY), Robert Lewis (age 14, born NY), Harriet Lewis (age 13, born NY), Charles Lewis (age 11, born NY), James Wilson (age 15), Mary Duller (age 4) and Benja Duller (age 11).

1856 Iowa State Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa; Orin Lewis (age 53, farmer, born NY), N. Lewis (age 35, born NY), R. Lewis (male, age 20, born NY Carpenter), C. H. Lewis (male, age 16, born NY), H. Lewis (female, age 10 born NY) and M. Lewis (age 20, born NY, carpenter). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 2 to 4 years (it appears that Orin and Robert Lewis came before the rest of them.)

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Orin Lewis (age 57, farmer, born NY), Nancy Lewis (age 39, born NY), Harriet Lewis (age 22, teacher, born NY) and Chas. H. Lewis (Age 20, born NY).

1870 Census: Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa; Charles H. Lewis (age 29, Co. Recorder & Attorney, born NY), Emma E. Lewis (age 22, born Vermont), Fannie Lewis (age 3, born Iowa). H.C. Kellogg and family lived next door.

1880 Census: Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa: Charles H. Lewis (age 38, State Judge Dist. Court, born NY), wife Emma Lewis (age 32, born Vermont), daughter Florence E. Lewis (age 13, born Iowa), son Edward I Lewis, born Iowa) and son Burtie Lewis (age 4, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa: Charles H. Lewis (age 44, Judge 4th Judicial, born NY), Emma E. Lewis (age 36, born NY), Florence E. Lewis (age 17, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Edward Lewis (age 13, born Cherokee County, Iowa) Burton Lewis (age 9, born Cherokee County, Iowa) and Ada Lewis (age 2, born Cherokee County, Iowa).

Charles H. Lewis LEWIS, Judge Charles Henry. The life of this honorable and honored citizen of Woodbury county as citizen, soldier, jurist and judge, stands a shining example of combined American attributes. He was born October 17, 1839, in Collins Center, Erie County, N. Y. His parents Oren and Elizabeth Nichols Lewis, were natives of Connecticut, descended from English ancestors. When he was but 9 months old the family moved to southern Wisconsin, where they remained for two years, and thence went to Boone County. Ill. They made their home there until 1851, when they came to Iowa, arriving at Independence October 8. Three years later the father moved to Quasqueton, Buchanan County, this state, where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1884.

Judge Lewis' early life was spent upon his father's farm, save for a little time when he was employed in the furniture factory operated by the father at Independence. In 1859 he began a close student's life in Cornell College, at Mount Vernon. In 1862 he left the school and enlisted in the army, entering the services as a private soldier in Company H, Twenty-seventh Iowa infantry. For a year he served as a private soldier, was then made sergeant-major of the regiment, and held that position for one year, when he was promoted to first lieutenant, and appointed and commissioned adjutant, which position he filled until the war closed. He served three years and five days, and during all that time was never absent from the regiment, and was off duty but three days, during which time he was on the sick list.

The war closing, he returned to his old home in Buchanan county, and soon engaged with his brother, and another in the milling and mercantile business, which he pursued for a little time. He then entered the law department of the State University, and graduated there from in the summer of 1869. He at once removed to Cherokee, Iowa, arriving there May 29th of that year, and formed a partnership with his father-in-law, H. C. Kellogg. They were the first lawyers in the county, and their practice was soon extensive and lucrative. Mr. Lewis was county recorder and county superintendent of schools of Cherokee county, for a time. In 1870 he was nominated district attorney of the Fourth judicial district of Iowa, the district then embracing twenty-two counties in north-western Iowa. He was elected by a large majority. He served as such until January 1, 1875. So well had Mr. Lewis performed his duties as district attorney, that in the summer of 1874 he was nominated for district judge, and at the fall election, in 1874, he was elected by an overwhelming vote. In the fall of 1878, Judge Lewis was re-nominated by acclamation to succeed himself, and at the fall election was chosen for another term by an increased majority. He served two terms more of four years each in that capacity, being re-elected by increasing majorities at each election, showing the appreciation the people had of his talents and his fitness for the office. He has been firm in the enforcement of the law, and has justly earned the reputation of being one of the best judges who ever presided over any court in Iowa In the first trial of John Arensdorf and others accused of the murder of Rev. George C. Haddock, of Sioux City, Judge Lewis presided, and won the favorable opinion of all loyal citizens. He has presided over nearly all the hotly contested legal battles growing out of the temperance legislation and agitation, in so far as the same have had hearing in northwestern Iowa.

The following is taken from the records of the district court of Woodbury county, being a portion of the resolution adopted by the bar association, upon the retirement of Judge Lewis:

Be Resolved, That the bar of Sioux City and Woodbury County tender to Judge Lewis their cordial and affectionate respect, recognizing in him those qualities which make a great judge; that unerring sense of justice which seeks for the right under whatever cloud of technicality; that promptness which takes from the law the reproach of delay; that benevolent spirit which knows how to temper justice with kindness; that firmness which acts and fears not; that impartiality which looks with equal eye upon all men and all causes, measuring them only with the standard of truth.

The judge has been a member of the G. A. R. for many years, and is prominent in the Loyal Legion of Iowa.

Biographies and portraits of the progressive men of Iowa, leaders in business, politics and the professions; together with an original and authentic history of the state, by ex-Lieutenant-Governor B. F. Gue (Page 477)

C. H. Lewis, of Cherokee, who had also been district attorney, was elected judge in the fall of 1874, and has now nearly completed his sixteenth year of consecutive service upon the bench. During the latter part of his term he has lived in Sioux City. The repeated election to the office which he has so well filled, speak more clearly than words, of the esteem and regard in which he is held, as a man and jurist, by those whom he has so long and faithfully served.

Judge Lewis commenced the discharge of his official duties just as he was entering upon the vigor of manhood, and for sixteen years wore the judicial ermine without stain. The proceedings of the Woodbury county bar upon the last day of the last term held by him, when an elegant gold watch and chain with appropriate inscriptions, was presented to him by the bar, were very impressive, and the resolutions then adopted show the kindly regard and esteem in which he was held, by those over whom he had so long presided. Upon that occasion, William L. Joy, on behalf of the bar, presenting the watch and chain, spoke as follows:

"The revolving days have brought us to the last hour of the last term in the sixteen years that your honor has served this district upon the bench, and it is well for the court and bar at this milestone, to pause for a moment in the busy cares of the day, and review the path along which we have traveled so pleasantly, and, we trust, profitably together. Many of us remember the day upon which your honor put on the judicial ermine, and from that day on we have toiled, each in our chosen paths, and from the lessons of the past we may gain some consolation for the present and inspiration for the future. We have rejoiced as we saw the firm grasp that the years of toil and labor were giving your honor upon those great principles that underlie our jurisprudence; we have admired the skill and the wisdom that came with years and experience in your application of those great principles to the affairs of our every-day life. It is not customary--it is rare indeed--that so long a period of service is rendered a people, as your honor has rendered. Although, at the time you put on the judicial ermine, you were in the vigor of manhood, just entering upon its active duties, yet I imagine that your most sanguine expectation, as you looked down the future, could have hardly mapped out such a course of usefulness as it has been your honor's privilege and lot to confer upon this people and upon this bar, though at that time all the valleys were lit up with sunshine, and the mountain peaks were radiant with hope.

"The lot that has fallen to you, to have so successfully administered the judicial affairs of this district for such a length of time, is certainly a great commendation, and but few men attain unto that honor. Then, too, your honor, the territory over which you have been called to preside was then in its infancy; the embryo cities were springing up along the great thoroughfares of travel, but the country was sparsely settled, only here and there the smoke curled up from the cabin of the early settlers, when you commenced your duties upon the bench. But how changed! Your honor has applied the principles that underlie our jurisprudence, to the affairs of life in the infancy of this great country. It is an honor to have thus had a hand in shaping the jurisprudence of this vast region -- vast to-day, vaster in the future, the home of millions yet to be, that shall refer to the record of your life and your work that you have left in the different counties in which your honor has presided, and they shall find written there, evidence, that in the earlier days, in the infancy of these different counties, the laws were faithfully, honestly and fairly administered. Your honor will pardon the suggestion, and I make it for the benefit of the younger members of the bar, that by earnest, persevering toil in the God-given paths of industry, your honor has been able to achieve that wonderful success that has been yours; it is here, and in these paths alone, by these painstaking, careful and earnest labors, that men achieve that which is lasting, that which is worthy of attaining. The monuments that the court and bar leave to posterity, are largely the judicial records of the courts in which it is their duty to preside or practice. Your honor, through northwestern Iowa, has left a record more enduring than marble or brass. You have recorded in the records of these counties, that which shall be read by your children's children; for sixteen years your honor has stood in the fierce light that beats around the throne; your honor has stood where your every act, and where all the weaknesses of our common humanity are brought out in the strongest light, and yet you may point to that record and challenge investigation. Few, few, can lay down the ermine unspotted and untarnished after having worn it for the length of time that it has been your lot to wear it. And now, in behalf of the bar of Woodbury county, we desire to present some slight token of our appreciation and regard, and ask that your honor wear it as a slight memento of the warm hearts, and the affectionate regard of those over whom it has been your duty so long to preside, and we present it with the hope on the part of each, that it may mark for you only pleasant hours."

E. H. Hubbard, presenting the following resolutions, said:

"May it please the court and gentlemen of the bar: We do not willingly part with a dear friend with one farewell. We rather linger in our parting clasp and say 'farewell and hail,' again and again. And so, dear judge, in these hours of parting between us, as judge and members of the bar, it seems fitting that we should express to you, not alone ill this personal memento, but in other ways that may endure to later generations, the appreciation that we have for an upright and just judge. For sixteen years you have sat in this place of honor. Most of us here are your children in the law. We have grown up under your administration; we have learned not alone to admire, but to love you as well, and it is nothing unseemly I think, at this time, but entirely fitting, that we should ask that there be placed among the records of this court, which have been in so large a part made by yourself, resolutions that may express our sense of your worth. I beg to offer to the members of the bar, resolutions as follows, and later, to move their adoption:

"WHEREAS, After sixteen years of faithful service as judge of the district court of the Fourth judicial district of Iowa, Hon. C. H. Lewis is about to leave the bench, it is fitting that the bar of the court over which he has so long presided, should express to him their feelings of regret at his retirement, and of respect for him as man and judge; therefore be it

Resolved, 1. That the bar of Sioux City and Woodbury county tender to Judge Lewis their cordial and affectionate respect, recognizing in him those qualities which make a great judge; that unerring sense of justice which seeks for the right under whatever cloud of technicality; that promptness which takes from the law the reproach of delay; that benevolent spirit which knows how to temper justice with kindness; that firmness which acts and fears not; that impartiality which looks with equal eye upon all men and all causes, measuring them only with the standard of truth.

2. That as a lasting memorial of our regard, and as a fitting testimonial to one worthy of honor, we ask that these resolutions be spread upon the records of the district court"

O. C. Tredway, seconding the resolutions, said:

"My Brethren: With the single exception of the Hon. S. T. Davis, I believe I am now the longest in practice at the Woodbury county bar of any of its members, and I may say that my sands of professional life are nearly, if not quite, run out, and I have no wish on this occasion to utter words except words of candor and of truth.

"I have, therefore, passed through, in active professional life, the whole official life of him whom we have here assembled on this occasion to bid farewell to, as an honored official, and yet, at the same time, welcome back into the private walks of life, in our midst with pride and pleasure.

"For twenty years Judge Lewis has held within his hand, the wand of power in connection with the due administration of the laws of our county, delivered to him by the sovereign power of the land the voice of the people-devolving upon him the duty in part, of public prosecutor in behalf of the state, and in part as judicial interpreter of the rights between the state and the citizen, and between the citizen and the citizen.

"No higher places of weighty responsibility have been created by the sovereign people in the formation of their government. No place, more than that of public prosecutor, calls for exact justice in action by the representative of the sovereign power of the state. No place more than that which he occupies, who is wrapped about by the sacred folds of the judicial ermine, calls for purity of heart and wisdom of' head.

"In these trying places of power and trust, Judge Lewis has long been tested, and now that he is about to resume the place of a private citizen, no murmur, charging tyranny, comes up from those over whom he has presided as public prosecutor, nor is a whisper heard against the integrity of his judicial decrees.

"It is, therefore, eminently fit and proper, in my humble judgment, that this gift be bestowed and accepted, and that these resolutions be spread upon the records of the court as a lasting monument of the high esteem in which an able, pure and upright judge is held by the Woodbury county bar."

J. S. Lawrence, George Argo, L. S. Fawcett, W. G. Clarke, S. M. Marsh, of the Woodbury county bar, and H. C. Curtis of the Le Mars bar, followed with appropriate and eloquent remarks.

Judge Lewis in response said:

"I trust that to-day, as in all the years of the past, I am thankful for the courtesy and kindness of the members of this bar and the officers of this court. Twenty years ago I began the work of district attorney in the Fourth judicial district of Iowa, a district then composed of twenty-two counties, and for two years served in that capacity. At the expiration of that time, the district was reduced to twenty counties, and for the balance of my term, two years, I served as district attorney in those twenty counties. After that time, sixteen years ago, it then being the 1st of January, 1875, I became the presiding judge of the Fourth judicial district of Iowa, a district then composed of twenty counties. For two years I presided as sole presiding judge of that district as then constituted; at the expiration of that time the district was divided and a new district was organized, composed of the nine counties now constituting the district. For a portion of the time since 1877, I have been sole presiding judge of the district, and later, when relief came, I have been one of the presiding judges of the district. The position has been to me one of pleasure, of duty and of work. Not a few of the members of the bar who were in the district then and in practice, are still here in the practice of their profession; some have gone to other counties, and from them we have good reports; others have gone to the beyond; they are away from the kindly words of friends, they are beyond the bitterness of enemies. The time has come when our relations as members of the bar, as officers of the court and as presiding judge must cease. You have seen fit, in this parting hour, to speak kindly words of praise to me and to present tokens of friendship. I accept these in the same kindly spirit that they have been presented. For them you have my kindly, my appreciative and my cordial thanks. You have seen fit to present to me this beautiful watch. I look upon its rich and its shining cases; in it are embedded the friendships of years, the friendships of the older and the friendships of the younger. I think of its springs, of its wheels and of its movements, and then I think of that power which moves heart to heart and soul to soul; I look into its open face and out of the avenues of years come the familiar faces which have so often appeared before me; I listen to its musical tick and from all along the memory of years come the voices that have been present to explain, to assist in the intricate problems of the law which have been before us.

"And now, gentlemen, as I go from this bench, as I go out of the doors of this court-house, as I leave the business of this district to go, I know not where, I go feeling that you have faithfully performed your duties to your clients; I go with the consciousness and thought that in all my years of work upon the bench I have each day and each hour sought to do the best I could; that I have never intentionally wronged or injured any person; that I have endeavored to keep myself free from all of those associations and combinations which in any way might effect my judgment on such questions as might come before us, and that to some of you in your work I may have been helpful, and to those whom you have so faithfully represented, I have been fair.

"It has been said that words are leaves, that deeds are fruits. Words are apples of gold when fitly spoken, and deeds are noble when rightly done and when rightly performed. . I have endeavored in all my judicial career, to be a man and officer of deeds rather than words, and as I go now from the bench, I go with the full consciousness that I have attempted to faithfully discharge my duty, and this, I trust, may ever abide and continue with me. My heart, gentlemen, is full of thankfulness to all of you and to each of you. Good-bye."

The watch which the judge received is one of the best ever made by the Elgin National Watch Company. The movement is the finest made, and is enclosed in a solid gold Louis XIV case, with an enameled dial, illuminated with diamonds and rubies, filigree gold hands and gold figures. On the inside cap is the inscription: "Presented Hon. C. H. Lewis, Judge of the Fourth Judicial District, by members of the Sioux City Bar." Attached to the watch is a very heavy 14-carat gold chain, and a plain, square, satin-finish gold locket, with a large diamond in the center.

HISTORY OF WOODBURY AND PLYMOUTH COUNTIES. (pages 141-147)

Charles H. Lewis filed for a pension on Sept. 25, 1897 in Iowa.

1900 Census, Sioux City, Woodbury County, Iowa: Charles H. Lewis (born March 1841, age 59, married 34 years, born NY, Lawyer), daughter (sic) Emma E. Lewis (March 1841, age 59, married 34 years, 4 children born, 4 still living, born Vermont), daughter Florence G. Lewis (born March 1867, age 33, born Iowa), son Bert K. Lewis (born July 1875, age 24, born Iowa), daughter Ida E. Lewis (born June 1882, age 17, born Iowa) and Mother Nancy Lewis (born Sept. 1829, age 79, widowed, born NY). (Note there are several errors on this census record: (1) Emma was identified as his daughter, she was his wife. (2) They used the same month and year of birth for both her and Charles. It does not appear to fit either one of them. (3) Nancy would actually be his stepmother. According to online family trees, his father married Elizabeth Nichols first. When she died, he married her sister Nancy Nichols).

Charles H. Lewis died Sept. 30, 1904 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa. Plot: Blk 4, lot 18, grave 10.

Emma Lewis died Oct. 13, 1905 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Cherokee County, Iowa. Plot: Blk 4, lot 18, grave 8.


Lewis, Edward P. He was born about 1837 in New York. He married Harriet Lisett Nash on Oct. 9, 1859 in Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838 - 1934). She was the daughter of James Nash (May 20, 1816 - Oct. 11, 1863) and Emily Frazer (Frazier).

1860 Census: Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa: Edward P. Lewis (age 23, farmer, born VT), Hattie Lewis (age 16, born NY), Helen Lewis (age 5, born NY) Chas. Lewis (age 3, born Iowa), Emily Nash (age 35, born NY), Anna Nash (age 12, born Ill), and Frank Nash (age 1, born Iowa). James Nash (age 44, farmer, born NY, was living next door).

1870 Census: Polk, Benton County, Iowa: E. P. Lewis (age 32, Par-Right Dealer?, born NY), Hattie Lewis (age 25, born NY), A. J. Lewis (age 8, born Iowa), Charley H. Lewis (age 6, born Iowa), Harry Lewis (age 3, born Iowa), Edna Lewis (age 1, born Iowa) and Anna Nash (age 22, Milliner, born Ill.).

1880 Census: Rochester, Olmsted, Minnesota: Hattie Lewis (age 36, divorced, born New York), son Alanson Lewis (age 18, born Iowa), son Harry Lewis (age 12, born Iowa), daughter Edith Lewis (age 7, born Iowa), son Robert Lewis (age 1, born Minnesota) and sister Anna Nash (age 32, teaching school, born Ill.). I could not find Edward P Lewis.

Edward P. Lewis filed for a pension on Mar. 15, 1887 in Illinois.

1890 Veteran's Census, St. Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri: Edward P. Lewis, Private, Co. H. 27th Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 14, 1862, Discharged Jan. 28, 1863, Length of Service: 5 months, 14 days., 1921 1/2 Franklin Street, St. Louis, Missouri. Disability Incurred: Chronic Diarrhea. Remarks: Discharged on Surgeon's Certificate.

1900 Census. I again did not find Edward P. Lewis. But I found Hattie L. Lewis in Rochester, Olmsted, Minnesota (born Dec. 1844, age 55, widowed, 1 child born, 1 still living, born New York.) She was living with son-in-law Lucas Hill and her daughter Edith Hill. I wonder about the 1 child born, 1 still living, but clearly this is her.

1910 Census: Again, no Edward P. But Hattie was in Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa: Robert T. Lewis (age 31, married 1 time for 3 years, born Minnesota), Maude M. Nash (age 27, married 3 years, 1 child born, 1 still living), son Robert A. Lewis (age 2, born Iowa), Mother Hattie L. Lewis (age 65, widowed, 6 children born, 3 still living, born New York) and Aunt Anna Nash (age 61, born Illinois).

U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Sawtelle, Los Angeles, California, Pacific Branch: Edward P. Lewis. MILITARY HISTORY: Time and Place of Enlistment: Aug. 4, 1862, Independence Iowa. Rank: Pvt. Company and Regiment; H, 27 Iowa Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: Jan 23, 1863, Memphis, Tenn. Cause of Discharge: Dis. Disabilities when admitted to the Home: Cardiac Hypertrophy, arteriosclerosis, Chron. Nasal catarrh, His. of chronic diarrhea. DOMESTIC HISTORY: Where born: New York, Age 82, Height: 5.7, complexion: fair. gray eyes, gray hair, can read and write, Religion: Prot. Occupation: Nurseryman, Residence subsequent to Discharge: Portland, Oregon, widowed, Names and Address of Nearest Relative: son A. J. Lewis, Seattle, Wash. and H. B. Lewis, Sacramento, Calif. HOME HISTORY: Rate of Pension: 30. Date of Admission: Oct. 10, 1919. Date of Death, Apr 5, 1924, Portland Oregon. Cause of Death, Unknown. GENERAL REMARKS: Pension Certificate: 504,139. Location of Grave and Remarks: Outside Burial, Portland, Oregon., no effects.

Edward P. Lewis died April 5, 1924 at Soldier's Home, California (Pension Index Record). He is buried at Multnomah Park Cemetery, Plot F, 107, Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon. Find a Grave has April 8, 1924 as DOD. That is most likely the burial date.


Litts, John G. He was born Dec. 16, 1836 in Pike County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Moses and Rachel Litts. He married Nancy A. Makinson on May 22, 1862.

1850 Census: Sandyston, Sussex County, New Jersey: Moses Letts (age 52, shoemaker, born NJ), Rachael Letts (age 46, born NY), Sarah Letts (age 20, born PA), Elizabeth Letts (age 18, born PA), Moses Letts (age 16, born NJ), John Letts (age 14, born NJ), James Letts (age 10, born NJ), Lydia Letts (age 8, born NJ), Hiley Ann Letts (age 3, born NJ), Mary Ann Slater (age 21, born NJ) and Frances Slater (age 2, born NJ).

1860 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Moses Litts (age 62, famer, born PA), Rachel Litts (age 51, born NY), Moses Litts (age 25, farmer, born PA), John G. Litts (age 23, born PA), James C. Litts (age 20, born NJ), Lydia Litts (age 16, born NJ), Ila A. Litts (age 10, born NJ), Laura A. Litts (age 12, born NJ).

1870 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: John G. Litts (age 34, farmer, born Penn.), Nancy A. Litts (age 34, born Michigan), Wihilmina Litts (age 7, female, born Iowa), James F. Litts (age 5,born Iowa), Louis A. Litts (age 3, born Iowa), George L. Litts (age 1, born Iowa) and Rachel Litts (age 59, born NY) (Indexed as Sitts)

1880 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Litts (age 43, farmer, born Penn.), wife Nancy Litts (age 43, born Michigan), daughter Wilhelmina Litts (age 17, born Iowa), son James F. Litts (age 15, born Iowa), son Louis Litts (age 13, born Iowa), son George Litts (age 11, born Iowa), daughter Minne Litts (age 9, born Iowa), daughter Susie Litts (age 8, born Iowa), son Ernest Litts (age 4, born Iowa), son Arthur Litts (age 1, born Iowa) and son Allison Litts (age 1/12, born May in Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa; John G. Litts (Township 89, Range 9, Section 24, SW SE, age 48, farmer, born Penn), Nancy A. Litts (age 48, born Mich.), Franklin Litts (age 19, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Louis Litts (age 17, born Buchanan County, Iowa), George Litts (age 16, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Minnie Litts (age 14, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Susie Litts (age 12, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Ernest Litts (age 9, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Arthur Litts (age 6, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Edward Litts (age 3, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

John G. Litts died Mar. 16, 1886 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

His widow Nancy A. Litts filed for a pension on June 7, 1886.

Nancy A. Litts married Brigham M. Savage on Dec. 25, 1889 in Buchanan County, Iowa (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934)

Nancy A. Savage filed as a guardian for a minor on Mar. 24, 1890.

1900 Census, Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa Brigham M. Savage (born Sept. 1818, age 81, married 10 years, born Mass), wife Nancy A. Savage (born Sept. 1836, age 63, married 10 years, 13 children born, 8 still living, born Ohio).

Nancy A. Savage (born Sept. 19, 1836), died Nov. 3, 1924 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Children of John G. Litts and Nancy A. Makinson:

  1. Wilhelmina Litts, born about 1862
  2. James F. Litts, born about 1864
  3. Louis Litts, born about 1866
  4. George Litts, born about 1868
  5. Minnie Litts, born about 1870
  6. Susie Litts, born about 1871
  7. Ernest Litts, born about 1875
  8. Arthur Litts, born about 1879
  9. Allison Litts, born about 1880

Logan, James W. He was born Feb. 6, 1847 in Ohio. He was probably the son of William and Mary Ann Logan. He married Sarah Ann Jamison on Oct. 13, 1867 in Butler County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of William Ross Jamison and Isabella Jorden.

1870 Census: Pittsford, Butler County, Iowa: James W. Logan (age 23, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah Logan (age 23, born Ohio) and John W. Logan (age 1,born Iowa). They were indexed as Legan.

1880 Census: Pittsford, Butler County, Iowa: James W. Logan (age 33, laborer, born Ohio), wife Sarah A. Logan (age 33, born Ohio), son John W. Logan (age 12, born Iowa), daughter Lena Logan (age 10, born Iowa) and daughter Elsy Logan (age 4, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living In Iowa: 27th Iowa: J. W. Logan, Private, Co. H. Present Post Office Address: Belmond.

1885 Iowa State Census, Belmond, Wright County, Iowa: James W. Logan (age 38, carpenter, born Ohio), Sarah A. Logan (age 37, born Ohio), Lena L. Logan (age 14, born Iowa), Elsie M. Logan (age 8, born Iowa), and Eva Logan (age 3, born Iowa).

1900 Census Pittsford, Butler, County, Iowa: James Logan (born Feb. 1847, age 53, married 32 years, born Ohio, farmer), wife Sarah A. Logan, (born Apr. 1847, age 53, married 32 years, 8 children born, 3 still living, born Ohio), daughter Eva U. Logan (born Sept. 1881, age 18, born Iowa) and son Jordan F. Logan (born Feb. 1887, age 13, born Iowa).

James W. Logan died Aug. 5, 1904 and is buried in Harlan Cemetery, C49, Dumont, Butler County, Iowa.

His widow Sarah A. Logan filed for a pension on Aug. 31, 1904.

Sarah Ann Logan died in 1924 and is buried in Harlan Cemetery, Dumont, Butler County, Iowa.

Children of James W. Logan and Sarah Ann Jamison:

  1. John W. Logan, born about 1868
  2. Lena Logan, born about 1870.
  3. Elsie Logan, born June 26, 1876, died 1964.
  4. Eva Ursula Logan, born Sept. 13, 1881.
  5. Jordan Fenner Logan, born Feb. 21, 1887, died May 1, 1968.

Losure, Clinton Harold He was born April 20, 1831 in Ohio. He was the son of Jacob and Ruhamy Losure. He married Sarah Beckley on Jan 25, 1857 in Buchanan County, Iowa (Buchanan County Marriages Book 1, F-L, 1848 - 1858). She was the daughter of James and Catherine Beckley. Her brother Samuel Beckley also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census: Wayne, Kosciusko County, Indiana: Jacob Lasure (age 50, farmer, born PA, Ruhmey Lasure (age 46, born Ohio), Clinton Lasure (age 18, farmer, born Ohio), Susan Lasure (age 16, born Ohio), James Lasure (age 14, born Ohio), Amanda Lasure (age 9, born Ind.), Jacob Lasure (age 6, born Ind.) and William Lasure (age 5, born Indiana.).

1856 Iowa State Census: Spring, Buchanan County, Iowa: Clinton Losure (age 25, born Ohio, Farmer), Sarah Beckley (age 17, born Ohio) and Nancy B. Miller (age 0, born Iowa).

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Clinton Lozier (age 28, born Ohio), Sarah Lozier (age 23, born Ohio), Mary Lozier (age 2, born Iowa) and Watson Lozier (age 1, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: Clinton H. Losure (age 31, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah Losure (age 28, born Ohio), Mary Losure (age 12, born Iowa), Willie Losure (age 10, born Iowa), Katie F. Losure (age 8, born Iowa), Belle Losure (age 6, born Iowa), Hattie Losure (age 4, born Iowa) and Eunice Losure (age 2, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Center, Antelope County, Nebraska: Clinton Losure (age 48, farmer, born Ohio), wife Sarah Losure (age 42, born Ohio), Son Wilson Losure (age 21, born Iowa), daughter Katie Losure (age 17, teaching school, born Iowa), daughter Isabell Losure (age 16, born Iowa), daughter Hattie Losure (age 13, born Iowa), daughter Eunice Losure (age 11, born Iowa), and son Frank Losure (age 5, born Iowa).

1885 Nebraska State Census Collection: Antelope and Boone: Clinton Joiner? (age 54, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah Joiner (age 47, born Ohio), daughter Isabel Joiner (age 21, born Iowa), daughter Hattie Joiner (age 18, born Iowa), daughter Eunice Joiner (age 15, born Iowa), son Frank Losure (age 9, born Iowa). Wilson Losure (age 25, born Iowa) was living next door. Next to him was Sam Beckley (age 50, born Ohio) and family). I have no explanation for the name of most of this family. I would assume a misunderstanding by the census taker.

1890 Veterans Census: Brazile and Eden, Antelope County, Nebraska: Clinton H. Losure (Private Co. H. 27 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 11, 1862, discharged Jan 1863. Post Office Address: Millerboro, Disability Incurred: Left Sided? Hernia). (indexed as Clinton H. Fossier)

1900 Census: Eden, Antelope County, Nebraska: Clinton Losure (born Apr. 1831, age 69, married 43 years, born Ohio, farmer), wife Sarah Losure (born Jan. 1838, age 62, married 43 years, 7 children born, 7 still living, born Ohio), daughter Hattie I. Losure (born Jan 1867, age 33, born Iowa), son Frank L. Losure (born Aug. 1875, age 24, married 1 year, born Iowa), daughter-in-law Amelia Losure (born Sept. 1882, age 17, married 1 years, 1 child born, 1 still living, born Denmark), daughter Mary M. Losure (born Dec.. 1899, age 6/12, born Nebraska). Living next door was Wilson Losure (born May 1860, age 40, born Iowa) and family.

Clinton Losure died Mar. 6, 1907 and is buried in Millerboro Cemetery, Brunswick, Antelope County, Nebraska.

Article says probably to be buried in Creighton cemetery...that is wrong.

Father Losure is Gone

C.H. Losure died Wednesday night about nine o'clock at the family home near the Millerboro church. He was around 80 years old and has been in poor health the last few years. His death was looked for. He was one of the old settlers of that community.

Up to the time of going to press no definite arrangements have been made for the funeral, but it will be held either Saturday or Sunday and burial probably be made in the Creighton cemetery. Funeral will be under the direction of Creighton Lodge AF and AM of which he was an honored member.

...The Creighton News 8 March 1907

His widow Sarah Losure filed for a pension on May 21, 1907 in Nebraska.

Sarah Losure (born Jan. 2, 1838), died April 12, 1908. She is buried in Millerboro Cemetery, Brunswick, Antelope County, Nebraska.

Children of Clinton H. Losure and Sarah Beckley:

  1. Mary Losure, b. 1858
  2. Wilson William Losure, b. May 1860, d. Nov. 27, 1929.
  3. Katherine F. Losure, b. 1863. d. 1936
  4. Isabell Losure, born 1864
  5. Hattie I. Losure, born Jan. 1867.
  6. Eunice Losure, b. 1869, d. 1936.
  7. Frank Loben Losure, b. Aug. 5, 1875, d. Jan. 4, 1936.

Love, Harrison Henry He was born July 10, 1837 in Mercer, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Samuel Love (Apr. 24, 1792 - Dec. 6, 1856) and Isabella McConnehey (June 1, 1802 - Aug. 4, 1891). He married Mary Amelia Sauer on July 19, 1866 in Independence, Iowa. She was the daughter of Henry Sauer (1824 - 1900) and Maria Catherine Rechlembach (1828 - 1897).

1850 Census: Smith, Mahoning County, Ohio: Samuel Love (age 58, born Unknown), Isabella Love (age 48, born Pennsylvania), Margaret F. Love (age 18, school teacher, born Ohio), Amy Love (age 16, born Penn), Harrison Love (age 12, born Penn.), Eliza M. Love (age 9, born Penn.) and David M. Love (age 5, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa James B. Potter (age 31, farmer, born New York), Charlotte Potter (age 29, born New York), Joseph D. Potter (age 4, born Iowa), Truman J. Potter (age 1, born Iowa), Susanna Potter (age 63, born Vermont), Rebecca Foreman (age 13, born Ohio), Harrison Love (age 20, born PA) and Edward F. Potter (age 29, born New York). (Note: Edward F. Potter also served in Co. H, 27th Iowa).

1870 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa; Henry Love (age 33, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Mary Love (age 21, born Ohio), Bell Love (age 3, born Iowa) and David Love (age 11/12, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Arcade, Phillips County, Kansas: H. H. Love (age 43, farming, born Pennsylvania), wife Mary A. Love (age 30, born Ohio), daughter Mary I. Love (age 13, born Iowa), son David M. Love (age 10, born Iowa), daughter Sarah E Love (age 8, born Iowa), son Charley O. Love (age 6, born Nebraska), daughter Maggy J. Love (age 5, born Kansas), daughter Rosa A. Love (age 3, born Kansas) and daughter Milly M. Love (age 1, born Kansas).

1885 Kansas State Census Collection: Arcade, Phillips County, Kansas: Harrison H. Love (age 47, farmer, born Penn, To Kansas from Nebraska. Honorably Discharged from the volunteer military service of the United States: Yes. Name of State: Iowa, Letter of Company: H, Number of Regiment: 27, Infantry.), Mary A. Love, (age 36, born Ohio), David M. Love, (age 17, born Iowa), Sarah E. Love (age 13, born Iowa), Charles O. (age 11, born Nebraska), Margaret J. Love (age 10, born Kansas), Rosa A. Love (age 8, born Kansas), Millie M. Love (age 6, born Kansas), Helena A. Love (age 4, born Kansas), Lottie J. Love (age 2, born Kansas) and Franklin Love (age 1 m., born Kansas).

1900 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Harrison Love (born July 1837, age 62, married 33 years, born Pennsylvania, farmer), wife Mary Love (born May 1849, age 51, married 33 years, 14 children born, 14 still living, born Ohio), daughter Lottie J. Love (born Feb. 1883, age 17, born Kansas), son Franklin Love (born June 1885, age 15, born Kansas), son Ralph Love (born Dec. 1887, age 12, born Kansas), Son Benjamin H. Love (born Mar. 1889, age 11, born Kansas), son Ameal E. Love (born June 1891, age 9, born Iowa) and daughter Rena R. Love (born Nov. 1895, age 4, born Iowa).

1905 Iowa State Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: H.H. Love, Mary A. Love, Frank Love, Ralph Love, Harrison Love, Clark Love, Rena Love. (All Post Office Address: Winthrop.

1910 Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: Harrison H. Love (age 72, married 1 time for 44 years, born Pennsylvania, general farmer) wife Mary A. Love (age 61, married 1 time for 44 years, 14 children born, 14 still living, born Ohio), son Benjamin B. Harrison (age 21, born Kansas), son Clark A. Love (age 18, born Iowa), daughter Rena R. Love (age 15, born Iowa) and Ward Shawn Kelly (age 9, born Iowa). They were living next door to Albert Sauer (age 59). (Note: he was indexed as Wallision H. Lone).

1915 Iowa State Census: Cono, Buchanan County, Iowa: H. H. Love, age 77, married; County: Buchanan, P. O. Winthrop, Township Cono. Occupation: Retired farmer. Extent of Education: Common 11, can read and write, Birthplace: Penn. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment: 27, Company H. Father's Birthplace, Penn., Years in Iowa: 40.

Harrison H. Love died Nov. 8, 1917 (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

His widow Mary A. Love filed for a pension on Nov. 28, 1917.

Mary Amelia (Sauer) Love (born May 16, 1849) died July 6, 1930 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Children of Harrison Henry Love and Mary Amelia Sauer:

  1. Mary Isabelle Love, b. Apr. 24, 1867; d. Oct. 20, 1955
  2. David McConnahey Love, b. Sept. 5, 1869; d. Aug. 21, 1950
  3. Sarah Emeline "Dolly" Love, b. June 15, 1871; d. Aug. 2, 1952
  4. Charles Orlan Love, b. June 5, 1873; d. June 11, 1950
  5. Margaret Jane Love, b. Mar. 4, 1875; d. Dec. 25, 1960
  6. Rosa Almedia Love, b. Nov. 19, 1876; d. Feb. 19, 1937
  7. Millie Mable Love, b. Oct. 3, 1878; d. Aug. 17, 1967
  8. Helen Amelia Love, b. Dec. 5, 1880; d. Jan 20, 1965
  9. Lottie Josephine Love, b. Feb. 27, 1883; d. Dec. 16, 1955
  10. Dodds Franklin Love, b. Jan. 30, 1885; d. Dec. 1, 1926
  11. Ralph Erwin Love, b. Dec. 4, 1886; d. May 30, 1959
  12. Benjamin Harrison Love, b. Mar. 18, 1889; d. Apr. 27, 1986
  13. Amil Clark Love, b. June 11, 1891; d. Nov. 2, 1970
  14. Rena Ruth Love, b. Nov. 3, 1894; d. Nov. 5, 1981

Loy, William N. He was born July 16, 1843 in Cardington, Morrow County, Ohio. He was the son of Fredrick Slagle Loy (Oct. 14, 1822 - Jan. 27, 1908) and Clarissa Purvis. He married Mary Edith North on Sept. 5, 1871 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Nelson North and Isabel Wiley.

1850 Census: Cardington, Morrow County, Ohio: Frederick Loy (age 28, farmer, born MA), Clarissa Loy (age 29, born NY). William N. Loy (age 6, born Ohio), Isabell Loy (age 5, born Ohio), George H. Loy (age 3, born Ohio) and Nelson T. Loy (age 1,born Ohio).

1860 Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: Fred'k S. Lay (age 37, farmer, born MA), Clarissa Lay (age 38, born NY), Wm. N. Lay (age 16, farmer, Laborer, born Ohio), Isabella S. Lay (age 14, born Ohio), Geo. H. Lay (age 13, born Ohio) Nelson F. Lay (age 10, born Ohio), Margaret L. Lay (age 7, born Ohio), Henry W. Lay (age 5, born Ohio), Mary E. Lay age 3, born Iowa), and Fred'k W. Lay (age 10/12, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: Frederick Loy (age 47, farmer, born Maryland), Clarissa Loy (age 47, born NY), William Loy (age 26, born Ohio), Sarah Loy (age 24, born Ohio), Louisa Loy (age 18, born Ohio), Nora Loy (age 13, born Wisconsin), Frederick Loy (age 10, born Iowa) and Sarah Purvis (age 74, born NY)

1880 Census, Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: William N. Loy (age 36, farmer, born Ohio), wife Edith Loy (age 27, born Wisconsin), daughter Elsie Loy (age 7, born Iowa), son Frederic Loy (age 4,born Iowa), Elma Loy (age 8/12, born Sept.. born Iowa) and servant Kate Habbermenn (age 20, born Wisconsin). Living next door was Nelson North (age 56, farmer, born Vermont), wife Isabel North (age 59, born Ohio) and son Elmer E. North (age 17, born Wisconsin).

1885 Iowa State Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: William Loy (Township 52, Range 9, Section 32, NW SE, age 41, farming, born Ohio) Edith Mary Loy (age 35, born Wisconsin), Elsie Loy (age 11, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Frederick Loy (age 8, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Elmer Loy( age 5, born Buchanan County, Iowa)

1900 Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: William N. Loy (born July 1843, age 56, married 29 years, born Ohio, farmer,), wife Mary E. Loy (born July 1852, age 47, married 29 years, 5 children born, 4 still living, born Wisconsin), son Frederick Loy (born Nov. 1875, age 24, born Iowa), daughter Lucy Loy (born Mar. 1888, age 12, born Iowa). Living next door was Nelson North (born Mar. 1824, age 76, married 49 years, born Vermont), wife Isabella North (born Dec. 1830, age 69, married 49 years, 4 children born, 2 still living, born Ohio) and son Elmer North (born Dec. 1862, age 37, born Wisconsin).

1905 Iowa State Census: Wm. Loy, post office address: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa), Mary E. Loy, Fred Loy, Lucy Loy. Also Isabel North and Elmer North (all in Independence).

1910 Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: William N. Loy (age 66, married 1 time 38 years, born Ohio, general farm), wife Mary E. Loy (age 57, married 1 time 38 years, 5 children born, 4 still living, born Wisconsin).

1915 Iowa State Census, Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Wm. M. Loy (age 71, married, County, Buchanan, Town, Independence, Ward 2, Occupation: Retired Farmer, Extent of Education Common Grammar, can read and write, Birth Place: Ohio. Father's birthplace: Penn. Mother; birth Place: NY. Years in Iowa: 40).

1920 Census: Independence Ward 2, Buchanan County, Iowa: William N. Loy (age 76, born Ohio), wife Mary E. Loy (age 67, born Wisconsin).

1925 Iowa State Census, Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: W. N. Loy (age 82, born Ohio, father's name: Fred Loy, born Penn), mother's name: Clarissa Purvis, born Penn. Parents married in Ohio), wife Mary E. Loy (age 72, born Wisconsin, father's name: Nelson North, born Vt, mother's name Isabel Wiley, born Ohio, parents married in Wisconsin), granddaughter Elsie Loy (age 14, born Iowa, father's name: Fred Loy, born Iowa. Mother's name Etta Closson, born Iowa. Parents married in Iowa.)

William N. Loy died April 13, 1928 and is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

His widow Mary E. Loy filed for a pension on Apr. 23, 1928.

Mary Edith (North) Loy - Born July 8, 1852 died May 6, 1929. (Iowa, Death and Burials, 1850-1990). She is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Children of William N. Loy and Mary Edith North:

  1. Elise Bell Loy b: July 29, 1872 in Sumner, Buchanan Co., Iowa
  2. Frederick N. Loy b: Nov 26, 1875 in Sumner, Buchanan Co., Iowa
  3. Alma Loy b: Nov 26, 1879 in Sumner, Buchanan Co., Iowa
  4. M.E. Lucy Loy b: Mar 15, 1888 in Sumner, Buchanan Co., Iowa

McBane, John He was born about 1842 in Ohio. He was the son of Malcom and Mary McBane.

1850 Census: District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Malcomb McBane (age 35, farmer, born Virginia), Mary McBane (age 34, born Ohio), Sarah McBane (age 10, born Ohio), John McBane (age 8, born Ohio), Susan McBane (age 5,born Ohio), James McBane (age 1, born Iowa), John McBane (age 65, born MD) and Susan McBane (age 63, born VA).

1856 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Malcomb McBane (age 41, born Virginia), M. McBane (age 41, born Ohio), S. McBane (age 16, born Ohio), J. McBane (age 13, born Ohio) S. McBane (age11, born Iowa), J. McBane (age 8, born Iowa) and C. McBane (age 4, born Iowa. The family had been in the state of Iowa for 13 years.

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Malcom McBane (age 45, farmer, born Virginia), Mary McBane (age 45, born Ohio), Jno McBane (age 17, born Ohio), Susan McBane (age 15, born Iowa), James McBane (age 11, born Iowa), and Cath McBane (age 8, born Iowa).

John McBane died Dec. 9, 1862 from measles and is buried in Mound City National Cemetery, Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois, Grave 747.


McGonigle, Alvi Curtis (Note: many records have his name as Megonigle). He was born Jan. 1, 1838, in Linn, Iowa. He was the son of Hamilton McGonigle (1807 - Apr. 24, 1867) and Mary Barklay Roop (Nov. 10, 1807 - Feb. 2, 1896). He married first Adaline Morehouse on Oct. 28, 1867. She was the daughter of Wheeler and Caroline Morehouse. It appears that her sister Mary Morehouse married Alvi's brother Bartimeus McGonigle who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. Three of his sisters married men that served in Company H, 27th Iowa. His sister Vironica Megonigle married Emanuel Miller, His sister Nancy Jane McGonigle married Benjamin Miller. And his sister Isabella McGonigle married William Crum.

I found this information here. Additional Megonigle information is available on the website.

Hamilton Megonigle: d. 24 Apr 1867

Hamilton Megonigle and Mary Barklay Roop were married in Juniata County, Pennsylvania in 1831. At this time Hamilton was 24 years old, and probably living with his father, John Megonigle, his mother, three younger brothers and two younger sisters. He was a shoemaker by trade. That same year his younger brother, Bartimeus, married Mary Catherine McDonald, also in Juniata County.

Tuscaror Township, where the Megonigles lived, was in Mifflin County until 2 March 1831, when the county was divided and the southern half named Juniata County. Al McGonigle, his wife and three children, all under five years old, lived in Turbett Township, which also was in the southern half. John and wife and Al were all between fifty and sixty years old, but Al's wife was younger, between thirty and forty.

The first child born to Hamilton and Mary was Bartimeus, born 22 December 1832. In those early times, children, especially boys, were named after close relatives, many times as many as four or five first cousins would all have the same name.

The next spring, 1833, Hamilton's family started west in search of cheaper land where they could start farming. They settled in Miami County, Ohio. Three girls Armina, Veronica and Louisa, were born during the six years here. The summer of 1838 (the year Iowa became a territory) was very dry, with long stifling weeks of drought, and there was much sickness. Perhaps this was the reason for the move further west that next spring. Bartimeus and Catherine, with their two children, Charles and Jane, came from Pennsylvania to join them in the long journey to Iowa. The mode of travel was of course the prairie schooner, making from fifteen to forty miles per day, depending on terrain and weather. The fording of the Mississippi River was quite an undertaking, and was still remembered by Veronica years later.

On 4 July 1839, the two families arrived in Linn County, Iowa, stopping, as most of the very early people did, at the edge of the woods. The section of the grove where they made their home projected out on the prairie in a point-like fashion...so from the beginning the grove was known as "McGonigle's Point". The site soon became a busy place as other pioneers came to the area and made it their headquarters. Alva Megonigle was born in 1840 and Calmanda in 1841.

Mary and Catherine couldn't have had many idle moments. They had to help outside, as well as in, as the children were all too young to do the heaviest labor. At first, fur from deer was carded and spun for much of the clothing and shoes were fashioned from the skin of the hind legs of the deer and stuffed with deer hair to keep the feet dry. Later flax was grown and spun into clothing and blankets, and when sheep became available, the wool was washed, spun, wound, knitted and woven into cloth. Most of the wool yarn was dyed brown with the liquid made from the bark of walnut or butternut trees. Flax could be dyed several colors, red from sumac berries, purple from oak or maple bark, yellow from peach or hickory bark, or gray from cedar berries.

Candles were made by moulding beeswax and venison tallow. There was soapmaking and preserving to be done, besides the everyday cooking.

The men cleared the land, plowed and planted, hunted for meat, and made much of the furniture and utensils. Bartimeus was probably old enough to use the ax and the rifle, as boys learned early how to hunt and trap, and there was always firewood needed. The younger children gathered plants and herbs for drying. These were used as flavorings and for cooking and medicine.

Corn was the main food, used nearly every meal, as mush, pone, johnny-cake, hoecake or cornbread. Wild game was plentiful, prairie chicken, woodcock, partridge, snipe, quail, wild goose, wild turkey, swan, pelican and ducks. There were many fur animals...otter, beaver, mink, raccoon, muskrat, wolf, fox badger, also wildcats and, occasionally, a panther. The men hunted deer and bear, and there were buffalo and elk on the prairie. Honey was used for sweetening and put up in barrels for the winter. Fish were abundant and so large that, tied together by the gills and thrown across a small horse, their caudal fins touched the ground on each side...some weighed twenty four pounds.

The young children had to be watched carefully, as it was said that, "to venture two miles out on the prairie was about as dangerous as to venture to sea without a compass". There were Indian trails crossing the prairie from stream to stream, leading to fording places, and paths up and down the river, and to every bubbling spring.

Bartimeus was a Judge at Michael Green's house (an election precinct) in 1841 and was one of the first Linn County commissioners during 1842-2. He had a great interest in politics, later making a try for the legislature.

The spring of 1842 was an extremely early one, there was grass two feet high in the lowlands, but the summer was dry and there was a frost every month that year. The potatoes were nearly killed and, on the twenty of September, the frost killed the corn, which was very poor due to dryness. John Hamilton Megonigle was born that year and during the terrible winter of 1843, Nancy Jane was born. That winter was the worst ever known in this region. Terrible snowstorms raged and the snow was four feet deep in the timber. Most of the people lived on venison, boiled corn and honey. Some cabins drifted completely full and were buried. The severe weather lasted into spring and men were still crossing the river with ox teams on the first of April. The ice didn't go out until last of April. In June the rivers were the highest the oldest Indians had ever seen and the summer was cold and wet.

Mail to McGonigle's Point came by way of horseback from Marion, Iowa. The people had so little money that, often, relatives and friends from the east prepaid the letters...which were valued highly by the whole family.

During the middle and late 1840's many farmers from surrounding counties came to McGonigle's Point for their supply of corn. (The Buchanan County history says "this was the "Egypt" of the early settlers"). Evidently it got too crowded for Hamilton and Bartimeus, because they both decided to move on, Hamilton to Buchanan County in 1846 and Bartimeus to Clayton County in the spring of 1847. Isabelle and William were new members of the Megonigle families, both born before the departure.

Mary and Hamilton now had seven living children, one little girl having died as an infant, so there were more possessions to get together this time. They came to Liberty Township (History of Buchanan County states that Henry Baker, the first permanent settler in Byron Township from 1844-46, had as a neighbor, Hamilton McGonigle, "who had settled suth of him in Liberty Township, some three or four miles away") living in several locations, one of which was where Wilson Cemetery now lies. Since Hamilton didn't have papers filed on this land, he was forced to leave it and the new owner took possession.

Quasqueton was the "Metropolas" of the County at this time, having had a store, flouring mill, saw mill, grist mill and tavern by 1844. It was called "Trenton" until 1847, when it was laid out in lots and a handful of white families living in Buchanan County in 1846, by 1849, according to the History of Buchanan County, there was Clark, Newton, Melrose and Walker up the river near where Littleton is now, Minton, Barr, Ross and Hathaway were on the creek five miles North of Independence, Greeleys, Bunce, Kint and Suggicool still further north in Hazleton Township, Jewell, Richardson and Messenger at Buffalo Grove, and Obenchain, Hickox, Hathaway, Boone, Sufficool, McKinney and Megonigle located around the edge of the timber north and east of Independence. In the spring of 1850, only Dr. Brewer and Thomas Close lived in the town of Independence.

Seymour P. Stoughton came to Independence in the spring of 1847 from Wisconsin, built a dam and saw-mill and became the first postmaster in 1847, but in 1850, after "holding more than two years the office which brought him more fame than money, and not enough of either to boast of", he resigned and left for the gold rush in California (he returned in 1851, stayed a few years, then, ill with lung fever, went south and died there a short time later).

By fall of 1847, there was "law and order" in the county, Thomas E. McKinney being appointed Justice of the Peace, in and for the centre precinct of the county. Punishment was usually by whipping, but "hanging" for murder was allowable by law in Iowa Territory. The men may have taken turns dealing out punishment, as Leora Nibeck remembers her mother telling of (when a little girl) watching Hamilton ride away on his horse, carrying his long black-snake whip. The family knew he had to "administer justice", but Delilah didn't recall (or perhaps they didn't know) where this was done. A traveling circuit judge stopped in the towns on occasion.

Wheat was being planted in the fields by 1847 and, for several years, did well. There were gardens, with squashes, pumpkins, potatoes and cabbage. The women cooked the vegetables with different meats in a big iron pot, then added dumplings and called it "potpie", and served it at house raisings and corn-huskings. The iron kettles brought from the East had to be well cared for, as iron was not available in the west for many years. The utensil most often used was the "spider", which was like a skillet, but had legs and a very long handle and could be set right over the fire. The cover had an iron rim, so that hot coals could be set on the top of the lid, as well as under the spider.

It was said that early pioneers hardly got a roof on their cabins before they began to think of schools. By 1850, there were three, all log cabins, in the county, at Quasqueton, Pine Creek and one near the John Boone place in Washington Township. The children attended when weather and work permitted.

Samuel Shepard Megonigle was born in the spring of 1850, the last of the children of Hamilton and Mary. John Rasmus was now two years old, and Mary 43. Many children were welcome, as the work on the farm was very hard and took many hands and hours.

The nearest trading post, a small one, was at Dubuque. Produce, such as hogs which were slaughtered at home, was hauled by ox team to Dubuque, where it was traded for flour and corn meal to last through the winter months.

On their trips to the trading post, they had to take spades along. There were no roads, no bridges, no land marks of any description. When they came to a stream, they would shovel the banks down so they could go down one side and up the other. A round trip took a full week.

After the land was cleared of trees, (a back breaking job), some of the trees were taken to the saw mills to make boards, planks, etc... Shingles were cut out of solid blocks of oak, then split and pointed with a broadax. Thousands of rails had to be split for fences. Wooden sleds and ox yokes had to be made.

To plant corn, the field was marked off with a home-made marker made of heavy plank. At each intersection the children dropped in three or four kernels of corn. The adults followed with hoes to cover these up. Then came plowing time with a double shovel plow drawn by one horse and someone had to follow with hoes to uncover the corn which got covered with dirt. This was done day after day, until the corn grew large enough to make it unnecessary.

When they made hay, they mowed the grass with a scythe and, when it was dry, each took a homemade rake, set it upon a swath of hay and pulled as far ahead as they could, repeating this until there were large piles. Someone followed with the team and rack, and the older children would throw the bunches of hay on it.

Oats and wheat were cut with a cradle which held just enough grain for one bundle. These were then bound, gathered and piled up so they wouldn't take so long to shock.

Corn husking went on for weeks in the fall, and in winter there were many tasks to be done. Grain had to be threshed with a flail. Two rows of grain bundles, heads together, were laid on the barn floor; then someone would have to swing the flail for many hours to get the grain all out. The straw was then carried to the cattle and horses. Next the grain was put through the fanning mill to fan the chaff out. This was turned by a crank.

The children drove the cattle to the creek every day in winter, cut holes in the ice (often more than a foot thick), and stayed until they drank, then drove them home again.

Until the railroads crossed Buchanan County in 1859, farmers often sold all the surplus raised, at their own doors, to newcomers and those moving further West.

The first transaction of land recorded for Hamilton and Mary was 13 November 1851, when they bought forty acres from the "School Fund Commission" for $50.00 plus 10% interest, payable each January first for five years; or until the full amount was paid. Mary had to acknowledge in a separate statement that she realized she was forfeiting her "dower" in these early transactions. This land was in Section 16 of Liberty Township. This was the year the State Road was surveyed from Independence to Cedar Falls and stakes laid out.

In 1852, Hamilton sold land in Section 16 for $200.00. Two days before selling it, he bought 80 acres in Section 8 in Liberty Township for $100.00, then borrowed against it that same week, $50.00 at 10% interest against forty acres.

One year later, in November of 1853 that land was first bought and recorded in Byron Township by Armina Megonigle; eighty acres of the north half of the North East quarter of Section 33 for $127.13, site of the home farm. In November of 1854, Armina bought for $146.35, the south half of the South East quarter of Section 28 (80 acres) in Byron Township.

The family must have moved to the eighty acres on Pine Creek, in the midst of the timber, in the winter of 1854, then bought eighty acres more that to add to the farm. It's been told that, when the family first moved to that area, there was only a path through the woods to their house, which was built south of the present one, down near Pierce's graveyard in the Southeast corner. There was plenty of wood and water available; the main condition for a home site.

The family nearest them on Pine Creek was Thomas and Mary McKinney and their five children, Charles W., Stewart, Acsah, William, and Mary. They had come West from New Jersey, where Thomas, Mary and the three oldest children had been born, William being born in Ohio. The two families became very good friends, and William and Alvi remained like brothers for many years.

Mary bought another eighty acres in Section 29, back in Liberty Township for $100.00 that spring. Three years later Hamilton borrowed $200.00 against it, but he must have been satisfied with his home on Pine Creek, for he bought no more land after this time.

His brother, Bartimeus, probably came to say "Goodby" in 1853, as that was the year he left for California, many were going to look for gold. Charles was seventeen years old and able to look after his mother and the younger children on the farm near Monona, Iowa.

Most of the early settlers were very religious people and the Megonigle's were no exception, for on 7 April 1853, a church of God commonly called the "Winebrennarian Church", was organized at Hamilton's home in Liberty Township, just before they moved to Byron Township, with five members present. For quite some time, the services were held in private homes or in the log schoolhouse, with Hamilton doing at least part of the preaching. Then in 1855 a church was built in the southwest part of Byron Township and called the "Bethel". The first minister was Reverend David Gill. A tank of water was used for immersion during Baptism in the winter, and in the summertime, the waters of Pine Creek served the same purpose.

The Bethel Church was built on ground that had formerly been a graveyard. The bodies had been moved to Wilson Cemetery because of too much water in the ground, all except one body, that of an Indian woman which was said to have been left there. This church played a very large part in the social and religious lives of the Megonigle and Miller families. Most were members from the beginning and their children, and their children attended church and Sunday School there for many years.

1855 was also the year that the first stage coaches were run from Dubuque to Independence and the first newspaper was published, the Independence Civilian. The next year brought a land boom, there were 952 families in Buchanan County, and the year after that it collapsed, and almost every business failed. The Village of Winthrop was laid out in 1857. On Sunday, at sunrise, January 12, the temperature stood at 40 degrees below zero, the coldest day ever known in Iowa.

The Buchanan County History states that the first marriage in Byron Township was that of Lousa Megonigle and Robert R. Copeland in 1856. However, the Copeland family Bible record shows their marriage as having taken place on 3 October 1858. Bartimeus was married to Mary Morehouse in 1856, but not in Byron Township.

The farmers had a bad year in 1858. Oats and corn were blighted and the yield so low that the price went from 30¢ per bushel to $1.00. This certainly didn't discourage the young people. The following winter Armina married Sam Miller and that fall there was another wedding, that of Jane to Ben Miller.

The winter of 1861 set another record, the worst continuous storm period ever known. On 15 January, there began a series of storms. Snow fell that night to a depth of 18 to 24 inches on the level, with fierce winds. Frequent snowfalls and almost constantly prevailing north and northwest winds shut down everything, even the railroad, for days at a time. There were only two trains arriving in Independence between 15 January and 1 March. There were many wolves and they often so bold as to come to the door and eat the pig feed from the swill-pails. That year was also the beginning of the Civil War.

Ben Miller's brother, Jacob M., got up a company of men willing to go fight for the North. They elected Jacob, Captain, and he signed them up in August of 1862.

Veronica and Emanuel Miller decided to marry before he left. The ceremony took place on 21 August.

Early on 3 October 1862, Alvi and Bart were at Hamilton's home preparing to walk to Dubuque, there to arrange for transportation to camp. The three McKinney boys, Ben and Emanual Miller and William Crum would join them, since all were to be "mustered in" that day at Dubuque.

Robert Copeland, who also served later, Lousia and their two girls were there to say goodby, and of course Bart's family. As the men walked away, the three little girls, Luella, Mary, and Delilah, started to follow. Bartimeus turned around and saw them, came back and lifted each one over the fence that encircled the house, giving them a kiss as he did so, then joined Alvi and walked on down the road. That was to be the last time the family was to see him.

The month before Bart went to war, he purchased from his sister, Armina, part of the home place, 35 Acres for $200.00, commencing at the Northeast corner of the Southeast quarter Section 28. This land is to the north of where the main buildings are now. Bart died the following spring in March of 1863. Bart left the 35 acres of the home place to his daughter, Luella. It was sold by her mother and stepfather for $18.00 an acre in 1868 to "aid in Luella's support and education". She was eight years old. The land never belonged to the family again.

In April of 1863, a month after the death of his brother, Alvi wrote the following letter to Adaline Morehouse, his future wife.

April 1863
To Miss Adaline Morehouse
Winthrop PO
Buchanan County, Iowa

Camp Reed
Jackson, Tennessee

" Dear Madam,
It is with pleasure I take my pen in hand to scribble a few lines to let you know how I myself and the rest of the boys is giting a long. My helth has been very poor but I think it is improving sum. The rest of the boys is all well as far as I know. The weather today is nice. The trees is all out in leeves and the ground is green with grass. The pech trees is all out in bloom and has been for sum time. When the green fruit git ripe I will eat it. I cant rest then I will think of all the young ladies up on pine. I often think what good times I use to have up there but them times gon and can not be brot back, I fel som what lonesome and low spirited sens Bart died and Bill McKiney went home. There has been a good many died in our company and discharged. Thare names is as folows Ben Suton, John Mcbane, John Tift, Walter Blafies, Charley Colbern, J.C. Glass and Jeorge Hathaway. We left him at holy springs and we have not heard from him yet sins we left him. I guess he is ded or els we would hear from him.

Well, anuff of that. I will rest a while I will try to finish. I will now tell you that the boys is most all out on picket to day. All but a fue and it sum what lonesom and Captain J.M. Miller started home today. We was paid off the 17 of this month. Well a nuff of that. So now for something els. I would like to be back there on old pine to [?] more good dance to swing myself with sum of them good looking girls. I have not seen but a fue that is midlin good looking but nothing to brag ove. I think we all will get home again this fall but if we dont I dont a dam. I dont care if I dont get in 7 years. If I keep good helth I can soljer. I had rather do it than anything els. It just [?] me when I am all rite. I would have wrote sometime ago if I had not got sick. I promist to write to evry girl on the creek but I have not and Im in a mess [?]. Well I will have to draw my scribling to a close. I have to tabil my paper on my nee so you must look over all poor spelling and poor writing. So I will close by biding you good by. Write soon.
Alvi Megoigle [to Adaline Morehouse]
Write soon and give all the news."

Charles McKinney, Ben and Emanual Miller, Wm. Crum and Alvi Megonigle served over three years, finally being mustered out in 1865. He had only the younger boys to help him and a rather full household, with Jane, Louisa and the three grandchildren living there. When the war was over Alvi came home for a short time, then joined Bill McKinney out near Omaha, Nebraska. In 1866, Hamilton wrote the following letter to his son.

June the 3, 1866

"I have taken my pen to communicate a few lines to you to let you know that we ar all in joying reasable helth at present. We hope that when this comes to hand that it will finde you the same. Armina has been very sicke. She has got beter, is abel to set up now some. I have bene sicke every sins you went away.

The boys is working oute. The ar gitting Sixteene dolers a month to harfist, and Isbel is to Sam Milers. I spoot [?] oute aboute five akers of corne. Ben is farming the reste. Mery Citch has bene very sicke. She is beter now.

Cris Grewham and Berche is meried and Bil Wilson went back to Ohio and broute a wife backe. Ben sede he was agonte rite to you today but I was righting he wood not righte tonehte. Sonday Rob and Ben has taken hundred akers to breake for wane man. They say he hired each of them to a aker a day.

I got a leter from Charles Megonigil. They was well. They hade herde from a name that hade bene a pardnor with your unchkel in the mins, that he was alive aboute a yere gow. The mane has gone back and seide he woode rite the partclers to them whene he got ther.

The wheate and oets lookes well here. The corne not so well. Wilson has boughte the Gray farme.

I treded for a three yere olde colte. I gave them two sters and ten dollers for it. She hade the ring bone on three feete and was very lame whene I got it but I thinke I have got it cured. It is not lame now. I thinke that is just as hansom as bet and wood make a parfecte mach for her. I was offered a hundrde and sevete dollrs for dol in greens backes. She is nise now.

Man Miller has rente Cellets plase and moved there and they have gone to toun. Coplen sooed perm and gote a jugement for that maman in corte so I must close for this time.

Righte soone. Nothing more but remune your father to death.

H. Megonigil to A. Megonigil"

(The Ben mentioned is probably Ben Miller. The Man Miller is Emanual Miller and Coplen is probably Robert Copeland, Hamilton's son-in-law. The uncle Hamilton refers to is his brother, Bartimeus, who no one had heard from and who had never returned from California. Charles, of course, was the oldest son of Bartimeus, still living at Monona, Iowa. The"boys" working out were John R. and Samuel. Hamilton mentions here that he has been sick since Alvi left home)

In February of 1867 Samuel wrote his brother:

" Feb 16, 1867
Mr. A. Megonigle

Dear Brother,

It is with much pleasure that I seat myself to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and all the rest of the folks and hope that when these few lines reache you that it will find you all right. I received you kind on the 1 of this month and was very glad. Well we have had good meting in the old beathel this witer, it has lasted 4 weeks and they have converted about 90 [?]. I will here mention a few of them Rob and Louisa, Mort Herin and Lib, John Snider and the wife, Mary Kitch, John Logon. Well their are a going to babtise to day all of the folks has gone but my self and I thought I woude remain at home and wright to you.

Well for something else it has been pretty could here this winter but is very pleasant here to day. I have been going to school this winter and have enjoyed my self first rate and hope that you have.

I will here tell you what stalk I have 3 Colts 1-2 years old, 2 yearlings, 1 three year heifer and 2 yearling calves, 4 hogs and 1 sheep. I don't like to brag but their are as good as are got up around here and Gasper has got an old mare and a three year old colt. We had them hiched up yesterday and drove them to Winthrop.

We have got 2 teames now and we can just make things get next summer. I wish that you was here to help us but maby Gasper will go down there. I don't know. He talks some of it but I guess he can't leave his mama. Well it is a thawing here like. It was good sleighing here three days ago but the snow is about all gone now. I guess that we are going to have spring right of. I hope so. I am geting a bout tired of such weather but I gues I will have to stand it.

You said that you was a going to keeping house in the spring I suppose that you are a going to batch it good for that we have had a good manny of these bussing parties bit. I have not tended any of them.

Well enough of such nonsens. I must bring my scribling to a close. Escuse all bad writing and poor spelling and wright soon and often and tell me all the news. Gasper says that he is going to (write) you next Sunday if nothing happens. From your most affectionate brother untill death.

Write soon good day,

Samuel Megonigle"

Hamilton seems to have been well enough to go to church at this time, but on 24 April, he died. He was buried in a Scottish outfit. In those days people always had certain clothes put away in readiness for burial. Isabelle had married Wm. Crum that winter and, with Alvi gone, only Sam, just turned seventeen, and John R. barely nineteen, were still at home with Mary.

She must have felt they were capable, because two months after her husband passed away, she bought another 80 acres for $400.00 to add to the home-place. The Northeast quarter of Southeast quarter and the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter of Section 33.

The following Mary received word of the death of Hamilton's brother, Bartimeus, out in California. His family had long before adjusted to his absence, but, nonetheless, still hoped for his return. This ended the waiting and the worrying.

About 1870 the wheat crop began to fail and, after that, lettle was sowed. During the 1870's part of the land in Sections 28 and 33 of the home farm was sold back and forth several times between Armina, John R. and Samuel, part of this was to settle a debt owed Armina by John R.

The year 1872 brought sad news. Alvi's wife, Adaline Morehouse, had passed away, leaving a small daughter. Addie had lived in Liberty Township, Buchanan County, for several years, after her father (Wheeler Morehouse) moved here with his family from Ohio in the late 1850's. Addie's mother, Caroline, died in Ohio, but there were several sisters and at least one brother who came to the farm near Winthrop, Iowa. After living in Ohio for over twenty years, the girls were glad to receive letters from relatives still there, as evidenced by the following letter:

"Colebrook 29 March 1862

My Dear Cousins and Friends,

I thought I would take this opportunity of leting you know how we are geting a long. We are all well as comon here. All the friends are well as maybe. We received a letter from Mary and was glad to hear that you were all well. I have not seen you for a good while but I must tell you what news I know. We have made 180 pounds of Shugar. We have opened about 150 trees. I am calculating to try to get a place to work out this sumer. Now I should like to have both of you come out and see us once more. You must come out. Write when you receive this now, Adie, you and Roda, both of you must write, but I must stop and leave some room for mother. Now write, both of you.

"This from George Bunker to cosins Roda and Adie Morehouse."

"A few lines to Adela and Roda "

You I love and shall forever
You may change but I shall never
though separation is our lot
Dearest Cousens, forget me not
from Lydia Bunker write to me.


Dear Friends,

It is with pleasure that I write a few lines to you to let you know how we are. It has been a snowing today. I should like to see you all but canot, but I often think of the good visits that we had with you and Caroline. But one friends after another dys and we to must die. I was in the gering [?] the other day where Caroline was buried. We are geting along as well as can be expected. We had 46 [?] bushels of wheat and a good crop of corn and oats and 26 head of cattle and a good span of 2 year old colts. We are a goin to make chease or curd. Buter is 20 cents a pound. Cheas 1 and 10 cents. The boys is all well. It seamed very lonesum after Hiram died. He was a good christian boy and gon to live with his mother in heaven so no more at present.

[?] Bunker


Much Respected Friends,

I now take my penn in had to answer your kind letter that we received and was glad to think that you had forgotten us. We often talk about the good visits we use to have down to your house and it seems almost like old times again to think it over. I supose you like to hear from all of the friends. I will try to tell you as far as I no. The Bunkers are well and all at home. They are all just as when you left here exceptin the change in Edwards family. He has been very lonesome since Hiram died. Flirana Critentons family is well as far as we no. They were up here this spring. The girls came up and stayed 2 weeks and them Hiram and Lecta came up and stayed over night. We had a first rate visit with them. Eliza Stebbins family is scattered. She is dead. She died with the Tyfoid fever 2 years ago this winter. Henry and Syntha live where they did. John is maried and lives on the old homestead. He has gone to war and Hiram lives with his wife. Betsey is maried and so is Sarah. They are well. Scattered Tibbles is alive and well. Now, Mary, you go over to Mrs. Tifts and have a good visit with her for me. If I could only see you all I could find enough to talk about for two weeks steady. Tell Amanda to write. I must close for want of room.

From B. Bunker to all of the friends.

Addie moved with her father to Pottawattamie County, Iowa in the middle 1860's and was married to Alvi there, at her father's home in 1867. Two years after Adie's death, Alvi remarried; to Elizabeth James. This ceremony also took place at Wheeler Morehouse's home.

John R. Married Sarah Campbell in 1879, so this left Samuel and Mary the only ones living on the home farm.

Isabelle and William decided to move, with their four children, to Nebraska. William had gone there in 1873 with Jacob M. Miller and now planned to make it their permanent home. Delilah Copeland was eighteen years old. Her parents had told her they would buy her a sewing machine if she would learn how to sew. She did and had a choice of three, Singer, Domestic or White. She chose the Domestic (which her daughter, Leora, still uses today) and when she learned Isabelle was moving, proceeded to make up a bolt of muslin for sheets and underwear for the family. She also helped sew on the covering for their wagon. The Crum's left that summer of 1879.

In 1880, John and Sarah sold to Samuel 65 acres for $1400.00 and in June of 1883, Mary sold to Samuel for $1000.00 another 80 acres of the home farm. The 40 acres in Liberty Township had been given to Louisa when she married, and now all the remaining land belonged to Sam.

We do not know whether Alvi felt this wasn't fair, or just what the situation was at this time between the two brothers and their mother, but that fall of 1883, Alvi was awarded in District Court, $400.00 and cost, by consent, from Mary Megonigle.

In District Court, Equity Calendar, in the spring of 1884, the case of Alvi Megonigle versus S.S. Megonigle was continued, also in December of that year and again in March of 1885. The outcome of this case was never printed in the paper (many weren't). Alvi moved from southwest Iowa to Nebraska that year, so perhaps it was settle out of court. Whatever was decided, there couldn't have been "hard feelings" for long as there were letters and visits exchanged between the two families.

Samuel stayed on with his mother, and when he married in 1888, at the age of nearly 39, Mary continued living with him and Jemina and their children. In the spring of 1889 Mary received word of the drowning of some (Irma Bergstrom states they were told many) McGonigles in the Johnstown Flood in Cambria County, Pennsylvania. (An account of the flood follows:)

The majority of the people who lived in Johnstown at this time were either Irish, Scotch Irish, German or Welsh. Cambria County, by 1889, had nearly 30,000 people living in the valley with Johnstown only one of several boroughs, East Conemaugh, Woodvale, Cabria City, Prospect, Millville, Morrellville, Grubbtown, and Moxham, which were clustered between the hills, packed in so tight there was scarcely room to build anything more. People worked at the Cambria Iron mills, the Gautier wire works and the woolen mills at Woodvale. It was said that people were poor, "very poor by later standards, but they didn't know it". Many of the mill workers lived in cheap, pine-board company houses along the riverbanks.

The Little Conemaugh and Stony Creek meet at Johnstown and rom the Conemaugh. Johnstown was situated at the bottom of the narrow valley with long densely forested ridges (called hogbacks) rolling off in every direction.

In 1889, there were still black bear and wildcat and, although the near hills had been stripped by the loggers, the forest within an hour's walk had not changed much from what it had been one hundred years before.

The south Fork dam on the western slope of Allegheny Mountain had been started in 1838 and finally finished in 1850. By 1889 it was owned by the "South Fork Fishing and Hunting Club" of Pittsburgh.

The storm started out of Kansas and Nebraska on 28 May. The next day there were hard rains in Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee. Warnings were telegraphed East. When the storm struck western Pennsylvania it was recorded as the worst downpour ever to hit that section of the country. On the mountains, the fall was ten inches in places.

Rain continued the next day and warnings were sent from the dam site down to the valley, that the dam was becoming dangerous and might break. Since the warning had been voiced by many for several years and nothing had happened, there was little concern among the people.

At ten after three, the break came, and the water moved away all at once, leaping into the valley, "roaring like a mighty battle", as one eyewitness said. Killing four men at South Fork. Sixteen died at Mineral Point, twenty eight at East Conemaugh and Franklin, 314 at Woodvale (one out of every three in town), and then the flood rumbled into Johnstown. Most never saw the water coming, only heard it, (a roar like thunder). They heard screaming, the crash of buildings going down and glass shattering.

Those who say the thirty six foot wall of water said there was a cloud of dark spray that hung over the front of the wave, like dust. The water crushed houses like eggshells and snapped trees and lifted immense objects "like so much chaff". The devastation and the drownings took about ten minutes.

Over 2200 people died. Over 770 were buried as "unknown". Hundreds of bodies were never found at all. (there were no McGonigles listed among the official burying lists. Several McConaghys, so either they spelled their names that way or their bodies were never found, or were buried as "unknown" as many were.)

Mary Barklay Megonigle passed away at her home on Pine Creek on Sunday morning 2 February 1896. The funeral was held at Bethel Church Monday and she was buried beside Hamilton at Wilson Cemetery. (Her grave is marked 1895).

Samuel and his wife raised their eleven children on the home farm, and Sam remained there after Jemina's death in 1920 "batching it with Bart for awhile, then with Alvi and family for ten years, and with Madge and family until he passed away in 1941, aged 91 years.

After his death, three of his children bought the home place from the other eight, and it was then purchased by Samuel Alvi Megonigle, which he farmed until his death in 1975.

The 245 acres, about 95 tillable, over 100 acres still in timber, and the rest pasture land with Pine Creek running through, was left to Samuel Megonigle's second wife, Doris Kerr Megonigle, and at her death will go to their son, William Megonigle and his children.

Children of Hamilton Megonigle and Mary Barklay Roop

  1. Bartimeus Megonigle b. 22 Dec 1832
  2. Armina Megonigle b. 8 Jan 1834
  3. Everonica C. Megonigle b. 27 Sep 1836
  4. Louisa Megonigle b. 11 Apr 1839
  5. Alvi Megonigle b. 1840
  6. Nancy J. Megonigle b. 16 Feb 1843
  7. Isabella Megonigle b. 11 Nov 1845
  8. John R. Megonigle b. 10 Apr 1848
  9. Samuel Shepard Megonigle+ b. 31 Mar 1850

1850 Census: District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Mcgonigle (age 43, farmer, born Penn.), Mary Mcgonigle (age 44, born Penn), Bartameous McGonigle (age 17, laborer, born Penn.), Armina Mcgonigle (age 15, born Ohio), Bironica Mcgonigle (age 13, born Ohio), Louisa Mcgonigle (age 12, born Ohio), Alvy Mcgonigle (age 10, born Iowa), Jane Mcgonigle (age 8, born Iowa), Isabell Mcgonigle (age 4, born Iowa), John R. Mcgonigle (age 3, born Iowa) and Samuel Mcgonigle (age 5/12, born Iowa).

1856 Iowa State Census: Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Megonegal (age 48, farmer, born Penn), Mary Megonegal (age 48, born Penn), Bartemous Megonegal (age 23, born Penn), Armina Megonegal (age 19, born Ohio), Louisa Megonegal (age 18, born Ohio), Alva Megonegal (age 15, born Iowa), Jane Megonegal (age 13, born Iowa), Isabell Megonegal (age 11, born Iowa), John Megonegal (age 8, born Iowa) and Samuel Megonegal (age 5,born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 16 years.)\

1870 Census, Rockford, Pottawattamie County, Iowa: Alvi Megonigle (age 25, farmer, born Iowa), Ada Megonigle (age 23, born Ohio), Adella Megonigle (age 2, born Iowa) and C. Morehouse (age 16, female, born Iowa).

Adaline (Morehouse) McGonigle died Sept. 10, 1872 in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. She is buried in Oak Grove Cemetery, St. John,

Alvi McGonigle married Elizabeth Rozella James on Oct. 19, 1874 in Rockford Township, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. Marriage record said A. C. Megonigle. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934).

1885 Iowa State Census: Rockford, Pottawattamie County, Iowa: Alvi C. Mcgonigle (Township 77, range 44, section 17, age 45, farmer), Elizabeth Mcgonigle (age 32, born Illinois), Mary A. Mcgonigle (age 16), Annie B. Mcgonigle (age 9), Addie Mcgonigle (age 4), Alvi H. Mcgonigle (age 2) and Charles M. Friend (age 23).

Nebraska Resident Military Roster on June 1, 1891: Alvi Megonigle, Private, Company H, 27th Infantry, City: Steele City, State Iowa.

1900 US Indexed County Land Ownership Maps, Endicott, Jefferson, Nebraska: Alvic Megonigle

1900 Census: Endicott, Jefferson County, Nebraska: Alvi Megonigal (born Jan 1840, age 60, married 27 years, born Iowa, farmer), wife Eliabeth R. Megonigal (born Aug, 1853, age 47, married 27 years, 8 children born, 7 still living, born Illinois), son Alvia Megonigal (born Dec, 1882, age 17, born Iowa), daughter Nitah Megonigal (born Fe. 1884, age 15, born Iowa), son Vance Megonigal (born Apr. 1886, age 13, born Nebraska) daughter Mable Megonigle (born Oct, 1889, age 11,born Nebraska), son Alfonzo Megonigle (born Jan. 1892, age 9, born Nebraska), daughter Arminia Hays (born Jan. 1867, age 24, married 4 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born Iowa), grand daughter Emie B Hays (born Sept. 1897, age 2, born Nebraska), and grandson Alvi H Hays (born April 1900, age 1/12, born Nebraska),

1910 Census, Rutland, Montgomery County, Kansas: Alvin Mcgonigle (age 72, married 2 times currently for 35 years, born Iowa, farmer, general farm), wife Elizabeth R. Mcgonigle (age 57, married 1 time for 35 years, 8 children born, 7 still living, born Illinois), son John C. Mcgonigle (age 20, born Nebraska), son Alfonza L. Mcgonigle (age 18, born Nebraska), daughter Mable A. Mcgonigle (age 16, born Nebraska).

1920 Census, Rutland, Montgomery County, Kansas: A. C. Megonigle (age 79, born Iowa) wife E. R. Megonigle (age 68, born Illinois), son A. B. Megonigle (age 30, born Nebraska).

1925 Kansas State Census Collection: Rutland, Montgomery County, Kansas, Alvi C. McGonigle (age 81, born Iowa, from Nebraska to Kansas), Elisabeth R. Mcgonigle (age 70, born Iowa), and Frank McGonigle (age 35, born Nebraska),

Alvi McGonigle died Nov. 30, 1932 at Independence, Kansas (Pension Index Record). (Note his name was listed as Megonigle in the Pension Indexes).

He is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Elk City, Montgomery County, Kansas. (gravestone has Megonigle as the spelling of his name)

His widow Elizabeth R. McGonigle filed for a pension on Dec. 15, 1932.

Elizabeth Rosella (James) Megonigle (born Aug. 30, 1852), died June 6, 1935 and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Elk City, Montgomery County, Iowa.


McGonigle, Bartimeus He was born Dec. 22, 1832 in Juniata, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Hamilton McGonigle (1807 - Apr. 24, 1867) and Mary Barklay Roop (Nov. 10, 1807 - Feb. 2, 1896). (see information posted above for his brother Alvi Curtis McGonigle, who also served in Company H, 27th Iowa). Bartimeus McGonigle married Mary E. Morehouse on Nov. 25, 1856 in Buchanan County, Iowa. She is the daughter of Wheeler and Caroline Morehouse. Her sister Adeline Morehouse married his brother Alvi McGonigle. Three of his sisters married men that served in Company H, 27th Iowa. His sister Vironica Megonigle married Emanuel Miller, His sister Nancy Jane McGonigle married Benjamin Miller. And his sister Isabella McGonigle married William Crum.

1850 Census: District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Mcgonigle (age 43, farmer, born Penn.), Mary Mcgonigle (age 44, born Penn), Bartameous McGonigle (age 17, laborer, born Penn.), Armina Mcgonigle (age 15, born Ohio), Vironica Mcgonigle (age 13, born Ohio), Louisa Mcgonigle (age 12, born Ohio), Alvy Mcgonigle (age 10, born Iowa), Jane Mcgonigle (age 8, born Iowa), Isabell Mcgonigle (age 4, born Iowa), John R. Mcgonigle (age 3, born Iowa) and Samuel Mcgonigle (age 5/12, born Iowa).

1856 Iowa State Census: Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa: Hamilton Megonegal (age 48, farmer, born Penn), Mary Megonegal (age 48, born Penn), Bartemous Megonegal (age 23, born Penn), Armina Megonegal (age 19, born Ohio), Louisa Megonegal (age 18, born Ohio), Alva Megonegal (age 15, born Iowa), Jane Megonegal 9age 13, born Iowa), Isabell Megonegal (age 11, born Iowa), John Megonegal (age 8, born Iowa) and Samuel Megonegal (age 5,born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 16 years.)

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa; Bartemus Mcgonagle (age 27 born Pennsylvania, farmer), Mary McGonagle (age 22, born Ohio), and Luella McGonagle (age 1, born Iowa).

Bartemus Megonigle died Mar 18, 1863, at Jackson, Tenn., of typhoid fever. He is buried at Corinth National Cemetery, Plot 2342, Corinth, Alcorn County, Mississippi.

His widow Mary E. Megonigle filed for a pension on Apr. 2, 1863. Information from her pension file is extracted below:

In the widow's declaration dated March 31, 1863 Mary E. Megonigle stated:

  • She was aged 25
  • A resident of Liberty Township, Buchanan County,
  • Widow of Bartimeus Megonigle.
  • He was a private in Company H, 27th Regiment of Iowa Volunteers
  • He enlisted at Independence on or about the 22nd day August 1862 for the term of three years
  • He died at Jackson, Tennessee on or about March 18, 1863 and the cause of his death was measles followed by typhoid fever.
  • She was married to Bartimeus Megonigle on Nov. 25, 1856 at Merton Moorehouse, by Horace Piersoll, Minister of the gospel.
  • Her name before marriage was Mary E. Moorehouse.
  • Her husband left but one child Luella C. Megonigle, aged three years the 28th day of May 1862.

A pension was filed for a minor on Feb. 3, 1866. M. E. Kitch was guardian.

Mary E. Kitch was appointed guardian of Luella C. Megonigle on January 19, 1866.

In a statement dated January 19, 1866 in Buchanan County, Iowa, Mary E. Kitch stated:

  • A resident of Liberty Township, Buchanan County, Iowa
  • She is the guardian of Luella C. Megonigle born May 28, 1859.
  • She had remarried, being now the wife of Jesse Kitch. They married on November 26, 1865 *

* The marriage license in file showed that they were married by Wm. H. Barton, County Judge. Jesse was age 41, and Mary was age 30.


Captain J. M Miller made the following statement: That he (Bartimeus Megonigle) died at the hospital over at Jackson Tenn., on the 18th day of March 1863 of Typhoid fever. He was first attached with measles, this was followed by pneumonia and finally he died as above stated with typhoid fever.

The month before Bart went to war, he purchased from his sister, Armina, part of the home place, 35 Acres for $200.00, commencing at the Northeast corner of the Southeast quarter Section 28. This land is to the north of where the main buildings are now. Bart died the following spring in March of 1863. Bart left the 35 acres of the home place to his daughter, Luella. It was sold by her mother and stepfather for $18.00 an acre in 1868 to "aid in Luella's support and education". She was eight years old. The land never belonged to the family again.

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Jessie Kitch (age 47, farmer, born Ohio), Mary Kitch (age 33, born Ohio), Eudora Kitch (age 15, born Iowa), Jasper Kitch (age 13, born Iowa), William Kitch (age 11, born Iowa), Semore Kitch (age 9, born Iowa) and Luella McGonigal (age 10, born Iowa).

Mary E. Kitch died Mar. 29, 1892 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.


McKenney, Charles Wesley He was born Apr. 24, 1829 in New Jersey. He was the son of Thomas Ellis McKenney (Dec. 14, 1805 - March 3, 1870) and Mary Adams (1807 - 1875). He married Ingaby Wilson On Jan 1, 1854 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). His brothers Steward McKenney and William McKeney also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

Charles W. McKenney

Image was found here.

Pvt. Charles Wesley McKenney was born in 1829/1832 in New Jersey. He died on 23 Aug 1908 in Buchanan Co., Iowa. He married Ingaby Wilson on 1 Jan 1854 in Independence, Buchanan, Iowa. He served in the military enlisted in Company H, 27th Regiment - Iowa Infantry Volunteers on 15 Aug 1862 in Independence, Buchanan, Iowa. He was employed as farmer before 15 Aug 1862 in Buchanan Co., Iowa. He served in the military, honorably discharged on 8 Aug 1865 in Clinton, Iowa. He resided on 30 Aug 1890 in Sumner Township, Buchanan, Iowa.

Ingaby Wilson was born in 1826 in Wayne, Ohio. She died on 14 Jun 1893 in Buchanan Co., Iowa.

Parents:

Thomas Ellis McKenney was born on 14 Dec 1805 in Burlington, New Jersey. He died on 3 Mar 1870 in Independence, Buchanan, Iowa. He was buried in Wilson Cemetery, Washington, Buchanan Co., Iowa. He married Mary Adams on 24 Jul 1828 in Burlington County, New Jersey. Thomas resided in 1850 in Buchanan Co., Iowa. He was employed as Farmer in 1850 in Buchanan Co., Iowa.

Mary Adams was born in 1807 in New Jersey. She died in 1875 in Independence, Buchanan, Iowa. Mary resided in 1843 in Ohio. She joined religion Methodist. She resided in 1850 in Buchanan Co., Iowa.

Civil War Pension File of Charles W. McKenney, Soldier's Certificate No: 655106. Circular No. 3-402, dated 15 Jan 1898: In the circular, Charles W. McKenney states that his wife's name was Ingaby Wilson and that she died 14 Jun 1893. He further states that they were married in Buchanan Co., IA by the Rev. David Gill.

1850 Census, District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thomas McKiney (age 44, farmer, born New Jersey), Mary McKiney (age 43, born NJ), Steward McKiney (age 19, born NJ), Charles W. McKiney (age 21, born NJ), Acsah McKiney (age 16, born NJ) and William McKinney (age 7, born NJ.)

1856 Iowa State Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: W. McKeney (age 27, born New Jersey), Ingaby McKenney (age 26, born Ohio) and Mary E. McKeney (age 1, born Iowa).

1860 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa Chas. W. Mckenny (age 31, farmer, born NJ), Ingaby Mckenny (age 31, born Ohio), Mary E. Mckenny (age 5, born Iowa), Jas Steele (age 22, born VT) and Wm. McKenney (age 18, born Ohio).

1870 Census: Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa: Wesley McKinney (age 41, famer, born New Jersey), Ingabay McKinney (age 41, born Ohio), Mary McKinney (age 15, born Iowa), domestic Servant Elizabeth Miller (age 27, born Ohio), Farm Laborer Daniel Deihl (age 29, born Pennsylvania) and Martha McWilliams (age 3, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles McKeney (age 57, laborer, born New Jersey), wife Ingaby McKeney (age 51, born Ohio) and daughter Martha J. McKeney (age 13, born Iowa).

Ingaby (Wilson) McKenney, born April 29, 1828, died June 14, 1893 and is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1900 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Christopher Schmidt (born Oct. 1869, farm laborer, born Illinois), Mattie J. Schmidt (born July 1866, age 33, married 8 years, 3 children born, 3 still living, born Iowa), son John Schmidt (born Oct. 1894, age 5, born Iowa), son Lowell Schmidt (born Nov. 1896, age 3, born Iowa), daughter Rose Schmidt (born Jan 1900, age 4/12) and Father-in-law Charles McKeney (born Apr. 1829, age 71, widowed, born New Jersey, farmer).

There are actually several McKinney/McKenney's that served in the 27th Iowa, however Charles W. McKenney is the only one that has initials that might fit.

G. W McKenney, who was a member the 27th Iowa, and who was receiving $12 per month, the highest pension allowed under existing law for disabilities not proven to have been contracted in the service, became totally blind some four years ago, but owing to a missing link in the chain of evidence connecting his disability with his Army service his claim for increase was rejected by the department. About a year ago his attorney, E. B. Abbott, prepared a petition for a special act of Congress for his relief. Congressman Birdsall introduced a bill allowing him $30 per month, which passed both houses, and this week Mr. McKinney received his first payment from the pension department.

Waterloo Daily Courier, Waterloo Iowa, April 12, 1905

Charles W. McKenney died Aug. 20, 1908 and is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Children of Charles Wesley McKenney and Ingaby Wilson:

  1. Mary Elizabeth McKenney, b. Jan 17, 1855; d. June 9, 1915
  2. Martha J. McKenney, b. about 1867.

McKenney, Steward He was born about 1831 in Burlington, New Jersey. He was the son of Thomas Ellis McKenney (Dec. 14, 1805 - March 3, 1870) and Mary Adams (1807 - 1875) He married Roselia Celia Gilder on Sept. 13, 1860 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Sterling Bushnell Gilder (Apr. 6, 1817- April 14, 1897) and Phebe Bowen (Mar. 17, 1823- Dec. 10, 1845). His brothers Charles W. McKenney and William McKeney also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

Stewart McKenney enlisted in the Union Army on 15 August 1862 at Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa in Company H, 27 Regular Iowa Infantry. He was wounded at the battle of Old Town Creek, Mississippi during the Civil War. He suffered a gunshot wound in the left hand causing the loss of the entire middle finger, and was also wounded in the right hand. Stewart was honorably discharged 16 May, 1865 at Davenport, Iowa. (Source: Ann Whitehill, Omaha, Nebraska.)

1850 Census, District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thomas McKiney (age 44, farmer, born New Jersey), Mary McKiney (age 43, born NJ), Steward McKiney (age 19, born NJ), Charles W. McKiney (age 21, born NJ), Acsah McKiney (age 16, born NJ) and William McKinney (age 7, born NJ.)

1856 Iowa State Census: Spring, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thoms. E. McKenney (age 31, born New Jersey), Mary E. McKenney (age 50, born New Jersey), Stuart McKenney (age 25, born New Jersey), Acsah McKenney (age 21, born Ohio) and Wm. McKenney (age 14, born Ohio). the family had been in the state of Iowa for 12 years).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thomas E. McKinney (age 54, farmer, born New Jersey), Mary McKinney (age 53, born New Jersey), Stewart McKinney (age 29, farmer, born New Jersey), and Wm. McKinney (age 18, farm laborer, born Ohio).

1870 Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa; Stuart McKinney (age 39, farmer, born New Jersey), Celia McKinney (age 27, born Ohio), Thomas McKinney (age 8, born Iowa), William McKinney (age 7, born Iowa), Jacob McKinney (age 3, born Iowa) and Mary McKinney (age 1/12, born Iowa).

1890 Veterans Census: Lincoln, Nebraska; Stewart McKeney, Private, Co. H. 27 Io, Inf, enlisted Aug. 15, 1862, discharged May 16, 1865, length of service, 2 years, 9 months, 1 day, Current Post Office Address: Dickens, Nebraska.

1900 Census: Wallace, Lincoln County, Nebraska: Stewart McKinney (born Mar. 1831, age 69, married 40 years, born New Jersey, farmer), wife Celia McKinney (born Aug. 1843, age 56, married 40 years, 5 children born, 4 still living, born Ohio), and son Jacob P. McKinney (born Aug. 1867, age 32, born Iowa).

Steward McKenney died Jan. 21, 1908, and buried in Olive Branch Cemetery, White Cloud, Doniphan County, Kansas. Section 5.

His widow filed for a pension on Feb. 28, 1908 in Kansas.

Rocelia McKenney (born Aug. 4, 1844), died Sept. 5, 1921, and is buried in Olive Branch Cemetery, White Cloud, Doniphan County, Kansas. Section 5.

Children of Steward McKenney and Roselia Gilder:

  1. Thomas McKenney, b. Aug. 28, 1861; d. Sept. 17 1896
  2. William S. McKenney, b. Dec. 29, 1862; d. April 1939
  3. Jacob P. McKenney, b. Aug. 28, 1867; died 1937
  4. Mary McKenney, b. Sept. 15, 1869; d. Oct. 31, 1931
  5. Samuel Albert McKenney, b. Oct. 3, 1874; d. Aug. 19, 1964

McKenney, William I. He was born Oct. 14, 1842 in Sandusky, Ohio. He was the son of Thomas Ellis McKenney (Dec. 14, 1805 - March 3, 1870) and Mary Adams (1807 - 1875). He married Elizabeth Decker on July 9, 1865 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of William Samuel Decker (July 7, 1818 - March 2, 1885) and Rena A. Clark (1821 - 188?). His brothers Charles McKenney and Steward McKenney also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

(Note Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, say William's date of birth is April 10, 1842 - and says William A. McKenney. Online family trees say his date of birth is Oct 14, 1842 - and say William I. McKenney. Both agree on the date of death -- I have to wonder if there are two different William McKenneys?)

1850 Census, District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thomas McKiney (age 44, farmer, born New Jersey), Mary McKiney (age 43, born NJ), Steward McKiney (age 19, born NJ), Charles W. McKiney (age 21, born NJ), Acsah McKiney (age 16, born NJ) and William McKinney (age 7, born NJ.)

1856 Iowa State Census: Spring, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thoms. E. McKenney (age 31, born New Jersey), Mary E. McKenney (age 50, born New Jersey), Stuart McKenney (age 25, born New Jersey), Acsah McKenney (age 21, born Ohio) and Wm. McKenney (age 14, born Ohio). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 12 years).

1860 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Chas. W. Mckenny (age 31, farmer, born NJ), Ingaby Mckenny (age 31, born Ohio), Mary E. Mckenny (age 5, born Iowa), Jas Steele (age 22, born VT) and Wm. McKenney (age 18, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thomas E. McKinney (age 54, farmer, born New Jersey), Mary McKinney (age 53, born New Jersey), Stewart McKinney (age 29, farmer, born New Jersey), and Wm. McKinney (age 18, farm laborer, born Ohio). (See my note up above: did William McKinney get counted twice in 1860, or are there two different William McKinneys?? Since he was with his family on both records, he most likely got counted twice.)

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa; Wm. McKenney (age 28, farm laborer, born Ohio), Elizabeth McKenney (age 29, born Ohio), Acsah McKenney (age 3, born Iowa), William McKenney (age 2, born Iowa), and George Rogers (age 8, born Iowa),

1880 Census: Solomon, Norton County, Kansas: William McKenney (age 38, farmer, born Ohio), wife Elizabeth McKenney (age 40, born Ohio), daughter Axey M. McKenney (age 14, born Iowa), son William J. McKenney (age 12, born Iowa), daughter Nancy E. McKeney (age 10, born Iowa), son Stewart E. McKenney (age 6, born Iowa), son Lafayette R. McKenney (age 4, born Kansas), son Charles E. L. McKenney (age 9/12, born Kansas) and step son George Rodgers (age 19, laborer, born Iowa).

1885 Kansas State Census: Lenora, Norton County, Kansas: Wm. McKenney (age 43, widowed, laborer, born Ohio, from Iowa to Kansas, Honorably discharged from the volunteer military service of the United States, State: Iowa, Company H, 27 Vol. Inf.), Will McKenney (age 16, born Iowa), Eda McKenney age 15, born Iowa), Earl McKenney (age 11, born Iowa), Lafe McKenney (age 8, born Kansas), Chas. A. McKenney (age 5, born Kansas) and Sam'l McKenney (age 3, born Kansas).

1910 Census, Beatrice Ward 2, Gage County Nebraska: William McKenney (age 68, widowed, born Ohio, retired).

1920 Census, Beatrice Ward 3, Gage County, Nebraska: Wm McKenney, Jr. (age 55, widowed, born Iowa), father Wm. McKeney Sr. (age 77, born Ohio).

William I. McKenney died Mar. 15, 1924 and is buried in Evergreen Home Cemetery, Beatrice, Gage County, Nebraska, Lot 37, Section 47.

Children of William McKenney and Elizabeth Decker

  1. Acsah M. McKenney, b. Sept. 11, 1867; d. Apr. 22, 1910
  2. William McKenney, b. about 1868
  3. Nancy Edith McKenney, b. about 1870
  4. Steward Earl McKenney, b. Oct. 27, 1873, d. Oct. 24, 1934
  5. Lafayette R. McKenney, b. about 1876
  6. Charles A. McKenney, b. Sept. 4, 1879; d. July 1880
  7. Samuel Hyram McKenney, b. May 2, 1882/1885; d. Mar. 29, 1936

I saw two different dates for Samuel H. McKenney. Everyone appears to agree on the month and day. But I am seeing some say 1882 and some say 1885. 1882 appears to be reasonable to me as he was listed as 3 years old on the 1885 state census.


McWilliams, Lewis He was born Nov. 18, 1842, in Scotch Ridge, Belmont County, Ohio. He was the son of Alexander McWilliams (May 1805 - Nov. 18, 1871) and Agniss Smith. He married Florence Madora Johnson on Oct. 6, 1873 in Harrison County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of John Johnson (1811- May 4, 1881) and Ann Hope. (Nov. 20, 1815 - Jun 16, 1906).

JOHNSON - Mrs. Ann JOHNSON, wife of the late John JOHNSON, will form the subject of this biographical notice. Her home is on section 28, of Jackson Township. She came to Harrison County September 12, 1858, in company with her husband. They located on the place she now occupies. They bought forty acres for which they paid $6.25 per acre.

Mr. JOHNSON made substantial improvements upon this place. His farmhouse which was a 16x24 feet structure, was the first frame house built in Jackson Township; the lumber being sawed by horsepower. In this rudely-constructed house the family lived for twenty-four years. After the death of Mr. JOHNSON the widow built a new house. They had added to the land, until at the time of his death he possessed one hundred and ninety-six acres, seventy of which are under the plow, and the balance in pasture, meadow and timber land. The place has been provided with good outbuildings, orchard and shade trees. The family saw many hardships at an early day, including the grasshopper raids, when the little winged pests devastated much of the farm products.

Mr. and Mrs. JOHNSON were born in England. The husband was a son of Hugh and Martha JOHNSON, who had twelve children--Sarah, Mary A., Jane, Martha, Hannah, John, Joel, Thomas, James, Henry and Isaac, and one who died in infancy. They are all deceased but three.

Mr. and Mrs. JOHNSON were united in marriage December 19, 1834. Mrs. JOHNSON's maiden name was Ann HOPE, the daughter of William and Nancy A. HOPE, natives of England, who also reared a family of twelve children--Elizabeth, James, Mary, Thomas, Charlotte, Hannah, William, Ann, Francis, Jane, and two who died in infancy.

Of Mr. JOHNSON it may be said that he remained with his parents until he was twenty-four years of age, at which time he was married and started in life for himself. He worked out for others before he came to this country. He landed in Boston, Mass., and went from there to Fall River, where he worked in a cotton factory for six months, and the next two years were spent as a teamster in New Jersey. We next find Mr. JOHNSON in Council Bluffs, Iowa, near where he rented land for two years, and then spent six months near Preparation, Monona County, and then came to this county.

Mr. and Mrs. JOHNSON were the parents of six children--Salena, born April 4, 1836, Emily, deceased, born November 21, 1838; Henry, January 4, 1842; Emily, deceased, born December 4, 1845; Maroni, August 25, 1850; and Florence M., December 21, 1854. Mr. JOHNSON was a member of the Foresters in England. They were both members of the Latter Day Saints Church, to which she still belongs.

1850 Census, Pease, Belmont, Ohio Alexander McWilliams (age 45, farmer, born Ohio), William McWilliams (age 21, born Ohio), Mary McWilliams (age 19, born Ohio), David McWilliams (age 16, born Ohio), John McWilliams (age 14, born Ohio), Henry McWilliams (age 16, born Ohio), Nancy McWilliams (age 12, born Ohio), Lewis McWilliams (age 8, born Ohio), Amanda McWilliams (age 5, born Ohio), and Emma McWilliams (age 2, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Alex McWilliams (age 55, farmer, born Ireland, David McWilliams (age 25, farmer, born Ohio), Margaret McWilliams (age 19, born Ohio), Worth McWilliams (age 8/12, born Iowa), Amanda McWilliams, John McWilliams (age 23, farmer, born Ohio), Henry McWilliams (age 19, farmer, born Ohio) and Lew McWilliams (age 19, born Ohio)

1880 Census: Jackson, Harrison County, Iowa; Lewis A. McWilliams (age 37, farmer, born Ohio) and Madora F. McWilliams (age 25, born Iowa), John Johnson (age 70, farmer, born England) and Ann Johnson (age 64, born England) were living next door

Florence Madora (Johnson) McWilliams (born Dec 21, 1854), died Sept. 21, 1892. She is buried in Soldier Valley Cemetery, Pisgah, Harrison County, Iowa.

1900 Census, Jackson, Harrison County, Iowa: L. A. McWilliams (born Nov. 1843, age 56, married 6 years, born Ohio, farmer), wife Carrie McWilliams (born June 1855, age 44, married 6 years, 0 children born, born New York), adopted daughter Zella Tucker (born Oct, 1889, age 10, born Nebraska) and son John McWilliams (born Apr. 1898, age 2, born Iowa). (Something appears to be incorrect here. How could they be married 6 years, she has no children born, and he has a 2 year old son?? -- Unless he was adopted too OR could they have been married 6 months instead of 6 years?--Or is the reported number of children born incorrect?--see the 1910 census.)

1902 Harrison County Land Owners: Surname: McWilliams. First Name: L.A. Township: Jackson. Township: 81, Section: 28. Range: 44. Acres: 156, Remarks: House, School, Creek, CNWRR. Page: 15.

1905 Iowa State Census: Dunlap, Harrison County, Iowa: Lewis A. Williams, Carrie McWilliams, Zella McWilliams, and John C. McWilliams. Post Office, Orson, Harrison County, Iowa. Ann Johnson was listed next. I could not tell if she was in the same household, or living next to them.

Lewis McWilliams died January 11, 1907 (Pension Index Records). He is buried in Soldier Valley Cemetery, Pisgah, Harrison County, Iowa.

1853 - 1980 Probate Index - Harrison county Iowa. Name: L.A. McWilliams. Docket: 6. Page 109. Case: 1218 Year/Notes: Blank

1910 Census: Jackson, Harrison County, Iowa: Carrie McWilliams (age 55, widowed, 3 children born, 2 still living, born New York), son John McWilliams (age 12, born Iowa), daughter Zela McWilliams (age 20, born Nebraska) and brother Lorenzo Burns (age 60, born New York.) (Based on this census record, I believe the number of children born reported in 1900 is incorrect. It is more logical that Zella is her daughter by a previous marriage and John is the son of Lewis and Carrie).

His widow Carrie McWilliams filed for a pension on Oct. 17, 1916 in Iowa.

Carrie McWilliams (born June. 18, 1855), died Dec. 23, 1925. She is buried in Soldier Valley Cemetery, Pisgah, Harrison County, Iowa.


Miller, Benjamin He was born Sept. 8, 1838 in Ohio. He married Nancy J. Megonigle on Sept. 22, 1859. She was the daughter of Hamilton McGonigle (1807 - Apr. 24, 1867) and Mary Barklay Roop (Nov. 10, 1807 - Feb. 2, 1896). She was the sister of the McGonigil brothers (Alvi Curtis and Bartimeus) that served with Company H, 27th Iowa. Two of her sisters married men that served in Company H, 27th Iowa: Her sister Vironica C. Megonigle married Emanuel Miller. Her sister Isabella McGonigle married William Crum. Benjamin's brother Jacob Miller also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

In 1850 Jacob M. Miller (age 24 and married) was in Plain, Wayne County, Ohio. According to information I found elsewhere Jacob and Benjamin were brothers. I searched for Benjamin Miller in Plain, Wayne County and found this:

1850 Census: Plain, Wayne County, Ohio: Jacob Miller (age 54, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Catherine Miller (age 56, born Pennsylvania), Daniel Miller (age 19, born Ohio), Mary M. Miller (age 17, born Ohio) and Benjamin Miller (age 12, born Ohio). So, possibly Jacob and Benjamin were the sons of Jacob and Catherine Miller. I am not certain this is correct, but could be.

1860 Census: Spring Creek, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Benjamin Miller (age 21, born Ohio), and Nancy J. Miller (age 17, born Iowa).

1870 Census; Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Benjamin Miller (age 31, farmer, born Ohio), Nancy Miller (age 25, born Iowa), Eunice Miller 9age 8, born Iowa) and Emma Miller (age 2, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Benjamin Miller (age 41, farmer, born Ohio), wife Nancy J. Miller (age 36, born Iowa), daughter Eunice E Miller (age 18, born Iowa), daughter Emma B. Miller (age 12, born Iowa), son Carlos A. Miller (age 9, born Iowa) and son Dellas B. Miller (age 4, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa: Benj. Miller, Private, Co. H. Post Office Winthrop.

1885 Iowa State Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Benjamin Miller, age 46, farmer, born Ohio), Jane Miller (age 40, born Iowa), Nola Miller (age 23, born Blackhawk County, Iowa), Emma Miller (age 16, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Carlos A. Miller (age 13, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Delas Miller (age 9, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1896 Iowa State Census: Oelwein, Fayette County, Iowa: Ben Miller (age 58, born Ohio, well driller), Nancy J. Miller (age 53, born Louisa County, Iowa), C. A. Miller (age 24, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and D. B. Miller (age 20, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1900 Census: Jefferson, Fayette County, Iowa: Benjamin Miller (born Sept. 1838, age 61, married 40 years, born Ohio, receives pension soldier), wife Nancy J. Miller (born Feb. 1844, age 56, married 40 years, 4 children born, 4 still living, born Iowa), son Delos B. Miller (born Dec. 1875, age 24, born Iowa).

Benjamin Miller died July 4, 1908 (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

Nancy J. Miller died Sept. 9, 1925 and is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

1825 Iowa State Census: Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa; David Auten. Emma B. Auten, born Iowa, age 56, father's name Benjamin Miller, born Ohio. Mothers name Nancy Magonigle, born Iowa, age 81, parents married in Winthrop, Iowa.) The record also listed children Delbert M. (age 18) and Loraine and Lorella, (both 13).


Miller, Emanuel He was born about 1840 in Wayne County, Ohio (Iowa, Deaths and Burials. - also his tombstone). He is possibly the son of Samuel S. and Susan Miller. He married Everonica C. Megonigle on Aug. 21, 1862. She was the daughter of Hamilton McGonigle (1807 - Apr. 24, 1867) and Mary Barklay Roop (Nov. 10, 1807 - Feb. 2, 1896). She was the sister of the McGonigil brothers (Alvi Curtis and Bartimeus) that served with the 27th Iowa. Two of her sisters also married men of Company H, 27th Iowa: Her sister Nancy Jane married Benjamin Miller. Her sister Isabella McGonigle married William Crum.

1850 Census, Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio: Samuel D. Miller (age 37, chair maker, born PA), Susan Miller (age 38, born PA), Thomas Miller (age 11, born Ohio), Emanuel Miller (age 10, born Ohio), Harrison Miller (age 6, born Ohio), Harriet Miller (age 1, born Ohio) and John Miller (age 25, born PA). Note, there are several Emanuel Millers in Ohio, born 1840, but this is the only one in Wayne County. Per his death record and tombstone he was born in Wayne County, so this could be him. Emanuel was indexed by Ancestry as Emalinel Miller. I found him by searching for Miller in Wayne County, Ohio).

1860 Census, Wayne, Wayne County, Ohio: Saml D. Miller (age 47, farmer, born PA), Susan Miller (age 48, born PA), Emanuel Miller (age 17, born Ohio), Harrison Miller (age 16, born Ohio), and Harriet Miller (age 11, born Ohio).

1870 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Manuel Miller (age 30, farmer, born Ohio), Vironica Miller (age 33, born Ohio), Carrie Miller (age 2, born Iowa) and Eugene Miller (age 1, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Emanuel Miller (age 40, farmer, born Ohio), wife Vironica Miller (age 43, born Ohio), daughter Carrie L. Miller (age 12, born Iowa), son Eugene S. Miller (age 11, born Iowa) and son Clatie E. Miller (age 2, born Iowa).

Emanuel Miller died Dec. 15, 1882 and is buried in Bryon Township Cemetery, add 1, lot 19, Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa. Note: Family tree information said Whitney Cemetery. I could not find a Whitney Cemetery. I did find a Byron-Whitney Cemetery on the Iowa Gravestone Photo Projects. It shows the cemetery photo for Byron Township Cemetery. Steve Hanken took the photo and says he is buried at Byron Township Cemetery.

His widow Vironica Miller filed for a pension on Feb. 12, 1883.

1885 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Veronica Miller (age 48, born Ohio), Carrie L. Miller (age 17, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Eugene S. Miller (age 15, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Clayton Miller (age 6, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

Vironica Miller (born Sept. 27, 1836), died Nov. 26, 1927. She is buried in Bryon Township Cemetery, Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa.

MRS. MILLER HAD LIVED IN COUNTY EIGHTY-TWO YEARS - CAME TO THE STATE IN 1839

Not More Than Five White Families Within the Limits of Buchanan County When She Came Here With Her Parents in 1845.

Mrs. Veronica [sic] Miller, 91, one of the true pioneers of Buchanan county died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. H. Whitney, in Rowley, at 4:00 o'clock, Saturday afternoon, November 26, 1927. Until almost the time of her death, she was in good health, and able to be up and about. Funeral services were held at 11 o'clock Monday morning from the Whitney church, Rev. Zeitman of Winthrop officiating. Interment was in the Whitney cemetery.

Veronica [sic] McGonigle, daughter of Hamilton and Mary McGonigle, was born in Miami county, Ohio, September 27, 1836. She was one of a family of ten children, five of whom preceded her in death. On July 4, 1839 she arrived with her parents in Linn county, Iowa. The journey had been made by prairie schooner, about the only mode of travel to the west at that time. Among other interesting experiences of the trip, was the fording of the Mississippi river.

At the time they settled in Iowa, this county was the free domain of the Red Man, and this family experienced all the hardships and thrilling experiences of pioneer life. When Mrs. Miller was nine years old she came with her parents to Buchanan county, where she had since made her home. At that time, not more than five families of white people inhabited this county. Their nearest trading point was Dubuque, which was only a small trading post in those early days. Their clothing was all homespun and their shoes were home made. Hogs were slaughtered at home and hauled by ox team to Dubuque, where they were traded for supplies. During a lifetime of nearly a century, Mrs. Miller was privileged to see this section of the country change from a wilderness ruled by the Indians, to the present state of civilization with the county abounding in productive well kept farms, and dotted with village and towns.

On August 21, 1862, Miss McGonigle was united in marriage with Emanuel Miller. Mr. Miller had previously enlisted in the Union army, and immediately left his home to serve his county, remaining until mustered out at the close of the war. Upon his return, he and his wife settled on a farm in Byron township. To Mr. and Mrs. Miller were born three children, all of whom survive. The husband and father passed away December 15, 1882, leaving his widow with a family to raise and support.

Early in life Mrs. Miller united with the Bethel church, where she retained her membership until death.

Surviving her are a daughter, Mrs. W. H. Whitney of Rowley; two sons, Eugene S., of Winthrop, and Clayton E., residing on the old home farm in Byron township, where Mrs. Miller made her home; three grandchildren, Fay Whitney of Independence, Vernon Whitney of Nora Springs, and June Miller of Byron township; one great grandchild, Lawrence Whitney of Nora Springs; three brothers, Alvi McGonigle of Elk City, Kansas; J. R. McGonigle of Peoria, Ill., and Samuel McGonigle of Byron township; one sister, Mrs. Wm. Crum of Creighton, Nebr., and a number of nieces and nephews.

Out of town relatives and friends who attended the funeral services were Mrs. R. F. Douglas and Mrs. D. M. Auten and daughters, Opal, Lorraine and Loretta, of Cedar Rapids; Mrs. Keiderling, of Waterloo; Mr. and Mrs. Hilmer Nibeck and Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Freeman, of Hazleton; Mrs. M.V. McMillen, of Oelwein; Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Whitney and son of Nora Springs, and a niece from Minneapolis.

SOURCE: CONSERVATIVE, INDEPENDENCE, IOWA, 30 Nov. 1927


Miller, Jacob M. He was born Dec. 25, 1827 in Ohio. He was possibly the son of Jacob and Catherine Miller. (See my notes above in the 1850 census records for Benjamin Miller.) His brother Benjamin Miller also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

The following interesting narration of the locating of the Captain Miller colony in the southern part of Knox and the northern part of Antelope counties is given by D. V. Coe, one of the early settlers in Ord township. Captain Jacob M. Miller and D. V. Coe both came from Buchanan County, Iowa, where they were acquainted.

D. V. COE'S STORY

"In the fall of 1871 Captain Miller, accompanied by his son John, came to my home in Ord township in a two-horse spring wagon. Captain Miller told me he had come out from Iowa to look up a location for a soldiers' colony, which would probably, in case they found a suitable location; grow to be a colony of a hundred families -- that the colony then numbered about fifty families. He inquired of me if I knew of any such location where no claims had been taken and the land was good, adding that they all wanted to settle in a body. I thought over the matter until the following day. The best location I could think of was in the northern part of Antelope County. I had been over on the Verdigris and also on the Bazile and knew the lay of the land and quality of the soil. In going there I had followed the Indian trail from Hackberry Hollow near Jim Smith's, to Walnut Grove, and felt confident I could go direct from my place to the land that would suit his purpose. I finally agreed to go with him and locate his intended colony for two dollars per day and expenses. When my wife had cooked and baked what we supposed would be sufficient in the provision line, we started out.

"We struck a bee-line for the Big Springs at the head of the east branch of the Verdigris, in what is now Royal township. After looking over the land in that vicinity and north of there for some time, we finally camped on section 22 in the present township of Verdigris, on the land subsequently taken by Jacob H. Hockensmith. Leaving both the Millers in camp, I started afoot directly east, as near as I could tell, to hunt up a government corner. I went nearly a mile without seeing a corner or seeing any object to attract my attention. Finally, on stopping to look around, I saw a stake and mound probably half a mile away to the east. Supposing it to be a section corner, I started for it with a view of reading the numbers on the stake so as to fix my exact location. When within a few rods of the mound I was surprised to see the corners of a red blanket sticking out from under the corners of the mound.

"When I got to the mound I did not know what it meant, still thinking it to be a government corner. I stooped over and pulled up one corner of the blanket and looked under it. The sight caused me to shudder. There, in a square hole, sat an old Indian with a red blanket wrapped around him and as 'dead as a door nail.' He had a ring about three inches in diameter in his nose and a ring in each ear, and moccasins on his feet. A red pipestone pipe, nicely finished but not bored out, and another pipe with stem unfinished lay in his lap. The hole wherein he was sitting was about three feet wide by four feet long and four feet deep. He faced the east and his head came within about twelve or eighteen inches of the surface of the ground. The skull was smashed in and at the time I supposed that was what had caused his death. The mound over the grave was about three feet high, with a pole at each end, one at the east and one at the west. Sticks were laid crosswise over the grave and over these a red blanket, and on these the earth from the grave was piled to make the mound. This grave was on section 23, in what is now Verdigris township. I left him without disturbing anything.

"Some years afterwards, in company with others, I visited this grave. The sticks had rotted and the mound had caved in. The skeleton was exhumed, and we found that he had been shot with three arrows -- one had pierced the thigh bone in front and two had entered the backbone. The arrow heads had entered the bones about three quarters of an inch and were still sticking there. These arrow heads were not of flint, but were iron or steel, such as the Indians used in those days. The skeleton, the last I knew of it, was in the possession of a Neligh doctor, and the rings were kept by some Neligh parties. I learned soon after that the Indian was a Ponca who had been killed just a few days before in a fight with the Sioux.

"After hunting around a while longer I found a corner stake with the numbers plainly marked. This gave a starting point. We followed the line north and finding land to suit began locating claims for the Miller colony."

History of Antelope County, Nebraska 1868-1883

A. G. Merriman, commonly known as Art. Merriman, was not only the first settler in Eden township but the first to take up a claim on any of the branches of Verdigris Creek. He was a member of Captain Jacob M. Miller's colony of old soldiers. Captain Miller himself, who was well known in Antelope County, settled just over the line in Knox County, but several members of his colony settled in Antelope County. In a letter from Mr. Merriman to William B. Lambert, dated Waterloo, Iowa, April 4, 1899. Mr. Merriman thus gives his experience in the great April storm:


ART. MERRIMAN'S STORY

"March 14, 1873, I left Independence, Iowa, for Nebraska, with a small team of mules, in company with J. A. Davis and John and Isaiah Miller.

"We arrived at Creighton on April 1, and drove west to old Mr. Palmer's about four miles, which was the last or frontier house in the settlement. Creighton consisted of Bruce's sod house and sod store, and Quimby's log cabin, where he kept the post-office, and one or two more log or sod houses.

"The next day we hunted our claims, which J. M. Miller had filed on for us the previous year, partly in Knox and partly in Antelope County. Mine was eight miles from Creighton and four miles from Mr. Palmer's house (it was the northwest quarter, section 4, Eden township).

"In a few days we set our three wagon boxes, with covers, where Millerboro is now, to live in until we could get material to build a house. We had been to Yankton for lumber with two teams, and got back on the 13th of April. That night it began a drizzling rain and before morning it turned to snow. The weather had been very fine, and gardens were partly made. We had built a pole and hay stable, but had little hay on it yet, and we set up some boards on the north and west sides to break the storm and wind from our horses. The next day was bad and snowed all day and all night, and the next day in the forenoon it was storming and blowing so bad we could scarcely see anything outside. We got out from our wagon covers about eleven o'clock and found some of the horses loose, some down and nearly buried in the snow, and one had packed the snow and kept getting higher until his knees were up to the roof. He had climbed clear up through the roof and eaten what covering he could reach. We turned them all loose, but could get nothing to feed them, for what little grain and hay we had was buried so deep we could not get at it. The air was so full of snow that we had hard work to find our wagon covers again, which were about four rods from the stable. The storm kept up all night, but on Wednesday, the 16th, it was not so bad, so we dug out a harness and hitched up a span of horses to a wagon and started for the settlement, four miles away. We went about twenty rods, when both horses got down in the snow, and we had to unharness them there to get them back. We left the wagon there. This was some time in the afternoon. We had had nothing to eat but some bread and crackers since supper on Sunday. So we dug out some meat and potatoes and the stove, which were all buried in the snow, and cooked supper -- the first warm meal in three days.

"The 17th was perfectly clear. We managed, by picking our way, to get our horses through the snow to the settlement and into a stable, where we kept them and hired our board for nearly two weeks. Then the snow melted and made high water and mud and very bad roads. I went to Yankton the first week in May to bring my wife and Fred and some goods. We had a hard time, though.

"I first made some garden on my claim, then I went to breaking, and planted about seven acres of sod corn; then broke out twenty acres more. Just after harvest I made a good dugout, thirteen by twenty feet inside, and moved into it; and made a good sod stable for my mules and cow. (Mr. Merriman and family lived in a house built by one of the Millers until the dugout was finished.)

"That winter the Millers all went away, so our nearest neighbor was Paul Thibadeau, about three miles northeast. West there were no settlers for about thirty miles, and south, for over twenty. The next spring the Miller boys came back and went to breaking and sowing wheat, etc. I sowed thirteen acres of wheat and planted about thirteen acres of corn. The grasshoppers came and damaged it, but I got sixty-four bushels of wheat and enough corn to feed.

"In 1875 I rented my land and moved to Neligh, leaving my dugout in very good shape; the settlers there used it as a schoolhouse, and on Sundays they had Sunday school and preaching in it.

"I proved up on my land in 1875, and in the spring of 1876 moved back to Independence, Iowa."

History of Antelope County, Nebraska 1868-1883

1850 Census, Plain, Wayne County, Ohio: Jacob M. Miller (age 24, farmer, born Ohio), Ann M. Miller (age 25, born PA), Celeste Miller (age 4, born Ohio), John S. Miller (age 2, born Ohio), Hamilton J. Miller (age 9/12, born Ohio) and Elizabeth Myers (age 78, born Pennsylvania).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Jacob M. Miller (age 35, farmer born Ohio). Ann Miller (age 36, born PA), Lester Miller (female, age 14, born Ohio), John S. Miller (age 11, born Ohio), Hamilton J. Miller (age 9, born Ohio), Isaiah B. Miller (age 7, born Ohio), Arnusta E. Miller (age 6, born Ohio), Carson Miller (age 3, born Iowa) and Laura A. Miller (age 1, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Creighton, Knox County, Nebraska: Jacob M. Miller (age 55, farmer, born Ohio), wife Ann Miller (age 56, born Pennsylvania), servant John W. Nye (age 21, farm laborer), Servant Chloe Van Every (age 18, domestic servant) and servant Joseph Burco (age 16, farm laborer

1885 Nebraska State Census: Lincoln, Knox, Nebraska: Jacob Miller, (age 60, doctor, born Ohio), wife Ann Miller (age 61, born Pennsylvania), Servant Agnes Carpenter (age 22, born Canada).

1890 Veterans Census: Logan and Miller, Knox County, Nebraska: Jacob M. Miller: Time used in raising companies. Co. H. 27 Iowa Vol. Enlisted Aug. 3, 1862, discharged Apr. 9, 1853, Length of Service: 8 months. Post office Millerboro, Knox County, Nebraska: Disability Incurred: Spinal affliction of back and sciatic nerve of legs & hips.

Jacob Miller died Apr. 12, 1895 and is buried in Millerboro Cemetery, Brunswick, Antelope County, Nebraska, Lot 45, Section 1.

Children of Jacob and Ann Miller:

  1. Celeste Miller, born about 1846 in Ohio.
  2. John S. Miller, born about 1848 in Ohio.
  3. Hamilton J. Miller, born about 1850 in Ohio.
  4. Isaiah B. Miller, born about 1853 in Ohio
  5. Arnusta E. Miller, born about 1854 Ohio
  6. Carson Miller, born about 1857 in Iowa
  7. Laura A. Miller, born about 1859 in Iowa.

The names of the children came from Census Records. I could not find them in 1870, and I also did not find any online family trees, so there could be additional children.


Monshaw, Abraham He was born July 7, 1830 in Pennsylvania. He married Sarah E. Keeley on Oct. 14, 1854. She was the daughter of George Keeley and Sarah Rooke.

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa; Abraham Monshow (age 30, carpenter, born PA), Sarah E. Monshow (age 25, born Pennsylvania), Oliver T. Monshow (age 4, born PA).

1870 Census: Independence Ward 1, Buchanan County, Iowa: Abraham Monshaw (age 39, cabinet maker, born Penn.), Sarah E Monshaw (age 35, born Penn), and Oliver T. Monshaw (age 12, born Penn).

1880 Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa; Abraham Munshaw (age 49, carpenter, born Pennsylvania), Sarah E. Munshaw (age 45, born Pennsylvania).

1885 Iowa State Census: Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa: Abraham Monshaw (age 54, carpenter, born Pennsylvania), Sarah E. Monshaw (age 50, born Pennsylvania) and Oliver Monshaw (age 28, born Pennsylvania).

1900 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Abraham Monshaw (born July 1830, age 69, married 45 years, born Pennsylvania, carpenter), wife Sarah E. Monshaw (born July 1834, married 45 years, 2 children born, 1 still living, born Pennsylvania).

Abraham Monshaw died Dec. 18, 1907 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

His widow Sarah E. Monshaw filed for a pension on Dec. 30, 1907 in Iowa.

Sarah E. (Keeley) Monshow died March 4, 1916.

1925 Iowa State Census: Waterloo, Black Hawk County, Iowa; Oliver Monshaw (age 68, born Pennsylvania. Father's name: Abraham Monshaw, born Pennsylvania. Mother's name: Sarah E. Keeley, born Pennsylvania.). Wife Christine Monshaw. Her father's name: John Brandenburg. Mother's name Mary Wilks).

Marriage record of Oliver Thomas Monshow, showed his parents as Abraham Monshow and Elizabeth Sarah Keeley.


Moore, Joseph He was born about 1819 in Pennsylvania. I tried to find a connection between Joseph and John Moore listed in the census records below. I would assume they were brothers. I tried researching John Moore. I found that he married Sophia Bidinger, but could not determine who his parents were either.

1850 Census: Mill, Tuscarawas County, Ohio: John Moore (age 34, farmer, born PA), Sophia Moore (age 28, born Ohio), Mary Moore (age 7, born Ohio), Nancy E. Moore (age 5, born Ohio), Sarah C. Moore (age 3, born Ohio), John T. Moore (age 7/12, born Ohio), Sarah Bidinger (age 68, born Ind.) and Joseph Moore (age 30, laborer, born PA).

1856 Iowa State Census, Spring, Buchanan County, Iowa John More (age 39, born PA), Sophia More (age 24, born Ohio), M. E. More (age 13, born Ohio), N. E. More (age 10, born Ohio), S. C. More (age 8, born Ohio), J. T. More (age 6, born Ohio), M. More (age 4, born Ohio), and Joseph More (age 37, born PA. Joseph had been in Iowa for less than a year).

1860 Census Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Moore (age 43, farmer, born P), Sophia More (age 38, born Ohio), Mary E Moore (age 17, born Ohio), Nancy E. More (age 15, born Ohio), Sarah C. More (age 12, born Ohio), John T. Moore (age 10, born Ohio), Louis L. Moore (age 5, born Ohio), Rachel A. More (age 2, born Iowa), Jas. H Moore (age 3/12, born Iowa), Marvilla Moore (age 8, born Ohio) and Joseph Moore (age 41, born PA).

Joseph Moore died Mar. 14, 1863, in Jackson, Tenn., of chronic diarrhea. He is buried in Crown Hill, Cemetery, Palo Alto County, Iowa.

LETTER FROM STATE OF IOWA GRAVE REGISTRATION SERVICE
TO PALO ALTO CO., IA COMMISSION OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
OCTOBER 1946

Letter listed as below records on permanent file with Iowa Grave Registration Service and requested the Palo Alto County Commission of Veterans Affairs to send copies of records they had on file that were not listed in the letter.

Name: Moore, Joseph
Date of death: 14 Mar 1863
Service: Co H 27th Ia Inf
Cemetery: Crown Hill
War: Civil


Morgan, William He was born March 1834 in Ohio. He was probably the son of Louis Morgan (1801- Apr. 1, 1869) and Catherine Biddinger (1805 - Feb. 20, 1894). He married Mary Casebeer on Nov. 30, 1865 in Buchanan County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Josiah Casebeer (May 3, 1817 - 1890) and Elizabeth Mosher (1825 - 1904) Her brother William Casebeer also served with Company H. 27th Iowa.

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Louis Morgan (age 59, farmer, born PA), Catharine Morgan (age 55, born Ohio), Henry Morgan (age 33, carpenter, born Ohio), Wm. Morgan (age 24, born Ohio), Curtis Morgan (age 22, born Ohio), Adelia Phelps (age 12, born Wisconsin) and Sarah Biddinger (age 78, born NC)

1870 Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: William Morgan (age 34, farmer, born Ohio), Mary Morgan (age 27, born Ohio), Edith Morgan (age 3, born Iowa), Charles Morgan (age 1, born Iowa) and Jake Casebere (age 14, born Iowa). (Note, I recognized the name Casebere. William Casebere also served with the 27th Iowa. I reviewed what I had found for him and found that he has a sister named Mary that was the right age to be Mary Morgan. William and Mary Casebeer had a younger brother named Jacob that would have been 14 in 1870. This is most likely him. I did some further research and found a marriage date for William Morgan and Mary Casebeer --I am pretty sure that this information is correct).

1880 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: William Morgan (age 45, farmer, born Ohio), wife Mary J. Morgan (age 36, born Ohio), daughter Edith E. Morgan (age 13, born Iowa), son Charles H. Morgan (age 10, born Iowa), daughter Viola Morgan (age 7, born Iowa), and son Freddie Morgan (age 1, born Iowa).

1885 Kansas State Census: Wea, Miami County Kansas (Post Office Louisburg): Wm. Morgan (age 49, farmer, born Ohio, to Kansas from Iowa, Honorable discharged from the volunteer military service of the United States: Yes, State: Iowa, Co. H, 27, Inf), M. J. Morgan (age 40, born Ohio), E. E. Morgan (female, age 18, born Iowa), C. H. Morgan (male age 13, born Iowa), Viola Morgan (age 10, born Iowa) and Fred Morgan (age 7, born Iowa).

1895 Kansas State Census, Everett, Woodson County, Kansas: Wm. Morgan (age 58, born Ohio, to Kansas from Iowa, Honorable discharged from the volunteer military service of the United States: Yes, State: Iowa, Co. H, 27, Inf.), Mary Morgan (age 45, born Ohio) and Fred Morgan (age 17, born Iowa).

1900 Census: Everett, Woodson County, Kansas: William Morgan (born March, 1834, age 66, married 34 years, born Ohio, farmer) wife Mary Morgan (born Nov. 1844, age 45, married 34 years, 5 children born, 4 still living), son Fred Morgan (born July 1879, age 20, born Iowa),

1910 Census: Yates Center Ward 4, Woodson County, Kansas: William Morgan (age 75, married 1 time for 45 years, born Ohio, farmer), wife Mary J. Morgan (age 66, married 1 time for 45 years, 5 children born, 4 still living born Ohio).

William Morgan died Jan. 24, 1916 at Thayer, Kansas (Pension Index Record) He is buried at Thayer Cemetery, Neosho County, Kansas.

His widow Mary J. Morgan filed for a pension on Jan. 29, 1916.

The following Veterans Names have been submitted by Jack Rogers, who has compiled the information for your use in research. Thank you Jack.

THAYER CEMETERY Neosho County, Kansas

Morgan, W.M. 1836-1916. Co. H, 27th Iowa Inf


I found a query on this same soldier, so I will include it here also:

MORGAN
Sandy Bachman (wbachman@kc.rr.com) 10 March 2002

In the cemetery of Thayer there is a grave for a William MORGAN, 1836-1916, GAR, Co., H, 27th Iowa Infantry, and a Mary J. MORGAN, 1843-1924.

The last census I could find them on was in 1900 Woodson County, Everett Township, but they are buried in Thayer, Neosho County, Kansas.

Where could I find an obituary for William or Mary? I didn't know if Thayer had it's own newspaper or not then.

1920 Census: Thayer, Neosho County, Kansas: W. S. Kelso (age 55, born Illinois), wife Edith Kelso (age 52, born Iowa), son Meryl Kelso (age 18, born Kansas), son Floyd Kelso (age 14, born Kansas), Mother-in-Law Mary J. Morgan (age 76, widowed, born Kansas), and boarder Joseph Burt, (age 26, born Kansas). (Note: Wesley S. Kelso and Edith E Kelso were in also in Neosho County in 1910. That probably explains why William and Mary J. Morgan came to that county.)

Mary J. Morgan died in 1924 and is buried in Thayer Cemetery, Neosho County, Kansas.

Children of William Morgan and Mary J. Casebeer:

  1. Edith E. Morgan, born about 1867
  2. Charles H. Morgan, born about 1869
  3. Viola Morgan, born about 1873
  4. Freddie Morgan, born July 1879

Mulick, Edward Everett He was born January 11, 1843 in Kentucky. He was the son of Michael Mulick (1815 - 1856) and Bridget Coleman (1821- Aug. 26, 1899). He married Ellen Elizabeth O'Brien on May 30, 1871, in St. Anthony Church in Davenport, Iowa.  His brother John Mulick also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

Notes by Elaine Johnson:

Note: Brothers John and Edward Mulick served with Company H, 27th Iowa. Per the Roster John Mulick was born in Ireland about 1837, and Edward Mulick was born in Kentucky about 1843.

There are two families with parents Michael and Bridget Mulick. In looking at family trees online, it appears to me they have combined these two families. I have labeled them (1) and (2) to keep them straight.

(1) Michael Mulick (1820 - 1902) and Bridget Calahan (1822-1906). Online obituaries for both of them show that they came separately from Ireland, married in New York in October 1849, moved to Dodge County Wisconsin, then to Iowa. Many online family trees show them as the parents of John (born 1837) and Edward Mulick (born 1843). The first thing that caught my eye was their year of marriage. 1849 was well after John and Edward were born. So at first I considered that maybe Bridget was a second wife and not their mother. But there was also no mention of them ever being in Kentucky. I think the conclusion that they are the parents of John and Edward may be incorrect. (I do note the neither obituary mentions her maiden name - but online family trees show her name as Bridget Calahan).

(1) In 1850 in Deerpart, Orange County, New York, I found Michael Mullock (age 30), Bridget Mullock (age 25) and William Mullock (age 0). I believe this is the same Michael and Bridget that are in Dodge County, Wisconsin in 1860.

(1) In 1860 in Dodge County, Wisconsin was Michael and Bridget Mulick with children William, Michael, John, Mary and Thomas. (these children were all born after 1849 and their ages and location fit what was told in the obituaries).

(1) 1870 Census, Jamestown Howard County, Iowa: Michael and Bridget Mulick with children Michael, Mary, Thomas, Margaret, and Edward (born about 1864 in Wisconsin).


BUT because the roster said Edward Mulick was born in Kentucky I searched for him in Kentucky.

(2) In 1850 in Mercer County, Kentucky, there was a Michael Mulick (born in Ireland about 1815) and Bridget Mulick (born in Ireland about 1823). They had 2 children born in Ireland John (1837) and Mary (1839), They also had children born in Kentucky: Thomas, James, Ellen, and Edward (1843). Based on where the first two children were born, I would assume they married in Ireland. I believe THESE are the parents of John (born Ireland) and Edward (Born Kentucky) in the 27th Iowa.

(2) In 1860 in Homer, Buchanan County was Bridget Mulick with children James, Thomas, Edward (born Kentucky), Ellen, Anna and Bridget. (No husband was listed, No husband was listed in 1870. In 1880 she was listed as a widow. So I believe this Michael Mulick died before 1860, possibly in Indiana as the last two children were born there).

(2) 1870 Census: Homer, Buchanan County, Iowa; Bridget Mulick (age 48, born Ireland), Thomas Mulick (age 29, farmer, born Kentucky), James Mulick (age 29, farmer, born Kentucky), Edward Mulick (age 21, farmer, born Kentucky), Anna Mulick (age 16, born Ind.) and Delia (age 14, born Ind.).

I have concluded that John and Edward are the sons of Michael and Bridget -- But the Michael and Bridget (2) that were in Kentucky and Iowa -- Not the Michael and Bridget (1) that were in New York, Wisconsin and Iowa. I do not know Bridget's maiden name at this time. She was in Buchanan County from 1860 to the 1885 Iowa State Census and was still alive in 1891, as she filed for a pension after John Mulick died. I did not find her on the 1900 census. Per Find a Grave, she died Aug, 1898 and is buried in Saint Johns Catholic Cemetery, Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa. There is a note that says: Wife of Michael Mulick of Mercer Co., KY.

Update 2/11/2010: on the 1925 Iowa State Census I found Mary Maloney (born 1839 in Ireland). She was living in Council Bluffs Ward 6, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. She was aged 86, widowed, and living with her daughter Margaret Carroll and several grandchildren. Mary Maloney said her parents were Michael Mulick, born Ireland and Bridget Coleman, born Ireland. Her parents married in Ireland. Her daughter Margaret Maloney (age 57, widowed, born Iowa, father Michael Maloney, born Ireland, mother Mary Mulick, born Ireland, parents married in Indiana). I believe this is the Mary Mulick that is listed in the 1850 Census above. If this is the right Mary Mulick, that would make Bridget's maiden name COLEMAN.

Update: 5/7/2013. I have been updating the website and adding additional information that I have found. I found a family tree that confirms what I suspected when I first researched John and Edward Mulick. I did learn that John and Edward are half brothers. Their father Michael Mulick was married to a first unknown wife that died when John was 3. Edward Mulick was the son of Michael Mulick and his second wife Bridget Coleman.


The information below is from "A Mulick Family Anthology," 2nd edition, pages 1 - 3, written & compiled by Diana J. Mulick & George C. Mulick in Aug. 2001. (Note I found a copy of this book here. But because over the years, I have had so many broken links, to be safe I also have a copy of it on my website. If the link above is broken, you can download it here.)

Michael Mulick
[Trees on Pages 409-422]

Note: The reader will discover that there were two Michael Mulicks living in the United States during the mid-1800s, both of whom were married to Bridgets. Please see Page 300 for the other Michael and Bridget.

Michael was born c. 1815 probably in County Roscommon, Ireland. He loved his native soil, but by the time he was 25 in 1840, he was finding it increasingly difficult to support his family. The English Tithe Law required Irish men to pay ten per cent of their earnings to the Church of Ireland, whether they were members or not (and 95% were not). If nothing else Michael was a strong Roman Catholic which meant he paid tithe to two churches. Then too, his first wife had died shortly after giving birth to little Mary (age 7) who was just two years old; their first-born John (Page 5) was three. And Michael had just remarried.

It was in about 1840 when he proposed to 20-year old Bridget Coleman (page 3). Michael had made it clear that he intended to emigrate to America. Now the cart was loaded with clothing, pots, pans and dishes they would need in the New World. Very early the next morning they would start on the 90-mile overland trip to Dublin.

Although excited, Michael was, none-the-less, apprehensive. He had never been out of County Roscommon and he had never seen an ocean, let alone a ship large enough to carry his family and hundreds of others like them on a journey of some 3500 miles. He felt heavily the responsibility he bore for his new bride and his small children and he wept at the thought of leaving his dear parents, his brothers and sisters, as well as the land he loved so much. Yet he had heard glowing reports from his cousin who had preceded him, so tomorrow they were off!

It took a week of hard travel to reach Dublin. Once there they soon found passage on a packet bound for Liverpool--That suited Michael just fine for he did not like the hustle and bustle of Dublin; he had never seen so many people in one place in his life.

Liverpool was worse! There were hucksters trying to sell their wares, beggars of every description, and emigrants pressing to book passage to ports all over the world.

At last they were off on what undoubtedly was the most frightening experience of Michael's life--the crossing of the Atlantic Ocean.

Finally the journey was over and they were in New York. Michael took an immediate dislike to the big city. It was too crowded, it was too cold, and the only lodgings they could afford were too mean. Michael was determined to move south where his farming skills would be in demand, and where he could raise his family in a better climate.

Kentucky sounded perfect to him. It was a place of small farms such as he was used to in Ireland, and he had heard of the milder winters. So Michael purchased an oxcart, packed his family and their belongings, and they were off to Kentucky. Michael found a job on a horse farm near Lexington. There, on Feb. 18, 1841, Bridget presented him with twin sons they named Thomas (page 10) and James (page 12). Two years later, on January 11, 1843, Edward Everett (page 15) made his appearance; then on June 4, 1844, Ellen (page 18) was born.

The next we hear of Michael is in 1850 when he is working as a "toll-gater" (i.e. road builder) in Mercer County, Kentucky, along-side a goodly number of other Irish immigrants, including his brother Edward (page 203) who had come to the United States in 1848. It was on May 23, 1852, when Michael ran afoul of a Barney Mulick. On June 17, 1852, Barney sued Michael in the Mercer County Circuit Court for two thousand dollars alleging that Michael had wounded him with a knife on two occasions--May 23 and June 16, 1852--while at the Harrodsburg and Cane Run Turnpike road. The suit was dismissed in 1853. (Nothing else is known about Barney Mulick. Barney probably was a nickname for Bernard, and there was a Bernard Mulick, age 23, who arrived in New York on June 22, 1848, from Liverpool on the Ship Meteor. His country of origin was given as Ireland. He did not appear in the 1850 census records of either Mercer or Scott County, however he stated his intention to become a citizen before the Mercer County Court on April 9, 1851.)

By this time Michael had determined to leave Kentucky. (Note: there was a paragraph in the information regarding his brother Edward P. Mulick (page 200) that said this: "When Michael left Kentucky because of his out-spoken views on slavery, Edward saw little reason to stay on. Since he was eleven years younger than Michael, he hadn't lived long enough under the repressive rules of the English to be quite as obsessed (as he felt Michael was) with slavery, and having lived through the potato famine, he had absolutely no interest in farming! Besides, he had liked the excitement of New York. So in 1853, Edward packed up his family and moved to the big city of St. Louis, Missouri, where he found work as a laborer.")

Again Michael packed his growing family and their belongings into the oxcart and they moved to the free state of Indiana. Michael found work in Jennings County probably near Scipio, a small town six miles northwest of North Vernon. (James and Thomas received their First Communion in St. Patrick Church [now suppressed] there. And there Anna (see page 20) was born on Sept. 4, 1854. Little Bridget, Jr., nicknamed "Dilla" (see page 23), arrived in 1855. And there, in 1856, Michael died.


From "A Mulick Family Anthology," 2nd edition, pages 4 & 5, written & compiled by Diana J. Mulick & George C. Mulick in Aug. 2001.

Bridget Coleman was born c. 1821 and was just 19 years old when the widower, Michael Mulick (the father of two small children), proposed to her. Yet on the night he asked her to marry him, she had readily agreed to emigrate to America with him (19-year-old Irish girls had not yet learned to say no to their betrothed). They were married c. 1839.

Bridget was 36 when Michael died in 1856, leaving her with eight children ranging in age from 17 to less than a year. She felt no desire to remain in Jennings County, Indiana, after Michael died, so Bridget and all her children except Mary, who had married the year before, joined a wagon train bound for Iowa.

By the fall of 1856, Bridget had found a farm in Homer Township, Buchanan County, about five miles south-southwest of Independence, Iowa. On October 9 of that year she paid $500 for a quarter section or $3.25/acre.

In 1860, Bridget was living on the farm with all of her children except Mary and John, who was away the day the census enumerator was there. A big-hearted, loving woman, Bridget had taken in an 11-year old orphan from the wagon train, a lad named Thomas Conivan. She was reasonably well off that year, having $600 in real property and $400 in personal assets.

But in 1861, financial difficulties arose due to a depressed business cycle and on January 4, 1862, Bridget was forced to use her quarter section as collateral for a loan of $65.00. Then, too, the Civil War had erupted the year before and James had enlisted almost at once. By the fall of 1862, both John and Edward had enlisted, and then Thomas was drafted in 1864, leaving Bridget, three of her daughters and young Thomas Conivan to work the farm.

By 1870, Thomas Conivan had set out on his own. Bridget had sold the western half of the farm and had sufficiently recovered financially so as to be able to pay off the loan. Thomas, James, and Edward had survived the war and were back working the farm. (John did not return.) Bridget could claim assets of $3750, while Thomas and James each claimed $1600.

In 1876 and 1877 fire destroyed Bridget's home and then in December 1878, Bridget suffered yet another grievous loss - the youngest of her daughters, "Dilla," died.

By 1880, her surviving children, except Thomas, had married and left the farm. At the time of the census that year, Bridget was alone on the farm with her daughter Anna and two of her grandchildren, Mary and Charley. Thomas had, no doubt, gone off for a visit.

Bridget died on August 26, 1899, at age 79 after a lingering illness of two years. She had out-lived her husband and nine of her thirteen children. The last sentence of her obituary read, "Thus has ended a long and useful life made up largely of self-sacrifice" - doubtless a fitting epitaph. She is buried in St. John's Cemetery in Independence, Iowa.

Footnotes:

1. The researcher will find the deed to the farm in Michael's name. The probable explanation for this is that women were not allowed to own real estate in their own names at that time in Iowa. The researcher will also find that Bridget signed all her documents and correspondence with an "X" signifying that she could not read or write English. To her credit, though, all of her children were taught to do so even though schooling was a difficult thing to obtain in those days - for example, the nuns did not arrive in Independence until 1869 (prior to that a man taught the basics).

2. Bridget's obituary, referenced above, states that she had 13 children of whom eight survived. No record has been found of the five missing children, all of whom probably were born in the ten year period between the births of Ellen in 1844 and Anna in 1854.

3. The year of Bridget's death as inscribed on the family marker in St. John's Cemetery (1898) is incorrect. She died on August 26, 1899.

Sources:

-Census - 1850, Mercer County, Kentucky, District 1, Dwelling 570
-Census -1860, Buchanan County, Iowa, Homer Twp., Page 24, Dwg. 178
-Census - 1870, Buchanan County, Iowa, Homer Twp., Page 52-37
-Census - 1880,  Buchanan County, Iowa, E.D. 87
-Warranty Deed dated Oct. 9, 1856, Buchanan County, Iowa
-Warranty Deed dated, January 25, 1862, Buchanan County, Iowa
-The World Book Encyclopedia (1983), Vol. 5, Page 127
-Civil War Pension Records of John Mulick filed by Bridget Mulick
-St. John's Cemetery records, Independence, Iowa
-Obituary of Bridget Mulick, Independence (Iowa) Conservative, Aug. 28, 1899
-Telephone conversation between Ms. Fran Rosauer of St. John's Church and G.C. Mulick, January 31, 2000
-Letter dated November 30, 2000, from the Buchanan County Genealogy Society to G.C. Mulick

From "A Mulick Family Anthology," 2nd edition, pages 16- 18, written & compiled by Diana J. Mulick & George C. Mulick in Aug. 2001

EDWARD EVERETT MULICK
(Son Of Michael and Bridget Mulick)

Edward was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on January 11, 1843. He, too, was on the long trek from Kentucky to Indiana (where his father died when Edward was 13) through Illinois to Iowa. He, too, worked the family farm with his brothers in Buchanan County until he enlisted as a private in Company H, 27th Iowa Infantry Volunteers for service during the Civil War. [The researcher will note that he gave his address as Brandon, Iowa - a small town about 3 miles southwest of the family farm.]

He mustered into the army on August 14, 1862, in Dubuque, Iowa. Twenty months later, on April 9, 1864, he was shot through the left thigh by a Minie-ball at the Battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana. (He was a color bearer who were prime targets of the enemy of both sides; the loss of the flag to show where their comrades were caused great confusion during the heat of the battle.) Edward was left in the field and captured by the Rebels when the Bluecoats retreated the next day. He was paroled on June 16, 1864, at Red River Landing, Virginia (a paroled service man during the Civil War signed a sworn statement to his captors that he would not bear arms against them until exchanged - both sides issued such paroles to avoid the necessity of feeding and guarding prisoners).

On July 1, 1864, Edward was in Adams General Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. It hardly seems possible that his oldest brother, John, was in Fort Pickering Hospital in the same city at the same time, and neither of them knew it, but such are the fortunes of war.

Edward rejoined his Company on January 27, 1865, and then, on June 1, 1865, he was hurt on the “cars” (a then-popular expression for a railroad) between Greenville and Montgomery, Alabama, and sent to the Division Hospital in Montgomery. On June 28th he was removed to the Post Hospital in the same city. (Errata & Addenda, page 1:  A subsequent examination of Edward's Civil War services records indicates that his injury on the cars was the result of his head contacting a railroad bridge. (he forgot to duck).

He was mustered out with his Company at Clinton, Iowa on August 8, 1865, and returned to his mother's farm where he stayed until 1870.

His war wound made it difficult for him to farm, so soon after the census was taken in 1870, Edward left home and entered a business school in Davenport, Iowa. There he met a young lady named Ellen Elizabeth O'Brien; he married her on May 30, 1871, in St. Anthony Church in Davenport.

The Davenport, Iowa, City Directories show that Edward was living at 511 West 11th Street in 1875. By 1877 he had moved to 525 West 11th Street, which was next door to Ellen's parent's home, and he was employed as a laborer. In 1878 he was a railroad car repairer; in 1880, a striker for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad; in 1881 - 1883, he was a blacksmith.

Edward and Ellen had seven natural children and an "adopted" son who was the youngest child of Edward's brother, James

  1. John Edward - born April 3, 1872
  2. Mary Antonia - born January 11,1874
  3. Ellen Frances - born June 12, 1876
  4. Edward Thomas - born December 21 , 1877
  5. Francis William - born November 22, 1879
  6. James Joseph - born February 27, 1882
  7. Margaret Loretta - born September 17, 1885
  8. James (adopted") - born August, 1885

All of Edward and Ellen's natural children were born in Davenport, Iowa, despite the fact that the family had moved to Omaha, Nebraska, in 1884 (1732 South 11 th Street). Ellen went back to Davenport to be with her mother for Margaret Loretta's birth.

The "adopted" James was born in Long Pine, Nebraska. It is not known whether "Little Jim" was formally adopted - there is a notation next to his name in the 1900 census saying he was adopted, but this may have been merely to distinguish him from James Joseph.

On February 24, 1889, Edward paid $700.00 for a house at 4107 Charles Street in Omaha. The property was to remain in the family for 75 years.

At about the same time Edward went to work for the Union Pacific Railroad as a yard clerk. He was the first of four generations to work for that railroad - one still does (see John Francis Mulick, Page 85).

Ellen died in Omaha on November 26, 1904, at age 61. She is buried in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery there.

ln 1910, at age 67, Edward was still employed as a car checker in the Omaha yards of the Union Pacific. Living with him in the home he owned on Charles Street were his daughters, Margaret Loretta and Mary Antonia, as well as Mary's three children.

Edward died at age 75 on June 11, 1918, of arteriosclerosis and acute embolism of the gall bladder. He is buried next to Ellen.

Sources:

  • -Census -1850, Mercer County, Kentucky, District I, Page. 570
  • -Census -1860, Buchanan County, Iowa, Homer Twp., Page 24, Line 38
  • -Census -1870, Buchanan County, Iowa, Homer Twp., Page 9, Line 52
  • -Census -1880, Scott County, Iowa, Davenport, E.D. 274, Pg. 54, Line 1
  • -Census -1900, Douglas County, Nebraska, Omaha, E.D. 92, Sh. 6, Line 62
  • -Census -1910, Douglas County, Nebraska, Omaha, E.D. 78, Pg 17,4
  • -Civil War pension records of Edward Everett Mulick
  • -St. Anthony Church records, Davenport, Iowa
  • -City Directories, Davenport, Iowa
  • -Letter dated June 12, 1991, from Nebraska State Historical Society to G.C. Mulick
  • -Property deeds, 4107 Charles St., Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska
  • -Holy Sepulchre Cemetery records
  • -Family records
  • -Omaha World Herald. June 13, 1918

1850 Census: District 1, Mercer County, Kentucky: Michael Mulick (age 35, born Ireland), Bridget Mulick (age 27, born Ireland), John Mulick (age 13, born Ireland), Mary Mulick (age 11, born Ireland), Thomas Mulick (age 8, born Kentucky), James Mulick (age 8, born Kentucky), Ellen Mulick (age 6, born Kentucky), and Edward Mulick (age 7, born Kentucky)

1860 Census: Homer, Buchanan County, Iowa; Bridget Mulick (age 39, farmer, born Ireland), James Mulick (age 19, born Kentucky), Thomas Mulick (age 19, born Kentucky), Edw. Mulick (age 17, born Kentucky), Ellen Mulick (age 15, born Kentucky), Anna Mulick (age 3, born Ind.), Bridget Mulick (age 3, born Ind.)

Per Kevin Frye, Historian of Andersonville Prison. 13 men of the 27th Iowa were held as prisoners at Andersonville Prison. He sent me the documentation that he had on each of them. If the information has the remark: "Also held at Cahaba, Alabama" Kevin also provided this information:

"Some were sent to Cahaba Prison, Alabama first. A large number of prisoners who were held there eventually were transferred by rail to Andersonville. This may be the case with all those with the 27th at Andersonville." He also has a website for Andersonville Prison.

CodeNo: 67224
Grave No: 0
Last Name: Mulick
First Name: Edward
Rank: Private
Company: H
Regiment: 27
State: Iowa
Branch Of Service :Infantry
Date of Death:
Cause of Death:
Remarks* Paroled January 7, 1865 and mustered out August 8, 1865 at Clinton, Iowa.
Reference: ADG VOL IV 1190
Place Captured: Pleasant Hill, Louisiana
Date Captured: 4/9/1864
Alternate Names:
Status: Survived Andersonville
Muster date: 10/3/1862
Age at Muster: 20
More Information Available :NO

Also held at Cahaba Alabama

1870 Census: Homer, Buchanan County, Iowa; Bridget Mulick (age 48, born Ireland), Thomas Mulick (age 29, farmer, born Kentucky), James Mulick (age 29, farmer, born Kentucky), Edward Mulick (age 21, farmer, born Kentucky), Anna Mulick (age 16, born Ind.) and Delia (age 14, born Ind.).

1880 Census: Davenport, Scott County, Iowa: Ed. Mulick (age 37, laborer, born Kentucky), wife Ellen Mulick, (age 37, born Canada), son John Mulick (age 8, born Iowa), daughter Nancy Mulick (age 6, born Iowa), son Edward Mulick (age 3, born Iowa) and son Frank Mulick (age 7/12, born Nov. in Iowa).

1885 Nebraska State Census Collection: Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska: Edw. Mulick (age 42, works RR, born Kentucky), Wife Ellen Mulick (age 41, born Canada), son John Mulick (age 13, born Iowa), daughter Nancy Mulick (age 11, born Iowa), son Edw. Mulick (age 8, born Iowa) son Frank Mulick (age 6, born Iowa and son Jim Mulick (age 3 born Iowa).

1900 Census; Omaha Ward 9, Douglas County, Nebraska: Edward Mulick (born Jan 1844, age 56, married 29 years, born Kentucky), Ellen Mulick (born June 1844, age 55, married 29 years, 7 children born, 6 still living, born Canada), son Edward T. Mulick (born Dec. 1878, age 11, born Iowa), son Frank Mulick (born Sept. 1879, age 20, born Iowa), son James Mulick (born Feb. 1880, age 19, born Iowa), daughter Loretta (born Sept. 1885, age 14, born Iowa) and adopted son James Mulick (born Aug. 1885, age 14, born Nebraska).

Ellen (O'Brien) Mulick died Nov. 26, 1904 and is buried in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Section 4, Block 1, Lot 9, Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska.

Mulick, Ellen (Mrs. Edward); 2 Dec 1904 True Voice p 21, Holy Sepulchre (Obituary).

1910 Census: Omaha Ward 11, Douglas County, Nebraska: Edward E. Mulick (age 66, widowed, first married at age 39, born Kentucky) daughter Antonia Hawley (age 36, divorced, 3 children born, 3 still living, born Nebraska), Loretta Mulick (age 24, born Iowa), grandson Edward M. Hawley (age 12, born Nebraska), grandson Joseph T. Hawley (age 11, born Nebraska) and grandson Harold A. Hawley (age 8, born Nebraska).

Edward E. Mulick died June 8, 1918 in Omaha, Nebraska (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska. Note: Pension Index record says he died June 9, 1918.

Mulick, Edward: 12 June 1918 Omaha Bee@Holy Sepulchre

Note: Omaha has a website dedicated to Obituaries. I found the information above. Holy Sepulchre Cemetery is located in Omaha Nebraska.


Mulick, John He was born about 1837 in Ireland. He was the son of Michael Mulick and his unknown first wife. His brother Edward E. Mulick also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. (See the extensive notes on Edward Mulick above).

1850 Census: District 1, Mercer County, Kentucky: Michael Mulick (age 35, born Ireland), Bridget Mulick (age 27, born Ireland), John Mulick (age 13, born Ireland), Mary Mulick (age 11, born Ireland), Thomas Mulick (age 8, born Kentucky), James Mulick (age 8, born Kentucky), Ellen Mulick (age 6, born Kentucky), and Edward Mulick (age 7, born Kentucky)

His mother Bridget Mulick filed for a pension on May 18, 1891 in Iowa.

from "A Mulick Family Anthology" by Diana Mulick & George C. Mulick, 8/2001. 

John was the oldest son of Michael Muick and his first wife. He was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, c. 1837 but was brought to the United States in about 1840 by his father and stepmother, Bridget, when he was three years old.

John was with his family in Mercer County, Kentucky, in 1850, but was not with Bridget and her other children in Homer Township, Iowa, In 1860, nor could he be found elsewhere in Buchanan County in that year.

He enlisted in Company H, 27th Regiment, Iowa Infantry, as a private (as did his brother Edward Everett) on August 15, 1862, for service during the Civil War. He gave his place of residence as Independence, Iowa; his age as 24; and his occupation as farmer. His physical description was: eyes, Hazel; hair, brown; complexion, ruddy; height, 5 ft.-9 3/4 in. He was mustered in on October 3, 1862, at Dubuque, Iowa (as was Edward).

On at least one occasion, in May or June 1863, John sent a sum of money to Bridget from Jackson, Tennessee, using the captain of his company, Dr. Jacob M. Miller, as his courier.

 John (and Edward) served with his company first at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, until November 1, 1862 and then at Cairo, Illinois, until November 20 when the regiment was moved to Memphis, Tennessee. On November 27, 1862, the regiment joined the army under Major General Sherman and marched against the Rebel Army then occupying a position on the Tallahatchie River below Waterford, Mississippi. This movement was made to reinforce General Grant's army, which was then moving down the line of the Mississippi Central Railroad with Vicksburg as its objective. The combined forces under General Grant pressed southward in pursuit of the enemy until they were stopped when the rebel forces captured General Grant's base of supplies at Holly Springs, Mississippi. The 27th did not come into contact with the enemy during this expedition.

On December 31, 1862, the regiment was making a forced march to reinforce troops at Lexington, Tennessee, arriving there the next day, only finding it was too late to participate in the conflict. The regiment then remained at Jackson, Tennessee, performing the duties of provost (i.e., keeping order), picket and train guards until June  2, 1863. Early in June, Jackson was evacuated and the regiment was conveyed by rail to La Grange, Tennessee, from whence it marched to Moscow, Tennessee. it was assigned to guard the Mississippi Central Railroad.

On August 20, the regiment marched to Memphis and was then conveyed by ships to Helena, Arkansas. It joined Major General Steele's army in attacking Little Rock, but since it was held in reserve, it saw no action at that time. The regiment remained at Little Rock until November 16 performing camp and picket guard duty. It was then transported by rail to Duvall's Bluff where it embarked on transports, moved down the White River to its mouth, and then up the Mississippi to Memphis where it remained until January 28, 1864.

But on January 27, 1864, John was taken ill and sent to Fort Pickering Hospital in Memphis. He apparently remained there a full year until he was transferred to the Veterans Reserve Corps (an organization of men who were unfit for active field service because of wounds or disease contracted in the line of duty, but who were fit for duty in the Invalid Corps). His medical records indicate that he suffered from chronic diarrhea and dyspepsia.

John was mustered out of the V.R.C. on August 22, 1865, in Washington D.C. He traveled to St. Louis, Missouri, where he wrote to Bridget saying that he was ill and under the care of a physician, but that he was coming home as soon as he could travel. (The letter was not in his handwriting.) His family never heard from him again, and they assumed he died. He was declared legally dead in 1915 in order to quiet Bridget's estate.

Sources:

-Census - 1850, Mercer County, Kentucky, District 1, Dwg. 570
-Civil War Service Records of John Mulick
-Civil War Pension Records of John Mulick
-Historical Sketch, Twenty-seventh Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Page 1115
-Probate of estate of Thomas Mulick, Buchanan County, Iowa


Munson, Warren He was born Apr. 14, 1840 in Durham County, Ontario, Canada. He was the son of William Munson and Mary Arnold (1796-Mar. 27, 1871). He married first Medora Bacon on March 28, 1867 in Tama County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Warren and Olive Bacon. He married second Mary Elizabeth Malin on Aug. 31, 1872 in Tama, Tama County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Thomas Minshall Malin (May 21, 1824-Feb. 6, 1905) and Martha Jane Yocum (Oct. 15, 1833-Aug. 18, 1908).

1870 Census: Carlton, Tama County, Iowa: Warren Munson (age 30, farmer, born Canada), Dora Munson (age 23, born Canada), Ettie A. Munson (age 2, born Iowa), Mary Munson (age 1/12, born Iowa) and Mary Munson (age 72, born Canada).

Medora Munson died Oct. 22, 1870 and is buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Howard, Tama County, Iowa.

1880 Census: Howard, Tama County, Iowa: William Munson (age 49, farmer, born Canada), wife Delia Munson (age 47, born Canada), ad. daughter Mary A. Munson (age 10, born Iowa), ad. son Frank F. Munson (age 13, born Canada), Andrew Weir, (age 31, hired hand), and brother Warren Munson (age 40, divorced, peddler, born Canada).

1880 Census: Columbia, Tama County, Iowa; Thomas Malin (age 56, farmer, born Ohio), wife Martha J. Malin (age 46,born Ohio), daughter Laura W. A. Malin (age 20, born Ohio), son Elmer M. Malin (age 18, born Ohio), son William E. Malin (age 15, born Ohio), daughter Annie V. Malin (age 12, born Iowa), daughter Rachel C. Malin (age 9, born Iowa) and granddaughter Emmie J. Munson (age 5, born Iowa).

Mary E. (Malin) Munson married John R. Phillips on July 4, 1881 in Tama County, Iowa.

Warren Munson died Oct. 30, 1884 and is buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Howard, Tama County, Iowa. (Iowa Cemetery Records. Name: Warren Munson, Death Date: Oct 30, 1884, Page #137, Birth Date: Apr 14, 1840. Cemetery: Rose Hill., Town: Howard. Relative: 44 Level Info: Gravestone Records of Tama County, Iowa.)

Mary E. Phillips filed a pension for a minor on Sept. 19. 1887 in Oregon.

Mary E. (Malin, Munson) Phillips married Levi P. Tallman on Feb. 16, 1889.

Mary E .(Malin, Munson, Phillips), Tallman died on July 15, 1915, in Eugene, Lane County. Oregon.

Children of Warren Munson and Medora Bacon:

  1. Ettie A. Munson (born about 1868)
  2. Mary Munson (born about 1870)

Children of Warren Munson and Mary Elizabeth Malin:

  1. Emma Jane Munson (Dec. 18, 1872 - Oct. 27, 1927)
  2. Ralph Munson (Oct. 13, 1877 - Jan. 21, 1880)

Olar, John He was born about 1842 in Ohio. He was probably the son of Abram Olar and Mary Lena Hart.

1850 Census, Shawnee, Allen County, Ohio: Abraham Oller (age 31, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Mary Oller (age 25, born Virginia) and John Oller (age 10, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census, Whitewater, Dubuque County, Iowa: Abram Oler (age 41, born Penn, farmer), Mary Oler (age 35, born Virginia) and John Oler (age 16, born Ohio, laborer).

1860 Census, Jefferson, Buchanan County, Iowa: Martin F. Coon (age 28,), John C Alvord (age 23), Louisa Davis (age 30), Eugene Davis (age 8) and John Olar (age 18, farmer, born Ohio).

John Olar died May 12, 1864, Memphis, Tenn. of chronic diarrhea. He is buried in Memphis National Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee, Section A, Site 1996.


Osgood, Augustus P. He was born Nov. 1830 in Canada. He married Abagail Hacket on July 31, 1853 in Manchester, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. (New Hampshire, Marriages, 1720-1920). Note: Marriage record for Ella J. Osgood says Abigail Haskill.

1860 Census; Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa; Augustus P. Osgood (age 29, carpenter, born Canada West), Abby M. Osgood (age 26, born NH), Hollis J. Osgood (male, age 2, born Iowa).

Abby M. Osgood (born Dec. 23, 1833, died Jan 19, 1867) and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, add 1, lot 125, Buchanan County, Iowa. Remarks w/o A. P.

Hollis J. Osgood (born May 15, 1858, died Apr. 24, 1868.) He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1870 Census; Independence Ward 1, Buchanan County, Iowa: James Cutter (age 44, day laborer, born Upper Canada), Sarah Cutter (age 26, born Penn), ucinda? Cutter (age 3, born Ill.) Augustus P. Osgood (age 40, carpenter, born Canada), and Julia E. Osgood (age 10, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, Dakota Territory: Boarder A. P. Osgood (age 55, widowed, carpenter, born NY).

1890 Veterans Census: Howard, Miner, South Dakota: Augustus P. Osgood, Private, Co. H. 27 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 15, 1862, discharged Aug. 8, 1865, Length of Service; 2 years, 11 months, 23 days. Post Office Address: Howard, Miner County, S.D.

1900 Census: Canova, Miner, South Dakota: A. P. Osgood (born Nov. 1830, age 69, widowed, born Canada, immigrated 1845, in U.S. 55 years, Carpenter), daughter Ella Osgood (born Aug. 1860, age 39, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Pierre Ward 3, Hughes County, South Dakota: Augustus P. Osgood (age 79, widowed, born Canada, FR, contractor, building), daughter Ella Osgood (age 49, born Iowa).

Augustus P. Osgood died Aug. 28, 1914 in Pierre, South Dakota (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, add 1, lot 125, Buchanan County, Iowa.


Patterson, George A. He was born about 1830 in New York.

1890 Veterans Census, Valley City, Barnes County, North Dakota:: George Patterson, Private, Co. H, 27 Iowa Inft., Enlisted Aug. 22, 1862, Discharged Mar. 25, 1865. Length of Service: 2 years, 7 months, 3 days, Post Office Address: Valley City, Barnes County, North Dakota. Disability Incurred: (writing was very faint, I could make out the word Lung). Remarks: Enlisted May 5th 1861 in 5th Iowa Inf. Discharged June 15, 1862.

His widow Louisa Patterson filed for a pension on Feb. 9, 1899 in North Dakota. His Pension index record indicates he was also a veteran of the Mexican War.

1900 Census: Valley City, Barnes County, North Dakota: Adolph Milton (born Oct 1848, age 41, married 11 years, born Sweden), wife Sophia Milton (born Oct. 1860, age 39, married 11 years, 7 children born 5 still living, born Sweden, immigrated 1886, in US 14 years), daughter Abbie G. Milton (born Aug. 1889, age 10, born No. Dakota), son Arthur M. Milton (born Oct. 1890, age 9, born North Dakota), daughter Mattie S. (born July 1893, age 6, born North Dakota), daughter Esther S. Milton (born Dec. 1899 (age 1, born North Dakota), daughter Ruth Milton (born Apr. 1900 (age 2/12, born North Dakota) Mother-in-law Louise Patterson (born Aug. 1834, age 65, widowed, 1 child born, 1 still living. born Sweden), Emma M. Watterson (servant, born July 1883, age 16, born Norway).


Perkins, Austin Whitman He was born August 8, 1835 in Paris, Oxford County, Maine. He was the son of Rev. Luther Perkins (1797 -?) and Sally Durell (1798 - ?) He married Olive Berry on Jan 22, 1857 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Buchanan County Marriages Book 1, M-R, 1848-1858) She was the daughter of Stillman Berry ((July 15, 1811 - Apr., 26, 1891) and Persis Cushman (Nov. 16, 1813 - May 13, 1897).

Austin W. PerkinsAustin W. Perkins. Image found here

1860 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Austin W. Perkins (age 25, farmer, born Maine), Olive Perkins (age 21, born Maine), Julia Perkins (age 2, born Iowa), and Luther A. Perkins (age 1, born Iowa. Stillman Berry (age 48, farmer, born Maine) and Parris Berry (age 46, born Maine) were living next door.

1870 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Austin Perkins (age 35, farmer born Maine), Olive Perkins (age 32, born Maine), Julia Perkins (age 12, born Iowa), Luther Perkins (age 11, born Iowa), Cyntha Perkins (age 8, born Iowa) and Gilbert Perkins (age 2, born Iowa). Stillman Berry (age 59) and Perris Berry (age 56), were living next door.

1880 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Austin Perkens (age 46, farmer, born Maine), wife Olive Perkens (age 21, born Maine), son Luther S. Perkens (age 21, born Iowa), daughter Cynthia A. Perkens (age 17, born Iowa) son Gilbert A. Perkens (age 11, born Iowa) and adopted son Fred Heacock (age 8, born Iowa). Stillman Berry (age 68) and Persis Berry (age 66) were living next door.

1885 Iowa State Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Austin W. Perkins (township 88 range 7, section 18, SW SE, age 49, farming, born Maine), Olive Perkins (age 46, born Maine), Cynthia A. Perkins (age 22, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Gilbert Perkins (age 16, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Stillman Berry (age 73, farming, born Maine) and Persis Berry, (age 71, born Maine).

Olive (Berry) Perkins (born Mar. 23, 1838), died March 9, 1898, and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, add 1, Lot 55, Byron Township, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1900 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Luther Perkins (born May 1859, age 41, married 18 years, born Iowa, farmer), wife Cora B. Perkins (born July 1851, ager 48, married 18 years, 2 children born, 2 still living), daughter Adda O. Perkins (born Dec. 1882, age 17, born Iowa), daughter Bertha E. Perkins (born Apr. 1884, age 16, born Iowa), Father Austin W. Perkins (born Aug 1835, age 64, widowed, born Maine), mother-in-law Eliza E. King (born Sept. 1822, age 72, widowed, born Ohio).

1910 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Luther Perkins (age 50, married 1 time for 28 years, born Iowa), Cora A. Perkins (age 57, married 2 times, currently for 28 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born Michigan), and Father Austin Perkins (age 74, widowed, born Maine).

1915 Iowa State Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: A. W. Perkins, age 79, widowed, County Buchanan, P. O. Winthrop, Township: Middlefield. Occupation: retired. Extent of Education: Common 7, can read and write. Birth Place: Maine. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company H. Father's Birthplace: England. Mother's birthplace: Maine. Years in Iowa; 59.

1920 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Luther Perkins (age 60, born Iowa), wife Nellie B. Perkins (age 42, born Iowa), father Austin W. Perkins (age 84, widowed, born Maine).

Austin W. Perkins died Aug. 24, 1920 in Winthrop, Iowa (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Fairview Cemetery, add 1, Lot 55, Byron Township, Buchanan County, Iowa. Buchanan County Burial Records. Date of death according to this source was June 26, 1920. (Note Online family trees say date of death is July 26, 1920). The date on the tombstone is July 26, 1920.


Potter, Edward Finn He was born in 1829 in New York. He was the son of John Burgoyne Potter (Sept. 13, 1796 - Apr. 6, 1837) and Susan Burlingame (Mar. 30, 1798 - Feb. 27, 1888). I found a family tree that said he married Cornelia Caroline Chase on Apr. 26, 1857. However, other family trees have her married to Benjamin F. Potter (on the same date). Pension record Index for Benjamin F. Potter show his widow as Cornelia C. Potter. AND I found marriages record for children showing their parents as Benjamin F. Potter and Cornelia C. Chase. So I think that Benjamin (not Edward) was married to Cornelia C. Chase. I could not find a marriage record for Edward F. Potter--although he apparently married at some point, because he was divorced on the 1880 census.

Rev. John Burgoyne Potter was born in Washington County, N. Y., and was removed with his father and mother to Cortland County, N. Y. His early life, up to the time of his entering the ministry was spent the farm of his father, from whom he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked at intervals during his life. He was baptized by Rev. Alfred Bennett (a truly eminent man of that early day), united with the Baptist church at Homer, N. Y., and was licensed to preach by that church when about eighteen years of age. He was ordained a minister at Canandaigua, N. Y., 1830. He married Miss Nancy Morse, 1815, and settled near the home of his father in Solon, N. Y. His first wife died in 1820, and he married a second time, in 1822, to Miss Susanna Burlingame. He died in Brockport, N. Y., in 1837

* Solon Baptist Cemetery *

1850 Census: Canal Winchester, Fairfield, Ohio. J. B. Potter, (age 33, Physician, born New York,) Elizabeth Potter (age 29, born Vermont), Edward Potter (age 21, Telegraph Operator, born New York).

Note: In 1850 when Dr. Potter conducted the [telegraph] office, Edward Potter became the operator, and received by sound. When the line was extended farther down the Hocking valley Edward Potter went to Logan .

1860 Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: James B. Potter (age 31, farmer, born New York), Charlotte Potter (age 29, born New York), Joseph D. Potter (age 4, born Iowa), Truman J. Potter (age 1, born Iowa), Susanna Potter (age 63, born Vermont), Rebecca Foreman (age 13, born Ohio), Harrison Love (age 20, born PA) and Edward F. Potter (age 29, born New York).

1880 Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: J. B. Potter (age 53, farming, born NY), wife Charlotte Potter (age 51, bedridden, born NY), brother Edward Potter (age 51, divorced, farming, born NY, rheumatism), son Joseph Potter (age 23, born Iowa), son Truman Potter (age 21, born Iowa) and son Hiram Potter (age 18, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: John B. Potter (Township 87, Range 7, section 19 SE SE, age 57, farmer, born NY), Charlotte Potter (age 56, born NY), Joseph Potter (age 26, born Linn County, Iowa), Hiram Potter (age 22, born Buchanan County, Iowa). Alice Potter (age 19, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Melvin Potter (age 0, born Buchanan County, Iowa), and Edward F. Potter (age 52, born New York).

Edward F. Potter died July 3, 1889 and is buried in Oak Shade Cemetery, Lot 151, Section P.S., Grave Number 3, 2 Ave., 7 St., Marion, Linn County, Iowa.

Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans. Name: Edward F. Potter, Pvt. Co. H. 27th Iowa Infantry. Cemetery: Marion at Marion Iowa. Date of Death July 3, 1889.


Rich, Walter F. He was born Apr. 10, 1841 in Wisconsin. He was the son of Zina Pitcher Rich (Sept. 19, 1812 - Mar. 28, 1898) and Ann Tompkins (1846 - May 14, 1856). He married Eliza Talley on Dec. 16, 1866 in Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). He married second married Olive Weston on March 27, 1871 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of William Weston (Nov. 5, 1818 - Dec. 16, 1903) and Anna Mae Marchant (April 14, 1818 - April 1, 1886). Walter's brother William T. Rich and his cousins Cassius Marcus Stockwell and Edwin Stephen Stockwell also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. (their mother Roana Rich was a sister of his father Zina Pitcher Rich).

1850 Census: Parish, Kenosha County, Wisconsin: Zina P. Rich (age 37, farmer, born New York), Ann Rich (age 34, born New York), Sarah M. Rich (age 13, born New York), E. Darwin Rich (age 10, born Wisconsin), Walter F. Rich (age 9, born Wisconsin), William T. Rich (age 6, born Wisconsin), Henry C. Rich (age 4, born Wisconsin), and Caroline Rich (age 9/12, born Wisconsin).

1856 Iowa State Census, Prairie, Buchanan County, Iowa.: Z.P. Rich (age 42, born NY), E. D. Rich (age 17, born Wisconsin), W. F. Rich (age 14, born Wisconsin), W. T. Rich (age 12, born Wisconsin), H. C. Rich (age 10, born Wisconsin), C. Rich (age 7, born Wisconsin), M. A. Rich (age 5, born Wisconsin), E. I. Rich (age 2, born Iowa), A. T. Rich (age 0, born Iowa). L. Whitman (age 20, born NH).

Zina P. Rich (age 42), married Lydia L. Whitman (age 19) on Oct. 22, 1856 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Buchanan County Marriages (Book 1, M-4), 1848-1858)

1860 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa. Zina P. Rich (age 46, farmer, born NY), Lydia L. Rich (age 23, born VT). Walter F. Rich (age 19, born Wisconsin), Wm. T. Rich (age 16, born Wisconsin), Henry C. Rich (age 14, born Wisconsin), Caroline Rich (age 10, born Wisconsin), Ella I. Rich (age 6, born Iowa), Leonard Rich (age 2, born Iowa), Oscar Rich (age 5/12, born Iowa), Oliver Gaylord (age 23, born Ohio) and Hannah Beith (age 17, domestic, born Scotland).

1870 Census: Fremont, Buchanan County, Iowa: Walter Rich (age 28, Farmer, born Wisconsin), Eliza Rich (age 20, born Ohio), Anna Rich (age 2, born Iowa).

Eliza J. Rich (born 1850, died Jan 15, 1871). She is buried in Fleming Cemetery, Fremont, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1880 Census: Paddock and Steel Creek, Holt County, Nebraska: Walter Rich (age 39, father, farming, born Wisconsin), mother Oliva Rich (age 33, born Michigan), daughter Annie Rich (age 12, born Iowa), son William Rich (Age 6, born Iowa), Brother Henry Weston (age 21, farming, born Michigan.

1885 Nebraska State Census: Paddock, Holt County, Nebraska: Walter Brick (age 44, farmer, born Iowa), Olive Brick (age 37, born Michigan), Annie Brick (age 17, born Iowa) and William Brick (age 11, born Iowa).

1890 Veterans Census: Paddock, Holt County, Nebraska: Walter F. Rich, Private Co. H. 27 IA. Inf. Enlisted Mar. 10, 1864. Discharged Jan. 20, 1866. Length of Service: 1 year, 10 months, 10 days. Post Office Address: Paddock, Nebraska. Disability Incurred: Heart disease and Chronic diarrhea.

1900 Census: Paddock, Holt County, Nebraska: Walt Rich (born Apr. 1838, age 62, married 27 years, born Wisconsin, farmer), Wife Olive Rich (born Sept. 1846, age 56, married 27 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born Michigan), daughter Carrie Rich (born Feb. 1888, age 13, born Nebraska), Boarder Rosa Brug (Born May 1865, age 35, divorced born Iowa).

Walter F. Rich died Feb. 22, 1904 and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Atkinson, Holt County, Nebraska, Lot 15, Row 15, Grave 5.

His Widow O. M. Rich filed for a pension on May 25, 1904.


Rich, William T. He was born May 10, 1844 in Wisconsin. He was the son of Zina Pitcher Rich (Sept. 19, 1812 - Mar. 28, 1898) and Ann Tompkins (1846 - May 14, 1856). His brother Walter F. Rich and his cousins Cassius Marcus Stockwell and Edwin Stephen Stockwell also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. (their mother Roana Rich was a sister of his father Zina Pitcher Rich).

1850 Census: Parish, Kenosha County, Wisconsin: Zina P. Rich (age 37, farmer, born New York), Ann Rich (age 34, born New York), Sarah M. Rich (age 13, born New York), E. Darwin Rich (age 10, born Wisconsin), Walter F. Rich (age 9, born Wisconsin), William T. Rich (age 6, born Wisconsin), Henry C. Rich (age 4, born Wisconsin), and Caroline Rich (age 9/12, born Wisconsin).

1856 Iowa State Census, Prairie, Buchanan County, Iowa.: Z.P. Rich (age 42, born NY), E. D. Rich (age 17, born Wisconsin), W. F. Rich (age 14, born Wisconsin), W. T. Rich (age 12, born Wisconsin), H. C. Rich (age 10, born Wisconsin), C. Rich (age 7, born Wisconsin), M. A. Rich (age 5, born Wisconsin), E. I. Rich (age 2, born Iowa), A. T. Rich (age 0, born Iowa). L. Whitman (age 20, born NH).

Zina P. Rich (age 42), married Lydia L. Whitman (age 19) on Oct. 22, 1856 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Buchanan County Marriages (Book 1, M-4), 1848-1858)

1860 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa. Zina P. Rich (age 46, farmer, born NY), Lydia L. Rich (age 23, born VT). Walter F. Rich (age 19, born Wisconsin), Wm. T. Rich (age 16, born Wisconsin), Henry C. Rich (age 14, born Wisconsin), Caroline Rich (age 10, born Wisconsin), Ella I. Rich (age 6, born Iowa), Leonard Rich (age 2, born Iowa), Oscar Rich (age 5/12, born Iowa), Oliver Gaylord (age 23, born Ohio) and Hannah Beith (age 17, domestic, born Scotland).

1870 Census: Dry Valley, Lincoln Nevada: W. T. Rich (age 26, laborer, born Wisconsin. It looked like he was living in a hotel or boarding house. It was just a long list of names.

William T. Rich, Residence Bullionville, Nevada. Married Maria B. Atc on May 26, 1873, In Pioche, Lincoln County, Nevada (Nevada Marriages 1860-1987, Lincoln County Courthouse, Volume B, Page 12). (I suspect that her last name is misspelled. I did not find that family name in Ancestry.com census records or on any family tree. It could be an abbreviation of some sort.- But hopefully the Date, Place, Book and Page number will help someone if they are interested))

1875 Nevada State Census Lincoln County, Nevada: W. T. Rich, (age 31, laborer, born Wisconsin.)

1880 Census: Leeds, Washington County, Utah: William P. Rich (age 36, carpenter, born Wisconsin), wife Maria Rich (age 27, born Utah), son Zina P. Rich (age 4, born Nevada), daughter Caroline E. Rich (age 1, born Utah) and brother Henry C. Rich (age 24, born Wisconsin).

1890 Veterans Census: Panaca, Lincoln County, Nevada: William T. Rich, Private, Co. H. 27 Iowa Infty, Enlisted: Aug. 15, 1862, Discharged Aug. 8, 1865, Length of Service: 2 years, 11 months, 24 days. Post Office Address: Panaca, Lincoln County, Nevada. Disability Incurred: Shot in Left Arm.

He filed for a pension on Apr. 20, 1891 in Missouri.

Zine P. Rich (born Dec. 31, 1875, died Apr. 21, 1891) and is buried in Panaca Memorial Cemetery, Panaca, Lincoln County, Nevada.

1900 Census: Panaca, Lincoln County, Nevada: Richard Rich (born May 1844, age 56, married 27 years, born Wisconsin), wife Maria Rich (born May 1853, age 47, married 27 years, 3 children born, 1 still living, born Utah), daughter Carrie Rich (born Aug. 1878, age 21, born Utah), brother Henry Rich (born Jan. 1846, age 54, born New York. (NOTE everything fits for this to be William T. Rich except his first name. Month/Year/place of birth and state of death, wife's name, brother's name and his month/year/place of birth. -- I do wonder why they have Richard though. But I think this is him.)

His widow Maria B. Rich filed for a pension on Nov. 24, 1902 in Nevada.


Shurtleff, Alonzo He was born about 1838 in New York. He was probably the son of Galen Shurtleff (1809 - 1888) and Sally Ann Bacheldor (Jan 14,1815 - Nov. 15, 1882). He married Anna M. Craig on April 29, 1860 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Andrew V. and Caroline Craig.

1850 Census: Hartland, Niagara, New York: Galen Shirtleff (age 39, mason, born VT, Sally A. Shirtleff (age 35, born NY), Nathaniel Shirtleff (age 14, born NY), Alonzo L. Shirtleff (age 12, born NY), Adelaide Shirtleff (age 10, born NY), and Oscar G Shirtleff (age 8, born NY).

1856 Iowa State Census, Perry, Buchanan County, Iowa: Galand Shurtleff (age 42, born Vermont, Mason), S. A. Shurtleff (age 35, born NY), F. Shurtleff (age 20, born NY), A. Shurtleff (age 18, male born Mich), A. Shurtleff (age 16, female, born Mich), and O. Shurtleff (age 14, male, born Mich). The family had been in the state of Iowa for less than a year.

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Alonzo Shurtleff (age 21, docker Lawyer (Sawyer?), born NY), Anna Shurtleff (age 18, born PA). They were with a family named Burriss. Also living in Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa were Galen Shurtliff (age 52, mason, born Vermont) Sallie A. Shurtleff (age 47, born NY) and Ada Shurtleff (age 19, teacher, born Mich (?).

1870 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Carrie Craig (age 55, born Virginia), Orville Craig (age 26, born Pennsylvania), Howard Craig (age 24, born Pennsylvania), Edward Craig (age 17, born Pennsylvania), Perry Craig (age 15, born Pennsylvania), Andrew Craig (age 12, born Iowa), Alonzo Shurtleff (age 31, farm laborer, born NY), Annie Shurtleff (age 27, born PA), Eddie Shurtleff (age 8, born Iowa). (In 1870 Galen and Sarah Shurtleff were living in Polk county, Oregon).

1880 Census, Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Orval T. Craig, (age 36, born PA), brother Perry V. Craig (age 24, born Pennsylvania), brother Edward O. Craig (age 27, born Pennsylvania), wife Lucy Craig (age 27), sister Anna Shartleff (age 36, divorced, born Pennsylvania), son Edward A. Shartleff (age 17, born Iowa).

I could not find Alonzo in 1880 or 1885. I did find Edward Shurtleff in 1900 through 1930 in Iowa. On the 1925 Iowa State Census, he stated that his father was Alonzo Shurtleff and his mother was Anna Shurtleff.


Silker, Henry He was born June 6, 1837. Nativity was "Atlantic Ocean". Family tree information says "On Ship in New York City Harbor, NY. All of his siblings were born in Illinois, which probably explains Illinois on several census record. He was the son of Henry Silker (Feb. 23, 1807 - Sept. 28, 1862) and Helena Adelheid Boedeker (May 31, 1808 - Aug. 17. 1890). He married Sarah Catherine Clements on Apr. 26, 1860 in Centralia, Dubuque County, Iowa. She was the daughter of John and Lydia Ann Clements.

1850 Census; Maine, Cook County, Iowa: Henry Silker (age 43, farmer, born Germany), Adeline Silker (age 41, born Germany), Catharine Silker (age 10, born Illinois), Louise Silker (age 8, born Illinois), John Silker (age 6, born Illinois), Mary Silker (age 4, born Illinois), Menah Silker (age 2, born Illinois) and Henry Silker (age 13, born Germany).

1860 Census: Center, Dubuque County, Iowa: Henry Silker (age 23, laborer, born Illinois), Sarah Silker (age 24, born Illinois).

1870 Census: Madison, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry Silker (age 32, farmer, born Illinois), Sarah Silker (age 34, born Illinois), John Silker (age 3, born Iowa), Minne Silker (age 2, born Iowa) and John Clements (age 7, born Virginia).

1880 Census: Madison, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry Silker (age 44, farmer, born New York, parents born in Baden), wife Sarah Silker (age 44, born Illinois), son John Silker (age 14, born Iowa), daughter Mina E. Silker (age 12, born Iowa), son Edward N. Silker (age 8, born Iowa) and son Harley C. Silker (age 3, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa, Henry Silker, Private, Co. C (sic), Post Office Address Lamont. (The list has Co. C, but that was an error. He was in Company H. -- There is no Henry Silker in Company C - But there is a Henry Sill, and he is listed directly below in this listing).

1885 Iowa State Census: Madison, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry Silker (Township 90, Range 11, section 4, NE NW, age 47, farmer, born at sea), Sarah C. Silker (age 49, born Illinois), John U. Silker (age 18, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Mina E. Silker (age 17, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Edward N. Silker (age 13, born Buchanan County, Iowa), and Harley C. Silker (age 7, born Buchanan County, Iowa.

1895 Iowa State Census: Henry Silker, age 59, born US. Page 158. Residence, Buffalo, Linn County, Iowa

1900 Census: Fairview, Jones, Iowa: Henry Silker (born June 1837, age 62, divorced, born at sea, parents born Germany, farmer).

Sarah Catherine (Clements) Silker (born Oct. 18, 1835), died July 1, 1905 and is buried in Campton/Oak Hill Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1910 Census: Township 157, Range, 100, Williams County, North Dakota: John U. Silker (age 43, married 1 time for 16 years, born Iowa, farmer), son Wyatt E. Silker (age 15, born Iowa) and father Henry Silker (age 73, widowed, born at sea).

1915 Iowa State Census: Marion, Linn County, Iowa: Henry Silker, age 78, widowed, County Linn, Town: Marion, Ward 4, Occupation: Retired. Extent of Education: Grammar 8, can read and write. Birth Place: New York. Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State Iowa, Regiment 27, Company H.

Henry Silker died Apr. 15, 1916 at Marion, Iowa (Pension Index Record) and is buried in Campton/Oak Hill Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

Iowa Cemetery Records: Name: Henry Silker, Death Date: Apr. 15, 1916, page 384. Birth Date: June 6, 1836. Cemetery: Oak Hill. Town, Madison. Level Info: Buchanan County Burial Records.

Children of Henry Silker and Sarah Catherine Clements:

  1. Mary Iona Silker (Sept. 3, 1861 - Feb. 6, 1865)
  2. John Ulysses Silker (July 22, 1866 - Feb. 1933)
  3. Mina E. Silker (1868 - Aug. 11, 1950)
  4. Edward N. Silker (1872 - Nov. 6, 1948)
  5. Harley Clements Silker (Mar. 23, 1877 - Nov. 3, 1949).

Slavin, John He was born about 1840 in New York.

His mother Rosanna Slavin filed for a pension on Sept. 12, 1877.

His father Michael Slavin filed for a pension on in Nebraska.

His pension index record for the 27th Iowa was cross referenced with 4th Iowa Cavalry, Company B.


Smyser, George Wesley. He was born about 1833 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of John Lischy Smyser (Oct. 25, 1811 - Aug. 2, 1869) and Leah Diehl (1814 -Nov. 9, 1900). He married Susan Neidigh on Nov. 17, 1866 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of David (1790 - Mar. 25, 1871) and Barbara Neidigh. (1794 - Feb. 9, 1873)

1850 Census: Plain, Wayne County, Ohio: John Smyser (age 38, farmer, born PA), Leah Smyser (age 36, born PA), George W. Smyser (age 16, born PA), Catharine Smyser (age 14, born Ohio), Daniel Smyser (age 10, born Ohio), Mary Smyser (age 9, born Ohio), Sarah A. Smyser (age 4, born Ohio), and John T. Smyser (age 1, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Smyzer (age 45, farmer, born PA), Leah Smyzer (age 41, born PA), G. W. Smyzer (age 21, born PA, farmer), Catharine Smyzer (age 19, born Ohio), Mary Smyzer (age 15, born Ohio), Daniel Smyzer (age 17, born Ohio), Sarah Smyzer (age 15, born Ohio), Leah Smyzer (age 6, born Ohio), Ella Smyzer (age 2, born Iowa) and Michael Smyzer (age 60, widowed, born Penn.). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 3 years.

1860 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Smyzer (age 48, farmer, born PA), Leah Smyzer (age 48, born PA), Geo. W. Smyzer (age 25, farmer, born PA), Kate Smyzer (age 23, born Ohio), Dan'l Smyzer (age 21, born Ohio), Mary Smyzer (age 19, born Ohio), Sarah N. Smyzer (age 13, born Ohio), Leah Smyzer (age 8, born Ohio), Ellen M. Smyzer (age 5, born Iowa), John Diehl (age 13, born Indiana).

1870 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: George W. Smyzer (age 32, farmer, born Ohio), Susan Smyser (age 28, born Ohio), Viola Smyser (age 2, born Iowa). John Smyser (age 11/12, born Iowa), David Neidigh (age 80, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Barbara Neidigh (age 76, born Pennsylvania.)

1880 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Wesley Smyser (age 47, farmer, born Pennsylvania), wife Susan Smyser (age 42, born Ohio), daughter Mary V. Smyser (age 12, born Iowa), son John Smyser (age 10, born Iowa), daughter Emma Smyser (age 2, born Iowa) and servant Harry Philips (age 35, farmer, laborer).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa, 27th Iowa: G. W. Smyser, Lieutenant, Co. H, Present Post Office Address: Independence.

1885 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: G. W. Smyser (Township 89, Range 9, section 24, SE SW, age 52, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Susan Smyser (age 44, born Ohio), Mary V. Smyser (age 17, born Buchanan County, Iowa), John W. Smyser (age 15, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Neva M. Smyser (age 6, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Walter Sampson (age 13, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

Susan C. (Neidigh) Smyser died Feb. 12, 1895. She is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

The following letter was found here.
Submitted by
Tam Stuart

George W. Smyser Letter

1900 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa; George W. Smyser (born Aug. 1834, age 65, widowed, born Pennsylvania, Land Lord), daughter Neva Smyser (born Apr. 1878 (age 22, born Iowa).

1910 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Crofford R. Kirkner (age 44, married 1 time for 20 years, born Pennsylvania), Mary V. Kirkner (age 43, married 1 tie for 20 years, 2 children born, 2 still living. Son L? W. Kirkner (age 20, born Iowa) daughter S? Kirkner (age 9, born Iowa), father-in-law Wesley Smyser (age 75, widowed, born Ohio). (Note there was a large ink blot covering the names of the children).

George W. Smyser died Nov. 9, 1910 and is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

In the 1925 Iowa State Census, Violo Kickner lists her parents as George W. Smyser and Susie Needy.


Smyser, Phillip C. He was born Aug. 3, 1825 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of Michael Smyser and Rebecca F. Ferree. He married Emeline Decker on July 5, 1856. (Buchanan County Marriages, Book 1, S-Z 1848- 1858). She was the daughter of William Casper Decker.

1856 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Phillip C. Smyser (age 31, born Pennsylvania, barber). He was listed with a group of other people.

1870 Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: Phillip Smyzer (age 45, farmer, born Pennsylvania), Emily Smyzer (age 30, born Ohio), Ellen Smyzer (age 10, born Iowa). They were indexed as Samezer.

1880 Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: Philip Smyser (age 54, farmer, born Pennsylvania), wife Emeline Smyser (age 40, born Ohio), daughter Ella Smyser (age 19, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: Phillip C. Smyser (age 59, farming, born Pennsylvania), Emeline Smyser (age 55, born Ohio).

1900 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa; Phillip C. Smyser (born Aug. 1825, age 74, married 43 years, born Pennsylvania), wife Emeline Smyser (born Jan. 1839, age 61, married 43 years, 0 children born, born Ohio).

1910 Census: Independence Ward 1, Buchanan County, Iowa: P. C. Smyser (age 84, married 1 time for 53 years, born Pennsylvania), wife Emeline Smyser (age 71, married 1 time for 53 years, 0 children born).

Phillip C. Smyser died Feb. 19, 1911 (Pension Index Record). and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

His widow Emeline Smyser filed for a pension on March. 6, 1911.


Sproull, Thomas He was born May 3, 1836 in Ohio. He is the son of Hugh and Margarett Sproull. He married Malinda Noggle on May 24, 1868 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of William and Eliza Noggle.

1850 Census: Mill, Tuscarawas County, Ohio: Hugh Sproull (age 41, farmer, born Ireland), Margaret Sproull (age 38, born Ireland), William Sproull (age 16, born Ohio), Thomas Sproull (age 14, born Ohio), Caldwell Sproull (age 13, born Ohio), John Sproull (age 12, born Ohio), Alexander Sproull (age 6, born Ohio). Nelson Sproull (age 4, born Ohio) and George H. Sproull (age 8/12, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Wm. Logan (age 56, farmer, born PA), Mary A. Logan (age 49, born PA), Jeremiah Logan (age 20, born Ohio), Sarah J. Spraul (age 18, born Ohio), Susanna Logan (age 16, born Ohio), Jas. W. Logan (age 14, born Ohio), Josephine Logan (age 11, born Iowa), Dan'l E. Logan (age 8, born Iowa), Thos. Sproul (age 24, born Ohio), and Lilly M. Sproul (age 6/12, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thomas Sproull (age 35, farmer, born Ohio), Malinda Sproull (age 24, born Ohio), Silla Sproull (age 10, born Iowa), William Sproull (age 1, born Iowa), and Alexander Sproull (age 25, farmer, born Ohio),

1880 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thomas Sproull (age 45, farmer, born Ohio), wife Malinda Sproull (age 35, born Ohio), son Willie Sproull (age 10, born Iowa), daughter Maude Sproull (age 8, born Iowa), daughter Floy Sproull (age 6, born Iowa), daughter Pearl Sproull (age 4, born Iowa), son Dair Sproull (age 2, born Iowa) and not named son (born May, age 3/12, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Thomas Sproull (age 49, born Ohio), Malinda Sproull (age 38, born Ohio), Lillie M. Sproull (age 25, born Iowa), William H. Sproull (age 15, born Iowa), Maude Sproul (age 13, born Iowa), Susan F. Sproull (age 11, born Iowa). Pearl Sproull (age 8, born Iowa), Dair Sproul (age 6, born Iowa), John F. Sproul (age 4, born Iowa), and Albert C. Sproull (age 2, born Iowa.)

Thomas Sproull died Jan. 4, 1898 and is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

His widow Malinda Sproull filed for a pension on Jan. 22, 1898 in Iowa.

1900 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Malinda Sproull (born June 1846, age 53, widowed, 9 children born, 9 still living, born Ohio), daughter Pearl Sproull (born May 1876, age 24, born Iowa), son John T. Sproull (born May 1880, age 20, born Iowa), son Albert C. Sproull (born Oct. 1872 (SIC), age 17, born Iowa), daughter Hazel D. Sproull (born Apr. 1885, age 15, born Iowa) and son Frank D. Sproull (born May 1888, age 12, born Iowa). (NOTE: Albert's year of birth is obviously incorrect, but it was clearly written as 1872. Most likely it should be 1882.)

Malinda (Noggle) Sproull (born June 18, 1846), died Jan. 28, 1917 and is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Children of Thomas Hugh Sproull and Malinda Noggle:

  1. Lilly M. Sproull, b. 1860
  2. William Hugh Sproull, b. July 1869
  3. Maude Carrie Sproull, b. Aug. 8, 1871; d. July 23, 1950
  4. Susan Floy Sproull, b. 1874
  5. Pearl Sproull, b. May 1876
  6. Dair Howe Sproull, b. Mar. 6, 1878; d. May 9, 1952
  7. Ford John Sproull, b. May 19, 1880; d. Aug. 1965
  8. Cleve Albert Sproull, b. Oc. 23, 1882; d. Aug. 30, 1972
  9. Hazel Dell Sproull, b. Apr. 9, 1885
  10. Frank Noggle Sproull, b. May 21, 1888; d. Oct. 1973

Stanford, Alfred K. He was born April 26, 1841 in Allentown, Monmouth County, New Jersey. He was the son of Thomas and Mary Stanford. He married Isabella Jane Haskins on Nov. 4, 1861 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934) She was the daughter of Harvey B. Haskins (Sept. 3, 1805 0 Sept. 22, 1867) and Lydia Ann Sutton (Apr. 20, 1805 - Feb. 26, 1900). Her brother James C. Haskins also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. Alfred K. Stanford married second Catherine Cox on Sept. 25, 1873 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). He married third Hannah Jackson on May 18, 1904 in Lake county, Florida (Florida, Marriages, 1837-1974)

1850 Census: Lower Makefield, Bucks County, Pennsylvania: Andrew K. Rowan (age 21, Grocer, born New Jersey), Alfred K. Stanford (age 9, born New Jersey).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Cordell (age 24, farmer, born Ohio), Sarah A. Cordel (age 22, born ?) Alfred Cordell (age 20, born Ohio), Albert Cordell (age 17, born Ohio), Benj. H. Reece (age 4, born Iowa) and Alfred H. Stanford (age 20, born New Jersey). Note: Albert and Alfred Cordell also served in Company H, 27th Iowa Infantry.

1870 Census: Homer, Buchanan County, Iowa: Alford Stamford (age 45, farmer, born New Jersey), Isabel Stamford (age 40, born Ohio), George Stamford (age 11, born Iowa), Hyatt Stamford (age 9, born Iowa), James Stamford (age 4, born Iowa), Charles Stamford (age 3, born Iowa), Theresa Stamford (age 1, born Iowa) and Lillie Stamford (age 1, born Iowa).

Isabella (Haskins) Stanford (born 1842, died January 30, 1871 and is buried in Rowley Cemetery, Homer Township, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1880 Census: Homer, Buchanan County, Iowa: Alfred K. Stanford (age 39, farmer, born New Jersey), wife Catherine A. Stanford (age 24, born New York), son Hyatt Stanford (age 17, born Iowa), son Charles Stanford (age 13, born Iowa), son Frederick Stanford (age 5, born Iowa), daughter Theresa Stanford (age 11, born Iowa), son William Stanford (age 4, born Iowa), daughter Rosa Stanford (age 2, born Iowa), and son Jesse Stanford (age 1, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Homer, Buchanan County, Iowa: Alford Stanford (Township 87, Range 9, Section 21, SW SW, age 41, farmer, born New Jersey), Katie Stanford (age 29, born New York), Fred Stanford (age 10, born Iowa), Willie Stanford (age 8, born Iowa), Rosa Stanford (age 7, born Iowa), Jessie Stanford (age 6, born Iowa), Leland Stanford (age 4, born Iowa) and Ray Stanford (age 2, born Iowa).

1900 Census: Homer, Buchanan County, Iowa: Alfred K. Stanford (born Apr. 1841, age 59, married 26 years, born New Jersey, farmer), wife Catharine A. Stanford (born July 1855, age 44, married 26 years, 10 children born, 9 still living, born New York), son Leland Stanford (born Nov, 1880, age 19, born Iowa), son Ray Stanford (born May 1883, age 17, born Iowa), son Carl Stanford (born Nov. 1884, age 15, born Iowa), son Harry Stanford (born Nov. 1887, age 12, born Iowa) and son Elmer O. Stanford (born Apr. 1889, age 11, born Iowa).

Catherine A. (Cox) Stanford born 1855, died Oct. 25, 1900 and is buried in Rowley Cemetery, Homer Township, Buchanan County Iowa.

Medical Facts, April 15, 1902: Heart disease, rheumatism, kidney disease and piles. (per pension papers).

Oct. 20, 1903, moved to Minneola, Florida.

Description: Mar. 7, 1909: 5' 4", dark complexion, gray eyes, dark hair.

Alfred K. Stanford died Nov. 6, 1909 at Minneola, Florida (Pension Index Record). He is buried in Rowley Cemetery, Add 1, Lot 259, Homer Twp, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Carey Hand Undertaker Record, Orlando, Orange County, FL.
(found on Find a Grave)

Undertaker's Memoranda

Date of Death: Nov. 7, 1909
Name: Mr. A. K. Stanford
Residence: Minneola, Fla.
Age: 69 years
Keeping Body: em. 25.00
Casket: 6/0 Black B. Cop L. & Box 150.00
Cemetery: Rawley Iowa
Carriages/Auto 15.00
Cause of Death: Heart Trouble

Remarks: His son C. A. Stanford accompanied remains to Iowa. Bill made to his wife Mrs. A. K. Stanford.

Iowa Civil War Soldier Burial Records: Name: Alfred K. Stanford; Rank: Private; Unit: IA 12 Inf. H; Birth Information: Apr. 26, 1841 NJ; Death Information: Nov. 6, 1909; Cemetery: Rowley; Cemetery Location: Buchanan Co. IA; Comments: Add 1, lot 259 enl IA 27 Inf H 04 Jan 1864 age 23 res Buchanan Co trans IA 12 Inf H 15 Jul 1865 m.o. 20 Jan 1866 Memphis TN.

His widow Hannah Stanford filed for a pension on Jan. 17, 1910 in Florida.

1910 Census: Minneola, Lake County, Florida: Hannah Stanford (age 62, widowed, 1 child born, 1 still living, born England). Charles Stanford (age 43, born Iowa) was listed on the same page.

1925 Iowa State Census: Rose M. Metcalf, Fred L. Stanford, William G. Stanford, Jess M. Stanford and Harry Stanford list their parents as Alfred K. Stanford and Kattie, Catherine, Kathryn, Kathrin, and Kate Cox. Each one had a slight variation on the spelling of her first name, but her surname was COX on all the census records.

Children of Alfred K. Stanford and Isabella Jane Haskins:

  1. George Stanford, b. about 1859
  2. Harvey "Hyatt" Stanford, b. July 6, 1862; d. April 13, 1916
  3. James Stanford, b. about 1866
  4. Charles Stanford, b. about 1867
  5. Lillian Jerene Stanford, b. Mar. 12, 1969; d. Oct. 12, 1936
  6. Theresa Stanford, born about 1869

Children of Alfred K. Stanford and Catherine Amanda Cox:

  1. Frederick L. Stanford, b. Oct. 9, 1874
  2. William Stanford, b. Dec. 21, 1875
  3. Rosa May Stanford, b. Sept. 28, 1877
  4. Jesse M. Stanford, b. Jan. 25, 1879; d. Dec. 21, 1960
  5. Leland Stanford, b. Nov. 26, 1880; d. July 4, 1950
  6. Ray Stanford, b. May 25, 1883; d. Jan. 26, 1950
  7. Carl B. Stanford, b. Nov. 11, 1885
  8. Harry M. Stanford, b. Nov. 5, 1887
  9. Elmer O. Stanford, b. April 20, 1889, d. 1929

Stockwell, Cassius Marcus He was born Dec. 11, 1845 in Kenosha, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. He was the son of Stephen Stockwell (Sept. 10, 1815 - May 8, 1847) and Rowena/Roana Rich (March. 31, 1822 - Oct. 8, 1855) According to online family tree information his father died from exposure to severe cold weather conditions after being stranded up a tree because of wild wolves. His mother and sister were killed by Indians. The two boys were raised by their Uncle Weed Rich. Cassius Stockwell married Minerva Rachel (Tripp) Baker on June 10, 1874 in Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934) She had previously married Judson A. Baker on Apr. 22, 1871 in Buchanan County, Iowa (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of David W. Tripp and Sarah Fish. Cassius' brother Edwin Stephen Stockwell and his cousins Walter Rich and William T. Rich also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. His mother Roana Rich was a sister to their father Zina Pitcher Rich.

Notes found in an online family tree

Name: Cassius Marcus STOCKWELL
Birth: 11 DEC 1845 in Salem, Wisconsin
Death: 17 JUL 1927 in Houston, Tx
Burial: 20 JUL 1927 Houston, Tx

Event: Joined Civil War 10 MAR 1864 At the age of 19 Cash (along with his cousin Walt Rich & Cash's older brother) joined Company H, 27th Iowa Volunteers Infantry, & stayed in untill the end of the war.

Event: A tid bit Cash once belonged to the Congregational Church but was cheated out his home by a minister. This dishonest act by a "man of the cloth" so disillusioned him that he would never attend church again.

Event: A tid bit 13 DEC 1866 After the war He and brother went to Nebraska and homesteaded land. Grasshoppers came that year and devastated the land so they abandoned the land.

Education: Cash was a bit of a mystic (6th sense) because he saw the vision of his mother and sister being burned in a cabin by Indians long before the news actually reached him.....His daughter Elisa had the same powers.

Education: He taught school for a few years at Winthrop, Iowa. He was good at imparting knowledge to children and his exceptional ability and knowledge of math.

Occupation: 1 DEC 1875 He moved his family from Winthrop, Iowa by covered wagon and moved per his brother Ed's request to Flatonia, Tx & worked odd jobs but mostly played fiddle in dances in the area.

Event: Talent -- He inherited music talent from his father. He had wonderful singing voice. Age 80 and living in Houston he entered a State contest for violinists & won 1st prize.

Event: Talent -- This musical talent has been present in all Stockwells in past and future generations. Nelson Horner's talent was passed to his son Don & grandchildren....

Event: Misc -- From the time he was 8 yr's old he had been reared by his Uncle Weed Rich & his wife Emily Gaylord.

Event: Misc -- Cash was a very athletic young man, very strong. He could walk on his hands all over the place.


Name: Minerva Rachel Tripp BAKER
Birth: 25 FEB 1853 in Independence, Iowa
Death: 3 FEB 1925 in Houston, Tx
Death: in Conflict of information-one record shows 02-30-1925 & another shows 02-03-1925 (as of 06-26-2002 date is not clear). Burial: 6 FEB 1925 Houston, Tx

Event: Name (Facts Pg) Had one child-Sam Baker Jr

Event: Name (Facts Pg) Minerva had first married Samuel Judson Baker

Event: A tid bit She a son named Sam Baker Jr by marriage to first husb Judson Baker Sr, he was a young soldier and was killed in service.

PROP: Her first husb had left her a farm in Kansas.

NATI: Minerva was of English decent, not known if from father or mothers family, no other details known.

Event: Misc Minerva was only 9 yr old when mother died, father was in Union Army & she was raised by her mother's sister untill she married Baker.

1850 Census: Salem, Kenosha, Wisconsin: J. Bolivar Wagoner (age 24, farmer, born New York. Rowena Wagoner (age 27, born New York), Edwin Stockwell (age 8, born Wisconsin) Cassius M. Stockwell (age 4, born Wisconsin) and John E. Wagoner (age 19, farmer, born New York).

1856 Iowa State Census: Prairie, Buchanan County, Iowa: S. W. Rich (age 31, born New York, farmer), E. M. Rich (age 21, born Ohio), A. L. Rich (age 0, born Iowa), E. Stockwell (age 12, born Wisconsin), and C. M. Stockwell (age 10, born Wisconsin).

1860 Census, Fremont, Buchanan County, Iowa: Smith W. Rich (age 31, farmer, born England), Emily M. Rich (age 28, born Ohio), Arthur D. Rich (age 4, born Iowa), Chas. Rich (age 2, born Iowa), Edwin S. Stockwell (age 18, born Wisconsin), Cassius M. Stockwell (age 14, born Wisconsin),

1870 Census: Fremont, Buchanan County, Iowa: Smith Rich (age 45, farmer, born New York), Emily Rich (age 35, born Ohio), Arthur Rich (age 14, born Iowa), George Rich (age 8, born Michigan), Mary Rich (age 6, born Iowa), August Rich (*age 3, born Iowa), Mary Rich (age 3/12, born Iowa), Mark Rich (age 3/12, born Iowa), Ella Rich (age 16, born Iowa), Drusilla Polen (age 17, domestic servant, born Iowa), Cassius Stockwell (age 24, farm laborer, born Wisconsin), and Frank Gayland (age 21, farmer laborer, born Ohio).

1890 Veterans Census: Leslie, Carroll County, Missouri, C. M. Stockwell (Minerva Stockwell), Private Co. H. 12 Iowa Volunteer, Enlisted Mar. 10, 1864, discharged Jan 17, 1866, Length of Service: 1 year, 10 months, 7 days., Post Office Address: Mandeville, MO, Carroll County. Disability Incurred: Chron. Diar.

1910 Census: District 56, Justice Precinct 4, Galveston, Texas: Cashes M. Stockwell (age 66, married 1 time for 36 years, born Wisconsin, Nursery man), wife Minerva Stockwell (age 56, married 2 times, currently for 36 years, 12 children born, 10 still living), son Arthur Stockwell (age 18, born Texas).

Cassius M. Stockwell died July 19, 1928 and is buried in Forest Park Cemetery, Houston, Harris County, Texas. Cause of death was Cancer of Stomach. (Note: I requested a photo of the tombstone through Find a Grave. This was their response: The general problem they reported is: "I searched the stated plot or section and could not find the grave. They also reported, specifically: Plot: Section E, Lot 49 - There is not a stone in that plot for Cassius Stockwell. There is one for Theodore Gail Jr, Mildred Pearl and baby M.J. Stockwell.")

Texas Death Index: Name. C. M. Stockwell. Death Date: July 17, 1928. Death County, Harris. Certificate: 30782.

Children of Cassius Marcus Stockwell and Minerva Rachel Tripp:

  1. Eliza Stockwell
  2. Lavina Stockwell
  3. Amanda Stockwell b: 22 MAR 1875 in Winthrop, Buchanan Co., Iowa
  4. Roana Stockwell b: 13 JAN 1878
  5. Harvey E. Stockwell b: APR 1882 in Texas
  6. Garfield Stockwell b: ABT. 1889
  7. Marcella Stockwell b: ABT. 1892 in Texas
  8. Vera Stockwell b: 24 FEB 1892
  9. Arthur Rich Stockwell b: 9 JAN 1895 in Texas

Stockwell, Edwin Stephen He was born June 27, 1842 in Salem, Kenosha County, Wisconsin. He was the son of Stephen Stockwell (Sept. 10, 1815 - May 8, 1847) and Rowena/Roanna Rich (March. 31, 1822 - Oct. 8, 1855). According to online family tree information his father died from exposure to severe cold weather conditions after being stranded up a tree because of wild wolves. His mother and sister were killed by Indians. The two boys were raised by their Uncle Weed Rich. Edwin S. Stockwell married Louisa Emila Palmer on Nov. 26, 1868 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). His brother Cassius Marcus Stockwell and his cousins Walter Rich and William T. Rich also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. His mother Roana Rich was a sister to their father Zina Pitcher Rich.

Edwin Stephen Stockwell Edwin Stephen Stockwell

The images of Edwin S. Stockwell was found here.

1850 Census: Salem, Kenosha, Wisconsin: J. Bolivar Wagoner (age 24, farmer, born New York. Rowena Wagoner (age 27, born New York), Edwin Stockwell (age 8, born Wisconsin) Cassius M. Stockwell (age 4, born Wisconsin) and John E. Wagoner (age 19, farmer, born New York).

1856 Iowa State Census: Prairie, Buchanan County, Iowa: S. W. Rich (age 31, born New York, farmer), E.M. Rich (age 21, born Ohio), A. L. Rich (age 0, born Iowa), E. Stockwell (age 12, born Wisconsin), and C. M. Stockwell (age 10, born Wisconsin).

1860 Census, Fremont, Buchanan County, Iowa: Smith W. Rich (age 31, farmer, born England), Emily M. Rich (age 28, born Ohio), Arthur D. Rich (age 4, born Iowa), Chas. Rich (age 2, born Iowa), Edwin S. Stockwell (age 18, born Wisconsin), Cassius M. Stockwell (age 14, born Wisconsin),

1870 Census: Fremont, Buchanan County, Iowa: Edward Stockwell (age 28, farmer, born Wisconsin), Louisa Stockwell (age 18, born Iowa) and Mary Timpson (age 22, domestic servant, born Massachusetts)

1880 Census: Precinct 4, Colorado, Texas: Sebron Stapleton (age 42), Kate Stapleton (age 32), Ben Stapleton (age 10), Anna Stapleton (age 7), Sadai Stapleton (age 3), Sam Stapleton (age 10 m) and E. S. Stockwell (age 37, born Wisconsin, married, wood chopper).

1900 Census: Alvin, Brazoria, Texas: Edwin S. Stockwell (born June 1842 (age 57, married 31 years, born Wisconsin, farmer), wife Eliza E. Stockwell (born June 1852, age 47, married 31 years, 9 children born, 7 still living, born Iowa), son Elmer P. Stockwell (born Aug. 1872, age 27, born Iowa), son Weed A. Stockwell (born Feb. 1876, age 24, born Texas), daughter Clara L. Stockwell (born Sept. 1878, age 21, born Texas), daughter Owen N. Stockwell (born Sept. 1885, age 14, born Texas), son Edwin S. Stockwell, Jr. (born Aug. 1889, age 10, born Texas) and son Tyner L. Stockwell (born Feb. 1895, age 5, born Texas).

1910 Census: District 9, Alvin, Brazoria County, Texas: Edwin S. Stockwell (age 67, married 1 time for 42 years, born Wisconsin), wife Louisa E. Stockwell (age 57, married 1 time for 42 years, 9 children born, 7 still living, born Iowa), daughter Owen Stockwell (age 24, born Texas), son Edwin S. Stockwell, Jr., (age 20, born Texas), son Tyner Stockwell (age 15, born Texas). His son Weed A. Stockwell (age 34, born Texas) and family were living next door.

1920 Census: District 5, Alvin, Brazoria County, Texas: Edwin S. Stockwell (age 77, born Wisconsin), wife Louisa E. Stockwell (age 67, born Iowa).

1930 Census: District 8, Alvin, Brazoria County, Texas: Edwin S. Stockwell (age 87, married. Age 26 at first marriage, born Wisconsin), wife Angelia C. Stockwell (age 76, married, age 24 at first marriage, born Wisconsin).

Edwin S. Stockwell died Jan. 25, 1935 and is buried in Confederate Cemetery, Alvin (Brazoria County), TX. His death certificate shows that cause of death was coronary occlusion. Married. Name of wife: Angela Stockwell. Date of birth: June 27, 1842. Occupation: Nurseryman. Birthplace: Near Kenosha, Wis. Father's name: Stephen Stockwell. Mother's Name: Amanda Rich. Informant was William R. Stockwell.

This cemetery was originally established for Confederate Veterans and their families. Later it was opened to public burials, to include Union Soldiers.

Children of Edwin Stephen Stockwell and Louisa Emila Palmer.

  1. William Rich Stockwell b: 17 JUN 1870
  2. Elmer Palmer Stockwell b: 7 AUG 1872
  3. Flora Minerva Stockwell b: 19 AUG 1874
  4. Weed Arthur Stockwell b: 18 FEB 1876
  5. Clarissa Louise Stockwell b: 28 SEP 1878
  6. Stella Stockwell b: 29 NOV 1883
  7. Owen Stockwell b: 30 AUG 1885
  8. Edwin Stephen Stockwell JR. b: 17 AUG 1889
  9. Tyner Louis Stockwell b: 19 FEB 1895

Stoneman, Martin Luther He was born about 1839 in Ohio. He was the son of John (1794 -?) and Catharine Elizabeth Glass (Dec. 20, 1797 - 1845). He married Elizabeth Gates on Dec. 31, 1870 in Buchanan County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Henry M. Gates (July 23, 1810 - Dec. 15, 1876) and Jane Hawley (1813 - 1879). He married second Isabell Glass. She was the daughter of Martin Glass (Jul. 28, 1809 - Jan. 26, 1901) and Nancy Belek (April 11, 1816 - May 5, 1870). It appears to me - from online family trees - that Catherine Elizabeth Glass and Martin Glass were siblings. If that is correct, then Martin L. Stoneman married his cousin Isabelle Glass.

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: John Stoneman (age 63, farmer, born PA), Eliza Stoneman (age 43, born PA), Buller Stoneman (age 23, laborer, born O), Rufus Stoneman (age 18, born O), Luther Stoneman (age 22, born O), Elizabeth A. Stoneman (age 12, born O) and Susan A. Stoneman (age 6, born O).

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Henry Deihl (age 26, farmer, born Indiana), Mary Deihl (age 28, born Ohio), Luther Stoneman (age 30, born Ohio).

Arthur Haines Stoneman was born Dec. 2, 1871.

Elizabeth (Gates) Stoneman (born Feb. 5, 1851), died May 25, 1873 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1880 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: M. Luther Stoneman (age 38, farmer, born Ohio), wife Bell Stoneman (age 30, born Ohio), son Arthur H. Stoneman (age 8, born Iowa), niece Hattie M. Glass (age 13, born Ohio) and niece Cliffe E. Glass, (age 3, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Luther Stoneman (age 45, farmer, born Ohio), Belle Stoneman (age 35, born Ohio), Arthur Stoneman (age 13, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Cliffie E. Glass (age 8, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1900 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Luther M. Stoneman (born Aug. 1839, age 60, married 20 years, born Ohio, landlord), wife Isabelle Stoneman (born Aug. 1844, age 50, married 20 years, 0 children born, born Ohio).

Martin L. Stoneman died Oct. 5 1906 (Pension Index Record), and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

His widow Isabell Stoneman filed for a pension on Nov. 3, 1906.

Isabell (Glass) Stoneman died in 1938 and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Winthrop, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Note: the 1925 Iowa State Census for A. H. Stoneman, born about 1873, lists his parents as Martin L. Stoneman and Elizabeth Gates.


Stutson, Howard T. He was born Feb. 14, 1844 in Hillsdale, Michigan. He was the son of Lester Stutson and Martha Howes/Hawes. (1925 Iowa State Census) He married Cordelia Elizabeth (Wigg) Campbell on Nov. 4, 1868 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Edward Wigg and Phyllis. (1925 Iowa State Census). Cordelia was previously married to William Campbell and had three children: William H., Edward and Cordelia. (I found William's first name on the 1925 Iowa State Census for Edward V. Campbell, who lived in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa and reported that his father's name was William Campbell and his mother's name was Cordelia Wigg. I then found his name listed on all the marriage records of the three children.)

1850 Census: East Genesee, Genesee County, Michigan: Lester P. Studson (age 31, farmer, born Ohio), Martha Studson (age 30, born New York), Ellen S. Studson (age 9, born Ohio), Howard T. Studson (age 6, born Michigan), Joseph T. Studson (age 2, born Michigan) and Joseph Stedson (age 20, farmer, born New York).

1856 Iowa State Census: Cedar, Muscatine County, Iowa: Lester P. Stutson (age 37, born Ohio), Martha Stutson (age 34, born NY), Ellen Stutson (age 15, born NY), Howard Stutson (age 12, born Michigan), Joseph Stutson (age 10, born Michigan), Mary Stutson (age 4, born Michigan), and Charles Stutson (age 2, born Michigan)

1860 Census: Oakland, Louisa County, Iowa: Lester Stutson (age 41, farmer, born Ohio), Martha Stutson (age 34, born New York), Howard Stutson (age 16, born Michigan), Joseph Stutson (age 12, born Michigan), Nancy Stutson (age 8, born Michigan) and Charles Stutson (age 5, born Michigan).

1870 Census, Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Howard Stutson (age 26, born Michigan), Cordelia Stutson (age 28, born New York), William Campbell (age 8, born New York), Edward Campbell (age 5, born NY), and Cordelia Campbell (age 2, born NY). Lester Stutson, age 60, born Ohio), Martha Stutson (age 58, born NY) and their son George B. Stutson (age 17) were living next door. Next to them were Edward and Mary Wigg.

1880 Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Howard Stutson (age 36, farmer, born Michigan), wife Cordelia E. Stutson (age 38, born NY), daughter Cordelia E. Stutson (age 12, born NY), son Charles H. Stutson (age 9, born Iowa), son Earnest A. Stutson (age 7, born Iowa), daughter Harriet E. Stutson (age 5, born Iowa) and son Vernon E. Stutson (age 1, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa: Howard Stutson, Private, Co. H. Present Post Office: Middlefield.

1885 Iowa State Census: Middlefield, Buchanan County, Iowa: Howard T. Stutson: Township 88, Range 7, Section 39, SW NE, age 40, farming, born Mich.), Cordelia E. Stutson (age 42, born NY), Charles H. Stutson (age 13, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Earnest A. Stutson (age 11, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Hattie E. Stutson (age 9, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Vernon C. Stutson (age 5, born Buchanan County, Iowa), and Eva E. Stutson (age 1, born Buchanan County, Iowa.)

1900 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Howard T. Stutson (born Fe. 1844, age 56, married 30 years, born Michigan, Veterinary Dentist), wife Cordelia E. Stutson (born March 1842, age 58, married 30 years, 9 children born, 7 still living, born New York), daughter Eva H. Stutson (born Apr. 1883, age 17, born Iowa), son Vernon C. Stutson (born Feb. 1879, age 21, born Iowa) and stepson William H. Campbell (born May 1862, age 38, married 10 years, born New York).

1915 Iowa State Census, Winthrop, Buchanan County, Iowa: Howard T. Stutson (age 70, married County Buchanan, Town Winthrop, Occupation: V.D., Extent of Education: Grammar 8, can read and write, Birth Place: Michigan, Value of farm or Home: 1500, Military Service: Civil War, Infantry, State: Iowa, Regiment 27, Company H. Father's Birthplace: NY, Mothers' Birthplace NY, Years in Iowa: 58.

1920 Census: Winthrop, Buchanan County, Iowa: Howard Stutson (age 75, born Michigan), wife Cordelia Stutson (age 76, born New York).

1925 Iowa State Census: Winthrop, Buchanan County, Iowa: Howard T. Stutson (age 80, born Michigan. Father's name: Lester Stutson, born NY, Mother's name: Martha Howes/Hawes, born NY, Parents married in NY), Wife Cordelia Stutson (age 82, born NY, Father's Name: Edward Wigg, born England. Mother's name: Phyllis, born England. Parent's married in NY).

Cordelia Elizabeth (Wigg) Stutson (born Mar. 28, 1842), died Mar. 22, 1925 and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1930 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Howard T. Stutson (age 86, widowed, born Michigan). Living next door to Vernon C. Stutson and family.

Winthrop, Iowa – Memorial Day exercises will begin at 9:30 Monday with the flag raising at the square. The procession will repair to Fairview Cemetery where the program will be given at 10 o'clock. The address will be given by Reverend Mr. Welles, Manchester. Only one Civil War veteran, Howard Stutson, 86, is left in Winthrop to represent the G.  A. R.

Waterloo Daily Courier, May 27, 1932


Winthrop Man's Destiny As Patriot Follows Example Set by Ancestors

Howard T. Stutson, Union Veteran, of Long Line of U. S. Soldiers

Winthrop, Iowa – the span of life of Winthrop's oldest citizen, Howard T Stutson, who celebrated his 89th birthday anniversary on Saturday, February 18, reaches from the slow trail of the prairie schooner to the swift flight of the airplane. He can tell tales of the pioneer days when the woods were crowded with many kinds of wild game and the streams filled with fish, of the patriotic days when as a boy he justified his Revolutionary era forbears and enlisted in the Union Army and of his transference to the American Legion, acting as last commander of the Grand Army of the Republic here, of the flag cherished by the union veterans who had been his comrades in the G. A. R.

Soldiers in Every Generation

Mr. Stutson is descended from a family which in every generation has served the nation. His great grandfather and five sons served throughout the Revolutionary war, his grandfather was in the War of 1812 and in two Indian conflicts, and his father and two brothers died while serving as soldiers in the Civil War. He himself was a member of company H, 27th Iowa infantry volunteers, which he entered with 38 other men at Quasqueton, Iowa in August 1862. He was discharged in February 1863 due to physical disability following in illness while in camp at Cairo, Illinois.

On Memorial Day of 1928 Mr. Stutson, as last commander of the G. A. R. Post here, handed to the American Legion Post the old flag of the Winthrop Civil War veterans organization, to be cared for by the Legion until its last member hands it on to his successors.

Native of Michigan

He was born in Hillsdale County, Michigan, February 18, 1844. When he was 10 years old, the family moved to Muscatine County, Iowa and in 1861 they came to Buchanan County when his father purchased 160 acres of land southeast of town.

Mr. Stutson married Cordella Campbell in 1860. Five of their six children are living. They are: Charles Stutson, Glendale, California; Curtis Stutson, Washington; Mrs. Hattie Bowling, Davenport; Mrs. Eva Lohter, independence; and Verne G. Stutson, Winthrop.

For 30 years he practiced his profession of veterinary surgeon. He was postmaster in Middlefield Twp. for 14 years and constable and school director for nine years.

Waterloo Daily Courier, Waterloo Iowa, Monday, February 9, 1933


Winthrop, Iowa - The 90th birthday anniversary of Howard T Stutson was observed by his family Sunday at the elderly man's home. He is the last of the Civil War veterans in this locality, having been a member of Company H, of the 27th Iowa Volunteers Infantry. He came to Winthrop when 10 years old and has lived here for 80 years. He is in fairly good health and lives in his own home near his son.

Waterloo Daily Courier, Waterloo Iowa, Monday, February 19, 1934

Howard T. Stutson died Oct. 8, 1935 and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Bryon, Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa Cemetery Records, Buchanan County Burial Records)


Sutton, Benjamin He was born Apr. 4, 1843 in Monmouth, Warren County, Illinois. He was the son of Robert Abbott Sutton (Dec. 24, 1804 - June 29, 1897) and Phoebe Leighton (Feb. 4, 1820 - Jan 29, 1909).

Benjamin Sutton Bible Death Record 1850 Census: District 11, Buchanan County, Iowa: Robert Sutton (age 40, farmer, born Penn.), Phebe Sutton (age 26, born Ill), Benjamin Sutton (age 7, born Ill), Henry Sutton (age 6, born Ill), James Sutton (age 4, born Ill) and Clarissa Ann Sutton (age 1, born Illinois).

1856 Iowa State Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Robert Sutton (age 50, farmer, born Penn), Phebe Sutton (age 35, born Ill), Benjamin Sutton (age 13, born Ill), Henry Sutton (age 11, born Ill), James Sutton (age 9, born Ill), Claricy A. Sutton (age 7, born Ill), and Thomas Sutton (age 5, born Iowa). The family had been in the state of Iowa for 6 years.

1860 Census: Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: Robert Sutton (age 59, farmer, born PA), Phebe Sutton (age 40, born Ill), Benj Sutton (age 17, born Ill), Henry Sutton (age 15, born Ill), Jas Sutton (age 13, born Ill.), Clarissa Sutton (age 10, born Ill), Thos. Sutton (age 9, born Iowa), Jessee Sutton (age 7, born Iowa), David Sutton (age 4, born Iowa) and Nancy Sutton (age 1, born Iowa).


Benjamin Sutton died Oct. 29, 1862 and is buried in Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA. Plot A-23. (Note the family Bible record above says Oct. 18, 1862). But I suspect that the Oct. 29, 1862 date is correct, because in a letter dated Nov. 3, 1862, Charles H. Lewis said: "Benjamin Sutton was buried yesterday, over yonder on the pleasant hillside, in the soldiers' burying-ground. He was ever ready to act his part, and the boys of our company will miss him."

His mother Phoebe Sutton filed for a pension on June 26, 1880.


Tift, John A. He was born about 1842 in Ohio. He was the son of Allen B. Tift (1804 - 1898) and Laura Moorehouse (1808 - June 20, 1891).

1850 Census: Colebrook, Ashtabula County, Ohio: Allen B. Tift (age 46, farmer, born NY), Laura Tift (age 41, born NY), Hannah Tift (age 18, born NY), Wealthy Tift (age 16, born NY), Eli Tift (age 14, born Ohio), Cordelia Tift (age 11, born Ohio), John Tift (age 8, born Ohio), Townshend Tift (age 6, born Ohio) and David W. Tift (age 1, born Ohio).

1856 Iowa State Census: Spring, Buchanan County, Iowa: Allen B. Tift (age 52, farmer, born NY), Laura Tift (age 47, born NY), W. A. Tift (age 20, born NY), E. Tift (age 19, born Ohio), L. C. Tift (age 17, born Ohio), J. A. Tift (age 14, born Ohio), Wm. T. Tift (age 11, born Ohio), O. W. Tift (age 7, born Ohio) and C. E. Tift (age 4, born Ohio).

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Allen B. Tift (age 56, farmer, born NY0, Laura Tift (age 51, born NY), Eli Tift (age 23, farmer, born Ohio), John Tift (age 18, born Ohio), Townsen Tift (age 14, born Ohio), Wheeler Tift (age 11, born Ohio) and Emma Tift (age 8, born Ohio).

John A. Tift died Nov. 30, 1862 from measles at Memphis, Tennessee.

His mother Laura Tift filed for a pension on May 26, 1890 in Iowa.

His father Allen B. Tift filed for a pension on July 25, 1891.


Turis, Joseph He was born May 7, 1830 in New Jersey. He was the son of Laurance Turis and Lucia Watson. He married Amanda Melvina Watson. She was the daughter of John B. Watson and Sarah Nuberg.

1870 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Joseph Turis (age 30, farmer, born New Jersey), Malvina Turis (age 26, born New York), William Turis (age 7, born Iowa), Ella Turis (age 4, born Iowa) and Joseph Turis (age 1, born Iowa). (Note: they were indexed a Tiers).

1880 Census, Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Joseph Turis (age 49, laborer, born New Jersey), wife Amanda M. Turis (age 36, born NY), son Wm. H. Turis (age 17, born Iowa), daughter Ella Turris (age 13, born Iowa), son Joseph Turis (age 10, born Iowa), son Albert Turis (age 9, born Iowa), son Charles Turis (age 6, born Iowa), and son Leonard Turis (age 3, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Joseph Turis (age 53, farmer, born New Jersey), Amanda Turis (age 42, born New York), William Turis (age 21, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Ella Turis (age 18, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Joseph Turis (age 15, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Albert Turis (age 13, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Charles Turis (age 11, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Leonard Turis (age 8 born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1900 Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Joseph Turis (born May 1830, age 70, married 38 years, born New Jersey, day laborer), wife Alvina (born Dec. 1849, age 57, married 38 years, 7 children born, 6 still living, born New York).

1910 Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Joseph Turis (age 79, married 1 time for 47 years, born New Jersey, own income), wife Levina W. Turis (age 66, married 1 time for 47 years, 7 children born, 6 still living, born New York), and son Charles W. Turis (age 35, born Iowa). (Note: they were indexed as Fures).

Joseph Turis died April 12, 1914 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa

His widow Amanda M. Turis filed for a pension on Apr. 22, 1914 in Iowa.


Turner, Henry H. He was born July 3, 1843 in Butternuts, Otsego County, New York. He was the son of Isaiah Turner (Feb 2, 1814 - Sept. 25, 1892) and Mary Ann Hoag (Dec. 24, 1823 - Feb. 11, 1856). He married Laura H. Whitenack on Apr. 16, 1871 in Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa. I found several family trees that said she was the daughter of John Flagg Whitenack (Aug. 9, 1813 - Oct. 31, 1894) and Malinda Jones (Dec. 17, 1822 - Aug. 27, 1888). However, the biography below says she was the daughter of Abraham Whitenack. He married second Alice Bulson on Dec. 4, 1901. She was the daughter of Frederick and Mary D. Bulson. Henry's sister, Jane E. Turner married Pulaski Hare Hughes, who served in Company B, 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry.

Henry H. Turner and wife H. H. Turner, an honored veteran of the Civil War, has been residing retired in Harvard since about 1902. He was born in Otsego County, New York on the 3rd of July, 1843, a son of Isaiah and Mary (Hoagg) Turner, both natives of the same county. In 1850 Mr. and Mrs. Turner removed to Byron, Illinois, where they resided until 1860, when they went to Iowa. The death of Mr. Turner occurred in the latter state. Throughout his entire life he had followed farming and at the time of his death owned two hundred and forty acres of fine land. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Turner: Mary, who is the wife of John Cherry and resides in Iowa. H. H., the subject of this review. T. E., a retired farmer residing at Harvard; Jane, who is the wife of Pulaska Hughes, a miller of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and William who is residing in Iowa. He was a staunch advocate of education and served as school director for many years. The grandfather of H. H. Turner was Ezra Turner, whose birth and death occurred in Otsego County, New York, where he was a well known and highly respected citizen.

H. H. Turner received his education in the public schools of New York and Iowa, and in due time attended Beloit College in Wisconsin. In 1862 he entered the Union army from Iowa, joining Company H, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and served three years. He was in the Army of the Tennessee and participated in the battles of Pleasant Hill, Brice's Cross Roads, Spanish Fort, Blakely, as well as other battles and skirmishes. At the close of the war he returned to Iowa and engaged in farming, achieving a substantial amount of success. In 1870 he was appointed to take the census and had eight townships under his supervision. In 1878 he came to Clay county and bought eighty acres of land for which he paid cash. He built a frame house and some outbuildings on the land and there resided until about 1902, when he moved into Harvard.

Mr. Turner has been married twice. On returning to Iowa after the close of the Civil War he was wed on the 16th of April, 1871, to Miss Laura Whitenack, a native of Indiana and a daughter of Abraham Whitenack, who was an early settler of that state. Her father later removed to Iowa and in 1871 settled in Milford, Nebraska. Five children were born to the first marriage: Etha, who is the wife of Fred Clark and resides in Kansas; Walter, who is engaged in the apple business in the state of Washington; Alice, deceased; Albert, who is a painter of Ardmore, Oklahoma; and Maude, now the wife of Earl L. Seitsinger, a farmer of Washington state. Mrs. Turner's demise occurred on the 4th of June, 1891, and on the 4th of December, 1901, Mr. Turner was married to Miss Alice Bulson, a native of Victoria, Illinois, and a daughter of Frederick and Mary D. Bulson. Her father was born in Otsego county, New York and her mother in Kentucky. They located in Illinois in 1847 and there they both passed away. Frederick Bulson served in the Mexican war one year and three months. Four children out of the family of eight born to Mr. and Mrs. Bulson are living. In 1886 Mrs. Turner came to Clay County, locating just east of Harvard and lived with her sister for some time.

Since age conferred upon Mr. Turner the right of franchise he has been a staunch supporter of the republican party and the principles for which it stands. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church and he is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. Mr. Turner has always taken an active interest in the development and improvement of the community and for many years was justice of the peace and a member of the school board. He has been well known in the agriculture circles of the county and his wife now owns a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres located six miles east of Harvard. Both Mr. and Mrs. Turner have many friends in the county and are readily conceded to be representative citizens.

History of Hamilton and Clay Counties, Nebraska, Volume II, 1921

1850 Census, Byron, Ogle County, Illinois: Isaiah Turner (age 36, farmer, born NY), Mary A. Turner (age 27, born NY), Mary E. Turner (age 8, born NY), Henry Turner (age 7, born NY), Ezra Turner (age 5, born NY) and Jane Turner (age 3, born NY).

1860 Census Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Isaiah Turner, (age 45, farmer, born New York), Mary E. Turner (age 18, born New York), Henry H. Turner (age 17, born New York), Ezra T. Turner (age 15, born New York and Willy F. Turner (age 6, born New York).

1870 Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Isaiah Turner (age 56, farmer, born New York), Mary Turner (age 28, born New York), Henry Turner (age 27, farmer, born New York), Ezra Turner (age 25, farmer born New York) and Willie Turner (age 16, born New York).

1880 Census: Lynn, Clay County, Nebraska: H. H. Turner (age 36, farmer, born New York), wife Laura (age 26, born Ind), daughter Etta Turner (age 8, born Iowa), son Walter Turner (age 6, born Iowa), and daughter Alice Turner (age 4, born Iowa).

1885 Nebraska State Census: Lynn, Clay County, Nebraska: Henry Turner (age 42, farmer, born New York), wife Laura Turner (age32, born Indiana), daughter Etta Turner (age 13, born Iowa), son Walter Turner (age 11, born Iowa), daughter Alice Turner (age 9, born Iowa) and daughter Maude Turner (age 2, born Nebraska).

Laura H. (Whitenack) Turner (born May 3, 1853), died Jun 4, 1891 in Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska and is buried in Harvard Cemetery, Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska.

1900 Census, Lynn, Clay County, Nebraska: Henry H. Turner (born July 1843, age 56, born New York, farmer), daughter Maude M. Turner (born Aug. 1882, age 17, born Nebraska), son Albert Turner (born June 1891, age 8, born Nebraska), and son Walter W. Turner (born Oct. 1873, age 26, born Iowa).

Henry H. Turner married 2nd Alice Bulson on Dec. 4, 1901 in Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska.

1910 Census: Howard Ward 1, Clay County, Nebraska: Henry Turner (age 66, married 2 times, currently married for 9 years, born New York, own Income), wife Alice Turner (age 51, married 1 time for 9 years, born Indiana).

1920 Census, Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska: H. Henry Turner (age 76, born New York), wife Alice Turner (age 61, born Illinois).

1930 Census, Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska: Henry H. Turner (age 86, age 28 at first marriage, born New York), wife Alice Turner (age 71, age 42 at first marriage, born Illinois

Henry H. Turner died Aug. 14, 1934 and is buried in Harvard Cemetery, Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska, Lot NW, Section 91, Grave 2

Children of Henry H. Turner and Laura H. Whitenack:

  1. Etha Turner b: 18 Feb 1872 in Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa
  2. Walter Turner b: 18 Oct 1873 in Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa
  3. Alice Turner b: 9 Mar 1876 in Quasqueton, Buchanan County, Iowa
  4. Maud Matilda Turner b: 9 Aug 1882 in Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska
  5. Albert Turner b: 3 Jun 1891 in Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska

Alice (Bulson) Turner (born Aug. 23, 1858), died Jan. 15, 1937 and is buried in Harvard Cemetery, Harvard, Clay County, Nebraska.

I (Elaine Johnson) have a copy of the diary listed below. Please contact me if you are interested.

Author: Turner, Henry H. Title: Memorandum of nearly three years service, 1862-1865.

Description:

1 item (25 pages). Notes:
Soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861-1865). Photocopy of a handwritten "memorandum" book.

Turner lists his dates of service, the towns he passed through, the location of various camps and the dates he was there, his pay, marches he undertook, steamers on which he travelled, and engagements in which he participated. Turner served with Company H of the 27th Iowa and was involved in many campaigns apparently with the Union Army of the Tennessee.

Subjects:

Turner, Henry H.
United States. Army. Infantry Regiment, Iowa, 27th -- History -- Sources.
Soldiers -- United States -- History -- Sources.
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865
Personal narratives.
Diaries. ftamc
Lists. ftamc

Location:

Brigham Young U. Special Collections Rm 4040 HBLL BYU Provo, Utah 84602. (801) 378-2932.

Control No.:

UTBV94-A727 Call Numbers for: SPEC-COLL

1) MSS 849 1 MANU-ARCH Manuscript Collection - 1130 HBLL

2) Z11/10/B 4 1 MANU-ARCH Manuscript Collection - 1130


Walter, Christian He was born Oct. 29, 1825 in Baden-Wuerttembert, Germany. He was the son of Adam Walter (1800 - 1880) and Mary Kautz (1805 - 1890). He married Caroline Wahl on Aug. 10, 1854 in Franklin County, Ohio. (Ohio Marriages, 1803-1900). She was the daughter of Christian Wahl (1805 - 1887) and Catherine (1810-1875).

1860 Census, Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Christian Walter (age 34, farmer, born Baden), Caroline Walter (age 27, born Baden), Chas Walter (age 5, born Illinois), Chris'n Walter (age 3, born Illinois) and George Walter (age 1, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Christian Walter (age 46, farmer, born Baden), Caroline Walter (age 37, born Baden), Charles Walter (age 15, born Illinois), Christian Walter (age 13, born Illinois), George Walter (age 11, born Iowa), Edward Walter (age 8, born Iowa), Emma Walter (age 6, born Iowa), Minnie Walter (age 3, born Iowa), and Eliza Walter (age 1, born Iowa).

1880 Census, Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Christian Walter (age 54, farmer, born Baden), wife Caroline Walter (age 47, born Baden), son Christian Walter (age 23, born Illinois), son George Walter (age 21, born Iowa), son Edward Walter (age 18, born Iowa), daughter Emma (age 15, born Iowa), daughter Mena Walter (age 13, born Iowa), daughter Louesa Walter (age 11, born Iowa), son Louis Walter (age 6, born Iowa), son Frederick Walter (age 3, born Iowa) and daughter Hellen Walter (age 7, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa: Christian Walters, private, Co. H. Post Office: Newtonville.

1885 Iowa State Census: Newton, Buchanan County, Iowa: Christian Walters (Township 87, Range 7, Section 10, SW SW, age 59, farmer, born Germany), Caroline Walters (age 61, born Germany), Edward Walters (age 22, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Emma Walters (age 20, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Mena Walters (age 18, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Louisa Walters (age 16, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Hellen Walters (age 12, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Louis Walters (age 10, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Frederick Walters (age 7, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1900 Census: Grant, Linn County, Iowa: Christian Walter (born Oct. 1825, age 74, married 46 years, born Germany, immigrated 1849, in US 51 years, naturalized, retired farmer), wife Caroline Walter (born June 1833, age 66, married 46 years, 11 children born, 8 still living, born Germany), daughter Louisa Walter (born Jan 1869, age 31, born Iowa).

Caroline (Wahl) Walter (born June 3, 1833), died Feb. 18, 1905. She is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

1910 Census, Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Christian Walter Jr. (age 58, married 1 time for 25 years, born Illinois, general farmer), wife Anna Walter, (age 48, married time for 25 years, 4 children born, 4 still living, born Iowa), son Archibald Walter (age 17, born Iowa), son Lowell Walter (age 15, born Iowa), daughter Nellie Walter (age 6, born Iowa) and father Christian Walter Senior (age 85, widowed, born Germany).

Christian Walter died Nov. 21, 1910 and is buried in Quasqueton Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Children of Christian Walter and Caroline Wahl:

  1. Charles Walter, b. about 1855
  2. Christian J. Walter, Jr., b. Dec. 1856; d. about 1936
  3. George Walter, b. about 1859
  4. Edward Walter, b. about 1862
  5. Emma Walter, b. about 1865
  6. Minnie W. "Mena" Walter, b. Nov. 1866; d. after 1930
  7. Louisa "Louise" Walter, born Jan. 1869; d. 1954
  8. Helen Walter, b. about 1873
  9. Louis Walter, b. about 1874
  10. Frederick Walter, b. about 1877

Wardell, Emanuel He was born Jan 16, 1834 in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. He was the son of John Wardell (Mar. 15, 1805 - Jan 18, 1876) and Catherine Harmon (Mar. 27, 1811 - Dec. 21, 1885). He married Jane Boone on Feb. 27, 1862 in Buchanan County, Iowa. She was the daughter of John Boone (Aug 27, 1806 - May 22, 1881) and Mary Sutton (Apr 15, 1808 - Oct. 27. 1892). Her brothers Morgan Boone and Nelson J. Boone also served in Company H, 27th Iowa.

1850 Census, Mill, Tuscarawas County, Ohio: John Wardell (age 44, farmer, born NJ), Catherine Wardell (age 41, born PA), Susana Wardell (age 21, born Ohio), Isaac Wardell (age 19, born Ohio), Peleg Wardell (age 18, born Ohio), Emanuel Wardell (age 16, born Ohio), Catharine Wardell (age 14, born Ohio), John Wardell (age 12, born Ohio), Josiah Wardell (age 9, born Ohio), Jeramiah Wardell (age 7, born Ohio), Hezakiah Wardell (age 6, born Ohio), Malissa Wardell (age 4, born Ohio), Obediah Wardell (age 3, born Ohio) and Albert Wardell (age 0, born Ohio).

Submitted by Sue & Steve

State of Iowa
Adjutant General's Office

It is certified that the records in our office show that Emanuel Wardell, age 28, nativity Ohio, residence Independence Iowa, was enlisted in Company H, (Captain J. M. Miller), 27th Regiment Iowa Vol Inf on the 22 day of August, 1862 and was mustered into the United States Service as a private for the period of 2 years on the 3rd day of October, 1862, at Dubuque Iowa by Capt. Pierce, U.S.A. Mustering Officer, and that the said Emanuel Wardell was discharged January 31, 1863, while in hospital at Cairo Ill, on Surgeons Certificate of disability.

In testimony where, witness my hand and seal, at Des Moines, this 14 day of March 1912.

George (can't read)
Adjutant-General

1870 Census: Jo Daviess, Faribault County, Minnesota: Emanuel Wardell (age 35, farmer, born Ohio), Jane Wardell (age 30, born Illinois), Clara C. Wardell (age 7, born Iowa), Edgar E. Wardell (age 5, born Iowa), Mary S. Wardell (age 3, born Minnesota) and Minnie Wardell (age 1, born Minnesota). (Note the last name was very faint. It definitely started with an M and was a female. It was indexed as Thomas, but that is not correct)

1880 Census: Sumner, Buchanan County, Iowa: Emanuel Wardal (age 46, farmer, born Ohio), wife Jayne Wardal (age 42, born Illinois), son Elsworth Wardal (age 15, born Iowa), daughter Susan Wardal (age 13, born Minn.), son Benjamin Wardal (age 5, born Iowa).

1885 Iowa State Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Emanuel Wardell (Township 89, Range 9, section 30, SW NE, age 57, farmer, born Ohio), Jane Wardell (age 45, born Ill.), Elza Wardell (age 20, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Susan Wardell (age 17, born Buchanan County, Iowa), Benjamin Wardell (age 10, born Buchanan County, Iowa) and Reatus Wardell (age 1, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

Emanuel Wardell died Nov. 27, 1894 and is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.

Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans - Emanuel Wardell, Co. H, 27th Regt, Iowa Inft. Cemetery, Oakwood at Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa. Date of Death: Nov. 28, 1894.

WPA Records: Emanual Wardell, born Jan. 16, 1835. Died Nov. 27, 1894, Cemetery, Wilson, Location: Washington TWP, County, Buchanan, Comments: Add 1, Blk, 6, Lot 3; Co. H. 27th Ia Inft. Member G.A.R.

His widow Jane Wardell filed for a pension on Dec. 21, 1894 in Indiana.

1900 Census, Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: Jane Wardell (born Aug. 1839, age 60, widowed, 6 children born, 5 still living, born Illinois), son Artus C. Wardell born Sept. 1883, age 16, born Iowa).

Jane (Boone) Wardell (born Aug. 27, 1839), died Apr 1, 1904 and is buried in Wilson Cemetery, Buchanan County, Iowa.


Whitney, Otis He was born June 13, 1821 in Seneca, Ontario County, New York. He was the son of Otis Whitney (Oct. 19, 1786 - Jan 25, 1885) and Betsy Hawley. He married Harriett Newell Barnes on Oct 4, 1854 at Monterey, NY. She was the daughter of Enos Barnes and Rebecca Wickes.

Capt. Otis8Whitney (Otis7, Nathan6, Jonathan5, Jonathan4, Jonathan3, Benjamin2, John1), son of Otis7 and Betsey (Hawley) Whitney, was born 13 Jun 1821, Seneca, NY.

He married, 4 Oct 1854, Monterey, NY, Harriett Newell Barnes. She was born 14 Sep 1829.

Otis Whitney, Jr., was born 13 Jun 1821, in the town of Seneca, Ontario County, state of New York, where he lived till nearly thirty years of age, working on the farm, attending school and studying law; was admitted to the practice in the supreme court of the state of New York at a general term of the court held in the city of Auburn, county of Cayuga, on the first day of November, 1847, but never engaged actively in practice, having no relish or respect for it. He traveled and taught school for three years, and then went into partnership with his brother-in-law, Tyler H. Abbey, who was a successful merchant at Watkins, Schuyler County, state of New York, and continued in business up to the fall of 1854, when he caught the western fever and decided to take the advice of Horace Greeley to "go west and grow up with the country." Before leaving he was united in marriage with the daughter of Dr. Enos Barnes, in western New York, a well known and popular physician and surgeon, and one of the earliest settlers on the west side of Seneca Lake. The newly married couple started immediately on the journey west, and finally located in Quasqueton, Buchanan County, state of Iowa, where he purchased two hundred acres of land, intending to make a farm of it, but finding more satisfactory employment in town never settled on the land. Most of the time up to 1862 was spent in clerking, overseeing flour and saw mills, and acting justice of the peace, for which office his previous study of law was especially helpful. In the fall of 1862 he went into the army as first lieutenant of Company H, Twenty-seventh Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry. In camp of instruction he was familiar with the drill, etc., as he had been studying the tactics from the commencement of the war and in command of and drilling a company of home guards for more than a year. In a few weeks the regiment was ordered to the field, or as the popular phrase is, to the front, and not more than half drilled or disciplined. On 10 Apr 1863, he became captain of the company by reason of resignation of Captain Jacob M. Miller, the previous captain, who became disabled and unable to endure active field service. Whitney was captain of the company up to the close of the war, and was discharged with the company and regiment at Clinton, IA, 8 Aug 1865. He returned to his home in Quasqueton, which he had not seen in three years, worn out, run down, and weak from constant for three years, and which continued for more than fifteen years after the war. Finding no place of business obtainable he with his family, wife and two children, went on a visit to the old folks at home in the state of New York. While on this visit he was induced to engage in an enterprise to be consummated at Richmond, VA, in the establishment of a dairy farm. The project was a complete failure, and mindful still of the advice of Greeley he again went west with his family to grow up again, locating on government land in Oswego Township, Labette County, Kansas, in the spring of 1867. Upon this place he lived seventeen years, when he sold out and moved into the city of Oswego, two and a half miles distant. The land sold for $31.25 per acre, costing from the government $1.25 per acre. He has continuously lived in Oswego up to date, 20 Oct 1894, aged seventy-three years four months and seven days. He has no regular business of his own, but spends most of his time assisting his son-in-law in a coal, wood, flour and feed store; resided Quasqueton, IA, and Oswego, KS.

Children of Otis8 and Harriett Newell (Barnes) Whitney:

  1. Emma Hawley Whitney, b. 2 Aug 1855; m. 1 Oct 1876, Lafayette Baker, b. 19 Sep 1851; resided Oswego. Children: Roy Whitney, b. 33 Aug 1877; d. 12 Nov 1877; Clifford Otis, b. 12 Jun 1879; d. Aug 1882; Edward Lafayette, b. 10 Feb 1883; Florence Eva, b. 5 Mar 1885; Emma Louise, b. 17 Aug 1890; Viola, b. 22 Jun 1893.
  2. Edward Otis Whitney, b. 29 May 1860; m. Laura M. Norris.

Source: Frederick Clifton Pierce, The Descendants of John Whitney, Who Came from London, England, to Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1635, (Chicago: 1895), pp. 583-584.

1860 Census: Liberty, Buchanan County, Iowa: Otis Whitney (age 36, druggist, born NY), Harriet N. Whitney (age 30, born NY), Emma H. Whitney (age 4, born Iowa), unnamed Whitney (male, age 3/365, born Iowa)

1870 Census: Oswego, Labette County, Kansas: Otis Whitney (age 42, farmer, born New York), Harriet Whitney (age 40, born New York), Emma Whitney (age 14, born Iowa) and Edward Whitney (age 10, born Iowa).

1880 Census: Oswego, Labette County, Kansas: Otis Whitney (age 52, farmer, born New York), wife Harriett N. Whitney (age 50, born New York) and son Edward Whitney (age 20, born Iowa).

1885 Kansas State Census: Oswego, Labette County, Kansas: Otis Whitney (age 63, Carpenter, born New York, from Iowa to Kansas, Honorably discharged from the volunteer military service of the United States, State: Iowa, Rank, Capt, Company H, 27th Inf.) Harriett N. Whitney (age 55, born New York), and Edward O. Whitney (age 24, brick mason, born Iowa).

1900 Census: Oswego, Labette County, Kansas: Otis Whitney (born June 1821, age 78, married 46 years, born New York), Wife Harriett N. Whitney (born Sept. 1829, age 70, married 46 years, 2 children born, 2 still living, born New York), Edward Otis (born May 1860, age 40), wife Lulu E. and son Carl N. lived next door to them.

Otis Whitney died June 8, 1901 and is buried in Pleasant Valley Cemetery, Labette, Labette County, Kansas.

His widow Harriet N. Whitney filed for a pension on July 1, 1901 in Kansas.

Harriett (Barnes) Whitney (born Sept. 14, 1829), died July 30, 1916 and is buried in Pleasant Valley Cemetery, Labette, Labette County, Kansas.


Wilcox, Aaron Morley. He was born on 24 Jul 1842 in Painesville, Lake Co., OH. He was the son of Aaron Wilcox (Mar 8, 1814 - May 13, 1881) and Eliza Jane Morley (Nov. 13, 1813 - Jul. 20, 1886). He married Helen M. Cleveland on 24 Apr 1873 in Conneaut, Ashtabula Co., OH. (Note another source says they married in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN). She was the daughter of George Smith Cleveland (July 24, 1821 - Dec. 19, 1887) and Lydia Jane Lyon (Sept. 21, 1823 - Apr. 6, 1913)

Aaron W. Wilcox Aaron W. WilcoxAaron Morley Wilcox, b. 24 JUL 1842, in Painesville, Ohio

of Painesville; Independence, Iowa (1859-1861); South Bend, Indiana (1865-1868); New York (circa 1896-1906)

Enlisted at start of Civil War, 27th Iowa Infantry

Occupation: banker in South Bend, Indiana 1865-1868; partner of firm Cleveland, Brown & Co. (Horace G. Cleveland and Peter M. Hitchcock) 1868-1879; Ontario Rolling Mill Company in Hamilton, Ontario; Vulcan Iron Works, St. Louis, Missouri, 1885-1888; in Cleveland iron and steel interest, 1888-1892

d. 16 APR 1906, of apoplexy, at Catalina Island, California [PT 17 APR 1906, p. 1, col. 4]

m. 24 APR 1873, in Conneaut, Ohio, to Helen M. Cleveland. She b. in Conneaut, Ohio dau. of George Smith Cleveland and Lydia Jane (Lyon) Cleveland

Children:

  1. Aaron Cleveland Wilcox, a.k.a. Aaron Wilcox, Jr. b. 13 JUL 1874; d. 5 MAR 1891, age 16 y., of pneumonia [PT 11 MAR 1891, p. 3, col. 5; LCCI] bur. Evergreen Cemetery, Painesville
  2. Horace Wilder Wilcox, b. 4 JAN 1876, in Painesville [Hamilton Herald] or Cleveland [TR], Ohio; graduate of Cleveland University School and Yale University; removed to Hamilton, Ontario, circa 1899; occupation: chemist at Hamilton Steel & Iron Company; Doolittle & Wilcox quarry in Dundas, Ontario; never married; d. 13 MAR 1912, age 38 y., of heart failure, in New York; New York [Hamilton Herald 13 MAR 1912; TR 14 MAR 1912, p. 1, col. 5]; bur. Evergreen Cemetery, Painesville [LCCI]

1850 Census, Painesville, Lake County, Ohio: Aaron Wilcox (age 36, merchant born Connecticut), Eliza J. Wilcox (age 36, born NY), H. E. Wilcox (age 12, born Ohio), Sarah J. Wilcox (age 10, born Ohio), A. M. Wilcox (age 8, born Ohio), J. E. Wilcox (age 6, born Ohio), and M. E. Wilcox (age 3, born Ohio).

Submitted by
Tam Stuart

Letter from Aaron Morley Wilcox to his father, Aaron Wilcox, while serving in the 27 Regt., 'H' Company, Iowa Infantry Volunteers.

Alexandria, La,
May 1st, 1864

Dear Father,

We are back to Alexandria again our troops marched down and had a fight every day. The enemy keeping within sight of our forces. Our division had the rear and of course done the fighting. I was not well enough to march and came down on a transport. The best Gun Boat in the fleet and one transport were sunk coming down. They were abandoned and burnt. Twelve of our largest and best Gun Boats were laying above the Rapids at this place unable to get over on account of the low stage of water. A good many think we will have to abandon and destroy them. Others think the River will rise next month and they can be got out. Before the Battle of Pleasant Hill, La., the Rebel officers were in favor of retreating with their forces to Texas and not fight us at all, but now they are as bold as possible. Friday afternoon they drove in our Cavalry pickets which are stationed Tin miles outside of Town - The cavalry sent into Gen. Banks that their whole army was advancing on the place. Gen. Banks sent out to the 13th army corps to come into town and to bring what Clothing Camp and Garrison Equipage they could on their Teams and to burn the balance. They burnt immense quantities of clothing Tents ammunition, Forage commissary stores etc. A short time after, our Brigade was ordered out there expecting to meet an enemy on there and out there was knapsacks, Blankets Strewn all along and if ever there was ever a disgraceful affair that was one. We lay in line of Battle that night in the camp of the 13th Corps. We came back to town early next morning. Banks troops have not the least confidence in him and say they will never fight under him again. If he was running for Constable of this town he could not get a dozen votes in the army. He has been badly out generalled in every movement he has undertaken since we have been with him. Gen. Franklin who commands the 19th A Corps who is with us is no better. Western men do not bet any money on Potomac Generals. They are from the Potomac.

We are getting quantities of splendid butter. I should think there was shipped daily from here from Two to Four Thousand Bales of splendid Cotton. The best I ever saw. Some say it belongs to speculators and others say the government own it. We all think every dollar the Government receives from cotton costs them Ten. We expect to remain here a month or six weeks longer and then join our Corps. which we expect to find at Chattanouga. It is very warm and seems more like July than May. We shall have Green Peas here in a few days. We have received mail but twice since we left Vicksburg nearly two months ago and I have not received any pay since I left home We do not expect to receive any until we get back to Memphis.

I will write you again soon.

Much love to all. Affectionately, your son A M W

Write often.

Received the paper you sent me.

Submitted by
Tam Stuart

Headquarters
Department and Army of the Tennessee
Chattanooga, Tenn, July 11, 1864

Special Order No 154

A. M. Wilcox 2d Lieutenant H Company 27th Regiment Iowa Infantry Volunteers, having tendered his resignation to enable him to accept an appointment as Captain and Commissary of Subsistence. United States Volunteers, is hereby honorably discharged the service of the United States, with condition that he shall receive no final payments, until he has satisfied the Pay Department that he is not indebted to the Government.

By order of Maj. General James B. McPherson.

Paid as Captain and Com. of Sub. from June 2, 1864.

Aaron W. Wilcox Medals

This Loyal Legion Badge and the Buttons belonged to Aaron Morley Wilcox who enlisted in an Iowa regiment and served through the Civil War. Submitted by Tam Stuart

In the fall of 1864 he (Horace Gillette Cleveland) formed a co-partnership with Joseph H. Brown, Richard Brown, Thomas Brown, and William Bonnell, of Youngstown, OH, under the name of Cleveland, Brown & Company, and opened a large iron and steel warehouse at Nos. 25 to 31 Merwin Street, making heavy hardware a specialty. They imported largely of Swedish iron, English steel, etc. Under Mr. Cleveland's energetic and capable management, their business operations reached an average of two millions per annum, and their trade extended throughout Northern Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, and the upper lakes, and, in some lines of goods, as far east as Boston. The reputation of the house for enterprise and honorable dealing was thoroughly established. There have been several changes of partners during the twenty-two years of its existence, the present firm consisting of H. G. Cleveland, Richard Brown, Peter Marshall Hitchcock, Aaron Morley Wilcox [who married Helen Mary Cleveland +15449], and Martyn Bonnell.

The Biographical Cyclopedia and Portrait Gallery, with an Historical Sketch of the State of Ohio, c1887.

Submitted by
Tam Stuart

CLEVELAND, BROWN & CO

IRON MERCHANTS.
25 TO 35 Murerin Street

Cleveland, Feb. 1st, 1875

Dear Father,

I telegraphed you this morning "Mr Cleveland glad to have Charley - will write".

Mr. C. returned from N.Y. Saturday evening having been delayed a day or two by sickness. He was very hearty & quite willing to give Charley the place though he had partially promised it to a nephew of his.

Charley Cleveland goes away about 10th March and I think Charley W. had better come up last of this month or 1st of March so he could familiarize himself with the work before he really has charge of it.

He ought to spend 4 or 5 hours a day improving his writing, you know Charley Cleveland is a very fine writer and I am afraid his will look shabby in comparison.

I have no special fears but what he will get along, but he will have to give his whole mind to the work and keep at it constantly.

As to salary, nothing was said, though I presume all would consent provided he succeeds in doing the work to pay say $300 to $350 first year. There would be no trouble in getting plenty of boys for nothing.

I would give him to understand if he decides to come, that at the ex........ of the year he is to return to school and finish his course.

Nellie and I would be very glad to have him board with us, and if he concludes to you had better advise us at once.

I have just shared above to Mr. Hitchcock and he thinks it would be well enough for him to come up first of next week and perhaps sooner if he can.

Yours of 13th instant is at hand.

Will try and see Taylor about property ...... though very likely he knows nothing of it.

Affectionately

A. M. Wilcox

1880 Census, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio: Aaron M. Wilcox (age 36, Iron Manuf & Dealer, born Ohio), wife Hellen C. Wilcox (age 31, born Ohio), son Aaron C. Wilcox (age 4, born Ohio) and son Horace W. Wilcox (age 4, born Ohio).

U.S. Passport Applications: No. 9065, Issued Dec. 28, 1883, State of Ohio, County of Cuyahoga.

I, Aaron M. Wilcox, do swear that I was born in Painesville, Lake Co., Ohio on the 24th day of July 1842, that I am a Native and Loyal Citizen of the United State.

Sworn to before me this 26th day of December, 1883, Geo. W. Howe, Collector of Customs

I, Charles H. Bill, so swear that I am acquainted with the above named Aaron M. Wilcox and with the facts stated by him and that the same are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Sworn to before me this 26th day of December 1883. Geo W. Howe, Collector of Customs.

Description of Aaron M. Wilcox

Age: 41 years.
Stature, 6 feet 0 Inches.
Forehead, High
Eyes: Gray
Nose: Large
Mouth: Full
Chin: Heavy
Hair: Brown & thin
Complexion: Dark
Face: Long


I, Aaron M. Wilcox, do solemnly swear that I will support, protect and defend the constitution and Government of the United States against all enemies, whether domestic or foreign; and that I will bear true faith, allegiance, and loyalty to the same, any ordinance, resolution, or law of any State, Convention, or Legislature to the contrary notwithstanding; and further, that I do this with a full determination, pledge, and purpose, without any mental reservation or evasion whatsoever; and further, that I will well and faithfully perform all the duties which may be required of me by law: So help me God.

Aaron M. Wilcox.

Applicant desires passport sent to following address:

Geo. W. Howe
Custom House
Cleveland, Ohio.


Custom House, Cleveland, Ohio
Collector's Office 26th Dec. 1883.

To the Department of State (Passport Division), Washington D.C.

Herewith find application of Aaron M. Wilcox for "Passport" with Postal order for five dollars.

Very Respectfully,

Geo. W. Howe.

1890 Veterans Census: Painesville, Lake County, Ohio: Aaron M. Wilcox, Post Office Address: Painesville, Ohio.

Aaron M. Wilcox died April 16, 1906 in Catalina, Los Angeles County, CA. He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Painesville, Lake County, Ohio.

Helen Mary (Cleveland) Wilcox (born July 3, 1848) died on Mar. 23, 1924.


Wilson, Robert He was born Nov. 1, 1847 in Indiana. He was the son of Charles W. Wilson (1805 - 1874) and Mary A. Black (1910 - 1859). He married Mary J. Henderson on Dec. 1, 1866 in Saline County, Nebraska. She was the daughter of John Marr Henderson (Nov. 20, 1810 - Dec. 2, 1861) and Elizabeth Jane Ohaver (May 8, 1813 - July 9, 1894).

1850 Census, Henry County, Illinois: Charles Wilson (age 44, born PA), Mary Wilson (age 44, born PA), David Wilson (age 21, born Ohio), James Wilson (age 19, born Iowa), John Wilson (age 15, born Ohio), Wesley Wilson (age 13, born Iowa), Samuel Wilson (age 15, born Ohio), Mary Wilson (age 11, born Ohio), Catherine Wilson (age 10, born Ohio), Rebecca Wilson (age 5, born Iowa), Robert Wilson (age 2, born Illinois) and Wm. Thomas Wilson (age 1, born Illinois).

1860 Census: Jefferson, Buchanan County, Iowa: Charles Wilson (age 55, farmer, born PA). David Wilson (age 31, born Ohio), Rachel Wilson (age 22, born Missouri), Robert H. Wilson (age 13, born Indiana), Thos. Wilson (age 11, born Ind.). Joseph Wilson (age 9, born Ill), George F. Wilson (age 7, born Ill), Rebecca J. Wilson (age 6, born Ind.), and Emma J. Wilson (age 3/12, born Ill).

1875 Kansas State Census: Pawnee, Smith County, Kansas: R. H. Wilson (age 26, born Indiana, Farmer), M. J. Wilson (age 26, born Iowa), J. M. Wilson (age 6, born Iowa), and R. O. Wilson (age 3/12, born Kansas. From Iowa to Kansas.

1880 Census: Pawnee, Smith County, Kansas: Robert H. Wilson (age 32, farmer, born Indiana), wife Mary J. Wilson (age 32, born Iowa), daughter Martha M. Wilson (age 11, born Iowa), son Reuben O. Wilson (age 5, born Kansas), John A. Wilson (age 3, born Kansas).

1890 Veterans Census: Line, Webster County, Nebraska: Robert H. Wilson (Private, Co. H, 27 Iowa Inf., Enlisted Jan 5, 1864. Discharged May 16, 1865. Length of service 1 year, 5 months, Post Office Address: Red Cloud, Nebraska. Disability Incurred: Diarrhea and Deafness).

1900 Census: Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska: Robert H. Wilson (born Nov. 1847, age 52, carpenter, married 34 years, born Indiana), wife Mary J. Wilson (born Oct. 1847, age 52, married 34 years, 4 children born, 2 still living, born Iowa), son John J. Wilson (born Jan. 1877, age 22, born Kansas).

1910 Census: Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska: Robert H. Wilson (age 63, married 1 time for 43 years, born Indiana, House Carpenter), wife Mary J. Wilson (age 62, married 1 time for 43 years, 4 children born, 2 still living, born Iowa), and son John A. Wilson (age 32, born Kansas).

Mary J. (Henderson) Wilson (born Oct. 1847), died June 5, 1919 in Webster County, Nebraska. She is buried in Red Cloud Cemetery, Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska, Lot 55, Section 14.

1920 Census: Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska: Robert H. Wilson (age 73, widowed, born Indiana).

Robert Wilson died Apr. 9, 1920 (Pension Index Record) and is buried in Red Cloud Cemetery, Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska, Lot 55, Section 14, Grave 3.


Winkley, William M. He was born March 1824 in New Hampshire. He was the son of Mark Winkley. He married Deborah Woods Brooks. She was the daughter of Gardner T. Brooks and Jemima Gove. Her name came from the 1925 Iowa State Census for their daughter Isora.

1850 Census: Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire: William M. Winkley (age 26, farmer, born NH), Deborah Winkley (age 22, born NH), and Isora E. Winkley (age 1, born NH).

1860 Census, Byron, Buchanan County, Iowa: William Winkley (age 36, farmer, born NH), Deborah Winkley (age 32, born NH), Isora Winkley (age 11, born NH), Frank Winkley (age 5, born Ohio) and Flora Winkley (age 8/12, born Iowa).

1870 Census: Washington, Buchanan County, Iowa: William Winkley (age 46, farmer, born NH), Deborah W. Winkley (age 42, born NH), Frank S. Winkley (age 15, born Ohio), Clara L. Winkley (age 9, born Iowa) and Willie H. Winkley (age 2, born Iowa). (Note: Indexed as Wickley)

1880 Census: Platte, Taylor County, Iowa: William Winkley (age 56, farmer, born New Hampshire), Deborah W. Winkley (age 52, born New Hampshire) and William H. Winkley (age 12, born Iowa).

1885 List of Ex-Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, Living in Iowa: 27th Iowa: Wm. Winkley Private, Co. H, Post Office, Clearfield.

1885 Iowa State Census: Platte, Taylor County, Iowa: William M. Winkley (Township 70, Range 32, Section 25, NW NE, age 60, farmer, born NH), Deborah W. Winkley (age 50, born NH), and Willie H. Winkley (age 17, born Buchanan County, Iowa).

1900 Census: Grant, Taylor County, Iowa: William Winkley (born March 1824, age 76, married 53 years, born New Hampshire, Farmer/Landlord) Deborah W. Winkley (Born March 1828, age 72, married 53 years, 5 children born, 3 still living, born New Hampshire).

1910 Census: Grant, Taylor County, Iowa: William M. Winkley (age 86, married 1 time for 63 years, born New Hampshire, own Income), Deborah W. Winkley (age 82, married 1 time for 63 years, 5 children born, 3 still living, born New Hampshire.).

Deborah W. Winkley (born March 30, 1828), died Oct. 15, 1910. She is buried in Clearfield Cemetery, Lot 59, Grant Township, Ringgold, County, Iowa.

William M. Winkley died Sept. 1, 1911 and is buried in Clearfield Cemetery, Lot 59, Grant Township, Ringgold County, Iowa. (Iowa Cemetery Records, Gravestone Records of Ringgold)

1925 Iowa State Census: Clearfield, Taylor Iowa: Isora E. Daken (age 65, widowed, born New Hampshire) said her father was William M. Winkly, born New Hampshire and her mother was Deborah W. Brooks, born New Hampshire.

However, I found a death record for William M. Winkley. It confuses the issue a bit, but could very likely have an error on it: Name: William M. Winkley; Death Date: Sept. 1, 1911. Death Place: Grant Township, Clearfield, Taylor County, Iowa; Age: 87; Birth Date April 12, 1824; Birthplace: New Hampshire; Occupation: Retired. Father's name: Mark Winkley. Mother's name: Deborah W. Brooks. (Iowa, Deaths and Burials, 1850-1990). (The name of Deborah Brooks as his mother COULD be an error depending on who provided the information. On my great grandmother's death certificate, my grandfather (her son-in-law) provided the name of her husband as her father. So I know errors can occur).


Woodward, Myron Hawley He was born June 23, 1845 in Warsaw, Wyoming, New York. He was the son of William H. Woodward (1819 - 1852) and Mary Ann Gregg. He married Laura Mae Harry on Dec. 18, 1873 in Illinois. She was the daughter of John Ashbury Harry (Aug. 14, 1820 - 1905) and Susan Ellen Whitaker (1822 - 1907)

1880 Census: Dillon, Tazewell, Illinois: Miron H. Woodward (age 33, farmer, born New York), wife Laura Woodward (age 26, born Cal), daughter Cora Woodward (age 6, born Illinois), son Edwin Woodward (age 4, born Illinois), and daughter Lucy Woodward (age 3/12, born March, born Illinois).

1900 Census: Labette, Labette County, Kansas: Myron H. Woodard (born June 1847, age 53, married 26 years, born New York, farmer), wife Laura Woodard (born May 1855, age 45, married 26 years, 5 children born, 5 still living, born California), Son Edwin Woodard (born May 1876, age 24, born Illinois), daughter-in-law Naomi A. Woodard (born Apr. 1879, age 21, born Missouri) and daughter Ella Nadia (born Dec. 1891, age 8, born Kansas).

1905 Kansas State Census: Labette, Labette County, Kansas: M. H. Woodward (age 60, born NY, to Kansas from Illinois, Honorably discharged from the volunteer military service of the United States. State: Iowa, 27 Iowa Inft. Co. H.), L.M. Woodward (age 51, born California) and Nadia Woodward (age 13, born Kansas.)

1910 Census, Coal Creek, Pawnee County, Oklahoma: Myron H. Woodward (age 61, married 1 time for 36 years, born New York), wife Laura Woodward (age 56, married 1 time for 36 years, 6 children born, 5 still living, born California), and daughter Nada Woodward (age 18, born Kansas).

Laura Mae (Harry) Woodward died Nov. 20, 1911 and is buried in Santa Ana Cemetery, Santa Ana, Orange County, California.

Myron H. Woodward married second Mae E. Callahan on Jan. 12, 1916 in Orange County, California. The marriage record showed that he was aged 71. Father's name: William H. Woodward; Mother's name: Mary A. Gregg. Mae E. Callahan was aged 35, the daughter of Mathew Sennott and Mary Dooley. (California, County Marriages, 1850-1952)

Myron H. Woodward died Dec. 30, 1921 and is buried in Santa Ana Cemetery, Santa Ana, Orange County, California

His widow Mae E. Woodward filed for a pension on Jan 14, 1922 in California.

Children of Myron H. Woodward and Laura Mae Harry:

  1. Elinor Florence Woodward, b. 27 Jul 1881 in Tremont, Tazewell, Illinois, USA
  2. Cora Maybelle Woodward, b. 15 Dec 1874 in Springlake, Tazewell, Illinois, USA
  3. Edwin Bell Woodward. b. 18 May 1876 in Hopedale, Tazewell, Illinois, USA
  4. Lucy Ellen Woodward, b. 4 Mar 1880 in Tremont, Tazewell, Illinois, USA
  5. Nada Muriel Woodward, b. 5 Dec 1891 in Paola, Miami, Kansas, USA

Woolley, Charles Wesley. He was born March 19, 1832 in New York. He married Sarah Ann Anders on Oct. 28, 1858 in Buchanan County, Iowa. (Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934). She was the daughter of Amariah Anders (Dec. 25, 1801 - June 4, 1861) and Mary (Polly) Imler (Dec. 1808 - May 5, 1887). Her brother Daniel Anders also served in Company H, 27th Iowa. (her brother William Anders also tried to enlist in the 27th Iowa, but was rejected.).

1870 Census: Rockford, Pottawattamie County, Iowa: C. W. Woolley (age 38, farmer, born New York), S. A. Woolley (age 31, born Ohio), Mary Woolley (age 11, born Iowa), Sherman Woolley (age 7, born Iowa), Carrie Woolley (age 5, born Iowa), Frank Woolley (age 3, born Iowa), Maud Woolley (age 11/12, born Iowa), and Frank Woolley (age 18, born Iowa).

1885 Nebraska State Census, Spring Branch, Wayne County, Nebraska: C. W. Woolley (age 53, farmer, born Nebraska?), wife Sarah Woolley (age 46, born Ohio), daughter Carrie Woolley (age 19, born Iowa), son Frank Woolley (age 17, born Iowa), daughter Maud Woolley (age 15, born Iowa) and Son Don Woolley (age 13, born Iowa).

1890 Veterans Census: Spring Branch, Wayne County, Nebraska: Charles W. Woolley (Sergt, Co. H, 27 Iowa Inf. Enlisted Aug. 20 186?, discharged May 8, 1863. Post Office Address: Haskins, Wayne County, Nebraska.

Charles W. Woolley died Sept. 19, 1896 and is buried in E.U.B. (Peace Evangelical) Cemetery, Hoskins, Wayne County, Nebraska

1900 Census: Hoskins, Wayne County, Nebraska: Fred Meyerheinsick (born Oct. 1866, age 33, married 6 years, born Germany), Wife Amelia Meyerheinsick (born Oct. 1873, age 26, married 6 years, 4 children born, 4 still living, born Nebraska), son Oscar Meyerheinsick (born Jan. 1895, age 5, born Nebraska), son August Meyerheinsick (born Sept. 1896, age 3, born Nebraska), daughter Elsie Meyerheinsick (born Feb. 1898, age 2, born Nebraska), son Erick Meyerheinsick (born Jan. 1900, age 4/12, born Nebraska), mother Sarah Woolley (born Mar. 1839, age 61, widowed, 8 children born, 4 still living, born Ohio).

Sarah Woolley died Jan. 8, 1908 and is buried in E.U.B. Cemetery, Hoskins, Wayne County, Nebraska.