Search billions of records on Ancestry.com

Chapter One

 

Andrew Brekey of Lismagonway

 

 

[Author’s note: Breakey surnames in this work will be transcribed as they appear on, or in, documented data. Apparent surname variants are not to be taken as typographical errors.]

 

*  *  *  *

1718:  Birth date of Andrew Brekey.  [This date was extrapolated from a deed reference that indicated Andrew Brekey was seventy years old in 1788] (Ken Breakey to author, 29 April 2003).

 

*  *  *  *

1746:   Andrew Brekey married Jane Flack - Clogher Diocese Marriage Licence Bonds    (McElroy to author, 11 May 1980).  Diocesan Marriage Licence Bonds, issued by the bishops of the Established Church, relate only to Church of Ireland marriages.4

 

*  *  *  *

28 February 1753 / 8 June 1758. Andrew Brekey, Lismagonway, County Monaghan witnessed the will of Andrew Ker [sic], Portatrave, County Monaghan [Registry of Deeds (ROD): 191 402 128685.  Eustace:  Abstract of Wills, Vol.II 1748-1785] (Ken Breakey to author, 4 June 2003).  It would appear that the original will was dated 1753 and registered/lodged in 1758.

*  *  *  *

[Author’s note: Two of the following three entries are copies of original late eighteenth century documents.]5

 

28 April 1783 / 29 January 1788   Registered 15 April 1788 at 11 [ROD: 391 509 261990].6 7

 

To the Register appointed by Act of Parliament for Registering deeds wills and so forth…

 

A memorial of an indented deed of lease bearing date the twenty eighth day of April one thousand seven hundred and eighty three and made between Alexander Montgomery of Rosefield in the County of Monaghan, Esq of the one part and Andrew Brekey of Lifsmagonaway [sic] in the County of Monaghan farmer of the other part Reciting that the said Alex’d Montgomery for the consideration therein mentioned did demise unto the said And’w Breakey his heirs and afsigns (being by virtue of a bargain and seal to him thereof made by the said Alexander Montgomery for the term of one whole year by indenture bearing date the day next before the day of these presents.) that part of the lands of Drumhirk formerly in the posefsion of Robert Armstrong containing by estimation nineteen acres one rood Irish plantation measure situate lying and being in the County of Monaghan aforesaid for and during the natural life of James Breakey of Ballintra in the County of Monaghan eldest son of the said Andrew Breakey. Excepting and always reserving out of this demise unto the said Alexander Montgomery his heirs and afsigns all royalties whatsoever in which said deed there are may other usual clauses and covenants and said deed is witnefsed by Sam’l Mitchell late of the Town and County of Monaghan, Gent: deces’d and William Breakey of Lifsgonaway [sic] in the County of Monaghan aforesaid linen buyer.

 

 

8

 

 

Signed sealed and delivered in presence of

Will’m Breakey

James Breakey

 

The above name William Breakey aged twenty years and upwards maketh oath and saith that he is a subscribing witnefs to the deed whereof the above writing is a memorial and saw the same duly perfected by the said Alexander Montgomery and And’w Breakey and is also a subscribing Witnefs to this memorial and saw the same signed and sealed by the above named And’w Breakey and that the name William Breakey subscribed as a Witnefs to said deed and this memorial is this Depon’ts proper name and handwriting.

John Mitchell

[?] Hamilton

Sworn before me at Monaghan in the county of Monahgan the twenty-ninth day of Jany one thousand seven hundred and eighty eight by virtue of a commifsion to me directed and I know the Depon’t.

                                                                                                {?} Crofs

                                    Will’m Breakey

 

*  *  *  *

 

25 February 1785 / 26 August 1785  [ROD: 373 175 248272] Although this document was not obtained by researcher Ken Breakey, from the abstract it is believed to be a memorial of a marriage settlement between Isaiah Breakey of Milford, his son, John Breakey of Lisnagalliagh, and John Rogers, and his daughter Mary Rogers. Andrew Breakey, Lismagonway, Parish of Aghabog was a witness to the memorial (Ken Breakey to author 7 June 2002).

 

*  *  *  *

 

16 March 1785 / 29 Jan 1788   Registered 15 April 1788 at 11 [ROD: 395 353 261989].

 

To the Register appointed by Act of Parliament for registering all deeds wills and so forth…

 

A memorial of an agreement made and concluded the sixteenth day of March one thousand seven hundred and eighty five by and between Andrew Breakey of Lismagonaway [sic] in the County of the one part and David Hening of Ballyard [?]9 in the County of Down of the other part Reciting that the said Dav’d Hening for and in consideration of a marriage which was had and solemnized between the said Dav’d Hening and Elizabeth Breakey daughter to the said And’w Breakey and for said consideration of the sum of one hundred pounds sterling in hand paid to the said Dav’d Hening by the said And’w Breakey and for and in consideration of a note bearing equal date with these presents for the sum of fifty pounds sterling and payable the thirteenth day of April on thousand seven hundred and eighty six  he the said Dav’d Henning did for himself his heirs, ex’ors  adm’ors and afsigns covenant with the said  And’w Breakey his heirs exors adm’ors and afsigns not to set sell or alien10 the farm of land known by  the name of Ballyard [?] held by a lease of three lives under the  Earl of Hillsboroug[h] except the dwelling house half the office half the office houses half the garden and half the flax mill therein and also the farm known by the name of  Tulmore [?]  in the Lordship of Newry all which lands and premifses are in the posefsion [sic] of the said Dav’d Hening but that the same shall go and devolve to the said Elizabeth Breakey and her ifsue by the said Dav’d Hening lawfully begotten, and that in case the said Dav’d Hening should die before the said Elizabeth leaving no ifsue that then the said lands shall go and devolve to the said Elizabeth Hening, in which said deed there are many other usual clauses and covenants which said deed is witnefsed by John Arnold of Drummuck in the County of Monaghan James Breakey of Napah11 in the County of Monaghan William Breakey of Lismagonaway [sic]  in the said County of Monahgan linen buyer.

 

                                                                        12

 

 

Deed sealed and delivered in presence of:

James Breakey

James Breakey Jun’r

 

Said James Breakey of Napa in the County of Monaghan aged twenty years and upwards maketh oath and saith that he is a subscribing Witnefs to the deed whereof the above writing is a memorial and saw the same duly perfected by the said And’w Breakey and David Hening and is also a subscribing Witnefs to this memorial and saw the same signed and sealed by the above named Andrew Breakey, and that the name James Breakey subscribed as a Witnefs to said deed and this memorial is the depon’ts proper name and handwriting…..

                        Signed: James Breakey

Sworn before me at Monahgan in the County of Monaghan the twenty-ninth day of June one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight by virtue of a commifsion to me directed And I know the depon’t

                                                                                                Signed: [?] Crofs

Signed:

John   Mitchell

[?} Hamilton

 

*  *  *  *

 

1796

 

During the late eighteenth century the Trustees of the Linen Manufacture devised a plan to encourage and promote the linen industry in Ireland.  Awards, or premiums, were to be given to any individual sowing sound flax seed between the specified dates of March 10th and June 1st, 1796.  Premiums were to be dependent upon the amount of acreage sown to flax:

 

            Not less than 1 acre – 4 spinning wheels

            Three roods – 3 spinning wheels

            Two roods – 2 spinning wheels

            One rood – 1 spinning wheel

 

In 1796 the Irish Linen Board created a list of those receiving premiums for the various acreage of flax cultivation.  Known as the 1796 Flax Seed Premium Entitlement List, the Flax Growers List of 1796, or the Spinning Wheel List, the names of nearly 60,000 individuals are recorded.   In the townland of Lismagonway, Parish of Aghabog, Widow Breakey is recorded as having received one spinning wheel as a premium (Ken Breakey to author, June 2000).  [Samuel Flack is also recorded as having received one spinning wheel].

 

 

*  *  *  *

 

1797 Will of Andrew Brekey of Lismagonway is recorded in the “Diocese of Clogher Wills 1661 – 1858” (Loyd ‘Jack’ Breakey to author, April 1984). This is one of many public records destroyed during the June 1922 conflagration of the Four Courts Building in Dublin where the public records of Ireland were housed.

 

Author’s note:  the previous two entries might appear contradictory, yet most probably the will of Andrew Brekey was written prior to this date, and was not lodged/registered until 1797 after the death of his wife and the registration of her will, as may be seen in the following entry.13

 

*  *  *  *

 

1797 Jane Flack Breakey of Lismagonway; will registered 1797, “Diocese of Clogher Wills pre-1858” (Ken Breakey to author, December 2000).

 

*  *  *  *

The previous entries support the following lineage for Andrew Brekey of Lismagonway:

 

Andrew Brekey born 1718; died prior to 1797; married 1746 Jane Flack who died 1796/7.

 

Issue:

i. James Breakey of Ballintra, County Monaghan who married and had issue:  James, Jr.

ii. Elizabeth Breakey married circa 1785 David Hening of County Down

 

 

*  *  *  *

 

Rather than provide the following data in an appendix, I have chosen to conclude this first chapter with several items of interest.  They are relevant to Andrew Brekey of Lismagonway either in time or geographically.  In one instance the documented data provides, to my knowledge, the earliest recorded dates ever for a Breakey family in public records.  And, as mentioned previously, further research possibilities will be addressed and noted as such.

 

Item

 

1728:  Jane McFarrin married James Brakey – Clogher Diocese Marriage Licence Bonds

(Birney).

 

1730: Margaret Breakey married Henry Addison - Clogher Diocese Marriage Licence Bonds (McElroy to author, 11 May 1980).

 

1743/44:  William Breakey married Sarah Wilson - Clogher Diocese Marriage Licence Bonds (McElroy to author, 11 May 1980).

 

Research possibilities:

 

Although the Diocese of Clogher includes a portion of the county of Louth, parts of counties Donegal and Tyrone, a greater part of Fermanagh, and all of the county of Monaghan (Lyons), from these marriage records we can estimate three of the earliest birth dates for any documented   Breakey family member in County Monaghan.

 

Item

 

Andrew Breakey, alias Andrew Brekey, born Aughabog [sic], Monahgan served in the 9th Dragoons; discharged age 39; covering dates 1795-1814 [The National Archives, Kew, UK] (Ken Breakey to author October 2004).

 

1843: Prerogative Wills 1811-1858 – Andrew Brekey Clementstown, County Cavan (Loyd ‘Jack’ Breakey to author April 1984).

 

Research possibilities:

 

Although recent research for any Breakey family member residing in this area was negative, one must ask: is this Andrew Brekey the son, or grandson, of Andrew Brekey of Lismagonway? 

 

Item

 

18 October 1811/12 January 1813 [ROD 649 572 452488]: David Miller – William Breakey & Elizabeth Breakey otherwise Miller; witness Andrew Breakey of Lismagonway, farmer (Ken Breakey to author, 2003).

 

Item

 

 

1822:   William Breaky Lismagonway - “Diocese of Clogher Wills 1661- 1858” (Loyd ‘Jack’ Breakey to author, April 1984).

 

1838:  William Breaky, Lismagonway. “Diocese of Clogher Administration Bonds - 1650 – 1858” (Loyd ‘Jack’ Breakey to author, April 1984.)  The same information was provided the author with an addition of the following: death date 22 January 1838; year of will registered 13 February 1838; Executor/Administrator – M. Breakey (Ken Breakey to author July 2000).

 

Research possibilities:

 

William Breakey, linen buyer, of Lismagonway is referenced in the two previous eighteenth century documents.  Is William Breaky a brother, cousin or son of the first Andrew Brekey of Lismagonway?

 

 


 

4 “Persons wishing to obtain a licence to marry without having banns called were required to enter into a bond with the Church of Ireland bishop of the diocese.  The licences and bonds do not survive but some abstracts and the indexes to the bonds lodged in each Diocesan Court…are available (McConnon).

5 Reading 18th century documents is difficult; transcribing them even more so due to the use of the ‘Long S’ as a legitimate form of ‘S’ (Irby).  What appears in such documents as a lowercase ‘f’ is actually the symbol for ‘s.’  “The long s letter can better be described as an ‘f’ without the crossline traveling through the vertical line.  The crossline only extends to the right of the vertical line.  Also, the long s was never used at the end of a word or to denote the possessive or to pluralize” (Davis).  In transcribing the following documents the typed lowercase symbol for the letter ‘f’ has been utilized to provide the reader with a better understanding for the difficulty involved in reading documents of the 18th century.

6 The first date given is that of the original deed; the second date given is that of the execution of a memorial of the original deed; date of registration in Registry of Deeds then follows.

7 Ffolliott reports “…the only original signatures in the records of the Registry are those of the person who registered the memorial and his two memorial witnesses.  The only original seal is that affixed by the individual who registered the memorial” (155).

8 Scanned facsimile of signature and seal on memorial document.

9 Throughout the document the second half of the location name appears, but is not legible.   ‘Gren,’ or ‘Grin,’ or ‘Gr’ ‘on.’  The location name involves two words, both capitalized.

10 Per Attorney R. Hollembaek, Baldwinsville, NY, this word is thought to mean ‘alienate.’

11 Nappagh is a townland in the County of Longford.  There is a townland of Knappagh in the County of Monaghan, Parish of Ballybay (Donnelly, 598).

12 Scanned facsimile of signature and seal on memorial document.

13 Ffolliott explains the registration of deeds in this manner:  “A deed could be sworn and registered within two days of being made, but normally it was done within a couple of years.  There are, however, innumerable cases of deeds being registered after a lapse of many years… The sudden urge to register was usually caused by death” (140-141).