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The Name Breakey (Brequet) in Geography

 

 

 

Cite de Brequemont (Noeux-les-Mines) (France), p. 520 of (940).  The First World War 1914 – 18 by Lieutenant Colonel C. a’Court Repington, C.M.Y.  2 V.  (In diary form.)  (Presents experiences.). Reference found in Drumskelt House.

 

Breakey Street in Killyleagh, County down, Northern Ireland (Ulster).  Information from William Breakey, youngest son of the Very Rev. Dr. James C. Breakey,   former pastor of Fortwilliam Park Presbyterian Church, Belfast (1961).

 

Breakey Lough Little (Water Surface, a little over 4 acres) in Kilboyne Townland, County Meath, Ireland (Eire).  Ordnance Survey Map, 6 inches to 1 mile, Edition 1912, Sheet 2, County Meath.

 

Breakey Bridge over Kilmainham River in Tirawinnea Townland, County Meath, Ireland (Eire).  Ordnance Survey Map, 6 inches to 1 mile, Edition 1912, Sheet 2, County Meath.

 

Breakey Cross Roads in Dengora Townland, County Meath, Ireland (Eire). Ordnance Survey May, 6 inches to 1 mile, Edition 1912, Sheet 2, County Meath.

 

Breakey Lough (water surface a little over 21 acres) in Bawnbreakey Townland, County Meath, Ireland (Eire).  Ordnance Survey Map, 6 inches to 1 mile, Edition 1913, Sheet 5, County Meath.

 

Bawnbreakey Townland, County Meath, Ireland (Eire).  Ordnance Survey Map, 6 inches to 1 mile, Edition 1913, Sheet 5, County Meath.  This Townland (farm) contained a little more than 173 acres.  The buildings and surrounding park were named Ashfield.  It is situated on the east side of Breakey Lough and immediately above Cormeen Townland, site of Cormeen House at Cormeen Cross roads, once the home of a James Breakey (See Thomas C. Breakey).  Bawn means a fortified enclosure (See the Oxford Universal Dictionary).

 

Breakeyville, Province of Quebec, Canada.  A small town on the Chaudiere River, situate across the Saint Lawrence River from Quebec and 8 to 10 miles south of that city.  Named for the family of Hans Denaston Breakey of Corryhagen House, Rockcorry, County Monaghan, Ireland, who emigrated to Canada sometime before 1846 and founded the lumber mills and business at Etchemin, inherited and greatly expanded by his son, John Breakey, born April 9, 1846, (See Canadian Men and Women of the time, 1912).  John Breakey became a banker and great industrialist.  Steam locomotives operating on the company’s railroads bore the name John Breakey in large white block letters.

 

(no date)                                                              Edward P. Breakey, Ph.D.

                                                                                         Belvedere

                                                                                 Sumner, Washington