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A RIGHT SMART FIGHT

 

 

Regarding

 

The American Civil War

 

By John Henry Knowlton, Jr., J_H-Knowlton@email.msn.com, Ottis Edwin Guinn, Sr., &

Suellen Clopton Blanton, [1]  bblanton@fast.net

 

 

 

IT BEGINS

 

The excitement prevailing here for

Several days past rose to the very

Highest pitch this morning, when it

was ascertained that war had been actually

commenced and Fort Sumpter attacked by

the forces of South Carolina.[2]

 

 

The respected Civil War scholar, Bruce Canton, once said:  “What we shall some day become will grow inexorably out of what today we are; and what we are now, in its turn, comes out of what earlier Americans were – out of what they did and thought and dreamed and hoped for, out of their trials and their aspirations, out of their shining victories and their dark and tragic defeats.”[3]

 

To fully comprehend how we got ourselves into a War which would leave 133,821 Southerner Americans and 110,070 Northerner Americans dead,[4] we must first divorce ourselves from the emotional and sometimes romanticized concepts of why so many were willing to fight and die.  The Britannica states the situation[5] as dryly and succinctly as possible without so much as hinting of the terrible suffering produced by the greatest National tragedy America has ever known.

 

American Civil War, also called WAR BETWEEN THE STATES, in U.S. history, a four-year war (1861-65) between the federal government of the United States and 11 states that asserted their right to secede from the Union.

 

Trouble had been brewing for decades.  With the exception of slavery, the issues were much the same as they are today:  how much right does the Federal Government have to meddle in the affairs of the states.  Slavery was just one hot button of many, although the freeing of the slaves ultimately became the lasting legacy of that War.  The South eventually had enough and rightly decided that since they had voluntarily joined the Union, they could voluntarily leave the Union.

We shall leave it to historians to fill out the details of what happened next, and leave it to others to endlessly debate the details of exactly what they were fighting for, and focus instead, on the lives of our ancestors.  To appreciate their roles in that awful drama, that terrible clash of human hopes and passions, we must study little scraps and bits of information our ancestors left behind.  In letters and family traditions, they reach through the years to share a sensitive record of the complexities of their lives with us as they fought, bled and died for their beliefs.  Let us not judge them by the standards of our day but rather honor their memories by preserving and passing on to future generations their stories, understanding what the War cost them and what it won for mankind as a whole.

 

 

Those Who Served[6]

(Last Updated March 26, 2002)

 

This is a very rough draft.  Please contact bblanton@fast.net if you have additional information or corrections regarding these individuals or if you have additional names of Clopton descendants or the husbands of Clopton descendants who served during the American Civil War.

The units the Clopton relatives belonged to are stated below in standard military order of battle format.  To save space the designation "Regiment" has been omitted in most cases and is implied.  Example the 30th Tennessee Infantry Regiment where the word regiment has been dropped to save space in number 1 below.  Regiments were usually formed sequentially so the 30th Tennessee Infantry would have been the 30th infantry regiment formed in the State of Tennessee. In most cases digit numbers are used to annotate the unit rather than spelling out the number.  Many units were consolidations of other smaller companies and/or the remains of decimated regiments.  This is why they may have belonged to several regiments.

 

1.        Walter B. Baker, C.S.A. Prisoner of War, the husband of Clopton descendant Mary E. Hampton.  He served in Company F, 30th Tennessee Infantry.  He was captured at Ft. Donelson and exchanged and detailed to Pioneer Corps.  At the battle of Fort Donelson the badly outnumbered Confederates lost, opening the Tennessee River to Union troops.[7]  The February 15, 1862 issue of the Washington Star stated:  “How any portion of the rebel army in Fort Donelson can possibly escape death or capture, is past us to divine. . .  [and] Fort Donelson is taken, with 15,000 prisoners.”[8]  This marked the first large surrender of prisoners of the War.  The treatment of these prisoners set the tone for the control and care of prisoners throughout the conflict.[9]  One company of the 30th Tennessee was on duty at Fort Henry on its surrender, and the rest of the regiment was marching to its relief when it fell. The regiment was in the four days' engagement at Fort Donelson, and was surrendered on the morning of the 16th February 1862, and sent immediately to prison. The enlisted men went to Camp Butler, Illinois, the line officers to Camp Chase, and then to Johnson's Island, Ohio, and the field officers to Camp Warren, Massachusetts. The field officers were exchanged August 3, 1862; the line officers and enlisted men were released the 30th day of September, 1862 at Vicksburg, Mississippi. ordered to Holly Springs, Mississippi October 10, 1862, and was in a number of engagements in North Mississippi till it reached Grenada, Mississippi December 1, 1862. It participated in the following battles: Fort Donelson; rear guard in Van Dom's Army while retreating through North Mississippi; Chickasaw Bayou near Vicksburg; Port Hudson, Louisiana; siege of Jackson, Mississippi; Missionary Ridge; Battle of Nashville; Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina; it was paroled at Greensboro, May 1, 1865.

2.        James Christopher Baytop, C.S.A., the husband of Clopton descendant Josephine Spotswood Lewis, of “Montrose.”

3.        Stacey Budd Bispham, C.S.A., of “Grassdale,” Fauquier County, son of Mary Ann Vanderwall Clopton and her husband, William Newbold Bispham, D.D.S.  He served with Mosby’s Battalion throughout the War.  His wife, Ellen Lewis Hill, was the niece of Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill, General Robert E. Lee’s Famous lieutenant who played such a significant role in the War.   Fort A. P. Hill in Virginia is named for him.

4.        James Henderson Blount, Sr.,  C.S.A.,[10] of Georgia, husband of Clopton descendant Eugenia Clopton Wiley.

5.        Francis Marshall Boykin, II., M.D., C.S.A., of Smithfield, Virginia, husband of Clopton descendant Mildred James Hill, of “Forkland.”

6.        Champ Langford Bradford, C.S.A., son of Clopton descendant of Thomas Jefferson Bradford, of St. Clair County, Alabama, and his wife, Nancy A. Langford.

7.        John Franklin Bradford, C.S.A., of St. Clair County, Alabama, son of Clopton descendant of Philemon Bradford, Jr., and his wife, Susannah Truss.

8.        Philemon Henry Bradford, C.S.A., Died in Action, of St. Clair County, Alabama, son of Clopton descendant of Philemon Bradford, Jr., and his wife, Susannah Truss.  He was the husband of Mary J. McClooney.  He died of wounds received at Resaca, Georgia, site of the first major battle of the Atlanta Campaign.  It is considered one of the bloodier battles of the Campaign with approximately 6,100 casualties, 2,600 of that number were Confederate soldiers.[11]

9.        Thomas Davis Bradford, C.S.A., Died in Action, of St. Clair County, Alabama, son of Clopton descendant of Philemon Bradford, Jr., and his wife, Susannah Truss.

  1. John R. Brake, C.S.A.,[12] Prisoner of War, husband of Clopton descendant Maria Louisa Clopton of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia. served in Company D, 7th Volunteer Georgia Regiment from August 23, 1861 to February 5, 1862, receiving a discharge due to his health.  He re-enlisted again on May 6, 1862 in Company O, Phillips Georgia Legion.  He was wounded at Fredricksburg in October 1862.  In 1863 he returned to his Company.  He was captured at Saylor’s Creek, Virginia on Thursday, April 6, 1865, only three days prior to the Appomattox surrender. Lt. General Richard S. Ewell’s entire corps was captured at the Battle of Saylor’s Creek, the last battle between the fabled Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac.[13]  Mr. Brake was carried to Lookout Point, Maryland where he remained a prisoner until June 24, 1865.  He is buried at Oak Grove Cemetery, Americus, Sumpter County, Georgia.

11.     William Jackson Christmas, C.S.A., of Virginia, son of Clopton descendant of Charles Nelson Christmas, of “Apple Grove,” and his wife, Sarah Massie, of Hanover County, Virginia.  He was the husband of Amy Swift.

12.     Robert E. Claiborne, C.S.A., of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Clopton descendant of James Claiborne, Sr., of Dinwiddie County, Virginia, and his wife, Sarah Brooking.  He was the husband of Emily Ann Lanier.  He served as a private in Company B, 3rd Georgia Reserves.

13.     Thomas Buller Claiborne, C.S.A., Died as a Prisoner of War, of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Clopton descendant of James Claiborne, Sr., of Dinwiddie County, Virginia, and his wife, Sarah Brooking.  He was the husband of Louisiana Lanier.  He served as a private in Company F, 66th Georgia Volunteer Infantry and was captured near Atlanta July 22, 1864.[14]  He was imprisoned at Camp Chase, near Columbus, Ohio, and died at the prison or shortly thereafter.  Conditions at the Federal prisons were no better than those found in the South.  In fact, the United States Government’s U. S. Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton, went out of his was to see that conditions were primitive.  When a Confederate officer complained to Commissary General William Hoffman about the “inhuman treatment” he had suffered at Camp Chase, Hoffman replied that the treatment was “retaliation for the innumerable outrages which have been committed on our people.”[15]

14.     (Captain) Albert G. “A.G.” Clopton, C.S.A., Prisoner of War, of Huntsville, Alabama, and Texas, son of William Hales Clopton, Sr., and his wife, Avery Garrett Smith.  He organized at Winchester, Tennessee, in the spring of 1862, Company 1, 41st Tennessee Infantry.  He was made its captain.  Soon afterward he was made regimental surgeon and served in that capacity through the War.  He was taken prisoner and held briefly at Ft. Donelson when he was discovered inside Federal lines.  He was in civilian clothing, having removed his uniform to have it washed.  He was given a pass by General Grant, who later discovered much to his chagrin, that he had given the pass to a Confederate officer.[16]

15.     Abraham Clopton, C.S.A., of Arkansas, son of John Clopton and his wife, Martha, of South Carolina.  He enlisted December 1861 with the Weaver Light Battery.  He was an Artificer.  The modern definition of an artificer is a “military mechanic.” 

16.     Lieutenant Colonel Albert Gallatin Clopton, M.D., C.S.A.,[17] of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Alford Clopton, M.S., C.S.A., and his wife Sarah Kendrick.  He was the husband of Anna M. Henderson. Texas,  He was in the cavalry, Company D, Ragsdale’s Battalion, Company D, 1st Texas Infantry, Lieutenant Colonel; Texas Infantry, 3rd State Troops, Surgeon; and as General & Staff Surgeon.

17.     Alford Clopton, M.D., C.S.A., of New Kent County, Virginia, son of David Clopton, Sr., and his wife, Mary Ann Vanderwall  He is buried at Tuskegee Cemetery, Macon County, Alabama.

 

18.     Alfred W. Clopton, C.S.A.,[18] Died of A Fever, of Richmond, Virginia, son of Edward A. Jackson Clopton, Esq., and his first wife, Dorothea C. Rodgers.  He served from Virginia in the 4th Cavalry, Company I, E. He enlisted on March 1, 1862 in Company 1, 4th Virginia Cavalry, from March 1862 until March 1, 1863 and served as a private.  He also served in Company E from March 1, 1863 until September 4, 1864. He was admitted to Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond on August 24, 1864 with a fever,  he was sent home and there he died on September 9, 1864.  Chimborazo Hospital was located on a hill near Richmond and was the Confederacy’s chief medical complex.  It boasted 150 wards with a capacity for more than 8,000 patients.  The single story pavilions served 76,000 patients during the War.[19]  Like most hospitals, they were themselves breeding grounds of disease.[20]

 

19.     (Lieutenant Commander) Anthony Clopton, Sr., C.S.A.,[21] of Tennessee, son of Benjamin Michaux Clopton, C.S.A. and his wife, Justine Augusta Haden.  He was the husband of Margaret Sophronia Mayes, of Arkansas. In 1862 or '63, Mr. Clopton enlisted in the Confederate States Army with Company D, Davidson's (afterward Daly's and, finally, Ragsdale's) Battalion, Texas Cavalry.  Records from that period give evidence he served in various capacities including:  the Quartermaster's Office as clerk, Quartermaster Sergeant, and Wagon Master. The Quarter Master’s Department was dedicated to securing food and clothing for the troops.  One of the great paradoxes of the War was that while attempting to totally annihilate each other, the two sides quickly realized they needed each other to survive.  Bruce Catton opines the War would have ended “a year or two sooner if there had been no mutual trade with the enemy on either side.”[22]

20.     B. M. Clopton, C.S.A., son of Oliver Hazard Perry Clopton and his wife, Paulina L. Cobbs.  He served in Company H. 12th Kentucky Cavalry; and, Company F, 1st Kentucky Infantry.  Long considered the aristocratic arm of combat, the use of long rang infantry weapons during the Civil War reduced the cavalry to the important but unglamorous tasks of scouting and skirmishing.  They formed screens around the army and could wreck havoc among opposing troops who sometimes ran unceremoniously away from the battleground.  Although the Southerners were the superior horsemen, neither they nor the less finely tuned Yankees could confront a trained infantry firing modern weapons and stay in the saddle.  As Bruce Catton notes:  “To be romantic, you had to be on a horse.”[23]

21.     B. M. Clopton, C.S.A.  He served in Company B., 13th Battalion Louisiana (Partisan Rangers).  Music.  During the American Civil War, military bands were, with few exceptions, composed entirely of brass and percussion instruments.  Confederate army regulations stated that “When it is desired to have bands of music for regiments, there will be allowed for each, sixteen privates to act as musicians, in addition to the chief musicians authorized by law . . . [and furthermore] . . . the musicians of the band . . . will be instructed as soldiers and liable to serve in the ranks on any occasion.”[24]  Military bandsmen, in addition to playing for various military functions and to simply entertain the troops, were expected to serve as stretcher bearers and assisted in medical operations in field hospitals.  They also helped transport and care for the wounded and buried the dead.[25]

22.     B. M. Clopton, C.S.A.  He served from Virginia in Company A, 25th  Infantry Battalion.  They were recruited and supported in the Allegheny Highlands of Virginia. "That Splendid Regiment" as the 25th Virginia was known, fought at Rich Mountain, Greenbrier River, Allegheny Mountain, McDowell, Cross Keys, Port Republic, Cold Harbor, Malvern Hill, Cedar Run, Manassas No. 2, Chantilly, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Fishers Hill, Cedar Creek, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Fort Steadman, Appomattox Courthouse.

23.     Benjamin Franklin Clopton, Sr., U.S.A., of Dade County, Missouri, son of William Guy Clopton and his wife, Mary Hunt Bryant.  He enlisted in the United States Army in 1862 and was discharged March 31, 1863.

24.     Benjamin Michaux Clopton, C.S.A., of Davidson County, Texas, son of Anthony Clopton and his wife, Rhoda Hoggatt.  He was the husband of Justine Augusta Haden, of Tennessee.  He served in Company B, 10th Texas Infantry.  The Texas Tenth Infantry Regiment was organized in the fall of 1861 and was captured at the Battle of Arkansas Post on January 11, 1863. The remaining men from the regiment were consolidated into the Army of Tennessee in July of 1863. It was under Patrick Cleburne that the regiment had the most impact which included the defense of Atlanta from Sherman's brutal march to the sea.  They fought in the following battles: Devall's Bluff, Arkansas Post, Chickamauga, Chattanooga Siege, Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Atlanta Campaign, Resaca, Pickett's Mill, New Hope Church, Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville, Carolinas Campaign, Bentonville.  They surrendered with General Joseph Johnston and the Army of Tennessee on April 26 of 1865.[26]

25.     Benjamin Michaux Clopton, C.S.A., Prisoner of War, of Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tennessee, son of Walter Clopton, Jr. and his wife, Martha Ann Duffer.    He was the husband of Mary Elizabeth McLin and Texanna Tennessee Lynn.[27]

26.     David Boyd Clopton, C.S.A., of Paulding County, Georgia, son of John M. Clopton, C.S.A., and his wife, Jane Tinsley.  He served in Company H, 19th Georgia Infantry.  Originally known as the Second Regiment, Fourth Brigade, Georgia State Troops, the Nineteenth Georgia Infantry mustered into Confederate service in August 1861. It fought at West Point, Seven Pines, Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Frazier's Farm, and Malvern Hill.  The regiment lost heavily at Cedar Mountain and Second Manassas, and the following month at Antietam it suffered casualties of more than 50%.  After Chancellorsville the Nineteenth went to North Carolina and then to Charleston.  It was sent to defend Florida against the Union advance in early 1864. In May of 1864 the well traveled regiment found itself back in Virginia, fighting at Drewry's Bluff and Cold Harbor, before defending Petersburg during the rest of 1864-1865. The Nineteenth was ordered to North Carolina near the close of the war, where it surrendered.[28]

27.     (Captain) David C. Clopton, C.S.A.,[29] of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Alford Clopton, M.S., C.S.A., and his wife Sarah Kendrick.  He was the husband of Martha E. Ligon, Mary F. Chambers, and Virginia Caroline (Tunstall) Clay.  He served in Company A, D, 1st Alabama Artillery Battalion, 2nd Alabama Infantry Regiment; and, in 12th Alabama Infantry, General and Staff Quarter Master’s Department.[30]  The 12th Alabama Regiment was organized at Richmond in July 1861, with members from Montgomery and Mobile, and Coffee, Coosa, De Kalb, Jackson, Macon, Morgan, and Pike counties. It fought in the Virginia area during the war.  He is buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery County, Alabama.

28.     Edward Andrew Jackson Clopton, Esq., C.S.A., [31]of Richmond, Virginia, son of Edwin J. Clopton, Sr. Virginia, First State Reserves, Company D, Private.

  1. (Corporal) Edwin J. Clopton, Jr., C.S.A., of Virginia, son of Edwin J. Clopton, Sr.  He served in Company D, 1st Virginia State Reserves, Virginia Company B, 52nd Military.
  2. (Captain) Francis Bacon Clopton, C.S.A.,[32] son of The Honorable John Bacon Clopton and his wife, Maria Gaitskell Foster.  Virginia, Assistant Engineer, Captain.
  3. F. C. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company E, 2nd North Carolina Infantry Battalion.
  4. Francis Clark Clopton, C.S.A.,[33] of Meriwether County, Georgia, son of Pleasant Perrin Clopton and his wife, Nancy Phillips.  He served in Company A, 60th Georgia Volunteers Regiment, Evan’s Brigade, Gordon’s Division, Company A.  Company A was known as the Anthony Grays. The 6oth fought in the following battles:  Gaines Mill, Malvern Hill,  Bristoe Station, Groveton, 2nd Manassas, Chantilly, Sharpsburg, Shepherdstown, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights, Salem Church, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Monocacy, 3rd Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Hatcher's Run, Fort Steadman, Saylor's Creek, Appomattox Court House.
  5. George Clopton, C.S.A.  He served in Company G., 30th North Carolina Infantry.
  6. George W. Clopton, C.S.A., South Carolina, Infantry, Hampton Legion, Company C.; and, South Carolina, 27th Infantry, Company D.
  7. George Washington Clopton, Sr., C.S.A., of Pettis County, Missouri, son of  Abner William Clopton, III and his wife, Lyndia Virginia Jenkins.  He served in Company B, 10th Missouri Infantry.  He served four years, and was with General Kirby Smith in New Orleans for their surrender Friday, May 26, 1865.  The Confederate Lt. General Simon Bolivar Buckner, who had surrendered Ft. Donelson to Grant in February 1862, met representatives of Major General Canby to surrender the last significant army of the Confederacy.[34]  Mr. Clopton was paroled at Shreveport, La, June 8, 1865.
  8. (Sergeant) H. Clopton, C.S.A., possibly H. C. Clopton, son of Oliver Hazard Perry Clopton and his wife, Paulina L. Cobbs.  He was the husband of Maudy E.  He served in Company F, 33rd Texas Cavalry.
  9. (Private) Henry Harrison Clopton, C.S.A., Prisoner of War, the son of John M. Clopton, and Jane, his wife. He was the husband of Martha Emily “Mattie” Petree.[35]  He is listed simply as H. H. Clopton at the age of 16 about the same time as his father, who enlisted when he was 60.  He served in the C.S.A. as did his father and his four brothers.  He served in Alabama, Cavalry, Hardie’s Battalion Reserves, Company E.  He enlisted September 21, 1864 at Cherokee.  He was paroled May 19, 1865 at Talladega, Alabama.
  10. Henry Clopton, C.S.A., Killed in Action, son of Walter Clopton, Jr.
  11. (Junior Second Lieutenant) Hoggatt Clopton, C.S.A., of “Clopton Hall,” Helena, Phillips County, Arkansas, son of John Hoggatt Clopton, Jr. and his wife, Matilda Caroline Drake.  He served in Company H, Cooke’s Arkansas Infantry Regiment, Junior Second Lieutenant; and, Albert W. Johnson’s Regiment, Lieutenant and Junior Second Lieutenant.  He resigned August 13, 1862 at Little Rock, Arkansas.[36]
  12. Hoggatt Clopton, C.S.A., of Bastrop County, Texas, son of Benjamin Michaux Clopton, C.S.A., and his wife, Justine Augusta Haden.  Husband of Martha Anne Christian.[37]
  13. (Junior Second Lieutenant) James A. Tipton Clopton, C.S.A.[38], Prisoner of War, of Meriwether County, Georgia, son of Pleasant Perrin Clopton and his wife, Nancy Phillips.  He served in Company A, 60th Georgia Volunteers Regiment, Evan’s Brigade, Gordon’s Division.  Entered the Confederate Army as a private on September 16, 1861.  He was captured at Roanoke Island, North Carolina.  It was imperative to the Union to capture the island.  The seizure of Hatteras Inlet earlier gave partial control that portion of the coast to the Federals, but Confederate control of Roanoke between Pamlico and Albemarle sounds still permitted Albermarle to be used for blockade running.  The capture of the island would also provide control of the many rivers flowing from the interior of North Carolina.[39]  The Confederates were overwhelmed by the Federal fleet, and on Saturday, February 8, 1862, the back door to Norfolk was opened to the Yankees.  About 3,000 Confederates were taken prisoner.[40]  Lieutenant Clopton was released at Elizabeth City, and appointed first Sergeant and then elected Junior Second Lieutenant.  He was again wounded, and captured at Point Lookout, Maryland.  He was exchanged at Venus Point, Savannah River.  Company A was known as the Anthony Grays. The 60th fought in the following battles:  Gaines Mill, Malvern Hill,  Bristoe Station, Groveton, 2nd Manassas, Chantilly, Sharpsburg, Shepherdstown, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights, Salem Church, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Monocacy, 3rd Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Hatcher's Run, Fort Steadman, Saylor's Creek, Appomattox Court House.
  14. (Private) J. C. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company I, 25th Alabama Infantry and is listed on the muster roll as Clapton.  He died June 4, 1863 at Mobile, Alabama and was survived by his wife, Lucinda Clapton[41]
  15. (Second Lieutenant) James F. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company E, 2nd North Carolina Infantry Battalion.
  16. J. M. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company H, Hardy’s Arkansas Infantry Regiment.  He enlisted April 28, 1862 in Pike County, Arkansas and detailed as a blacksmith July 20, 1863 through February 29, 1864 with Company K, 24th Arkansas Infantry.[42]
  17. James Malvern Clopton, C.S.A., of Huntsville, Alabama, son of James Alexander Clopton, M.D. and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Penny.  He served iin Company B, 35th Alabama Infantry; and, Company E, Hardie’s Battalion Calvary Reserves.  The 35th Alabama Infantry Regiment was organized at Lagrange, March 12, 1862, with about 750 men recruited from Franklin, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, and Madison counties.  It fought in the Georgia and other contiguous areas in the war.[43]
  18. (Second Lieutenant) James Osgood Andrews Clopton, C.S.A.  Killed in Action, of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Alford Clopton, M.S., C.S.A., and his wife Sarah Kendrick.  He served in Company H, 33rd Alabama Infantry.  He was killed in action on Sunday, August 21, 1864, as General Judson Kilpatrick’s Federal cavalry raided Georgia’s Lovejoy’s Station.  Their efforts to destroy the Macon and Western Railroad were blocked as the Confederates fought bravely but in vain to stop General William Tecumseh Sherman’s forthcoming “March to the Sea.”[44]  The Thirty-third Alabama Infantry Regiment was organized at Pensacola, FL, on 23 April 1862, with men recruited from Butler, Coffee, Covington, Dale, and Montgomery counties.  It fought in the following locations, the Battle of Shiloh; Munfordsville; Perryville; Murfeesboro; Chickamauga; Missionary Ridge; Ringgold Gap; Atlanta, at New Hope Church, and around Atlanta; Franklin.[45]
  19. (Private) James R. Clopton, U.S.A., of Hart County Kentucky, son of William B. Clopton and his wife, Lettice Bush.  He was the husband of Mary Elizabeth Reynolds.  He served in Company A, Kentucky Infantry.
  20. James Wilford Clopton, C.S.A., of Davidson County, Texas, son of Anthony Clopton and his wife, Rhoda Hoggatt.  He served in Company K, 24th Arkansas Infantry.
  21. (Corporal) James Wilford Clopton, I., C.S.A.  Prisoner of War, of Marshall County, Mississippi, son of John Hoggatt Clopton, Jr. and his wife, Matilda Caroline Drake.  He was the husband of Sarah Elizabeth Rainey.  .  He served in Company C, 15th Arkansas (Josey’s) Infantry.  He served in Yell’s Rifles, Major General Cleburn’s Command.  He was wounded at the Battle of Shiloh.  With approximately 60,000 troops, Union General George B. “Little Mac” McClellan began his long crawl up the Virginia peninsula with the intention of capturing Richmond.  The Confederates, with about 40,000 men stuck first on April 6, 1862, at Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River, near a little country church called Shiloh.[46]   The fighting was fierce and both sides ultimately claimed victory, although with 13,000 Federal losses and nearly 11,000 Confederate,[47] it was a big price to pay.  Although the Confederates intended and nearly succeeded to destroy the Union forces, they did not.  They continued to drop deeper south, leaving more of the Mississippi vulnerable to Federal seizure.  Mr. Clopton was later captured in Arkansas on leave and taken to Alton, Illinois.  After being held prisoner for five months, he was exchanged and rejoined his Regiment at Murfreesboro.  Alton was the cite of a nearly empty state prison which, in early 1862, was converted to hold prisoners of war.[48]  Small Pox ran rampant at the prison.[49]  At war’s end, approximately 21% of the 7,717 Confederate prisoners had died, second only to the disgraceful 77% suffered at Rock Island, Illinois’s prison facility.[50]
  22. (First Lieutenant) Jesse Perkins Clopton, I., C.S.A.  Prisoner of War, of Davidson County, Tennessee, son of John Hoggatt Clopton, Jr. and his wife, Matilda Caroline Drake.  He was the husband of Virginia C. Swan.  He was First Lieutenant, Adj. 1st Arkansas Cavalry.  He was a graduate of the College at Lebanon, Tennessee.  His study of medicine was interrupted by the start of the Civil War, and he enlisted in 1861 in the 15th Arkansas Regiment, Cleburn's Command.  During the war he was wounded, and after rejoining his Regiment after a four month hospital stay, was captured.  He was exchanged and fought in the Battle of Helena. Prior to May 1863, there existed between the sides a rather elaborate set of agreements regarding a cooperative system of prisoner exchanges.  If the prisoner could not be immediately exchanged, they were to be paroled, sent home, and agree not to fight again until the other side received an equal number of parolees.  But the Confederates refused to exchange black soldiers, and Union generals hurled accusations that the South constantly violated the use of paroled soldiers in battle.  Although neither side was prepared to take care of massive numbers of prisoners, the agreement was buried under mountains of paper work and charges of ungentlemanly conduct, and was abandoned.[51]
  23. John Clopton, M.D., C.S.A.,  Surgeon, 13th Mississippi Infantry.  The 13th Mississippi fought at Manassas, Malvern Hill, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Lookout Mountain, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Cedar Creed, and Appomattox Courthouse.[52]
  24. John Clopton, M.D., C.S.A., Assistant Surgeon, 5th Texas Infantry.
  25. John Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company F, 21st Virginia Infantry.
  26. (Sergeant) John Dabney Clopton, C.S.A., Killed in Action, son of Rueben Monroe Clopton, I., and his wife, Caroline Eliza Hunter.  He served in Company E, 19th Mississippi Infantry.[53]
  27. John Fielding Clopton, Sr., M.D., C.S.A.,[54] of Virginia, son of William Edmund Clopton, Sr., Esq. and his wife, Mary Ann Apperson.  He was the husband of Wilhelmina Somerville Piggott.  He was Assistant Surgeon, 34th Virginia Infantry; and, General and Staff Surgeon, Medical Purv.
  28. (Private) John M. Clopton, C.S.A., the son of David Clopton of South Carolina and his wife, Priscilla.  At the age of 60 he enlisted in Company E., Hardie’s Battalion, Calvary Reserves of Alabama on September 28, 1864.  Four of his surviving sons had already enlisted in the C.S.A., including his youngest, Henry Harrison Clopton, who was only 16.
  29. John H. Clopton, C.S.A., Served in Company A, 2nd Mississippi Reserve Regiment; and, Mississippi, Unatt. Reserves, Moore’s Company.
  30. John P. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company B, 18th Virginia Infantry.
  31. John W. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company C, 1st Mississippi Sharpe Shooter Battalion.  Company A, “Coms Avengers,” was raised in Carroll County, Mississippi.  Company B, the “Red Rebels,” was raised in Holmes County, Mississippi.  Company C, Captain Leigh’s Independent Company, was raised in Yalobusha County, Mississippi.  Company D, the “Wigfall Guards,” was raised in Tennessee. They fought in Vicksburg, battle of Corinth; on the Tallahatchie near Fort Pemberton; Canton when Sherman began his march to Meridian from Vicksburg, fell back to Demopolis, Ala.;  Resaca, skirmishing on the Cassville line; New Hope Church; Kennesaw Mountain; Peachtree Creek; Franklin; Nashville; Columbia; Bentonville, North Carolina.[55]
  32. Jonathan Phillips Clopton, M.D., C.S.A.,[56] of Meriwether County, Georgia, son of Pleasant Perrin Clopton and his wife, Nancy Phillips.  He was a surgeon with the 55th Georgia Infantry.  He was a graduate of Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and served as a surgeon throughout the War.  The Fifty-fifth was sent to east Tennessee, in the spring of 1862, and in Heth's division marched into Kentucky. Returning to east Tennessee, it served in that department until it surrendered with the rest of the garrison of Cumberland Gap in the summer of 1863. After exchange it was placed on detached service, guarding prisoners at Andersonville, Georgia., and Salisbury, North Carolina.   In March, 1865, the detachments of the regiment were ordered to report to General Johnston in North Carolina, but the war ended before the order could be obeyed.[57]
  33. Joseph Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company I, 18th Tennessee Infantry.  The 18th Tennessee (Bates) Regiment was organized June 11, 1861 and mustered into Confederate Service August 7, 1861.  The men fought in the battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Rocky Face Ridge, Reseca, New Hope Church, Powder Springs Road and Chattahoochee River, Franklin.  Surrendered at Greensboro, North Carolina.[58]
  34. Leonard G. Clopton, C.S.A., son of John D. Clopton of Granville, North Carolina and Missouri, and his wife, Rebecca.   He served in Company H, Clarke’s Missouri Infantry Regiment; and, Company A, Snider’s Battalion, Missouri Cavalry.
  35. (Major) Lucius C. Clopton, C.S.A.,[59] of  Meriwether County, Georgia, son of Pleasant Perrin Clopton and his wife, Nancy Phillips.  He served in the Pike County Georgia Cavalry.
  36. (Private) M. C. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company A, 4th Alabama Cavalry.
  37. Maria Gaitskell (Foster) Clopton,[60] the wife of The Honorable John Bacon Clopton.  Mrs. Clopton’s contributions to the Confederate Cause through her fund raising efforts and her successful hospital in Richmond are recognized by the United Daughters of the Confederacy.  Membership to that association will be accepted through her line.
  38. (Sergeant) Martin Kendrick Clopton, C.S.A.,[61] Died of Typhoid Fever, of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Alford Clopton, M.S., C.S.A., of New Kent County, Virginia, and his wife Sarah Kendrick, of Washington County, Georgia.  He was the husband of Sara Elizabeth Greathouse, of Newton County, Georgia.  He served in Company D, 61st Alabama Infantry.  He served in Robert E. Lee’s Army of Virginia.  He died in a Confederate hospital at Greenville, North Carolina.  The 61st Alabama Infantry, also known as the 59th Alabama Infantry, was organized at Pollard in September, 1863. A number of the men, from Barbour, Chambers, Coffee, Henry, and Macon counties. It fought at The Wilderness;  Spotsylvania; 2nd Cold Harbor; Snicker's Gap and Winchester; Fisher's Hill; Hare's Hill.[62]
  39. Mortimer L. Clopton, C.S.A.,[63] of “Mount Ida,” Cumberland County, Virginia, son of William Dowles Clopton, Sr., C.S.A. and his wife, Mary S. Jones.  He was the husband of Bernetta Horde.  Virginia, 18th Infantry, Company E.; and, Virginia, Infantry, 25th Battalion.  He was a sharpshooter.
  40.  (Corporal) Nathaniel Alford Clopton, C.S.A., of “Grassdale,” Fauquier County, Virginia, son of Nathaniel Vanderwall Clopton and his wife, Sarah Susan Grant Skinker, of “Spring Farm.”  He served in Company H, 4th Virginia Calvary. "This Company (Company H, the Black Horse Cavalry from Warrenton) was enrolled in Warrenton 25 April and ordered to Dumfries.  They marched to Brantsville (21 miles) and were ordered to Warrenton Springs, six miles beyond their point of departure.  They reached Warrenton Springs on the 28th of April.  Forty-six members were at Harpers Ferry 5 days after joining." Signed by Capt. Wm. H. Payne, Commanding Officer.
  41. Nathadious D. Clopton, C.S.A., son of John M. Clopton, C.S.A., and his wife, Jane Tinsley.  He served in Company D, 22nd Alabama Infantry.  The 22nd Alabama Infantry Regiment was first organized at Montgomery on 6 October 1861, and was encamped at Mobile during that winter. Men were recruited from Calhoun, Cherokee, Choctaw, Clarke, Mobile, Montgomery, Pike, Randolph, and Walker counties.  He died April 11, 1862 in Corinth, Mississippi, “of disease.” Following the battle of Shiloh.  His regiment fought at Shiloh; Mumfordsville; Perryville;  Chickamauga;  Missionary ; Dalton to Atlanta, losing gradually by the constant fighting; Jonesboro; Franklin, ; Nashville. ; North Carolina; Kinston and ; surrendered at Greenesboro, NC, on 26 April 1865.[64]
  42. (Second Lieutenant) Patrick Henry Clopton, III., C.S.A., of New Kent County, Virginia, son of Patrick Henry Clopton, Sr., and his wife Harriet Dowles.  He served in the 56th Virginia Infantry, Company; and, Company D, 10th Virginia Cavalry.
  43. R. M. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company D, 1st Mississippi Cavalry; Company K, 3rd Mississippi Infantry; and, Company K, 23rd Mississippi Infantry.[65]
  44. Reuben Monroe Clopton, II., C.S.A., son of Reuben Monroe Clopton, I., and his wife, Carolina Eliza Hunter.  Husband of Sarah Clopton Campbell and Willie Eugene Smith.[66]
  45. Robert Clopton, U.S.A., Died of Wounds Received in Action, of Hart County Kentucky, son of David Clopton and his wife, Lavinia Codgill.  He was the husband of Priscilla Davis, of Indiana.  He served in Company F, 39th Iowa Infantry.
  46. Robert Anderson Clopton, M.D., C.S.A., Prisoner of War, of Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Milan, Tennessee, son of John Marshall Clopton, M.D., and his wife, Mary W. Terry.  Dr. Clopton served with Colonel Jackson’s Company G, First Kentucky Cavalry Regiment.  He was taken prisoner in 1863 and was paroled two months later.  He did not again enter service.
  47. (First Lieutenant) Robert E. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company H, 33rd Mississippi Infantry; and, Company I, 11th Mississippi Infantry.  The 11th Mississippi Infantry was a consolidation of individual companies formed in Mississippi.  Company I -known as the Van Dorn Reserve and was raised in Monroe County, Mississippi.  The regiment took part in some of the heaviest fighting of the war.  In the battles of Manassas and second Manassas, Sharpsburg, Gettysburg (in Pickett’s charge of July 3), Bristoe Station, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Talley's Mill, Spottsylvania Courthouse, Petersburg.  By the time they fought at Petersburg there were only sixty four men remaining in the regiment.  After Hatcher's Run the regiment was disbanded rather than be captured.[67]

76.     Robert Emmett Clopton, Sr., C.S.A.[68], of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Thomas B. Clopton, M.D., a veteran of the War of 1812, and his wife, Harriet B. Claiborne.  He served in Company B, 11th Georgia Artillery Battalion (Sumpter Artillery); and, Company D, 11th Georgia Artillery Battalion (Sumpter Artillery).  He was a private when he enlisted in 1862 at Americus, Georgia and was transferred to Company K, 8th Georgia Cavalry on December 29, 1864.  He is buried at Concord United Methodist Church Cemetery, Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia.  The unit was mustered into service at Richmond, Virginia on July 15, 1861. Company B: Greene County men-Stocks Volunteers.  Most of this company was captured at Cumberland Gap and spent time in prison camp at Douglas, IL.  Those not captured were mostly detailed as guards at Andersonville. Company D: Hall County men-Hall Volunteers.  The men fought at Battle of  1st Manassas, Dranesville, Seven Days, Cedar Mountain and Second Manassas, Turner's Gap, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Spotsylvania Court House, Cold Harbor, Petersburg.[69]

  1. (Sergeant) Robert J. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company I, 2nd Mississippi Partisan Rangers.
  2. (Lieutenant) Samuel Cornelius Clopton, Jr., D.Div., C.S.A., of China, son of Samuel Cornelius Clopton and, and his wife, Keziah F. Turpin. Virginia, served in Company A. 13th Virginia Artillery Battalion; and, Company D, Virginia First State’s Reserves.
  3. T. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company B, 12th Mississippi Cavalry.  12th Mississippi Cavalry,  Company B -known as- Ryan’s Company (raised in Lowndes County, MS)  This regiment was organized of Alabama and Mississippi unassigned companies after Sherman's raid to Meridian.  It took part in the battles around Richmond, Virginia; part of the command of General Pillow in his raid upon Sherman's communications ; Lafayette, Georgia; defense of Spanish Fort, east of Mobile Bay; capitulated at Citronelle, May 4, 1865.[70]
  4. T. C. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company K, 3rd Mississippi Infantry.  The 3rd Mississippi Infantry, Company K was known as the “McWillie Blues,” and was raised in Copiah County, Mississippi.  It took part in the defense of the Mississippi coast in 1861 at Ship Island, Pass Christian, and Biloxi.  It then was assigned to the Vicksburg defense.  After Vicksburg it fought in the battles at Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, Columbia, Franklin, Nashville, Kinston, and Bentonville.   Surrendered near Durham Station on April 26, 1865.[71]
  5. Thomas Alexander Clopton, C.S.A.,[72] Prisoner of War, of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Thomas B. Clopton, M.D., a veteran of the War of 1812, and his wife, Harriet B. Claiborne.  He was in and out of hospitals throughout the war and was eventually captured and sent to the infamous Federal prison at Fort Delaware.  Although scurvy reached epidemic proportions at the prison and the amount and quality of food given to the prisoners was appalling, United States Commissary General William Hoffman, in charge of Confederate prisoners in the North, considered that only food that was absolutely necessarily purchased, and vegetables were considered, by him, a luxury.  At the end of the War, $23,000 remained in the Fort Delaware relief fund, even as hundreds of men languished in misery.[73]  He is buried at Concord United Methodist Church Cemetery, Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia.
  6. (Captain) Thomas Coles Clopton, M.D., C.S.A., of Gloucester County, Virginia, son of Edwin J. Clopton, Sr.  He was the husband of Malvina Doswell.  He served as Company Commander in Company D, 24th Virginia Cavalry; and, as Company Commander iin Company D, 40th Cavalry Battalion.  On January 3, 1863, the 59 year old physician was chosen to lead a company of men recruited from Gloucester County.  They were, in fact, all boys below draft age.  Although from Gloucester, they were based at Saluda and were to resist the passage of any Federals cavalry patrols into Gloucester Point.
  7. Thomas Edmond Clopton, C.S.A., Killed in Action, son of Rueben Monroe Clopton, I, and his wife, Caroline Eliza Hunter.  He served in Company K, 23rd Mississippi Infantry; and, Grace’s Cavalry Company, Mississippi (St. Troops).
  8. Thomas H. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company A, 44th North Carolina Infantry.
  9. (Third Lieutenant) Thomas Jones Clopton, M.D., C.S.A., of “Havers Hall,” Gloucester, Virginia, son of Thomas Coles Clopton, M.D., C.S.A., of “Camden,” and his wife, Malvina Doswell.  He was the husband of Mildred Cecilia Anderson of King & Queen County, Virginia.  He served in the 5th Virginia Cavalry; and, Company A, 34th Virginia Infantry.
  10. W. A. Clopton, served in Company C, 45th Tennessee Infantry.  The 45th was mainly from Wilson and Rutherford counties.  It fought in the following battles:  Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Battle of Murfreesboro; Battle of Chickamauga; Missionary Ridge; Dalton, Georgia; skirmishing, through Adairsville, Cassville, Cartersville, Powder Springs, Marietta, Peach Tree Creek; it was surrendered and paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina, May 1, 1865.
  11. Waldegrave James Clopton, C.S.A.[74] son of James Brown Clopton, Sr., M.D., of New Kent County, Virginia and his wife, Mary R. Reese, of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia.  He was the husband of Frances D. Lamar of Georgia.  W. J. produced oil cloth for the government at Montgomery, Alabama throughout the War.  He was a private in Company B, the Montgomery County Reserves.
  12. Walter D. Clopton, C.S.A., of Richmond, Virginia, son of William Clopton of New Kent County and his wife, Sarah E. Vaughan.  He served in Company E, 18th Virginia Infantry.
  13. W. B. Clopton, C.S.A., and served in Company A. 13th South Carolina Infantry.  The men took part in Seven Days Battles,  2nd Manassas, Chantilly, Antietam, Shepherdstown Ford Fredericksburg  Chancellorsville, Gettysburg,. Falling Waters,. Bristoe Campaign,. Mine Run Campaign,. The Wilderness,. Spotsylvania Court House,. North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg Siege, 1st Squirrel Level Road,. Jones' Farm,. 1st Pegram's Farm, Five Forks, and Appomattox
  14. William Abner S. Clopton, C.S.A., Killed in Action, of Virginia, son of James Chappell Clopton, A.B. and his wife, Mary Ann Cottrell.  He served in Shoemaker’s Company, Virginia Horse Artillery.  The following obituary appeared in the October 1, 1863 issue of the Religious Herald:[75] Was killed, December the 5th, 1862, near Port Royal, Va. [on the Rappahannock River east of Fredericksburg],[76] in an encounter with Federal gunboats, Wm. A. S. CLOPTON, a member of the Lynchburg Beauregard artillery, and son of the Rev. James C. Clopton of Lynchburg, aged 19 years and 4 months.  Though not eighteen years of age at the beginning of hostilities, the deceased was among the first to enlist in the defense of the invaded rights of the country, and as he was prompt to enter the service, so he was faithful in the discharge of every duty devolved upon him.  He faltered at no hardship, quailed at no danger, murmured at no fortune, but was always at his post, ready to do a soldier's part with cheerful alacrity.  He passed through the -?- Virginia campaigns of last year, participating in several battles, and was never found wanting in the hour of need, or laggard in the discharge of obligations.  In the truest sense of the term, he was a faithful soldier, which, in a word, comprehends all of praise and of compliment that might be said in that -?-.  His character as a man was equally admirable and commendable.  The better and nobler qualities of the heart he possessed in an eminent degree.  Even-tempered and cheerful in disposition, he was always an agreeable companion, shedding a sunny influence around in hours of deepest gloom.  The blended beautifies of generous and sympathetic emotions shone brightly in him.  to make others happy was more his aim than to enhanced his own pleasures.  His mind was quick, vigorous and strong, and would have matured, had he lived, into very marked intellectual development.  The deceased was a member of the Baptist church, and in his blameless life illustrated the hallowing and beautifying influences of religion.  In his death his parents have sustained the loss of an affectionate and promising son, around whom their affections and hopes were fondly clustered; his friends a valued and trusted companion; and the country an unfaltering soldier.  But he has left the legacy of a good name and untarnished memory to those who love him.
  15. William Calvin Clopton, C.S.A., of Paulding County, Georgia, son of John M. Clopton, C.S.A., and his wife, Jane Tinsley..  He served in Company H, 19th Georgia Infantry.  He died in Lynchburg, Virginia at the Confederate hospital from either injuries received during the War or possibly of measles following an outbreak of the disease that resulted in many deaths in his unit.
  16. (Private) William Capers Clopton, C.S.A.,[77] son of John Hoggatt “Jack” Clopton, Sr. and his wife, Matilda Caroline Drake.  He served in Company K, 1st Arkansas (Dobbin’s) Cavalry.  He enlisted Helena at the age of seventeen and was paroled at Wittsburg.
  17. (Major)[78] William Dowles Clopton, Sr., C.S.A., of New Kent County, Virginia, son of Patrick Henry Clopton, Sr., and his wife Harriet Dowles of New Kent County, Virginia.  He was the husband of Mary S. Jones, of “Mole Hill,” and Lucie Perkins Chores.  Virginia, 3rd Cavalry, Company G.
  18. (First Lieutenant) William Edmund Clopton, Esq., C.S.A.,[79] of “Oakland,” New Kent County, Virginia, son of William Edmund Clopton, Sr., Esq. and his wife, Mary Ann Apperson.  He was the husband of Ellen Hesseltine Hill.  He served in Company F, 3rd Virginia Cavalry.
  19. (First Lieutenant) William Hales Clopton, Jr.,  C.S.A., of Oglethorpe County, Georgia, son of William Hales Clopton, Sr. and his wife Avery Garrett Smith.  He was the husband of Manirva Caroline Phillips.  He served in Company I, 11th Mississippi Infantry.[80]

 

 

 

 

  1. William Henry Harrison Clopton, C.S.A.,[81] of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Thomas B. Clopton, M.D., a veteran of the War of 1812, and his wife, Harriet B. Claiborne.  He served in Company F, 44th Georgia Infantry, Cantrell’s Company, Georgia Cavalry; and, Company B, 3rd Georgia Infantry.  He is buried at Concord United Methodist Church Cemetery, Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia.

 

 

 

  1. (First Lieutenant) William Hickman Clopton, Esq., C.S.A., of Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama, son of James Alexander Clopton, M.D. and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Penny. Mr. Clopton was educated at La Grange (Alabama) Military Academy, 1860-61, Southern University, Greensboro, Alabama, 1861-1862, and received his LL.B. from the University of Virginia in 1868.  He entered the C.S.A. April 1, 1864 at Montgomery, Alabama, at the age of 16, in Shockley’s Alabama Escort Company, formed in 1864 by Cadet’s of the University of Alabama.  He served under General Dan Adams as a member of his escort and later with scouts for the Department of Alabama.  He also served as escort to General Abraham Buford.  He received a saber wound at Selma.  He surrendered with Forrest at Gainsville, Alabama, May 10, 1865.
  2. (Captain) William Izzard Clopton, C.S.A., [82] son of The Honorable John Bacon Clopton and his wife, Maria Gaitskell Foster.  He was Senior First Lieutenant, Company I and H, 1st Virginia Artillery; and, Captain, Company B, 38th Virginia Light Artillery Battalion.  His reputation as a fearless fighter on the battlefield earned him many accolades in later years.
  3. (Second Lieutenant) William P. Clopton, C.S.A.[83] Killed in Action, of Meriwether County, Georgia, son of Pleasant Perrin Clopton and his wife, Nancy Phillips.
  4. William S. Clopton, C.S.A., served in Company E, 12th Virginia Infantry.
  5. William W. Clopton, C.S.A., Prisoner of War who served in Company I, 18th Tennessee Infantry.  This regiment was organized at Camp Trousdale June 11, 1861; sent to Bowling Green, Kentucky, September 1, under General Buckner; sent to Fort Donelson in February; participated in that fighting.  He was captured February 16, 1862 and was a prisoner until September 16, 1862 when he was exchanged at Vicksburg.  The regiment was reorganized at Jackson, Mississippi and sent to Murfreesboro; placed in Breckinridge's Division and took active part in the engagement at Stone's River, especially on Friday evening; was in the fight at Chickamauga in Division of Major General Stewart; lost 144 men killed and wounded; was not much injured in Battle of Missionary Ridge. “We were then in Stevenson's Division and are at present. Temporarily consolidated with 26th Tennessee, October 8, 1863,” reported one of the 18ths staff officers
  6. James Sproull Cothran, Sr., Esq., C.S.A., husband of Clopton descendant Emma Chiles Perrin
  7. William Virginius Croxton, C.S.A., of “Barton Heights,” son of Clopton descendant of Etheline Temple Walker and William Edwards Croxton.
  8. Robert William Dabney, C.S.A., Died as a Prisoner of War, of Virginia, son of Clopton descendant of Anna White Jackson, of “Wood Lawn,” and her husband, William Spottswood Dabney.  He served in the 4th Virginia Calvary and was captured at Strausburg, Virginia October 9, 1864 and sent to Point Lookout, Maryland October 13, 1864.  He complained of fever and was admitted to the hospital at Point Lookout on February 6, 1825 with typhoid fever.  He died February 22, 1865.  His name is found on the monument to Confederate soldiers at Point Lookout.[84]  On Tuesday, October 13, 1863, Brigadier General Gilman Marston, Commander of the prison at Point Lookout, Maryland, made a plea to Colonel William Hoffman, Federal Commissary-General of Prisoners, for funds to construct barracks.  His request was refused and would result in untold suffering on the part of the Confederate prisoners who would occupy the camp.[85]  The inmates suffered terribly from scurvy and other health problems directly or indirectly caused by poor nutrition.  Family and friends attempted to relieve their suffering by sending gifts of food.  However, Colonel Hoffman objected to this and wrote to General Marston in November 1863, “As the prisoners are bountifully supplied with provisions, I do not think it well to permit them to receive boxes of eatables from their friends.”[86]
  9. William Henry Davidson, C.S.A., of Missouri, the husband of Clopton descendant Mary Elizabeth Clopton, of Molalla, Missouri.
  10. John William Edwards, C.S.A., of Mississippi, son of Clopton descendant James David Edwards, Sr. and his wife, Anne Talitha “Annie” Brown.  According to family tradition, his father served in the war, was wounded or became sick, and returned home to die.  His father’s records, however, have never been found.  In the Edwards Family Bible the initials “U.S.S.A.” are found after the name of James David Edwards, Sr.  John William Edward’s C.S.A. Pension application[87] states he resides in Copiah County, Mississippi at Georgetown.  He is a citizen of the United States and Mississippi.  He enlisted July 1, 1864 in Copiah;  He served in Company C under Captain John Wilkinson, Colonel George Mormon.  He was never officially discharged from his command.  He was in active service until the surrender in 1865.  The petition was sworn to and subscribed to on September 4, 1922 and signed by J. C. Smith, Chancery.
  11. (Captain) Burr Grayson DuVal, C.S.A., of St. Joseph, Texas, son of Clopton descendant of Thomas Howard DuVal and his wife, Laura Peyton DuVal.  He was the husband of Ella Moss.
  12. John Crittendon DuVal, C.S.A., son of Clopton descendant of William Pope DuVal and his wife, Nancy Hynes.  “Texas John” fought in three wars:  Texas War of Independence, Mexican War, and the Civil War.
  13. Lemuel Ellett, C.S.A., son of Clopton descendant of Charles Ellett and his wife, Susan E. Bowles.
  14. Willis Newell Floyd, C.S.A.,  Died in Action, husband of Sarah Susan Clopton.  He was killed in Arkansas Thursday, December 11, 1862.
  15. No! John R. Godkin, M.D., C.S.A.,[88] husband of Sarah Elizabeth Clopton of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia.
  16. Henry Heard, C.S.A., Died at C.S.A. Hospital, Barnesville, Georgia, of Augusta, Georgia.  Son of Clopton descendant of Edna Perrin of South Carolina, and Revolutionary War Veteran, George Heard.  He was wounded in the Battle of Pine Mountain.  General Joseph E. Johnston began positioning his troops in the vicinity of Pine Mountain, Georgia on Saturday, June 4, 1864.  During the ensuing clashes General Leonidas Polk, one of the South’s finest leaders, was killed instantly.[89]
  17. Claiborne Johnson Hill, Esq., C.S.A., of Virginia, son of Clopton descendant of William Claiborne Hill, of “Forkland,” and his wife, Elizabeth Yancey Johnson, of “Canterbury.”  He was the husband of Clopton descendant Susan Anne DeFarges.
  18. Alexander Spottswood Jackson, C.S.A., of Virginia, son of Clopton descendant of William Jackson, II, of “Catalpa Hall,” and his wife, Agnes Ann Jackson, of Cub Creek.  He was the husband of Louisa A. Cooke.
  19. Felix Cary Jackson, C.S.A., Died in Action, of “Catalpa Hall,” son of Clopton descendant of Alexander Spottswood Jackson, C.S.A., and his wife Louisa A. Cooke.
  20. Henry Clay Jackson, C.S.A., Died in Action, of “Catalpa Hall,” of “Catalpa Hall,” son of Clopton descendant of Alexander Spottswood Jackson, C.S.A., and his wife Louisa A. Cooke.
  21. (Sergeant) George C. Kurtz, C.S.A., Killed in Action, the husband of Anna Eliza Clopton of Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama.  He served in Company F, the 35th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry.  He enlisted March 15, 1862 at Crawfordville for three years.  He was killed in action on October 5, 1862 at Hatchie Bridge in the Battle of Corinth, Mississippi.
  22. Dolly (Blount) Lamar,[90] the daughter of Eugenia Clopton and her husband, James Henderson Blount.  She was the wife of Walter Lamar.  A Georgia Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy is named for her.

119.  Anthony Clopton Lane, C.S.A.,[91] of DeSoto County, Mississippi, son of Virginia Susanne Clopton, of “Mayfield,” and her husband, Frances Asbury Lane, of “Clover Bottoms Farm.”  Tennessee, 7th Cavalry, Nathan Bedford Forest’s command.  Wounded in action.  The regiment was with Forrest in his defeat of Major General William Sooy Smith's forces near Okolona, Mississippi; the regiment accompanied General Forrest in his raid into West Kentucky, and on March 24 captured at Union City, Tennessee ; Battle of Tishomingo Creek, where Forrest defeated Major General S. D. Sturgis on June 10. On July 14, it was again with Forrest in the Battle of Harrisburg; the regiment was with Forrest in his raid into Middle Tennessee, beginning September 24 with the capture of Athens, Alabama; Under Chalmers, and later under Forrest, it formed part of the rear guard for Hood's Army December 18-28, 1864, then withdrew to North Mississippi with Forrest. On March 1, 1865, it was placed in Brigadier General A. W. Campbell's Brigade, Brigadier General W. H. Jackson's Division, then at West Point, Mississippi. It made contact with LaGrange's Brigade, Major General J. H. Wilson's Corps, U.S.A. near Tuscaloosa, Alabama, March 31, and again on April 1 at Scottsville, Alabama. These actions occurred during General Wilson's raid to Selma, Alabama, which resulted in the final surrender of Forrest's forces at Gainesville, Alabama, May 12, 1865, where the regiment was paroled.[92]

  1. Clifford Anderson Lanier, Sr., C.S.A.,[93] of Griffin, Georgia, husband of Wilhelmina Clopton, of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia.  Clifford’s brother, the beloved Georgia poet, Sidney Clopton Lanier, saved Clifford’s life during the War.  Sidney thereafter suffered poor health for the rest of his life.  Clifford blaming himself, gave up his own budding career as a poet and devoted his life to supporting not only his family but his brother as well.
  2. Andrew Jackson Little, C.S.A., of Alabama, husband of Clopton descendant Julia Ann Williamson.
  3. James Madison Melton, C.S.A., Prisoner of War, husband of Clopton descendant Margaret E. Presley, of St. Clair County, Alabama.
  4. James Hoggatt Moncrief, C.S.A., Died of Camp Fever, of Tennessee, son of Agnes Watkins Morgan Clopton and her husband, Thomas Moncrief.
  5. Robert Hoggatt Moncrief, C.S.A., Killed in Action, of Tennessee, son of Agnes Watkins Morgan Clopton and her husband, Thomas Moncrief.  Killed at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee.
  6. (The Honorable) John Calhoun Nichols, C.S.A., of Brunswick, Georgia, husband of Sarah Jane Clopton of New Kent County, Virginia.
  7. (Sergeant) George Robert Patteson, C.S.A., Prisoner of War, of Buckingham County, Virginia, son of Adosha Glover Clopton and Samuel Glover Patteson.  Served in Company E, 21st Virginia.  He was wounded at Gettysburg July 3, 1863 and captured July 5.  He was a prisoner at Fort Delaware, Delaware and exchanged at Point Lookout, Maryland, May 3, 1864.
  8. (Sergeant) William Henry Patteson, C.S.A., Killed in Action, of Buckingham County, Virginia, son of Adosha Glover Clopton and Samuel Glover Patteson.  Served in Company E, 21st Virginia.  He was taken prisoner at Kernstown, March 23, 1862 and held prisoner at Fort Delaware.  He was exchanged at Aikens Landing a few months later.  He was wounded at Gettysburg in the shoulder on July 3, 1863 as was his brother, George.  He died from these wounds July 6, one day after his brother was captured.
  9. (Brigadier General) Abner Mason Perrin, Esq., C.S.A., Killed in Action, of Edgefield, South Carolina, son of Clopton descendant of Abner Perrin, The Younger, and his wife, Mary Carson Patterson.  He was the husband of Emily Butler, daughter of the Governor of South Carolina, Pierce Butler.  Brigadier General Perrin was killed on Thursday, May, 1864, at Spottsylvania Court House, Virginia.  On the day he died, General Robert E. Lee mentioned only three men in his report at the end of the day.  He wrote:  “The brave General Perrin was killed.”  The engagement was to prove to be one of the costliest battles of the War.  About 6,800 Union and 5,000 Confederates were either killed or wounded.  Another 4,000 Confederates were captured.  So great were the casualties that Union General Ulysses Grant was accused of butchery in the Northern newspaper.  But for the North it represented a great victory because General Robert E. Lee now had nearly 10,000 fewer men, seasoned veterans who could not be easily replaced.[94]
  10. Edward Burt Perrin, Sr., M.D., C.S.A., of Green County Alabama, son of Clopton descendant of George Gwyn Perrin, Sr., and his wife, Adeline Burt.  He served as chief surgeon, General Pillow’s Division of Cavalry.
  11. (Captain) George Gwyn Perrin, Jr., C.S.A., Killed in Action, son of Clopton descendant of George Gwyn Perrin, Sr., and his wife, Adeline Burt.  He was killed at the Battle of Pine Barren.
  12. (Lieutenant) Robert Perrin, C.S.A., son of Clopton descendant of George Gwyn Perrin, Sr., and his wife, Adeline Burt.  He served in Fowler’s Battery.
  13. (Colonel) Robert O. Perrin, M.D., C.S.A., son of Clopton descendant of Abner Perrin, The Younger, and his wife, Mary Carson Patterson.  He was the husband of Elizabeth Spencer and Mary Collier.
  14. William Alexander Perrin, C.S.A., son of Clopton descendant of Abner Perrin, The Younger, and his wife, Mary Carson Patterson.  He was the husband of Mary Florida Lacy Jones.
  15. Oliver P. Pittman, C.S.A., of Edgecombe County, North Carolina, husband of Clopton descendant Fannie E. Claiborne of Richmond, Virginia.
  16. (Captain) Sidney Alexander Reid, Esq., C.S.A.[95], of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Marianne Clopton and her husband, Andrew Reid.  He was the Quartermaster for company G, 12th Georgia Infantry Regiment.  He was wounded in Virginia and returned to duty.  He remained with Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and surrendered at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865.  He is buried at Pine Grove Cemetery, Eatonton, Georgia.
  17. (Captain) David Henry Reid, C.S.A.,[96] of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Marianne Clopton and her husband, Andrew Reid.  Captain Reid served with Company A, 12th Georgia Infantry.  He was wounded at Front Roy, Virginia.  He surrendered with General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865.
  18. Edwin Clopton Reid, C.S.A.,[97] Prisoner of War, of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Marianne Clopton and her husband, Andrew Reid.  Private Reid served with Tolverts Scouts and was captured near Calhoune, Georgia, December 1864.  He was imprisoned at Point Lookout Prison, Maryland.
  19. (First Lieutenant) William Andrew Reid, Esq., C.S.A.,[98] of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, son of Marianne Clopton and her husband, Andrew Reid.
  20. (Colonel) Thomas Peter Saffold, C.S.A.,[99] husband of Clopton descendant Sarah Elizabeth Reid of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia.  He served in Mill’s Regiment, Georgia State Guards.  He was a Delegate from Madison, Morgan County, Georgia to the secession convention of 1861 where he cast his vote to secede from the Union.  He received a Presidential Pardon from President Andrew Johnston September 9, 1865.[100]
  21. Dabney Minor Scales, Sr., C.S.N.,[101] of “Woodlawn,” Orange County, Virginia.  Son of Clopton descendant of Ann Nancy Meriwether Minor, of “Woodlawn,” and her husband, Peter Scales.  He was the husband of Susan Black Winchester.  He served in the confederate Navy aboard the C.S.S. Arkansas and the C.S.S. Shenandoah.
  22. (General) William S. Steele, C.S.A. of New York, husband of Clopton descendant Ann DuVal.  A graduate of United States Military Academy at West Point, he was a regular officer in the U.S. Army.  He resigned to take a commission in the C.S.A.  In the 1870’s he was made Adjutant General of Texas to reorganize the Texas Rangers.
  23. George W. Swan, C.S.A., Killed in Battle at Nashville, Tennessee, son of America Thompson and her husband, James G. Swan of Kentucky.
  24. Julian Fox Terrel, C.S.A., husband of Clopton descendant Sarah J. Christmas, of “Apple Grove.”
  25. Thomas Rhodes Thomson, ,C.S.A. Killed in Action, of “Happy Valley,” the son of Clopton descendant of David Thomson, of “Happy Valley” Louisa County, Virginia, and his wife, Maria Louisa Ellis.
  26. James Davis Truss, C.S.A., son of Clopton descendant of Enos Truss and Tabitha T. Bradford, of St. Clair, Alabama.  He was the husband of Martha Cordiba Coleman.
  27. (Major) Charles Shannon West, C.S.A., the husband of Clopton descendant Florence Randolph DuVal.
  28. (Captain) Bolling Anthony Stovall, Sr., C.S.A., husband of Clopton descendant Martha Smithey Wilson.[102]  He entered service on October 12, 1861 in Company A, Richmond Huggars, Cobbs Legion as 4th Sergeant.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant, Artillery, and to Captain on July 4, 1864.
  29. Benjamin Franklin Wheeler, U.S.A., husband of Nancy Ellen Clopton of Hart County, Kentucky.
  30. (Major General) Charles Moses Wiley, C.S.A.,[103] of Macon, Bibb County, Georgia, son of Ann Gunn Clopton and her husband Jack Barnett Wiley, Sr., M.D.  Husband of Clopton descendant Sarah Juliette Reid, of Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia.  He graduated from the Military College at Marietta, Georgia.  In April 1861, he enlisted in the Macon Volunteers.  After serving 10 months with Company B, 2nd Georgia Battalion, he was promoted to the adjutancy of the 44th Georgia, with which regiment he served two and one half years.  He took part in numerous engagements in the Valley of Virginia, was at Seven Pines, in both battles of Fredericksburg, all the fight around Richmond, and many other hard fought engagements.  Although severely wounded in the right thigh at Ellison's Mill, Virginia, June 26, 1862, he continued in service until the close of the war.  He never fully recovered from the effects of this injury.
  31. Edmund Myrtle Williams, C.S.A., son of Henrietta Adelaide Clopton and her husband, Thomas H. Williams, Sr., M.D. C.S.A.  It was discovered he was only fourteen years old when he was wounded during battle.
  32. Thomas H. Williams, Sr., M.D., C.S.A., Prisoner of War, husband of Henrietta Alelaide Clopton. Dr. Williams served as United States Army Surgeon from March 2, 1849-March 16, 1861.  He resigned from the US Army in March 1861 and registered with the Confederate States Army in Richmond, June 22, 1861.  He served as the General Beauregard's Medical Director at Manassas; and, in September 30, 1861 with General Joe Johnston until June 6, 1862.  He continued to serve the C.S.A. in a number of positions, including, Surgeon General's Inspector of Hospitals, Medical Director in the Surgeon General's Office in Richmond, and in the Medical Purveyors' Department.  Surrendered with an arm wound in Augusta, Georgia, May 5, 1865. Parolled June 29, 1865.
  33. (Captain) Addison Milton Williamson, C.S.A., of Danielsville, Georgia, son of Clopton descendant of Margaret Caroline Perrin and her husband, William Williamson, M.D.  He was the husband of Clopton descendant Nancy Ann Kerr of South Carolina.  He served in Company I, 58th Alabama Infantry.  Men in the regiment were from Barbour, Calhoun, Coffee, Dale, Fayette, Geneva, Henry, Jefferson, Pike, St. Clair, and Talladega counties.  They fought in the Battles of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Resaca,  New Hope, Kennesaw Mountain, Columbia, Franklin, and Nashville.  At Spanish Fort the regiment was in the garrison there during the siege.  They surrendered at Meridian, Mississippi.
  34. James Thomas Williamson, C.S.A., of Danielsville, Georgia, son of Clopton descendant of Margaret Caroline Perrin and her husband, William Williamson, M.D.  He served in Company I, 58th Alabama Infantry..

 

 

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[1] Those Who Served, The American Civil War, is an excerpt from The Ancestors and Descendants of Sir Thomas Clopton, Knight & Dame Katherine Mylde, and is the property of the Clopton Family Genealogical Society which holds the copyright on this material.  Permission is granted to quote or reprint articles for noncommercial use provided credit is given to the CFGS and the authors.  Prior written permission must be obtained in writing by the Society for commercial use.

John Henry Knowlton, Jr.,. is a member of The Clopton Family Genealogical Society & Clopton Family Archives and serves on the Society’s Editorial Advisory Board.  The late Ottis Edwin Guinn, Sr., was a founding member of The Clopton Family Genealogical Society & Clopton Family Archives and served on the Society’s Editorial Advisory Board.  Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton is Founder and Executive Director of The Clopton Family Genealogical Society & Clopton Family Archives.

[2] Mirror of War, The Washington Star Reports the Civil War, Compiled and Edited by John W. Stepp and I. William Hill, Prentice-Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1961, p. 33.  The beginning of the article in the Saturday, April 13, 1861 issue with the headline, “Conflict At Charleston.  Immense Excitement.”

[3] Bruce Catton, Reflections on the Civil War, Edited by John Leekley, Promontory Press, New York, 1998, p. xix, quotes the late Catton’s remarks which he made on the “Lost Colony,” to the Roanoke Island Historical Commission, June 23, 1958.

[4] The Civil War Book of Lists, Compiled by the Editors of Combined Books, Combined Books, Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, 1994, p. 90, 96.  What is even more horrifying is that these figures are probably much higher than reported.  So many records were lost that a truly accurate account is impossible.  The number of those wounded, many seriously, has been the subject of many wild estimations.

[5] The New Encyclopaedia Britannica, Volume 1, Micropaedia, 15th Edition, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., Chicago, 1987, p. 327.

[6] Many people contributed information making it possible to compile this list.  Special thanks to Martha Bennett, Fort Delaware Society; Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.; Juleigh Clark, Public Services Librarian, and the staff of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Library of Colonial Williamsburg, Linda Carol (Wright) Clopton; Martha Alice (Bailey) Clopton; Peggy Charlotte (Schleucher) Clopton; John M. Coski, Historian, The Museum of the Confederacy, Richmond, Virginia; Lillie Crowe, Assistant Director, Mary Vinson Memorial Library, 151 S. Jefferson Street, Milledgeville, Georgia; Barbara Donley, Virginiana Room Librarian, Fauquier County Public Library, Warrenton; Virginia Dun, Research Archivist, Virginia State Library and Archives; Hugh Harrington, Circulation Librarian, Russell Library, Georgia College & State University, Milledgeville, Georgia; Hattie Mina (Reid) Hickey; Sam Ferris Holmes, Jr.; Sam Hodges, Washington Correspondent, for The Mobile Press Register and The Mississippi Press, Newhouse News Service, Washington, D.C.; Virginia; James Penick Marshall, Jr., President, Eatonton-Putnam County Historical Society; Alice James & Charlotte Ray, Georgia Department of Archives and History; James I. “Bud” Robertson, Jr., Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of History at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and author of Stonewall Jackson:  the Man, the Soldier, the Legend, which won the Douglas Southall Freeman Award and seven other national awards;  Suzanne Hattaway (Saffold) Shockley; Darlene Slater, Research Assistant, Virginia Baptist Historical Society, University of Richmond, Virginia; Virginia Historical Society, Richmond; The Honorable Frank A. S. Wright, Judge, The Circuit Court of the City of Richmond; Leonard Alton Wood, M.S.; and, Vonnie S. Zullo, The Horse Soldier Research Service.

Thanks also to Clopton descendants Thaddeus Lamar Aycock, Dorothy Lee (Maddox) Bishop; John Harper Brake; Cecilia Clopton Brown; James Stanley Clopton, Michael Gregory Clopton;  Wallace Chandler Clopton; William Purcell Clopton; Carl L. Cochrane; Ida (Brake) Crane; Jean (Holloman) Daniels; Katherine Elizabeth (DeLoach) Eubanks, B.S., R.N.; Carroll (Taylor) Everett; Lois Eulalia (Armstrong) Goocher; Lee Graham, Jr., M.Div.; Doris Charlotte (Kolb) Holmes; Alonzo D. Hudson; Carole Elizabeth Scott, Ph.D.; Henry King Stanford, Ph.D.; Isabel Lancaster (Clopton) Steiner; Jack Hugh Thacker, M.B.A., Lt. Col., Rt.; Stella Hutoka (Richardson) Thomas; Miles George Turpin; William Edward Waters, III.; Patsy Ann (Clopton) Wheeler; and, Lorraine Dolores (Suda) Williams.

[7] The New Encyclopaedia Britannica, Volume 3, Micropaedia, 15th Edition, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., Chicago, 1987, p. 788.

[8] Mirror of War, p. 88-90.  An article dated Saturday, February 15, 1862 places the number of Union troops at 50,000 men, “aided by the noble fleet of Commodore Foote.”  Upon surrender on Tuesday, February 18, 1862, The Star claimed the Union suffered 400 deaths and 800 wounded.

[9] Robert E. Denney, Civil War Prisons & Escapes, Sterling Publishing company, Inc., New York, 1993, p. 10.

[10] See When All Is Said and Done

[11] Lenz, The Civil War In Georgia, Infinity Press, Watkinsville, Georgia, 1995, p. 22.

[13] Robert E. [on the Rappahannock River east of Fredericksburg], A Day-by-Day Chronicle, Gramercy Books, New York, 1998, p. 555.

[14] Lenz, The Civil War In Georgia, p. 7.  Notes fighting all around and in Atlanta.  The bloodiest battle of the Atlanta Campaign happened on July 22 with over 10,000 casualties.

[15] James I. “Budd” Robertson, Jr. and the Editors of Time-Life Books, Tenting Tonight, The Soldier’s Life, Time-Life Books, Chicago, 1984, p. 114-115.

[16] Memorial Records of Alabama in Two Volumes, Brant & Fuller, Madison, Wisconsin, 1893, Volume II, p. 1135.

[18] See Fire, Fear and Death:  The Fall of Richmond.   His military records are located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Miles George Turpin.

[19] Robertson, Tenting Tonight, p. 97.

[20] For a look at the highly successful but short lived Clopton Hospital, see In Praise of Mint Juleps.

[21] See Jack of All Trades

[22] Catton, Reflections, p. 145.

[23] Catton, Reflections, pp. 130-132

[24] Army Regulations Adopted for the Use of the Army of the Confederate States,  Bloomfield and Steel, New Orleans, 1861, p. 6.

[25] Robert Garofalo and Mark Elrod, A Pictorial History of Civil War Era Musical Instruments and Military Bands, Pictorial Histories Publishing Co., Inc., Missoula, Montana, 1985, p. 54-55.

[26] In 2001 a copy of the photograph was in the possession of Roger Allen Bartlett, Esq.

[27] Texas Confederate Soldiers & Widows Pension Application number 19168 was made by Texanna T. Clopton of Navarro.

[29] See Valor and Lace

[33] In 1999 a copy of his military records are in the possession of Doris Charlotte (Kolb) Holmes.

[34] Denney, The Civil War Years, p. 572.

[35] Texas Confederate Soldiers & Widows Pension Application number 45478 of Wilbarger was made by Mattie Clopton.  Henry Harrison Clopton, of Wilbarger, number 33341, also made application.

[36] In 1999 a copy of his military records were in the possession of Doris Charlotte (Kolb) Holmes.

[37] Texas Confederate Soldiers & Widows Pension Application number 33307 was made by Martha Ann Clopton of Bastrop.  Hoggatt Clopton of Travis also made application n umber 10491.

[38] In 1999 a copy of his military records are in the possession of Doris Charlotte (Kolb) Holmes.

[39] Denney, The Civil War Years, p. 111

[40] Denney, The Civil War Years, p. 124

[41] It is noted on his military records that his surname may not be Clopton but possibly Closston or some variation of that spelling.  See http://www.datasync.com/~jtaylor/25alii.htm

[44] Lenz, The Civil War In Georgia, p. 7.  The battle raged from August 18 until the 22.

[46] Mirror of War, p. 110.

[47] Mirror of War, p. 113.

[48] Denney, Civil War Prisons, p. 40-42.  The request to use the facility was made to the Governor of Illinois on December 25, 1861.  On January 26, 1862, the facility was offered and accepted by the United States Government.

[49] Denney, Civil War Prisons, p. 121-122, quotes a lengthy letter written in November 1863, by an inmate discussing the cases of smallpox and the miserable treatment they received.  The letter ends with the soldier’s comments:  “All day and all night, day after day, night after night, the groans and prayers of the poor, suffering prisoners could be heard piteously begging for water or for some trivial attention from the cold-hearted nurses.”  They were male nurses.

[50] Denney, Civil War Prisons, p. 381. Denney notes that the number of deaths said to be reported at each prison varies from report to report.  It seems to be true, however, that records consistently indicate a higher percentage of Confederate prisoners died than Union prisoners while incarcerated, most of them in Illinois prisons.

[51] Robertson, Tenting Tonight, p. 111.  Robertson notes that as part of this system, “enlisted men were to be exchanges one for one, as we officers of equal rank.  Beyond that, there was a complex scale of values:  Denney’s Civil War Prisons & Escapes, p. 375-376, prints The Prisoner Exchange Cartel of July 22, 1862.  The officers could be exchanged for officers of equal rank.  If there were no officers to exchange, the following rules applied: a general commanding-in-chief or admiral for forty privates or common seamen; certain commodores and brigadier-generals for twenty privates or common seamen; naval captains or colonels for fifteen privates or common seamen; lieutenant-colonel or a naval commander for ten privates or common seamen; lieutenant-commander or a major for eight privates or common seamen; lieutenant or a master in the navy or a captain in army or marines for four privates or common seamen; naval masters’ mates or army lieutenants and ensigns, four privates or common seamen; naval midshipmen, warren-officers, masters of merchant vessels, and commander of privateers, for three privates or common seamen; second captains, lieutenants, or mates of merchant vessels or privateers, and all petty officers in the navy and all noncommissioned officers in the army or marines, for two private or common seamen, and private soldiers or common seamen shall be exchanged for each other, m an for man.

[54] See All This Nonsense

[56] In 1999 a copy of his military records are in the possession of Doris Charlotte (Kolb) Holmes.

[59] In 1999 a copy of his military records  in the possession of Doris Charlotte (Kolb) Holmes.

[61] See The Unfortunate Mattie Lee.  A copy of his military records located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Alonzo D. Hudson.

[63] Texas Confederate Soldiers & Widows Pension Application number 20576 was made by Mortimer L. Clopton of Harrison.

[66] Texas Confederate Soldiers & Widows Pension Application number 35945 was made by Willie E. Clopton of Montgomery.  Reuben M. Clopton of Montgomery also made application number 11571.

[67] Dunbar Rowland, Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898; company listing courtesy of H. Grady Howell’s For Dixie Land, I’ll Take My Stand.

[68] See Dr. Thom.  A copy of his military records located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton.

[72] See Dr. Thom  A copy of his military records located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton.

[73] Robertson, Tenting Tonight, p. 118

[74] See Ragged Rebbles and the Killkenny Cat  Copy of a letter he wrote in which he describes his service to the C.S.A. located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Eulalia (Armstrong) Goocher.

[75] Copy located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Darlene Slater, Research Assistant, Virginia Baptist Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia.

[76]Denney, The Civil War Years, p. 237-238, places date of the engagement between patrols of the two armies as Thursday, December 4, 1862.

[78] The announcement of his marriage which appeared in the “Southern Churchman” on August 27, 1858, refers to him as “Major William D. Clopton.”

[79] See A Quilt of Many Colors

[81] See Dr. Thom and Of Possums and Land Barons and Wonders of the Sea.  Copy of his military records located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Jean (Holloman) Daniels.

[83] In 1999 a copy of his military records are in the possession of Doris Charlotte (Kolb) Holmes.

[84] Edwin W. Beitzell, Point Lookout Prison Camp for Confederates

[85] Denney, Civil War Prisoners, p. 115.

[86] Denney, Civil War Prisoners, p. 119.  Denney notes “There were probably 10,000 prisoners at Point Lookout who would have contested Hoffman’s concept of bountiful when it applied to their rations.”

[87] Located Copiah County, Mississippi Court House, courtesy of Talitha Edwina (Price) Snyder.

[89] Denney, Civil War Prisons, p. 201-205.  See also, Denney, The Civil War Years, p. 419.

[90] See When All Is Said and Done

[91] See Extreme Misfortune

[93] See Fair Willie

[94] Denney, The Civil War Years, p. 406

[95] See A Tempest in the Briar Patch..  A copy of his military records are located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Ottis Edwin Guinn, Sr.

[96] See A Tempest in the Briar Patch. A copy of his military records are located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Ottis Edwin Guinn, Sr.

[97] See A Tempest in the Briar Patch. A copy of his military records are located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Ottis Edwin Guinn, Sr.

[98] See A Tempest in the Briar Patch. A copy of his military records are located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Ottis Edwin Guinn, Sr.

[99] See A Tempest in the Briar Patch..  A copy of his military records are located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Ottis Edwin Guinn, Sr.  Mr. Guinn also has contributed to the Archives many letters exchanged during the War between Captain Saffold and his wife.  James I. “Bud” Robertson, Jr., Ph.D., opines that letters from women to the men are to be found rarely because the men would carry the letters around in their uniforms, re-reading them so many times that they eventually disintegrated.  Because Colonel Saffold spent the duration of the War in Georgia he was able to return home often and evidently left the letters at home so that they were preserved in good condition.

[100] A copy of the pardon is located Clopton family archives courtesy of Ottis Edwin Guinn, Sr.

[101] See Before the Batteries of the Enemy

[103] See A Fine Officer and A Gentleman