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NameElinor (Ellen) GILMORE (GILMER), 5G Grandmother
Birthca 1722, ?, Ulster, Ireland
Death?, Washington, Virginia
BurialEbbing Springs Cemetery
Misc. Notes
Note from Mrs. Shoemaker: “Ellen (Eleanor) Gilmore Beattie, wife of John Beattie, whose house stands near Emory, Virginia, was the sister of my gr-gr-grandfather, William Gilmer, known as Billie Gilmer, who came with the Beatties to America along with the Andersons, McCampbells and others. The Beatties and Gilmers settled on the James River in what is now Rockbridge County, Va., near present site of Lexington, where both families operated mills. Bille Gilmer married Elizabeth (Betty) Anderson, daughter of Isaac Anderson, Augusta County, Va. (For a new of years it was thought that the wife of Bille Gilmer was the sister of John Beattie, however, the Isaac Anderson Bible was located and shows his daughter, Elizabeth Betty Anderson, married to William Gilmer in Rockbridge County.”
Spouses
1John BEATTIE, 5G Grandfather
Birth1711/1718, ?, Ulster, Ireland
Death18 Aug 1790, ?, Washington, Virginia
BurialEbbing Springs Cemetery
FatherArthur BEATTY (1673-1741)
MotherMartha CAIRNES (1687-1743)
Misc. Notes
Gordon Aronhime, in his 1991 article on the homes of the Cummings Petition signers, wrote about John Beattie:

"In the Fall of 1772 he moved with his family from Augusta County on Carr's Creek (now Rockbridge) to the great tract that stretched from west of Emory to east of Glade Spring. This was purchased from the family of Mary and James Wood and consisted of 2,900 acres, though only surveyed by Buchanan on 26 March 1750 as 2,193 acres. Buchanan used a "Scotch" pole instead of the standard one, thus cutting down on the acres to be taxed by the owner. John Beatie's homesite is said by descendants to have been at the spring immediately west and very slightly south of the Madison Beatie home on 667 near 609."
423, pg. 6 
 
Mary Jane Beaty Davis Moffett, writing in her journal about 1870, described the Beaty family..."The Beaty family are Irish descent, a good family of people well respected and good livers, generally, and industrious."
376 

John was a party to a deed March 19, 1732, with his father in the lands of Arnagh, by which he go Farranseer, but was disinherited by his father. His father's will disinherited John because "he hath been disobedient and behaved in such manner as he is not intitled to my favors."

John evidently immigrated to America after he was disinherited. His arrival in America is not known as the first documented record of him is in Rockbridge/Augusta Co, VA where some/all of his children were born before migrating on to Washington Co, VA where he died.

THAT THIS JOHN BEATTIE IS THE JOHN, DISINHERITED SON OF ARTHUR, IS NOT PROVEN ENTIRELY. The following information was received by Ray Beaty in December, 1996: "Look Forward, Beatty!" (From the files of the late Rayvon Beatty, Sherrills Ford, NC) printed in THE BEATTY CLEARINGHOUSE newsletter, June 1993, edited by Elizabeth Bray Sherrill, CGRS, RG, Sherrils Ford, NC, page 33 -- quoting Rayvon's notes -- "Letter from a Researcher in Ireland" -- "There is no marriage settlement for John Beattie to Elinor Gilmore prior to 1744, and no transactions between Beattie and Gilmore families 1707-48. All John Beattie deeds were read, and eventually a record of a John Beattie was found which is most probably that of your ancestor, although we have no documentary proof that he is the John who went to America. However, the fact that the dates fit, that he had an uncle and cousin in Virginia, and the fact that he was disinherited, all point to him being the man you seek." "In 1732, John Beattie, second son of Arthur Beattie of Farransear, parish of Killeshandra, County Cavan, was party to a deed with his father and his eldest brother, William. The will of Arthur Beattie of Farransear, dated 8 April 1741, and proved 11 Dec 1741, Diocese of Kilmore, mentions his three sons, William, John, and David, and he disinherits John completely because of his conduct towards him, or as described in the will, "disobedience." The date of John's disinheritance, 1741, coincides perfectly with the first appearance in VA of your John in 1744. The John, son of Arthur, first appears in the deeds in 1732, when he becomes of age, and was therefore, born ca. 1711, which also fits the John of VA.

“Much has been written and speculated on the parentage of John Beatie. Some sources indicate that he is the son of Arthur Beattie who was disinherited in Arthur’s will (1741) for being “disobedient.” Many “same time and place” factors seem to indicate that John (Lineage 4) was, indeed, the “disobedient” son. A major contradictory point, however, is the fact that John (Lineage 4) had a brother, Francis (proven from Virginia court records) and although Arthur mentions children in addition to “disobedient” John, he mentions no Francis. Since Arthur did mention John who he disinherited it seems plausible that Francis would have been mentioned if, indeed, he was a son of Arthur.

“Others have also attempted to link their John with Arthur’s “disobedient” son, John. A colingian lineage has arguments as valid as anyone else.

“There are other lineages where we might be able to “connect” John of Lineage 4, but at this point no credible evidence exists as to who John’s actual parents were. Lineage Three has a great mystery in that they supposedly were in Chester Co, PA in the late 1600s with the first actual documentation of them occurring in 1748 (Martha McCollock’s Chester Co Will--Martha grandmother of George and Martha below) when a William Beatty and wife, Martha Stuart McCollock Beatty were someplace in Virginia with son George and daughter Martha and other unnamed siblings. William would be of the age to be a brother of John of Lineage 4 and William’s father was supposedly a John Beatty. No other record of William and his family has been found except for George who appears in Hampshire Co, VA in 1782.”424

Also from Rayvon's notes, p. 33: "Other Beatty men living in Washington Co, VA along with John Beatty, are his brother, Francis Beatty, a Robert Beatty, and William Beatty, who received a land grant from the State of Virginia on 5 July 1785, for 254A in Washington Co, VA. He was also a brother of John and Francis Beatty." (RCB notes-this is not clear!-8 Jan 1997).

Norma Beaty Crye wrote in 1984 that "John Beaty born ca. 1711 is probably the son of Francis Beattie, and not the son of Arthur Beattie." (Francis, brother of Arthur).

John Beatty’s executors vs. Reverend Edward Crawford--O. S. 53; N. S. 18--Bill, 15th November, 1802. Early in settlement of Western country John Beatty acquired a tract in present Washington County on middle Fork of Holston, of which he sold to Francis Beatty 200 acres (John and Francis were brothers). Francis devised the land to John Steward, who married a daughter of Francis. John Beatty died two years after Francis, testate, and devised his lands to James Dysart and Mathew Ryburn, his sons-in-law and executors, and to his sons David and William. He also had a son John who was killed at Battle of King’s Mountain and died unmarried and without issue. Will of John Beatie, of Washington County, dated 18th August, 1790, proved in Washington County, 14th September, 1790. Wife Elenor, son William, daughter Agness Dysart, granddaughters Ellinor and Martha Gilmore, son David, son-in-law David Sawyers, son-in-law James Logan, son-in-law James Dysart, son-in-law Mathew Ryburn. Thomas Edmonson, the surveyor who made the plats, married Mathew Ryburn’s wife’s daughter. Deed dated 15th march, 1971, executors of Francis Beatie to John Stuart, proved in Washington County March, 1791.425

28 Aug 1750-granted land425, Book 2, pg. 801
9 Feb 1767-mortgaged land. L10. Mortgage to pay L12.425, Book 13, pg. 336
20 Mar 1771-creditor to the estate of Margaret Linsey settled by John Gilmore -- paid alexander Deal, John Beaty, Robt. McLehenny, Timothy Ryan, Wm. Porter, Alex. and Robt. Tedford425, Book WB4, pg. 374

Family sheets on file at the Historical Society Library at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, VA

One sheet written by Mary Agnes Beattie, wife of Geo. A. C. Beattie, Glade Spring, VA states: "John Beattie came to America from Ulster County, Ireland. He came to Maryland, Augusta County, Rockbridge, VA then to Washington County where he settled at what is known as Ebbing Spring, fifteen miles from Abingdon in the vicinity of Glade Spring. He was a commissary General under Washington in the Revolutionary War. He married Elinor Gilmor. I have not been able to find her records but it is thought their children were born before coming to Washington County. They had 9 children."

Norma Mae Beaty Crye, Espanola, NM, September 3, 1984. Norma quotes from a "Beatty Bulletin" article by a Miss Shoemaker (no other documentation): "Ellen (Eleanor) Gilmore Beattie, wife of John Beattie, whose house stands near Emory, VA was the sister of my great-great-grandfather, William Gilmer, known as Bille Gilmer, who came with the Beatties to American along with the Andersons, McCampbells, and others. The Beatties and Gilmers settled on the James River in what is now Rockbridge Co., VA near the site of Lexington, where both families operated mills. Billie Gilmer married Elizabeth (Betty) Anderson, daughter of Isaac Anderson, Augusta Co, VA."426

John--on Kerr's Cr., 1750c to 1772c--Children: David (b-1752c), John (b-1780), Agnes (m. James Dysart, 1775)427

“Area Home has Colorful History: Bristol Herald Courier - Monday, March 15, 1959 - by Phebe Fullerton Levenson.

“Two centuries ago, an Irishman brought his bride to the New world. They left their home and family to make the stormy voyage across the sea to settle in Maryland. From Maryland they went to Rockbridge County, Virginia and then, in 1768, they made the long trip up into the wild mountains of Southwest Virginia.

“He was John Beattie, and his wife was Ellen Gilmore Beattie. They probably settled first in the Ebbing Spring area, then in 1783, John Beattie bought 2,193 acres of rich bottom land from the widow of James Wood, for which he paid 410 pounds. This land was originally part of a land grant from the King of England to James Wood and it ran from Emory to Glade Spring.

“The Beatties had three boys and four girls. One of the girls, Agnes, married James Dysart, who built the log house that was the original Brook Hall. Their first son, David, was a Captain in the Battle of Kings Mountain, and their second son, John, was killed in that battle.

“Inherited Estate: William, the youngest child, inherited the majority of John Beattie’s property, including, as stated in the will of John Beattie: “All that tract of land I now live on, with its appurtenances, together with all my farming utensils, my two Negro men, Peter and Joshua, all my work horses, except my wife shall choose one of them, together with the residue of my household and kitchen furniture.

“William Beattie married Mary Allison, and they had thirteen children. Their eldest daughter married Colonel William Byars, who built the present Brook Hall, and several old homes in this area.

“William Beattie’s son, Madison, inherited most of his father’s property. Seven years before his father’s death at the age of 100, he had the brick home, later known as the Madison Beattie Place, built by his slaves.

“First House Burned: The original brick home burned the day it was completed. It is said that Madison Beattie began building the present home the next day, and the original house was much more elaborate than the present one. The second house was completed in 1853. At his father’s death, Madison inherited the estate, the household furnishings and the slaves.

“Madison Beattie married Martha A. Cunningham, and they had three children. Their youngest daughter, Mary married Charles mcKinney on June 10, 1879 while he was attending Emory and Henry College. The young couple settled at the old homeplace and remained there until 1925, when the estate was sold to Welfred Bell.

“The Madison Beattie Place is an eight room home, and is a beautiful example of pre-Civil War Georgian architecture. The home has three porches: one at the front and a sleeping porch at the back. The outside cornice carving is quite elaborate and lovely and is supposedly a copy of the carvings at Monticello. The cherry stairway is circular but has a platform, and the fireplaces are simple but artfully carved.

“Elaborately Furnished: Many people remember the old home when the McKinneys lived there. The house was beautifully and elaborately furnished. The McKenneys entertained frequently, and at a Christmas party in 1898, someone cut the date on a front window pane with a diamond.

“The McKinneys kept and trained magnificent race horses around the turn of the century. They had a race track in the bottom land below the house, and many colorful races were held there.

“Bought by Arlingtons: Welfred Bell, now of Abingdon, Va., bought the home in 1925, and he and his family lived there until 1937, when they sold the estate to the B. M. Arlingtons, the present owners.

“The Arlingtons, who have named their home “Morningside,” have kept the pleasing aura of the past in their home. Furnished with many antiques, “Morningside” has both the charm of a home and the dignity of its heritage.

“Many legends are told about the old estate. According to one of the most interesting, Madison Beattie, during the Civil War, instructed one of his most trusted slaves to bury the family silver and some money. The slave was seen taking the silver and money down toward the creek behind the house, and later coming back without it. Several days later, while the slaves were putting the roof on the new log crib, a troop of Federal soldiers was seen marching toward the house. In the excitement of the frightened slaves, a log fell and killed the one who had buried the valuables. Neither the silver nor the money has ever been found.

“Some descendants of John Beattie are Robert and William Beattie and Mrs. James McFanned of Childowie, Virginia, Zan McKinney of Emory, Virginia, and the wife of John Beattie’s great-grandson, Mrs. George Beattie of Bristol.

Mr. James McChesmey Prickett, Rural Retreat, Virginia, is a descendant of the Beattie-Gilmore Family. He says: “My maternal grandmother was Rachel Elizabeth Beattie, daughter of Colonel Robert Beattie who ran the old farm - the old Town House Tavern in the early part of the nineteenth century. For nearly 200 years eight generations of Beatties lived there. It seems that John Beattie, a Scotch-Irishman, settled first in Rockbridge Co., Virginia, then later moved into Washington County, prior to the Revolutionary War. He had three sons in that war. John, Jr., who was killed in the Battle of Kings Mountain; William, also in that battle, from whom most of the Beatties in Smyth and Washington Counties descend; and David, a Captain in that battle.

“William is buried in the old cemetery that nearly surrounds the Presbyterian Church near the intersection with Lee Highway of roads leading to Damascus and Glade Springs. He lived to be over a hundred years of age. He was my grandmother’s grandfather. On the site of the old church was once a stockade called Fort Beattie.

“Colonel Robert Beattie also had a store near the Preston Tavern at Seven Mile Ford. Robert Beattie was the first County Clerk of Smyth County. He had three sons in the Confederate Army. His daughter, Rachel Elizabeth married Thomas G. McConnell and became the grandmother of James McHesney Prickett. Mr. Prickett says his grandmother spelled her name Baity.”

Glade Spring, VA
November 26, 1915

Miss Evelyn Beattie
Chicago, Illinois

My Dear Cousin:

In the absence of my father from home I have decided to answer your letter which was written the first day of this month. I should have written sooner but have been collecting all the data in connection with our family history that I could find in order to give all the information possible.

Most of the papers are in possession of my father’s sister, Mrs. Mary Beattie McKinney, who lives at the old Beattie home built by her father Madison Beattie, it is the original John Beattie or Beatie home place, but his old house has been replaced by one of much later date in which she and her family live. My Aunt Mary McKinney and I examined most of the old papers and we found John Beatie’s will, a copy of which I send you in this letter, I believe it must be the same you mentioned has having seen on record in Chicago. We know this will was made by our ancestor John Beatie. Francis Beatie mentioned in this will was very probably his brother, he owned a farm adjoining that of John Beatie, but we could not find any positive proof that they were brothers. John Beatie, son of John Beatie and brother to David and William was killed in the Battle of King’s Mt in 1781. He was in his brother David’s company, so was William who was my great grandfather. We found a letter to my grandfather Madison Beattie from his brother James G. Beatie of Brownville, Saline County, Mo. in which he spoke of his recent removal there from Craborchard Ky. This letter was dated June 21st 1846. My Aunt said the land or farm of 550 acres where Emory and Henry College stands was willed by John Beatie to his son John who was killed at King’s Mountain but he was killed years before this will I am sending you was made; that accounts for him not being mentioned in this will, he never married. On paper written by my grandfather says that John Beatie was born and raised in Ireland, but we did not find any older records to prove that statement. The same paper tells that John Beatie and his family emigrated from Ireland to America, first settled in maryland then moved to Rockbridge County, Va and from there to Washington County where he must have died in 1790 or 1791 as his wife Elinor wrote her will in June 1791. He was buried in Washington County about three miles from where we live. I have seen his grave and tombstone, but don’t remember date, some of those old tombstones are terribly defaced, as number of them have fallen and are piled up together.

I also saw the grave of David Beatie, his son. My great grandfather William was buried in a newer cemetery where our church now stands, the first church was called Ebbing Spring Church, but when the location was changed they changed the name to Glade Spring, being named for the old fort. The town of Glade Spring is two miles from this old church. It is Presbyterian and all of the Beatties since the time of John Beattie have been connected with this church. It was organized in 1772, the first pastor was named Cummings. Think his first name was David. As soon as I can find time and opportunity I will go again to the old Ebbing Spring Cemetary and try and ascertain the date of John Beatie’s death. William Beatie was born in 1760 and died April 4, 1860. He was married when only nineteen years old to Mary Allison who was sixteen. They were married in Washington County at her home I think. As William Beattie’s wife was sixteen when married she must have been born in 1763. John Beattie and his son were both farmers and Presbyterians. John and Elinor Beatie were married before leaving Ireland. It may be that you can find records from there whether it was Ireland or Scotland they came from, by identifying the will I send. William Beattie was born on Carr’s Creek in Rockbridge County in 1760. David Beattie was born there too and probably others in the family. David died in 1814 he married Mary Beattie a distant relative. All of John Beatie’s children were born either in Maryland or Rockbridge Co, Va. My great grandfather William was 12 years old when they moved to Washington County. I hope you will be able to prove without doubt which was our John Beatie, from the information I give you in this letter. We all feel very much interested in the family history and are anxious for a copy of the book when published. I hope you will have no further delay or trouble in collecting correct data for this book.

Dr. Dunn a distant relative who lives at Glade Spring has a history of the Battle of King’s Mountain and that is where I found that David Beattie was Captain of a company in this battle and that his two brothers John and William were members of his company, John having held the office of Ensign.

This is all I can tell you at present. If you are the great granddaughter of James G. Beattie of Mo. we are third cousins as he was a brother of my grandfather, but was a great deal older. My grandfather was the youngest of the family. We would love to know you and hope some day to have you come to see us.

I must close and mail this today so you will get it as soon as possible.

Very sincerely M. Lena Beattie”428

John Beatty’s executors vs. Reverend Edward Crwford--O. S. 53; N. S. 18--Bill, 15th November 1802. Early in settlement of Western country John Beatty acquired a tract in present Washington County on Middle Fork of Holston, of which he sold to Francis Beattie 200 acres (John and Francis were brothers). Francis devised the land to John Steward, who married a daughter of Francis. John Beatty died two years after Francis, testate, and devised his lands to James Dysart and Mathew Ryburn, his sons-in-law and executors, and to his sons, David and William. He also had a son John who was killed at battle of King’s Mountain and died unmarried and without issue. Will of John beatie, of Washington County, dated 18th August, 1790, proved in Washington County, 14th September, 1790. Wife Elenor, son William, daughter Agness Dysart, granddaughters Ellinor and Martha Gilmore, son David, son-in-law David Sawyers, son-in-law James Logan, son-in-law James Dysart, son-in-law Mathew Ryburn. Thomas Edmonson, the surveyor who made the plats, married mathew Ryburn’s wife’s daughter. Deed dated 15th March, 1791, executors of Francis Beatie to John stuart, proved in Washington County March, 1791.425, Section I, pg. 90

Much has been written and speculated on the parentage of John Beatie. Some sources indicate that he is the son of Arthur Beattie who was disinherited in Arthur’s will (1741) for being “disobedient.” Many “same time and place” factors seem to indicate that John (Lineage 4) was, indeed, the “disobedient” son. A major contradictory point, however, is the fact that John (Lineage 4) had a brother, Francis (proven from Virginia court records) and although Arthur mentions children in addition to “disobedient” John, he mentions no Francis. Since Arthur did mention John who he disinherited it seems plausible that Francis would have been mentioned if, indeed, he was a son of Arthur.

“Others have also attempted to link their John with Arthur’s “disobedient” son, John. A colingian lineage has arguments as valid as anyone else.

“There are other lineages where we might be able to “connect” John of Lineage 4, but at this point no credible evidence exists as to who John’s actual parents were. Lineage Three has a great mystery in that they supposedly were in Chester Co, PA in the late 1600s with the first actual documentation of them occurring in 1748 (martha McCollock’s Chester Co Will--Martha grandmother of George and Martha below) when a William Beatty and wife, Martha Stuart McCollock Beatty were someplace in Virginia with son George and daughter Martha and other unnamed siblings. William would be of the age to be a brother of John of Lineage 4 and William’s father was supposedly a John Beatty. No other record of William and his family has been found except for George who appears in Hampshire Co, VA in 1782.”

Also from Rayvon's notes, p. 33: "Other Beatty men living in Washington Co, VA along with John Beatty, are his brother, Francis Beatty, a Robert Beatty, and William Beatty, who received a land grant from the State of Virginia on 5 July 1785, for 254A in Washington Co, VA. He was also a brother of John and Francis Beatty." (RCB notes-this is not clear!-8 Jan 1997).

Norma Beaty Crye wrote in 1984 that "John Beaty born ca. 1711 is probably the son of Francis Beattie, and not the son of Arthur Beattie." (Francis, brother of Arthur).

John Beatty’s executors vs. Reverend Edward Crawford--O. S. 53; N. S. 18--Bill, 15th November, 1802. Early in settlement of Western country John Beatty acquired a tract in present Washington County on middle Fork of Holston, of which he sold to Francis Beatty 200 acres (John and Francis were brothers). Francis devised the land to John Steward, who married a daughter of Francis. John Beatty died two years after Francis, testate, and devised his lands to James Dysart and mathew Ryburn, his sons-in-law and executors, and to his sons David and William. He also had a son John who was killed at Battle of King’s Mountain and died unmarried and without issue. Will of John Beatie, of Washington County, dated 18th August, 1790, proved in Washington County, 14th September, 1790. Wife Elenor, son William, daughter Agness Dysart, granddaughters Ellinor and Martha Gilmore, son David, son-in-law David Sawyers, son-in-law James Logan, son-in-law James Dysart, son-in-law Mathew Ryburn. Thomas Edmonson, the surveyor who made the plats, married Mathew Ryburn’s wife’s daughter. Deed dated 15th march, 1971, executors of Francis Beatie to John Stuart, proved in Washington County march, 1791.

Family sheets on file at the Historical Society Library at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, VA

One sheet written by Mary Agnes Beattie, wife of Geo. A. C. Beattie, Glade Spring, VA states: "John Beattie came to America from Ulster County, Ireland. He came to Maryland, Augusta County, Rockbridge, VA then to Washington County where he settled at what is known as Ebbing Spring, fifteen miles from Abingdon in the vicinity of Glad Spring. He was a commissary General under Washington in the Revolutionary War. He married Elinor Gilmor. I have not been able to find her records but it is thought their children were born before coming to Washington County. They had 9 children."

Norma Mae Beaty Crye, Espanola, NM, September 3, 1984. Norma quotes from a "Beatty Bulletin" article by a Miss Shoemaker (no other documentation): "Ellen (Eleanor) Gilmore Beattie, wife of John Beattie, whose house stands near Emory, VA was the sister of my great-great-grandfather, William Gilmer, known as Bille Gilmer, who came with the Beatties to American along with the Andersons, McCampbells, and others. The Beatties and Gilmers settled on the James River in what is now Rockbridge Co., VA near the site of Lexington, where both families operated mills. Billie Gilmer married Elizabeth (Betty) Anderson, daughter of Isaac Anderson, Augusta Co, VA."

John--on Kerr's Cr., 1750c to 1772c--Children: David (b-1752c), John (b-1780), Agnes (m. James Dysart, 1775)

“Area Home has Colorful History: Bristol Herald Courier - Monday, March 15, 1959 - by Phebe Fullerton Levenson.

“Two centuries ago, an Irishman brought his bride to the New world. They left their home and family to make the stormy voyage across the sea to Settle in Maryland. From Maryland they went to Rockbridge County, Virginia and then, in 1768, they made the long trip up into the wild mountains of Southwest Virginia.

“He was John Beattie, and hiw wife was Ellen Gilmore Beattie. They probably settled first in the Ebbing spring area, then in 1783, John Beattie bought 2,193 acres of rich bottom land from the widow of James Wood, for which he paid 410 pounds. This land was originally part of a land grant from the King of England to james Wood and it ran from Emory to Glade Spring.

“The Beatties had three boys and four girls. One of the girls, Agnes, married James Dysart, who built the log house that was the original Brook Hall. Their first son, David, was a Captain in the Battle of Kings Mountain, and their second son, John, was killed in that battle.

“Inherited Estate: William, the youngest child, inherited the majority of John Beattie’s property, including, as stated in the will of John Beattie: “All that tract of land I now live on, with its appurtenances, together with all my farming utensils, my two Negro men, Peter and Joshua, all my work horses, except my wife shall choose one of them, together with the residue of my household and kitchen furniture.

“William Beattie married mary Allison, and they had thirteen children. Their eldest daughter married Colonel William Byars, who built the present Brook Hall, and several old homes in this area.

“William Beattie’s son, Madison, inherited most of his father’s property. Seven years before his father’s death at the age of 100, he had the brick home, later known as the Madison Beattie Place, built by his slaves.

“First House Burned: The original brick home burned the day it was completed. It is said that Madison Beattie began building the present home the next day, and the original house was much more elaborate than the present one. The second house was completed in 1853. At his father’s death, Madison inherited the estate, the household furnishings and the slaves.

“Madison Beattie married Martha A. Cunningham, and they had three children. Their youngest daughter, Mary married Charles mcKinney on June 10, 1879 while he was attending Emory and Henry College. The young couple settled at the old homeplace and remained there until 1925, when the estate was sold to Welfred Bell.

“The Madison Beattie Place is an eight room home, and is a beautiful example of pre-Civil War Georgian architecture. The home has three porches: one at the front and a sleeping porch at the back. The outside cornice carving is quite elaborate and lovely and is supposedly a copy of the carvings at Monticello. The cherry stairway is circular but has a platform, and the fireplaces are simple but artfully carved.

“Elaborately Furnished: Many people remember the old home when the McKinneys lived there. The house was beautifully and elaborately furnished. The McKenneys entertained frequently, and at a Christmas party in 1898, someone cut the date on a front window pane with a diamond.

“The McKinneys kept and trained magnificent race horses around the turn of the century. They had a race track in the bottom land below the house, and many colorful races were held there.

“Bought by Arlingtons: Welfred Bell, now of Abingdon, Va., bought the home in 1925, and he and his family lived there until 1937, when they sold the estate to the B. M. Arlingtons, the present owners.

“The Arlingtons, who have named their home “Morningside,” have kept the pleasing aura of the past in their home. Furnished with many antiques, “Morningside” has both the charm of a home and the dignity of its heritage.

“Many legends are told about the old estate. According to one of the most interesting, Madison Beattie, during the Civil War, instructed one of his most trusted slaves to bury the family silver and some money. The slave was seen taking the silver and money down toward the creek behind the house, and later coming back without it. Several days later, while the slaves were putting the roof on the new log crib, a troop of Federal soldiers was seen marching toward the house. In the excitement of the frightened slaves, a log afell and killed the one who had buried the valuables. Neither the silver nor the money has ever been found.

“Some descendants of John Beattie are Robert and William Beattie and Mrs. James McFanned of Childowie, Virginia, Zan McKinney of Emory, Virginia, and the wife of John Beattie’s great-grandson, Mrs. George Beattie of Bristol.

Mr. James McChesmey Prickett, Rural Retreat, Virginia, is a descendant of the Beattie-Gilmore Family. He says: “My maternal grandmother was Rachel Elizabeth Beattie, daughter of Colonel Robert Beattie who ran the old farm - the old Town House Tavern in the early part of the nineteenth century. For nearly 200 years eight generations of Beatties lived there. It seems that John Beattie, a Scotch-Irishman, settled first in Rockbridge Co., Virginia, then later moved into Washington County, prior to the Revolutionary War. He had three sons in that war. John, Jr., who was killed in the Battle of Kings Mountain; William, also in that battle, from whom most of the Beatties in Smyth and Washington Counties descend; and David, a Captain in that battle.

“William is buried in the old cemetery that nearly surrounds the Presbyterian Church near the intersection with Lee Highway of roads leading to Damascus and Glade Springs. He lived to be over a hundred years of age. He was my grandmother’s grandfather. On the site of the old church was once a stockade called Fort Beattie.

“Colonel Robert Beattie also had a store near the Preston Tavern at Seven Mile Ford. Robert Beattie was the first County Clerk of Smyth County. He had three sons in the Confederate Army. His daughter, Rachel Elizabeth married Thomas G. McConnell and became the grandmother of James McHesney Prickett. Mr. Prickett says his grandmother spelled her name Baity.”

Glade spring, VA
November 26, 1915

Miss Evelyn Beattie
Chicago, Illinois

My dear Cousin:

In the absence of my father from home I have decided to answer your letter which was written the first day of this month. I should have written sooner but have been collecting all the data in connection with our family history that I could find in order to give all the information possible.

Most of the papers are in possession of my father’s sister, Mrs. Mary Beattie McKinney, who lives at the old Beattie home built by her father Madison Beattie, it is the original John Beattie or Beatie home place, but his old house has been replaced by one of much later date in which she and her family live. My Aunt Mary McKinney and I examined most of the old papers and we found John Beatie’s will, a copy of which I send you in this letter, I believe it must be the same you mentioned has having seen on record in Chicago. We know this will was made by our ancestor John Beatie. Francis Beatie mentioned in this will was very probably his brother, he owned a farm adjoining that of John Beatie, but we could not find any positive proof that they were brothers. John Beatie, son of John Beatie and brother to David and William was killed in the Battle of King’s Mt in 1781. He was in his brother David’s company, so was William who was my great grandfather. We found a letter to my grandfather madison Beattie from his brother James G. Beatie of Brownville, Saline County, Mo. in which he spoke of his recent removal there from Craborchard Ky. This letter was dated June 21st 1846. My Aunt said the land or farm of 550 acres where Emory and Henry College stands was willed by John Beatie to his son John who was killed at King’s Mountain but he was killed years before this will I am sending you was made; that accounts for him not being mentioned in this will, he never married. On paper written by my grandfather says that John Beatie was born and raised in Ireland, but we did not find any older records to prove that statement. The same paper tells that John Beatie and his family emigrated from Ireland to America, first settled in maryland then moved to Rockbridge County, Va and from there to Washington County where he must have died in 1790 or 1791 as his wife Elinor wrote her will in June 1791. He was buried in Washington County about three miles from where we live. I have seen his grave and tombstone, but don’t remember date, some of those old tombstones are terribly defaced, as number of them have fallen and are piled up together.

I also saw the grave of David Beatie, his son. My great grandfather William was buried in a newer cemetery where our church now stands, the first church was called Ebbing Spring Church, but when the location was changed they changed the name to Glade Spring, being named for the old fort. The town of Glade Spring is two miles from this old church. It is Presbyterian and all of the Beatties since the time of John Beattie have been connected with this church. It was organized in 1772, the first pastor was named Cummings. Think his first name was David. As soon as I can find time and opportunity I will go again to the old Ebbing Spring Cemetary and try and ascertain the date of John Beatie’s death. William Beatie was born in 1760 and died April 4, 1860. He was married when only nineteen years old to mary Allison who was sixteen. They were married in Washington County at her home I think. As William Beattie’s wife was sixteen when married she must have been born in 1763. John Beattie and his son were both farmers and Presbyterians. John and Elinor Beatie were married before leaving Ireland. It may be that you can find records from there whether it was Ireland or Scotland they came from, by identifying the will I send. William Beattie was born on Carr’s Creek in Rockbridge County in 1760. David Beattie was born there too and probably others in the family. David died in 1814 he married Mary Beattie a distant relative. All of John Beatie’s children were born either in Maryland or Rockbridge Co, Va. My great grandfather William was 12 years old when they moved to Washington County. I hope you will be able to prove without doubt which was our John Beatie, from the information I give you in this letter. We all feel very much interested in the family history and are anxious for a copy of the book when published. I hope you will have no further delay or trouble in collecting correct date for this book.

Dr. Dunn a distant relative who lives at Glade Spring has a history of the Battle of King’s Mountain and that is where I found that David Beattie was Captain of a company in this battle and that his two brothers John and William were members of his company, John having held the office of Ensign.

This is all I can tell you at present. If you are the great granddaughter of James G. Beattie of Mo. we are third cousins as he was a brother of my grandfather, but was a great deal older. My grandfather was the youngest of the family. We would love to know you and hope some day to have you come to see us.

I must close and mail this today so you will get it as soon as possible.

Very sincerely M. Lena Beattie” 90 , 149 , 136 , 56 , 127
Research
The Beattie surname appears in early records as Beatie, Beattie, Batie, Baty, Beaty and Beatty. For consistency's sake I elected to use Beattie although some branches of the family retained the "y" spelling, in particular Beaty; others commonly used Beatie. For many years the spelling was subject to the whim of the clerk recording the name; often more than one variation occurs within the same document. However signatures of two of John's grandchildren (Beattie Ryburn, son of Jane; James Beattie, son of David) have survived. Since they both wrote the name Beattie I have elected to use that as my "standard" spelling. 
Marriageca 1741252
ChildrenDavid (1744-1814)
 Mary (ca1746-1841)
 Martha (ca1746-)
 John (1752-1780)
 Nancy Agnes (1754-1833)
 Jane (ca1760-1814)
 William (1760-1860)
Last Modified 13 Nov 2008Created 31 Dec 2008 using Reunion for Macintosh