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Lockport Daily Journal (Lockport, NY) 30 January 1871

COURT PROCEEDINGS

Judge Marvin Presiding

CRIMINAL CALENDAR

The following indictments were found by the grand jury:

The People against Daniel D. Day; indicted for receiving stolen property, knowing it to be stolen. Case sent to the next term of this court, and defendant gave bail for his appearance.

The People against Warren Dindruff; indicted for grand larceny. Defendant arraigned and plead not guilty. Remanded to jail to await trial.

The People against Daniel McRae, indicted on the charge of biting off the ear of "Straps" McDonald. Defendant arraigned and plead not guilty. Case sent to the next term of Court of Sessions. McRae gave bail for his appearance at said court.

The People against George Day; indicted for burglary and larceny. Defendant arraigned and plead not guilty. He subsequently withdrew this plea and plead guilty of burglary and larceny in the second degree. He was remanded to jail to await sentence of the court.

The People against Byron Day; indicted for burglary and larceny (second offence). Defendant arraigned and plead not guilty. He subsequently withdrew this plea and plead guilty to buglary and larceny in the second degree. He was remanded to jail to await sentence of the court.

The People against Thomas Johnson, indicted for manslaughter. Defendant arraigned and plead not guilty. He was then remanded to jail to await trial.

The People against Seymour Day, indicted for receiving stolen property. Defendant arraigned and plead not guilty. He was remanded to jail to await trial.

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Lockport Daily Journal (Lockport, NY) 6 February 1871

COURT PROCEEDINGS

Judge Marvin Presiding

SENTENCE OF PRISONERS

At 12 o'clock to day the prisoners found guilty at the present term of the court were arraigned before the bar to receive sentence. Before doing this, however, Judge Marvin addressed them upwards of half an hour, on their past conduct, giving them kindly admonition and advice as to their future course.

His remarks first turned to the Day boys, who he feared were fast journeying on the downward course. It was a sad sight to him, to see five young men, vigorous and strong, stand before him, soon to be sentenced to States Prison. Each of the prisoners in turn were addressed by Judge Marvin, in a kind and impressive manner. With the exception of Seely, who seemed to be quite deeply affected, the prisoners listened to the Judge's remarks with apparent indifference. We regret that time will not permit a synopsis of the address.

The following are the names of the prisoners with their sentences:

Eben O. Seeley, convicted for forgery on a promissary note of $130, two years and a half in the Auburn States Prison, at hard labor.

Charles Richardson, convicted for assault and battery with intent to kill, three years in Auburn States Prison, at hard labor.

Warren Dindruff, convicted for grand larceny, in stealing a buffalo robe from B. Warren, three years at Auburn States Prison at hard labor.

George Day, convicted for burglary, in entering the house of Dr. Johnson, Charlotte, three years at Auburn.

Byron Day, convicted for the same offense, having finished an apprenticeship before of three years at Auburn, was sentenced to a term of 7 years, at the same institution, at hard labor.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 1 March 1879, p. 391.

VARIETY HALLS

...At ENOCH'S VARIETIES, Philadelphia, during the week ending Feb. 21, the specialty people were the Bixford Bros., Fred A. Fisisted, Billy O'Day, John Kiots, Mulligan and Morris, Ned Oliver, the Bauer Sisters, and Nellie Weeks. Tom Haywood is now stage-manager, vice Lou Frasier. Business light. Ella Warner, Lloyd and parker, J.H. Saville, Conway and Farrell, Jas. Woodville, and Billy O'Day will be the new faces Feb 24. Billy Wright, the negro comedian, who for several seasons was connected with the house, and who is now dying of consumption, and is in a destitute condition, will be tendered a benefit Feb. 27, Manager Enochs giving the house and the company free of all charge.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 22 November 1879, p. 275.

VARIETY HALLS

...AT THE THEATRE COMIQUE, Bradford, Pa., the departures Nov. 16 were Eddie Edwards, Pittsburg; Mille. Lorraine, Cincinnati; Little Julie and Master Ceco, New York. To appear 17: Fletcher and Lynch, Chas. and Gertie Seamon and Nellie Walters, G. E. Eiting benefited 8 to a full house. Charley Green, stage manager, benefits 15...The Academy of Music was reopened 10 by Ida Vincent's English Blondes for one week. The company includes Aggie Clinton, De Voy, Sisters ?osle, Emina and Clara, Rose Harris, Kitty Montague, Nellie Oakes, Billie O. Day, Dick Baker, Morelin Bros., Montagne and McBride and Ida Vincent. Vinia Wray, Annie and May Campbell and Ida Mack join this party 16, when they take the road, playing in Erie Pa., 17, Cleveland O., 18, Toledo 19, Detroit, Mich., 20, East Saginaw 21, Bay City 22. E.V. Chadwick is proprietor and manager, and Geo. Jennese advance-agent...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 21 May 1881, p. 146.

VARIETY HALLS

...MILLER'S WINTER GARDEN, Philadelphia, was fairly patronized May 15, the show being given by Andy Morris and Ida Maussey, Chas. and Carrie Moore, Billy O'Day, Fanny Prestige, Nellie Bland, Edith Sinclair and Ed F. Barnes, Geo. H Edwards, Chas H Sheffer, Rita Keller and Chas. Young. Business was fair last week...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 12 December 1885, p. 612.

MINNESOTA

Duluth--...The Duluth Theatre did a very large business last week. The ? included Lizzie Feasley, ? Russ, Loraine, Nellie Woods, Billy O'Day, Valler ? 3 and 5 years old). Alf Barber and Mile Lola on the trapeze. Manager Jackson informed me that the house will keep open until 12, and when it closes it may remain so for one or three months. He may "go it alone" best chance. There is some talk of having another variety house here next Spring, besides the Duluth. This place will not support two places of the kind at the same time...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 21 May 1887, p. 149.

WASHINGTON TERRITORY

Tacoma--At Morgan's Variety Theatre; James Fitz, Billy O'Day, Hazel Lester, Lavarie and Le Seur, Sylvenio and Arthur, Ellen Banks, Birdie Wilson, Annie Donavio, Holland Sisters, May Wallace and Chas. Archer.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 30 July 1887, p. 308.

VARIETY AND MINSTREL

...One of the unfortunates of the Alcazar Theatre holocaust at Hurley, Wis., was Sadie Wells, wife of Billy O'Day. Mr. Day writes us as follows: "After the fire had started--at the Post-office--my wife went to her room in the theatre and tried to save our clothes. The flames caught her garments and she was burned to death. Ten minutes before the fire I went out to post our letters and while away, and before I could get back, the theatre was burned to the ground. That was the last I saw of my dear wife. My own wardrobe is a total loss..."

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 10 March 1888, p. 835.

KENTUCKY

...GRAND CENTRAL--Week of 3: Jerome Chapman ?, Frank ?, Lillie Queen, Ida Walks, Geo. C. Thompson, Billy O'Day, Emma Leon, Ed. L. and Eliza Bardelia. Attendance is fair.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 14 July 1888, p. 279.

OHIO

COLUMBUS--...WONDERLAND--Curio Hall: Rose the Wild Girl and the Half Lads. Stage: Gleason Children, Price and Connors, Billy O'Day, Kitty Proctor, Howard Powers. Business is big.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 9 March 1889, p. 837.

CIRCUS, VARIETY AND MINSTREL

...BILLY O'DAY has joined the Garden City Quartet. They are to be known under the new name of Callahan, Bigley, Callahan, and O'Day...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 16 March 1889, p. 431.

CIRCUS, VARIETY AND MINSTREL

...WILLIAM O'DAY, basso profundo, has joined the Garden City Quartet....

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 8 May 1889, p. 156.

VARIETY AND MINSTREL GOSSIP

...BILLY O'DAY, character comedian, was married at Philadelphia, Pa. May 7 to Laura Mortimer, ?, of San Francisco Cal...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 29 June 1889, p. 256.

DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL NOTES

...William O'Day has signed for the season of 1889-90 to play the aged negro in "Held by the Enemy."

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 6 July 1889, p. 274.

CIRCUS, VARIETY AND MINSTREL NEWS

SCHUBER'S CONCERT GARDEN, Rockaway Beach, L. I. opened June 30 with the following people: Vera Nobrega, Lew Johnson, the Hronelees, Hen H. Clark, Harris and Walters, Billy O'Day, Phyllis Allen, Chas. Emerson and Wilhelm Konrad.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 3 August 1889, p. 337.

MASSACHUSETTS

Boston--...Aslin & Stone's--A horse show is the novelty this week. Stage performers 28. Edward Giguere and Blanch Boyer, Prince de Julius Setting, Nellie Davis, Zuzannie, Georgia Montifiore, Frank and Laura Marion, Lida Morse, William and Maude Edison, Billy O'Day, Marie Arkwright, Tommy Lewis. I have been told, on pretty good authority, that Gus White has been engaged to fill the vacancy caused by George Mallink's departure. He was formerly connected with Hastings photographic studio.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 18 July 1891, p. 313.

WASHINGTON

PALACE THEATRE--Week of June 28 business was big. New scene July 6: The Mexican Troubadours, Prince Paul, Laurine, Billy O'Day, and Kitty Nealey, Ramaling, Jerry Groman, Frank Rice, Chas. Wray, Kitty Godwin, Jamie Eldridge, Birdie Wilson. Ollie Leonard, Mamma Howard, May Marks, Lottis West, Carrie Ward and Emma Taylor.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 31 October 1891, p. 571.

Variety and Minstrelsy

...Recent appearances at the Coliseum Theatre, Helena, Mon., included May Wonderly, Mamie Merritt, Mlle. Nina, Cappy Black, Percy Lloyd, Frankie Howard, May Gordon, Lulu Temple, Coughlin and Gerry, Ades Hastings, Eva Fonda, Della Metcalf, Tillie Russell, Billy O'Day, Emma Forrett and Etta Leon...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 10 September 1892, p 426. 313.

PENNSYLVANIA

Scranton--...THE PALACE MUSEUM opened 3 with Leonine, Major Littlefield and w fe Meehan's Canine Paradox, Jerome Saskine, Rose Bacan, Witon and Nelson, T.J. Heffron, James Edwards, Katie Edwards and Billy O'Day.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 24 September 1892, p. 457.

VARIETY & MINSTRELSY

...ARRIVALS at Anderson's Wonderland, Wilkesbarre, Pa. Sept. 19: Domingo, Mlle. Aimee, Couffl? and Frank Leopold, Griffin and Gallagher, the Loretts, Billy O'Day, Chattaway and Ripley and Risbee...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 22 October 1892, p. 525.

Variety and Minstrelsy

WILLIAM O'DAY was married Oct. 13, at the Hotel Vendome, Johnstown, Pa. to Mary Engel, of Altoona, non-professional.

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The Utica Observer, 7 September 1893, p. 1

Amusements, Meetings, &

WONDERLAND THEATRE

...

BILLY O'DAY

Vocal and character artist, assisted by Miss May O'Day

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 11 August 1894, p. 367.

Variety and Minstrelsy

...BILLY AND MAY O'DAY inform us that they will sail for England shortly to fill a six months' engagement...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 11 August 1894, p. 358.

Variety and Minstrelsy

Howard Atheneum.--Of course Manager Lathrop is on the "Living Picture" swim, which he advertised at the Howard this week; also the Howard Musical Co. in the musical skit "Baby," with Viola Bancroft, G. W. Watson, Harry La Marr and others in the cast. In the olio: Leclair and Leslie, in their burlesque sketch, "Hamlet, Up to Now;" Millie Tournour, Hattie Stewart and Tommie Gillen, Murphy and Mack, Fannie Leslie, Bimbo and Tehl, Carr and Sawyer, Florence Eiche, Club Swinger Prouty, Minnie Cline, Prof. Schaffi, Mamie Flower, Edgar Eli, May Walsh, Milie and May O'Day and Lillie Weldon.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 19 January 1895, p. 734.

New York

Harlem--Atheneum--It is hard to tell what the management of this place bound to do. It was their intention to give a continous performance, but they only kept it up the first and second week. The third week, without notifying the public, they changed the opening to 2:30, and did not give a performance until 3:00 o'clock. This week they will give two shows a day. This week Russell and Kenny, Billy and May O'Day, Coll Dawley, Harris and Fields, C. H. Hicks, ? Fredericks, J. Ross Nordheim, Frank Manning, Meehan's Canine Paradox and John Leavitt.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 10 March 1894, p. 4.

Variety and Minstrelsy

...BILLY AND MAY O'DAY are again in working harness. The latter has been very ill...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 25 February 1893, p. 821.

Variety and Minstrelsy

WISCONSIN

Milwaukee.--WONDERLAND MUSEUM.--Week beginning 20: Curio Hall--The Strong Man's Contention. Charles Richards. Emile Rond. Fitz Williams. Zip and Punch. Round Theatre--Wm and May O'Day, John Sanderson, Meehan and Raymond, Geo W. King, Murphy and Lenora, and Emma L Mans.

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Utica Daily Press (Utica, NY) 5 September 1893.

Reopening of Wonderland

An event of interest that occurred yesterday afternoon was the reopening of Wonderland, Utica's popular low-priced amusement resort. Although it was a holiday with plenty of made outside, a great attraction at the Park, and a superb day for an outing, a large audience was present at the opening. The first thing that attracted the attention of visitors was the great improvements that Manager De Witt has made at Wonderland during the summer. The auditorium has been enlarged, furnished with comfortable chairs throughout and decorated in find style. It has a seating capacity for 1,000 people, comfortable and convenient. The stage has been fitted up with entire new scenery and is beautiful and attractive. Entertainments will be given every week day afternoon and evening, with an entire change of programme every Monday.

This week the principal attractions ar A? and Battle's World's Fair Novelty, introducing Mlle. Adored, with her wonderful live cat minstrels, and Miss anipt, the only capt ballet dancer in the world' Bonnie Lottle, the champion child song and dance artist; Billy and May O'Day in the new and humorous comedy, "Woman Rules the House," Tom and Gertie Grimes in the farcical comedy, "Fun in a Boarding School," Bryant and Connors, princes of Irish comedy, Charles Walker and Kitty Randolph in their great original creation, "Master and Man;" and Will Fowler, the comical clown juggler and equilibrist. This is a grand bill for a show whose prices of admission ryb frin 10 to 25 cents, and is evidence that Mr. De Witt intends to give his patrs more and better for the money than has ever before been presented.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 1 June 1895, p. 194.

New Jersey

Hoboken--Oriental--Jas. H. Phillips, late manager of the Bijou, will assume control here and will have a strong company for his opening week, 27. Nick Collins' Athletic and Specialty Co., Mark Wolley, manager. The people: Fillas and Wolley, Jeanne Earle, George and Maud Ricketts, Mattie Weston, Billy O'Day, May O'Day, Myrtle Tressider, Campbell and O'Brien, and Sophie Collins. Matinees Monday and Saturday. Prices ? The place will be known hereafter as the Lyric.

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Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) 1 September 1895, p. 13.

Plays and Players, Songs and Singers

...Walter Snow and William O'Day have signed with Agnes Wallace Villa...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 11 January 1896, p. 712.

HARLEM MUSEUM -- Crowded house at all performances is the rule at this popular priced house. New faces this week are Jos. F. Campbell and Maggie Evans, Edw. H. Banker, Will G. Mack and Billy O'Day, Jennie Robey, Frank Le Bar, Edw. M. Decker and Eugene Benton, Dick Allen, Kinura, Ottora, Edw. Thorn and Enoch, the man fish.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 11 April 1896, p. 86.

...WILL G. MACK and Billy O'Day have been engaged for this week at the Kensington Theatre, Philadelphia, Pa...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 11 July 1896, p. 294.

Variety and Minstrelsy

...BARLOW BROS.' MAGNIFICENT MINSTRELS, which takes the road Aug 3, under the management of M. A. Mosely will be made up thus: M. A. Mosely, manager; Harry Ward, assistant manager; Claude B. Long, general agent; W. M. Scott, press agent; W. N. Gilbert, programmer; Harry Ward, Will G. Mack, Billy O'Day, Burt Marion, Eddie Penand, Mons Zella, Baby Higgins, Joe Higgins, Joan Callem, Arthur Borell, Jack Hughes, Ed. C. Samson, Tom Crockett, Eddie Samson, Chas. D. Kimay, S. C. Bottnott, R. E, Moddy, T. H. Murphree, C. Sostbar, Lester Cohn, H. C. Russell, Harry Brooks, H. B. McCallam, Dan Bodder, Will Speers, Frank Harmon, Herbert Craddock. The company will travel in a palace hotel car. The band, under the leadership of Jack Hughes, will be a feature. The orchestra will be composed of ten musicians, including a solo harpist. The first part, "The Outing of the Swells" and "The Penwin-a-la," the latter arranged by Harry Ward, will be featured...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 1 August 1896, p. 342.

Variety and Minstrelsy

NOTES FROM BARLOW BROS.' MAGNIFICENT MINSTRELS.--This company is now in readiness to take the road, and will open its season Aug 3., with better equipment and a stronger show than ever before. The complete roster of the company is as follows: Leath and Mosely, sole owners; M. A. Mosely, manager; Henry Ward, assistant manager; C. W. Rex, treasurer; T. H. Murphree, secretary; C. H. Long, general agent; W. E. Scott, press agent; Will G. Mack, Billy O'Day, Valentine and Weeks, Fred Russell, Zella, Tom Crockett, MIke Rale, Ed. Samson, Little Arthur Samson, R. E. Moody, Wm. Densmore, S. C. Boltmolt, Jack Hughes, leader; C. W. Rodgers, P. Schumacher, E. Delare, Harry Brooks, H. E. McClellan, T. H. Murphree, O. Gremer, J. J. Shaw, M. O. Elbert. We are making all new and special paper, and Claude Long, in the advance, assisted by Wm Scott, will bill the show like a circus. Our new car, America, is a beauty and well laid out for the comfort of all.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 15 August 1896, p. 374.

Variety and Minstrelsy

NOTES FROM BARLOW BROS. MAGNIFICENT MINSTRELS.--We opened the season Aug. 3, at Petersburg, Va., under the most auspicious circumstances. Mr. Leath, accompanied by Phil McNiven, who are joint owners, with Manager M. A. Mosely, came down from Richmond, and viewed the performance. The first part novelty, "The Outing of the Sports," is a good introduction to the entertainment. The orchestra is under the direction of Prof. Jack Hughes. The vocalists and musicians are dressing in outing suits; the draperies are a rich satin and plush flags, and the three editions of end men are attired in various colored silk plush dress suits, with white satin pumps. Billy O'Day and George Week made strong hits on the first two editions, and Fred Russell and Harry Ward finished the first part with their different styles of comedy. After a finale by Weeks, Russell and Samson; Billy Eberhardt, novelty juggler, appeared and was followed by the plantation sketch of Will G. Mack and Billy O'Day, who had them in good humor for Harry Ward, who told a few different stories, responded to four recalls, and made way for Valentine and Weeks, who made their usual great impression. Zella, demon contortionist, covered himself with glory in his new act, which closed the show. The new car "America" is a beauty, and the word of Claude Long, who puts up the beautiful new paper ahead of the show, is very commendable.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 5 September 1896, p. 422.

Variety and Minstrelsy

...BILLY O'DAY, of Mack and O'Day, has closed with the Barlow Bros., Minstrels. Will G. Mack takes his place on the end. Fred Russell and Mr. Mack are producing a new act...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 26 September 1896, p. 472.

NEW YORK STATE

Buffalo.--IMPERIAL MUSIC HALL.--Allen May, Ruth Livingstone, Charm Chaspella, Mack Lorton, Leslie and Allie, Alice Carmels, Marie Wallace, Billy O'Day, Ryan and Ryan, and Korman, frog man.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 24 October 1896, p. 537.

PENNSYLVANIA

HARRISBURG.-- BLOU THEATRE.--Manager Foley's new arrangement, one performance in the afternoon and a continuous show at night has, with a reduction in prices, made a big improvement in business. During the week of 19 he offers the following bill: Roche and Whiting, Lottie Freeman, Billy O'Day, Hamilton and Hamilton, and Gordon and Gilbert.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 16 January 1897, p. 730.

Variety and Minstrelsy

...BILLY O'DAY has been engaged for fourteen weeks in Texas, opening Feb. 22, at Fort Worth. He is playing Sam. T. Jack's Opera House, Chicago, Ill., this week...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 24 July 1897, p. 334.

Vaudeville and Minstrels

...BILLY O'DAY has been engaged as manager of Patzel's Music Hall, Macon, Ga...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 11 September 1897, p. 456.

MASSACHUSETTS

Boston.--HOWARD ATHENEUM.--At this popular old time show house for week of 6 will be seen Forrie West, Harning and Ah Sid, the Cloon Trio, Keno and Welch, Donovan and Robertson, Mille Olive, Wear and Devereaux, Bryant and Cleaver, Emma Cottrelly, the March Trio, Delmore and Kennelle, DeCanto, Carl Rikarz, the Duquesne Quartet, Billy O'Day, and Pike and Oliver. The Howard's own female burlesquers, some thirty in number, also appear in a one act extravaganza, entitled "Going to the Ball."

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 25 September 1897, p. 491.

MASSACHUSETTS

Boston.--AUSTIN & STONE'S MUSEUM.--The water show provided by Cora Beckwith and his troupe of comely young female swimmers proved a very strong drawing card here during the week past, and so attractive have they been that Managers Stone and Shaw have re-engaged them for another week. Other specialties will likewise be found in the hall, the most prominent of which is beatrix, who fearelessly handles "Big Beg," the monster snake. In the theatre, in hourly shows, are the Musical peasants, from Naples, Italy; the Burroughs, Murray and McCoy, Sumers Gifford, Griff Williams, Marlow and Flanker, Ada Hunter, Carroll and Healey, the Sensational Mouillot Family, the Nayetta Duo, Woodville and Hall, Princeton Sisters, Florence Zeller, Bella Melbour, William O'Day, Marvelous Krieger.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 30 October 1897, p. 578.

MASSACHUSETTS

Boston.-- GRAND THEATRE.--Thomas & Watson will produce at their house week of 25 the stirring melodrama, "Neck and Neck," cast to the strength of a very capable company. In the bill are "The Black Mascots," Al. and Mamie Anderson, Ryan and Gregory, May Bryant, Dollie Lafferis, Billy O'Day, and Sheehan and Sheehan.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 6 November 1897, p. 592.

World of Players

Billy O'Day joined Gus Hill's "McFadden's Row of Flats" for the remainder of this season at Providence, R. I., Nov. 1.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 5 February 1898, p. 806.

World of Players

-- Billy O'Day of "McFadden's Row of Flats," writes to the clipper as follows: "We closed in Milwaukee, Wis., last Saturday night, and Mr. Hill chartered a special train to bring his company to St. Paul, Minn., to open on Sunday night. We went to the depot in Mailwaukee to our sleepers, and the storm was so bad that the engine could not move the two cars, and we did not get out of the yards until 2.35 in the morning (Sunday). Then we got help from engine No. 2, and at ten A. M. we got ten miles from Milwaukee, when the track was cleared and we run as far as Elroy. That was three P. M., and they put a big engine on and started for St. Paul. We had one hundred and ninety-six miles to go, and we reached St. Paul at 7.39. It was a hustle, and at 8.40 Sunday night, Jan 23, the curtain went up with one round of cheers from all parts of the house, and it was packed from pit to dome. We made the fastest time ever made into St. Paul. We run at the rate of fifty-five to sixty miles an hour, and at one time we run at the rate of seventy-five miles and hour. That was the time we needed some one to hold our hair on."

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 2 April 1898, p. 74.

World of Players

...Billy O'Day writes thus: "Gus. Hill's 'McFadden's Row of Flats' Co. on March 24 played at the Soldiers' Home, Hampton Roads, Va. The house was packed with old vets., and just before the curtain rose the governor of the home stood in his private box and raised the Stars and Stripes far above his head, the band played "The Star Spangled Banner," and the show commenced. We had the pleasure of witnessing the launching of the twin battleships, Kersarge and Kentucky, March 24, at Newport News, Va. Mr. Hill and wife were presented with a carriage and driven to a close view of the launching."...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 6 August 1898, p. 370.

Vaudeville and Minstrel

...BILLY O'DAY has been engaged to play Old Cloe, the wench part in "South Before the War."...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 17 November 1900, p. 833.

--William O'Day and Jerry Cunningham have been engaged to play the black face parts, Mandy and Rufus, in Frank E. Baker's "Heart of the Blue Ridge" Co.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 16 March 1901, p. 47.

World of Players

Georgia

LYCEUM (Caley Anderson, manager).-- Bills for week of 4: Della Fox, Rider's trained monkeys, Ameta, the Rasares, Billy O'Day, Emerson and Omeago, the biograph. Business is good.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 23 November 1901, p. 837.

Billy O'Day had been engaged by Keogh & Reed to play Col. Negley, in "Barbara Frietchie," Eastern Co. He is meeting with great success.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 5 October 1901, p. 679.

Vaudeville and Minstrel

...THE GREAT AMERICAN VAUDEVILLE CIRCUS CO. opened in Augusta, Ga. for four nights, commencing on Sept. 23. Company consists of: Brummage and Clark, Rio Bros., the Great Richards, Little and Pritzkow, Zenca, Buskirk, and Rich, La Var Sisters, Billy O'Day, J. D. Smith, manager; Chas. Turner and brass band...

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The Auburn Bulletin" (Auburn, NY) 23 November 1901.

AMUSEMENTS

The Boards

When four big attractions are billed for four successive nights in Auburn, some one of them usually suffers poor patronage. Barbara Frietchie, the Clyde Fitch play which was written for Julia Marlowe, was the one last night. It deserved a much better reception. The performance suffered from two ailments which may easily be remedied if the play comes this way again--an incompetent actor struggling with an important role and the supernumeraries. William Dolan was the actor and Mr. Frietchie was the role he so dismally failed to assume. The supernumeraries--well, it matters not who they were and probably they were as good as could be obtained for the compensation paid, but they were sad looking soldiers. That much against the performance. This much for the rest of it; It was thoroughly enjoyable. Mis Florence Wickliffe, who was seen here last season in When We Were Twenty-One, had Miss Marlowe's role. She is an actress of fine qualities and whatever she does she does well. Her Barbara is really artistic and it found high favor last night. Nellie Haywood as Mammy Lu was another who work was particularly pleasing. Of the male members of the company probably few in the audience recognized in Colonel Negley a former Auburnian and a famous minstrel comedian. It was none other than William O'Day, Billy O'Day he was called in his youth around here. He was one of the first black-face comedians to introduce a monologue and he has been doing black-face work for many, many years but this season he is a "real actor." He invests the role of Colonel Negley with the necessary dignity and a wealth of voice and physique. He reads his lines intelligently, missing nothing to bring out their strong points, and his ipersonation of the Southern officer is really notable. He will probably find much easiser and more lucrative employment henceforth in this line of work than he has enjoyed as a minstrel, although he was one of the high priced ones in that branch of the profession. Percy Lennon as Jack Negley was also good and the work of C. L. Walters as Fred Gelwix, one of the soldiers, was worthy of special mention...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 15 March 1902, p. 21.

Vaudeville and Minstrel

...NOTES FROM THE GEORGE R. DOWNING Vaudeville Co., with John L. Sullivan as Simon Legree.--Roster: William O'Day, as Uncle Tom; the Starkeys, Billy O'Day, Williams and Melburn, Mabel Delberg, Brummell and Kimberly, May Yvonne, Doody and Wright, Russell and Dunbar. We are playing to packed business, and John I. is a big drawing card. We travel in our own parlor sleeping car...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 15 June 1902, p. 345.

World of Players

--Zelma Rawlston played Geneva, N. Y., June 8 and Sundayed there, where she took her company for a day's outing on the beautiful Lake Seneca. She chartered the steamer Ottlantl and invited her entire company, including: Will Cowper, Harry Mayo, I Isman Noa, Billy O'Day, John Reilly, L. H. Weinrich, Manuel Klein, Ellenor Gray, Margaret Schultz, Mrs. E. H. Gray, Tom Maguire. The following New York friends, while on their way to the Pan-American, were also invited: Ben Jerome, Myrtle Tressidor, Geo. Nichols and Jack Spanton. All aided in making the day a very enjoyable one.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 6 September 1902, p. 601.

William O'Day has been engaged by Jules Murry to play Col. Armitage in "The Tyranny of Tears."

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Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) 18 January 1903, p. 16.

DRAMA

"Joe Welch" is well-know as one of the foremost inpterpreters of a certain class of Hebrew character types in vaudeville. Sullivan, Harris and Woods are starring him this season in "The Peddler" written for his use by Hal Reid.

The scenes of the play ar ein New York, and the story is as follows: Abraham Jacobson, a peddler, had by means of frugality and saving, banked enough money to help him open a second-hand clothing store. His wife had died and he had a son, Sammy, who was inclined to be wayward. The boy had been playing the races with much luck, and had met at the race track a married woman who became madly infatuated with him. Her husband suspected his wife, and resolved to warch her. Jacobson havign heard stories of his boy resolved to take him to task. He told him of his dead mother's wish for him to marry the girl of her heart, and of a diamond valued at three thousand dollars which as to be his on his wedding day. Won by his father's pleading Sammy resolves to turn over a new leafe, marry the girl his parents had picked out for him, and live as an honest Hebrew should live. Jacobson is overjoyed, but his joy is short lived. The woman with whom the boy had carried on an intrugue enters the shop to dispose of an old waits, and Jacobson buys it.

Seven years before the time the play opens, Jacobson, while peddling on the lower East Side, had heard the cry of a baby, and to his astonishment found the little one lying near a barrel, its little face all blue from cold and the snow covering what meager clothing it had on. Jacobson picks the babe up and hurries home with it. His wife discovers it is blind, and the two resolve to bring the babe up as their own.

After Jacobson had bought the wiast he began to look it over, and founda note which explained that the owner had years before deserted a blind child named Mary, born out of wedlock. Jacobson realizes that the babe he had picked up seven years ago was that child. The woman comes back demanding her wait, claiming that she did not want to sell it, as it contained something of value to her. Sammy walks into the store, and the woman greets him familiarly as "Charlie." Jacobson explains his name is Sammy and that he is the young man's father. Tge woman laughs and turns to Sammy. The boy laughs and declares Jacobson is not his father. The old man is astounded, and when his business is through with the woman, orders them both out of the store. Sammy returns later, and in company with a thug robs the safe. Jacobson discovers them, shoots his son, and when the police come declares his son was shot defending his father. Jacobson has the boy sent to a hospital, and in order to pay for him there, raises money on his store. He is unable to pay the mortage and it is foreclosed, and but for a kindhearted depty sheriff, who finds him crying over the dead body of his baby, would have been dispossessed. meanhile the boy is taken away from the hospital by his mistress, and on the way encounters her husband. Jacobson, reduced to a peddler again, comes along, and is just in time to save his son from being shot by the betrayed and deserted husband. The blind child, unknow to Jacobson, goes to Chinatown to sell papers, is kidnapped, and rescued by the peddler.

Jacobson received news that he is a baron, and heir to big estates in Germany. He is living in a handsome mansion, when one evening a peddler knowcks on the door, and Jacobson confronts his own son. father and son look at each toher--the son cries out "Father," but the latter fails to recognized him. Sammy tells him how he had turned over a new leaf, left the woman who had caused his downfall, and was leading an honest life. The boy leaves the house in tears, and soon after the woman enters and threatens Jacobson and his son. Her husband, who had followed her, sees her through the window and shoots her dead. The peddler rushes in, and at the urgent pleading of the girl who should have been Sammy's wife, Jacobson forgives and forgets.

The play is said to be copetently cast and handsomely staged.

The cast and synopsis:

Sammmy Jacobson...Herbert K. Betts

"Uncle Jason...Dave Posner

"Chuck" Conver...Ed Lawrence

Charles Wyandotte...John J. Pierson

Edward Morgan...Robert Bills

Sergeant Pat McCann...William O'Day

Dr. Joseph Ash...R. Brandon Mitchell

Salome Wyandotte...Fanny McIntyre

Sarah Goldberg...Olive Madison

"Lise" Barcley...Nina Harrington

Little Mary...Little Beatrice Abbey

Abraham Jacobson...Joe Welch

Synopsis

Act I.--Clothing store of Abraham Jacobson

Act II.--Scene 1--Cooper Union. Scene 2--Tammany Hall. Scene 3--Jacobson's attic.

Act II.--Scene in Pell street, Chinatown.

Act IV.--Drawing room in Jacobson's residence.

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Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) 21 January 1903, p. 12.

Actor O'Day a Rochester Man

William O'Day, who is playing the part of Sergeant Pat McCann in Joe Welch's "The Peddler" company at the National Theater, is a Rochester man. He has been on the stage for many years, having entered the profession at about the same time that Frank McNab, another Rochester man, did so. Mr. McNab played in Rochester last week. Mr. O'Day has been with several minstrel companies and has done a great deal of work of the character of that in which he is now engaged. He has called on many old acquaintances this week.

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Utica Herald-Dispatch (Utica, NY)3 August 1903, p. 4.

MANAGER HAS DISAPPEARED

VAUDEVILLE PERFORMERS LEFT STRANDED IN UTICA.

NO MONEY FOR FARE HOME.

Manager Haskin Left Butterfield Saturday, But Failed to Take HIs Trunk--Matter Will be Put in the Hands of Police.

A. A. Haskin, a slick appearing individual who has been managing the troupe of vaudevill artists at Utica Park, has left town according to the reports of the people who have been appearing under his management. The people are still in the city and in somewhat straitened circumstances. Some of them assert that they have not sufficient funds to pay their railroad fare back to the gay Rialto of New York, while their board bills continue to accumulate.

Mr. Haskin came to Utica several weeks ago and contracted with the traction company for the privilege of running a vaudeville show at the park. He then sent to New York and various other places and hired performers to come on here and present their acts. Last Wednesday the performers asked Mr. Haskin for a small advance on their salaries but that gentleman replied that he never paid until the end of the week. The end of the week came but the ghost did not walk and the players began to wonder where their lucre was to come from.

Mr. Haskin was a guest at the Butterfield and Saturday night left that hostelry without taking his wardrobe and without performing his small but important role of paymaster. It is said that the Butterfield managers would also be glad to again see the busy manager and are now hunting for Haskin. Three of the performers are at the Mansion House and two at the Metropolitan. Their bills are: Billy O'Day, black faced comedian, $40; Kane, the ventriloquist, $40; Drew and Doty, $50, and Madam Baretu, opera singer, $60.

A lawyer has been engaged on the case and an officer of the law will be sent to intercept the forgetful Mr. Haskin and remind him of the unpaid salaries and the languising Thespians in Utica. The troupe appeared in the Police Station this morning in an endeavor to secure a permit to string a banner across Genesee street to advertise a performance to be given by them to secure funds to pay their transportation to their homes or to New York, where they may secure other engagements at the opening of the season. They were directed to Mayor Talcott with their request.

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Utica Herald-Dispatch (Utica, NY)4 August 1903, p. 4.

BENEFIT PERFORMANCE

The vaudeville actors who were left stranded high and dry by their pilot and manager, A. A. Haskins, still are in the city, at least the majority of them and are still awaiting the return of the genial Haskins, who seems to have found a more congenial climate. Billy O'Day and Drew and Dooty left the city yesterday having the necesssary funds to save them counting the ties between here and New York...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 5 September 1903.

...William O'Day has cancelled his engagement with "Through Fire and Water"...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 10 August 1907, p. 672.

Wallack's (Chas. Burnham, manager)--A novelty in one sense was shown here on Monday evening, Aug 5, when the spectacle of a musical comedy with pathetic finales to each act was brought forth for the approval of New Yorkers. The piece, which is in three ?, was "The Time, the Place and the Girl," which was then produced for the first time in this city. Those concerned in its construction were Will. M. Hough and Frank Adams, who are credited with the "chatter." Joseph F. Howard, who wrote the jingles and the tunes; Ned Warburn, who staged the dances,, and Arthur Evans, who directed the dramatic portions. The chatter, taken all in all, would hardly pass muster, because there was too much of the rehash about it, even the ever willing and overworked story of the schoolmark who laid the eggins on the desk being brought forth. But Arthur Deagon, who had ? all the "men" of the comedy to himself had an occasional good time in his slangy material, and as he is a comedian who is really worthy of the title, and a worker whose energy never lags, no matter what the condition, he kept his auditors interested all the while, and propped up the humor of the piece so that it really stood without tottering. The musical numbers, of which there were only a few, were all good, and were encored as though the audience would never get enough of them. Ned Wayburn's handiwork was plainly noticable in the dances and chorus work, and he made "The Waning Honeymoon" and "Uncle Sam's Best Girl" get ? galore. The story of the piece is well designed, as it is all about the ? of "Happy" Johnny Hicks, a gambler, who makes a martyr of himself by confessing to a crime which he never committed, in order that his pal, who was the real culprit, may win the girl of his choice. But things are all adjusted in the end, and Hicks, who loves Molly Kelly, a nurse, gets the lady, while Tom, his pal, wins Margaret Simpson, "the girl," in spite of everything. Next to Mr. Deagon, who made the hit of the evening, Harriet Burt, as Mrs. Talcott, a young and charming widow, made a distinct success, her singing being good and her dancing proving graceful. Elene Foster was quitely effective as the nurse, and Violet McMillen, as The GIrl," looked dainty and pretty, and did the little that fell to her lot in a creditable manner. William Ricelardi, as an Italian, was good, and Hubert Hornsby played a "child" cleverly. The cast: Pietro, William Ricelardi; Mrs. Talcott, Harriet Burt; Molly Kelly, Elene Foster; Bud Simpson, John G. Rowe; Jasper Simpson, George Ebner; Laurie Farnham, James Norval; An Attendant, Barney McConnell; Margaret Simpson, "The Girl," Violet McMillen' Tom Cunningham, George Anderson; "Happy" Johnny Hicks, Arthur Deagon; Willie Talcott, Hubert Hornsby; A Chaffeur, Clyde Hunnewell; A Goal Keeper, George Johnson; A Police Sergeant, William O'Day.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 8 September 1906, p. 761.

World of Players

...BILLY O'DAY is engaged with "The Man in the Box" Co. this season. The company goes to San Francisco and back this season.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 9 February 1907, p. 1341.

World of Players

...BILLY O'DAY, a member of the No. 1 "The Girl of the Golden West" Co., writes: "As we were leaving Medina, N. Y., on Jan. 24, on our way to Lockport, N. Y., the smoking car of our train jumped the track and was thrown over on its side, and the only thing that saved the lives of our people was a freight car, standing on a side track, that stopped our car from going over."...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 18 July 1908, p. 559.

On the Road

Ohio

Zanesville. ?Maxanala? Park (M. E. Daly, manager). -- Bill week of 6: Billy O'Day, Tossle, the girl wonder, and others; also moving pictures. Business good.

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Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) 6 December 1908.

AMUSEMENTS

...William O'Day, seen in the part of a police sergeant, is a Rochester boy, and he plays it so naturally that it seemed as though one of Chief Hayden's staff had been impressed into service...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 19 February 1910, p. 3.

A RAMBLE AMONG THE MINSTRELS

...Tommy Winnett, who was one of the Keystone Boys, forty years ago, is in business in this city. Johnson and Powers is another old song and dance team that remains intact; but of the old Barlow Bros., only Bill, who is comfortably located in Pittsburg, is living. Billy O'Day, who ranked with the best as a rough wench, is playing regularly...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 12 March 1910, p. 116.

OUT OF TOWN NEWS

GAIETY (G. H. Batcheller, man.)--Week of T. Bowery Burlesquers. The Belman show drew good houses last week. Mollie Williams, Lon Hascall, Courtnay Sisters, George Armstrong, Will Kennedy, Joe Barton, ?le Casmore, Billy O'Day, Margaret King, Lillian Herndon and the Dollar Troupe were the principals. Next week, Vanity Fair.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 16 July 1910, p. 564.

BURLESQUE NEWS

CALLS

Have Narrow Escape

...Billy O'Day is at his home in Zanesville, O., for the summer, having been out with the Great ? Show the past season. He is enjoying himself with his horse and dogs, ?. He has a nice camp on the banks of Muskingum River.

Mr. and Mrs. William O'Day had a very narrow escape one day the past week when they were watering their horse near the Monroe Street bridge on the Adamsville Road. The animal became unmanageable as the bridlee caught on the trough and slipped over its head. Suddenly freed, the horse dashed suddenly out of the road, with Mr. O'Day standing erect in the buggy and tugging with all his might to stop the runaway. He finally succeeded in so doing. It was only a miracle, though, that both horse and those driving were not injured...

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The Auburn Citizen (Auburn, NY) 22 August 1911, p. 7.

IN THE PLAYHOUSES

The New Jefferson

Numerous counter attractions last night did not prevent a large audience from gathering at the Jefferson theatre to witness the first appearance in Auburn of the fun play dealing with life in New York entitled Seven Days. The farce is a collaboration of Mary Roberts Rinehart and Avery Hopwood, founded on the former's successful book, When a Man Marries, and deals with the familiar theme of mild deception that generally leads to all sorts of embarassing difficulties and leaves the perpetrators sadder and wiser. An excellent company presented the play and local interst was increased in the appearance, in the case, of William O'Day, a former Auburn boy. He took the part of Officer Flanagan, which by the way is an important role in this play, and his clever acting evoked great applause. In fact people who have seen others in the role say that O'Days's Officr Flanagan is the most clever and amusing of all. The play was beautifully staged. While the cast was generally capable, special mention must be made of Anna Littele as Aunt Selina whp proved to be one of the best laugh producers ever seen here.

Auburn friends of Mr. O'Day greeted him and extended congratulations upon his success in the higher rounds of his profession. He was for 19 years engaged in minstrel entertainment with Billy West and others and during the last nine years he has been connected with many companies producing the high grade plays.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 16 September 1911.

WILLIAM O'DAY WITH "THE TRAVELING SALESMAN"

This well known character actor has signed for this season with "The Traveling Salesman" company, now on a tour which will extend to the Pacific coast.

As Mr. O'Day and his wife desired to change their abode from the West to the East, they sold their real estate holdings in Zanesville, O., and have secured a fine residence in Red Peak, N. J.

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The New York Clipper (New York, NY) 12 October 1912, p. 23.

Vaudeville Notes

...WILLIAM O'DAY writes: "I am with the Barry Vaudeville Co., playing the role of an old sea captain. We opened our season at the Park Theatre, Youngstown, O. The act was a big hit."..

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 7 December 1912, p. 14.

NEW VAUDEVILLE ACTS

Edwina Barry and Company, in "The Home Breaker."

KEITH'S UNION SQUARE, MATINEE, Nov. 29.

Edwina Barry had the opportunity of putting on her new farce comedy playlet her at the Monday evening show of Nov. 25, replacing Middleton, Spellmeyer and company, who closed on account of illness after the opening matinee.

"The Home Breaker" was written by Jimmie Barry, and he used his pen cunningly in writing the material of the sketch as close about Edwina as possible.

Miss Barry plays the role of Dotty Plumdaffy, a housemaid, who comes to the home of the Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Haskell with a record of broken hearts to her credit, and a photo of each poor soul who "fell" for her kissable red lips (Dotty has always made it a point to get a picture of every man who kissed her).

She captures the uncle of Mr. Haskell, and later adds the young minister to her photo collection, besides arousing jealousy between the religious couple that very nearly ends disastrously, when she tells of a lady calling on the husband, and of a gentleman calling on the wife. The two visistors, however, prove to be unexpected relations of the Haskells, and they return just in time to avoid a separation of their niece and nephew, and also prevent Dotty from packing away the furniture in her trunk.

Miss Barry's ridiculous make-up for the servant role is as laughable as her mannerisms and portrayal of the part.

The sketch was finely received, and ran about nineteen minutes, full stage.

Miss Barry's company includes: William Richards, Billy O'Day, Theodora Dudley and Isabelle Colridge.

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Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY) 29 December 1912.

TEMPLE THEATER

...There is one comedy sketch on the bill and it is entirely new to Rochester. It is called "The Home Breaker," and will be presented by Edwina Barry, William Richards and company, the company consisting of Billy O'Day, Isabel Colridge and Theodora Dudley....

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The New York Clipper (New York, NY) 3 May 1913, p. 4.

Vaudeville Notes

KATHERINE O'DAY has bought a Kentucky bred pacer, and is up with the birds every morning jogging him out on the mile track, in Zanesville, O. She says she paid $750 cash for her pet. Mrs. Billy O'Day is said to be one of the best horsewomen in the state of Ohio.

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The New York Clipper (New York, NY) 11 April 1914, p. 18.

PAT CHAT

JARRETT AND WAGNER IN CHIGAGO

Dave J. Jarrett, superintendent, and Fred Wagner, special representative of the Robinson Famous Shows, which are to open in Montgomery, Ala., this month, honored the Western ? of THE NEW YORK CLIPPER in Chicago, with a call Friday. According to them the extensive lineup for the Robinson Famous Shows will be an exceptionally capable. one. Fred E. Miller will be the equestrian director; W. C. Dean, headmaster; J. J. McNulty, manager of sideshows; Wild West and concert people, Henry Boggs; superintendent of refreshments, Joe Wolff; Dining car waiters and porters, Lou Rader; superintendent of stock, Claude Orton; superintendent of commissary, George Dynan; trainmaster, John "Irish" Martin; boss canvasman, Charles Young; superintendent of side show canvas, William O'Day; boss property man, Doc Williams; superintendent of lights, Thomas Meyers; boss animal man, Archie Dunlop; and superintendent of ticket sellers, J. A. Carr. Bert Bowers will be the manager, and a successful season is predicted.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 26 September 1914, p. 12.

WHITE RATS' SCAMPER

That canonading and mobilizing on West Forty-sixth Street, Thursday night, Sept. 17 (and Friday morning), was not for the benefit of the European mass, but "Big Chief" Frank Fogarty and a "million" faithful White Rats holding a Scamper at their clubhouse.

In running off the "big show" "Dublin Frank" was capably assisted by Joe Mack in the capacity of chairman of the amusement committee.

Among those taking part in entertaining were Hazel Mann, who sang Tosca's "Good-Bye and "Mother Machree;" "The White Rats' Volunteer Band" Tom Lewis, Andy McCloud, Frank Gerard and the Van Vros., featuring Tom Lewis in five solos (with variations); Grace Camo sang "My Hero;" Jack Goldie sang and whistled; Joe Keise talked and sang; Big Chief Fogarty told more new rib-bustin' stories; Andy McCloud did "six shows without a kick;" George White sang "What Do You Think of That?" and Tom Brown, of the Six Brown Bros., gave a saxaphone solo.

Edwin George Tried hard to do some juggling; Zelaya was "tossed" at the piano, half scared to death because of treatment in "tossing;" Andy McCloud and Ernie Van offered music and songs; Jolly "Mother" Keany spread out a bunch of "nut comedy; George Paner hypnotised 'em with a piano; Billy O'Day sang "Old Kentucky Home," assisted by "Rat" Linden--and subkissed "Tubby" Garron, last, but not least, ramped through a cabaret stunt all his own, to the delight of B. C. Frank and all the others of the White Rats tribe.

All were singing, "Last Night was the End of the World" as they anbled out among the stragglers on the White Lane, Friday A. M., but chief Fogerty vowed he was fit to do five shows on fish day on an old "time."

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 11 October 1914, p. 27.

Vaudeville Notes

...MRS. BILLY O'DAY writes: "As you are a friend of my husband, Billy O'Day, I take the liberty to write that I start on a driving trip from Zanesville, O., to our new home in Milwaukee, Wis., where Mr. O'Day has gone in the show business with his brother. Mr. O'Day is with the big time vaudeville act, "The Vital Question," and played Miles' Theatre, Minneapolis, last week; next week, the Crystal Theatre, Milwaukee. I made my trip from Zanesville to Milwaukee in five days and four hours; going some, don't you think?"...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 15 November 1914, p. 27.

OUT OF TOWN NEWS

Detroit, Mich.--Miles (C. W. Porter, mgr.)--Bill week of 10; Hal Davis, William F. Powell, Allen Arts, Grace taylor, Ruby Blackburn, Billy O'Day, Alta York, Leo Filee, Joe Stistle and company, the Musical Gollmans, Evans and Virdoq, and the Milescope.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 26 December 1915, p. 22.

WHITE RAT NIBBLES

...Billy O'Day has been engaged to play the role of Captain Bogsby in the big scenic vaudeville production, "The Mystic Compass"...

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 25 December 1916, p. 89.

WHITE RAT NIBBLES

...BROTHER JERRY CUNNINGHAM returned to New York, after an absence of many years. He was a member of Dumont's Minstrels, in Philadelphia, for eleven seasons, and made his home in Philadelphia until the death of his wife, professionally known as Louise Stetson, which occurred about a year ago. He then went on the road. He arrived in New York last Friday, to join his former partner, Billy O'Day, and the team will present a comedy black face specialty...

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The New York Clipper (New York, NY) 21 August 1918, p. 15.

SCRIBNER ENGAGES O'DAY

Billy O'Day has been engaged by Sam Scribner and will be located at the Gayety Theatre, Pittsburgh, this season.

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The New York Clipper (New York, NY) 8 January 1919, p. 34.

FEATURE FILM REPORTS

"THE SILVER KING"

Artcraft. Five Reels.

Cast

William Faversham ... Wilfred Denver

Nellie Denver ... Barbara Castleton

>Cissie Denver ... Nadia Gray

Neddie Denver ... Lawrence Johnson

Jaikes ... John Sutherland

Herbert Skinner ... Warburton Gamble

Olive ... Helen Meyers

Geoffrey Ware ... John Sunderland

Baxter ... Daniel Pennell

Henry Corkett ... Cecil Yapp

Elijah Coombes ... Willliam O'Day

Cripss ... Louis Hendricks

Bilcher ... Robert Ayrton

Story--Dramatic. Written by Henry Arthur James, scenario by Burns Mantle, directed by George Irving, featuring William Faversham.

Remarks

This film has been adopted from the big Broadway success, "The Silver KIng," produced on the legitimate stage some years ago. It is a thrilling drama, well acted and staged, and should score a great success.

William Faversham, who is featured in the picture, is a star of the first magnitude, and well supported. If there is any fault to be found it is in the setting, which is of the old, conventional type and not up to modern standards.

Wilfred Denver, an English Lord, is ruined financially by Geoffrey Ware, his rival in love of past years. Although intoxicated, he goes to the house of the latter, armed with a revolver and gets in just as the house is being robbed. There he is chloroformed by Skinner, called "The Spider," a gentleman crook. Skinner later shoots Ware and fixes things so that circumstantial evidence will make Denver appear to be the murderer. When the latter recovers from the effects of the drug, he recollects only a struggle and thinks that he is the one who killed Ware. He makes good his escape and journeys to America, where he "strikes it rich," and becomes know as "The Silver King," the appeelation being given him because of his white hair, cause by continual suffering while crossing the desert.

Later he returns to England, where he has money given to his wife, who is in bad straights. Both he and Baxter, a detective, then shadow Skinner to his den, where they are suprised to hear Corkett, Ware's former valet, accuse Skinner of being the murderer. In the ensuing struggle, the crooks are made prisoners, and Denver freed from the stigma of crime, returns home, where there is a happy reunion.

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New York Clipper (New York, NY) 19 November 1919, p. 6.

McIntyre and Heath Are Hosts to Former Pals

Entertain and Banquet Minstrels of Days Gone Bye--Famous Team Has Now Been Together Forty-Five Years and Still Going Strong

James McIntyre and Thomas Heath, know to three generations of theater goers as the team of Mcintyre and Heath, last Wednesday celebrated their forty-fifth years as partners in the business of making the world laugh. In the afternoon they gave a guest matinee at the Forty-Fourth Street Theatre, where they are playing in Hell, Alexander", to twenty-six old time minstrels, twenty odd members of the Actors' Fund Home and representatives of all the papers and then invited the whole lot to the National Vaudeville Artists clubhouse for a seven course dinner.

...Those of the old time minstrels in attendance included Bert Marion, T. F. Thomas, James H. Dawson, Otto T. Johnson, Jerry Hart, Hi Henry, Joe Norcross, Major John F. Burk, Fred Wilson, Dan uiland, Henry J. Sayers, Chas. A. Morris, Lew Benedict, Barney Fagan, Tom Lewis, Francis T. (Pop) Ward, Rob Richmond, James H. Decker, John Unsworth, Billy O'Day, Arthur Yulo, Billy Payne, Charles Heywood and W. H. Sult Jr.

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