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The Clopton Chronicles

A Project of the Clopton Family Genealogical Society

 

 

 

FUN AND GAMES IN OLD FAUQUIER

 

 

Regarding

 

Dr. Nathaniel Vanderwall Clopton & His Son

John Marshall Skinker Clopton

 

 

By Leonard Alton Wood, lwood4562@aol.com  &

Suellen Clopton Blanton,[1] bblanton@fast.net

 

 

 

Persimmon Beer and No Bad Tricks

 

                Stolen from my premises fifteen miles

                From Fredericksburg on the night of

                The 14th June a bright chestnut sorrel horse.

 

 

Nathaniel Vanderwall Clopton[2] loved nothing better than a fine horse and a good joke.  In fact, he pretty much dedicated his life to the pursuit of both.  He was a hard working man, a successful Fauquier County, Virginia, physician.  A veteran of the War of 1812, his reputation as a jokester was known far and wide, and it became something of a challenge to see who could pull a fast one on the good doctor and turn the tables on him.  The results of one such celebrated incident was immortalized in the Warrenton True Index nearly half a century later.[3]

 

. . . Doctor Clopton went to Fredericksburg to line his pockets with the proceeds from the sale of his crops.  Sauntering up one of the streets he was attracted to an auction block from which a little fellow was halloaing:

                “Fifty, fifty, fifty – only fif-tee dollars, for a fine young saddle horse!  Fif-tee, once- f-if-tee, twice, - once – twice – and-a-going at only fif-tee dollars.  Too low, gentlemen, will some judge of horses please examine that one, and give me an advance of fifty, fifty, fifty – fifty-fifty-fifty – and a-going at fif-tee dollars.”

                Doctor Clopton stepped up to the horse, tiptoed to chin the withers – passed his hand down every leg as carefully from knee joint to coronet as if seeking a pulse – opened the mouth to ascertain age from teeth – and then asked the rider to show the horse’s gaits.

                “Splendidly gaited, gentlemen – sound as a dollar – warranted to have no bad tricks – and a-going at fif-tee dollars,” said the auctioneer.  “Fifty, fifty, fifty- on-ly fif-tee – and a-going at – “

                “Five,” bid the Doctor.

                “Fifty-five!  Five, five, five3 – fif-teen-five!  All done?  F-I-f-tee-five, and a-going – once, twice, t-h-r-e-e times.  Gone to Dr. Clopton at Fifty-five dollars.”

                The horse was a beautiful chestnut sorrel distinguishably marked.  Three of his legs from knee to coronet were black, while the remaining left fore-leg was white.  His foretop, singular to say, was tipped with white, and fell on a well-defined white star in the middle of his forehead.  To all appearances he was as richly worth $200 as a First National bank check is worth its face value.

                When the doctor reached home his neighbors congratulated him on his bargain; and one of them remarked that he wondered any one should part with such an animal for $55 unless he had stolen it.

 

            A few days later, the annual regimental muster of veterans of the Revolution and the War of 1812 was held in the little Fauquier community of Germantown.  To call it a community is stretching things a bit.  At that time there was only a single dwelling at a crossroads.  These events were always a source of great excitement for the citizens who threw up stands selling cakes, apple pies, cider and persimmon beer.  All kinds of refreshments were available including ample supplies of alcohol.  A steady stream of soldiers on foot, horses, and carriages poured in, regimental colors lending a festive air to the proceedings.  Games between the competitors got rowdier  in direct proportion to amount of alcohol consumed.

                Dr. Nathaniel Clopton never missed one of these occasions.  As he came into view riding his recently purchased horse, Captain Davy James turned to Sam Chilton, and offered to wager wine that the doctor would leave the celebration before the “day’s fun” was over.  Knowing Dr. Clopton’s love of the rough encounters, the bet was accepted.  Soon afterwards a confederate of the captain might have been seen busily writing a score of posters at headquarters, of which the following is a copy:

 

 

$200 REWARD!

 

                Stolen from my premises fifteen miles from Fredricksburg on the night of the 14th June a bright chestnut sorrel horse, six years old last spring.  He is over 16 hands high, wel formed, rides and works well and is without a fault.  He has a white tip to his foretop, a star on his forehead, three blacks legs, and his right fore leg is white.  I will give the above reward for the recovery of the horse and arrest of the thief, or $100 for horse or thief.  Address                                         A. D. Perkins

                                                                                Fredricksburg, Va.

 

 

                These bills were posted on trees about the parade grounds and attracted scores of readers.  Soon hundreds of men who had nags tied to saplings, bending limbs, and fence stakes, had their suspicions aroused.  The doctor meantime, unconscious of what was passing, complacently sat his cheap purchase.  Presently one man alone, afterwards two together, then three or more neared him, eyed the horse closely and went away.  Af first this rather gratified the doctor, but by and by inquisitive glances gave place to threatening scowls, and now and then muttered hints like these fell from their lips:

                “Never head tell of two horses with white fore-tops.”  “Zactly the ‘scription’ ‘cepting the wrong leg’s white.”  “Ef taint the same horse, he’s a good match for him,” etc.

                Trotting over where Captain Davy stood the doctor inquired of him if he knew why strangers eyed him as if he were an infernal thief.

                “Read that,” replied the captain laconically, pointing to a poster.

                As the doctor dismounted to bring his magnifiers to bear at the right focus on the paper, a busybody looking over his shoulder remarked, “Guess you’ll walk home to-night, Doc.”  Before he got through reading the poster another came up, half breathless with the intelligence that the “old colonel was writin’ out a warrant.”  A third capped the climax by insinuating consolingly that he would “stand by doc and go his bail if necessary.”

                Just then a stalwart chap waltzed around the little circle as if hunting up a pugnacious partner while he tugged away at his coat cuffs.  “D--n me, ef I can’t lick the old horse thief,” said he, “And I can put both eyes of his best friend in mourning,” chimed in a second.

                “And I’ll see yer through, boys,” vociferated a third man.

                Simultaneous with these threatening utterances, the squire shouted, “Fight!” “Fight!” echoed a little urchin up the tree.  “Fight!” repeated a man at the nearest cake-stand.  “Fight – fight!” – ran from lip to lip through the parade ground.  And in five minutes a half acre of excited men were surging around the little ring of earnest combatants.

                “Better leave quickly,” whispered the captain confidentially in the ear of the old doctor – and leave he did “without standing on the order of his going.”

 

 

                Without further urging, Dr. Clopton high tailed it towards home, taking with him his needles, coat-plasters, lancets, and splints.  No sooner had he vacated the grounds than one poor soul, a “pugilist with flattened proboscis,” staggered about pitifully crying out for the doctor, vainly trying to reattached a severed finger on his mutilated hand.

 

                Kettle-drums beat the long roll, the crowd unknotted, the regimental line was formed on an indistinct furrow, the drill proceeded, the 85th was dismissed, and the usual addenda followed.

                When the curtain fell on depleted pockets, bunged eyes, and bloody noses – when the “sport” was ended – Captain James, Sam Chilton, Thom Skinker and other hail-fellows collected and turned the heads of their horses towards Dr. Clopton’s hospitable residence.  Meeting them at the stile, for once in his life the doctor permitted his anxiety to get the better of his politeness, and his salutory was

                “Have you seen Perkins?”

                “Yes,” answered Tom carrying the air for a choir of voices in sweet accord.

                “Why, then, didn’t you invite him to call for his sorrel?”

                “Because the title by law is vested in you,” interposed Chilton.

                “Think I’d retain the d-----d horse on technical grounds?” queried the doctor with warmth.

 

               

After working the now thoroughly rattled Doctor over for a little longer, they took pity on him and urged him to carefully read the reward poster again.  Possibly alerted by the barely suppressed laughter in his friends voices, the realization eventually dawned on him that it was all a hoax.

 

 

“Light, boys, light!” said the doctor righting up, “and allow me to pay the debt.”  “Light” they did; and one of the merriest nights of coterie of bon-vivants ever spent was spent beneath the hospitable roof of old Dr. Clopton on that occasion.  Long live pleasing memories of the olden time.

 

 

 

Devastation

 

                Not happy with destroying the house

and landscape and carting off all the livestock,

they destroyed the well by throwing in cannon balls,

bones, and anything self that caught their fancy.

 

 

The nights of laughter the father knew would end for his children, replaced by the agonizing cries of the dying.  Dr. Clopton died in the fall of 1855, and his property, which consisted principally of “Grassdale” and “Mount Ida,” was divided among his living children, with the provision they care for their mother until her death.  Although the plantations were adjacent, the houses were about three-quarters of a mile apart.  The Civil War found his son, Nathaniel, living at “Grassdale,” with their mother, and the oldest son John, with his wife and son, living at “Mount Ida.”[4]  At the beginning of the Civil War, Nathaniel, then a bachelor, was mustered into the Black Horse Cavalry in Warrenton and John stayed to care for the family and oversee the affairs of both plantations.

Just about the worst place a family could find itself at the start of the Civil War as in the Virginia counties located near the border states.  Fauquier County[5] located in the lush foothills of northern Virginia, was an easy ride from Pennsylvania.  The county boasted gracious antebellum homes and some of the finest horses in the country.  By 1861, the Cloptons were well established.  Their plantations, “Grassdale” and “Mount Ida,” were prosperous. Such abundance was sure to catch the eye of Union forces.

Before the Yankees descended on the peaceful land, John Clopton whisked his mother, wife, and son, Nathaniel, to Richmond[6] in the mistaken belief that there they would be safe for the duration of the War.  His neighbor, Charles Hickerson,[7] decided he and his family would take their chances and stay.  In 1863, however, as the sound of battle drew closer and closer, he fled with his wife and children.[8]  Returning to his house he was in the process of drawing water when a cannon ball sailed through the air and tore a path through the top of his house.  The cannon ball was quickly followed by the Yankees themselves, who promptly set about taking everything the Hickersons owned.  Only one little colt, still young and wild, escaped their clutches and somehow managed to survive in the forest until the end of the War.[9]

                After burning the house, the soldiers took the bricks and what lumber could be salvaged, and created a village of tents, the bricks making walk ways.  The cedar trees shading the house were also sacrificed, leaving the once lovely land denuded.  Not happy with destroying the house and landscape, and carting off all the livestock, they destroyed the well by throwing in cannon balls, bones, and anything self that caught their fancy.

                The thoroughly terrified family made their way to the Clopton plantation, “Grassdale,” where they stayed for the duration of the War and several years thereafter.  Mr. Hickerson and John Clopton were in hiding.  Like most Southern women, Mrs. Hickerson and the children were left to manage as best they could.  Determined to protect the house, Mrs. Hickerson went to the Federal Camp and demanded a guard.  One day a Union soldier managed to pry a door off its hinges and was in the process of carrying it away when the guard fired on him, missing the soldier but hitting the top of the door.  It was only through the Grace of God that “Grassdale” survived the War relatively unscathed.  A confederate soldier, seeking refuge, knocked at the door one night.  The guard was sleeping soundly, and Mrs. Hickerson permitted the frightened young man to stay all night, spiriting him away before light, the guard none the wiser.

                Mr. Hickerson and John Clopton managed to elude the Yankees for some time, but their luck ran out and they were captured.  They were thrown into a box car bound for Catlett.  Luckily, the legendary Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson and his men surprised them and after a furious exchange of gun fire, the Union soldiers fled and the prisoners were released. [10]

 

 

The Warrenton Fishing Club

 

                He sent Wright around to all of Clopton’s friends

                And let them in to the joke,

                And warned them under no consideration

                Should they go Clopton’s bail.

 

 

The ability of the human spirit to adjust and rebound is one of nature’s greatest miracles.  It would be many, many years before the South would completely recover from the tragic consequences of the War, but slowly and surely, the people began to go about the business of healing and loving, and the renewing sound of laughter once more pierced the night.

In the 1870’s “The Warrenton Fishing Club,” was organized with about a dozen members.[11]  The rules were few and simple.  Paramount among them was that no member who on one of their expeditions became absolutely drunk  they would be booted out of the organization.  Some were veteran’s of the Civil War,[12] so the definition of “absolutely drunk” was at best vague.  Joseph Arthur Jeffries, himself a Civil War Veteran, remembered one expedition to Marsh Run trip vividly.  John Clopton, on whose land by invitation they went, met them at the fishing grounds.

While Mr. Jeffries does not mention anyone becoming “absolutely drunk,” it seems two of the boys, R. H. Downman and Wright James, made off with a couple of shocks of oats belonging to one of John Clopton’s neighbors, George Taylor, to feed their horses.  They shared this fact with John who, never missing an opportunity to play a practical joke, kept quiet until he saw Mr. Taylor a few weeks later.  Mr. Taylor was easy to excite, and John played it for all it was worth and egged him on to have the offending parties arrested.  Into town they rode, Mr. Taylor intent on locating a magistrate to get a warrant, John looking forward to some fun.  After many hours and not a few Mint Juleps, the matter was settled without anyone landing in jail.

Now it just so happened that R. H. Downman, one of the erstwhile thieves, bided his time until he could get back at John Clopton.  He was at that time Recorder of the town of Warrenton.  It was he who tried most of the corporation cases.

 

It was not many months before John Clopton had an account to settle before a Commissioner and came here with the other parties to the controversy, to hear and give testimony in the case. Downman was present on the occasion and as the case progressed, Clopton got into an angry dispute with his opponent and was only stopped by those present from making an assault on him.  Downman promptly issued a warrant and had Clopton arrested.   [Downman] sent for Wright James and privately told him what he had done, and that it was then their inning.  He sent Wright around to all of Clopton’s friends and let them in to the joke, and warned them under no consideration should they go Clopton’s bail.  He could only be bound over to keep the peace, so Downman did that and required local security to prevent any of Clopton’s country friends from serving him.  Clopton begged Downman to sign his bond, but Downman regretted that as an officer he could not do so.  The alternative was jail unless a surety could be had.  Clopton, by permission, went gloomily forth in charge of the town sergeant to seek an endorser to his bail bond.  He went up and down the streets, into stores and offices everywhere, to meet with the uniform regret that none were in condition to go his bail.  After several hours of misery Clopton was told of the joke that had been put upon him, and why.  He was too much relieved to get mad at their joke.  He hurried home, and though the fishing club received many courtesies at his hands in subsequent visits to his neighborhood, he tried no more to play upon them practical jokes.[13]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


                1.  Nathaniel Vanderwall20 Clopton, M.D.  (David19, Waldegrave18, William17, William16, William15, Walter14, William13, Richard12, William11, John10, William9, Thomas8, Walter7, William6, Walter5, William4, Walter3, William2, Guillaume1 Pecche, Lord Of Cloptunna and Dalham)1 was born May 2, 1786 at New Kent County, Virginia2, and died October 6, 1855 at "Grassdale," Fauquier County, Virginia of gout at the age of 703.  He married Sarah Susan Grant Skinker, of "Spring Farm"4 October 17, 1821 at "Spring Farm", Fauquier County, Virginia5, daughter of William Skinker and Harriet Keith.  She was born May 7, 1798 at "Spring Farm", Fauquier County, Virginia6, and died January 30, 1881 at "Grassdale," Fauquier County, Virginia.

       

Children of Nathaniel Clopton and Sarah Skinker are:

+      2                 i.    Mary Ann Vanderwall21 Clopton, of "Grassdale", born August 18, 1822 at Fauquier County, Virginia; died Aft. 1910 at Mitchell County, North Carolina.

+      3                ii.    John Marshall Skinker Clopton, of "Mount Ida", born December 1, 1824 at "Spring Farm", Fauquier County, Virginia; died January 15, 1900 at "Mount Ida," Fauquier County, Virginia and buried at Remington Cemetery.

        4               iii.    Harriet Judith Mildred Clopton, of "Grassdale", born November 1, 1828 at Grassdale, Fauquier County, Virginia; died January 11, 1833 at Grassdale, Fauquier County, Virginia7.

+      5               iv.    Nathaniel Alford Clopton, of "Grassdale", born January 9, 1832 at Remington, Fauquier County, Virginia; died April 7, 1886 at Grassdale, Fauquier County, Virginia of softening of the brain at the age of 52, and is buried at Remington Cemetery.

 

 

Generation No. 2

 

        2.  Mary Ann Vanderwall21 Clopton, of "Grassdale" (Nathaniel Vanderwall20, David19, Waldegrave18, William17, William16, William15, Walter14, William13, Richard12, William11, John10, William9, Thomas8, Walter7, William6, Walter5, William4, Walter3, William2, Guillaume1 Peche, Lord Of Cloptunna and Dalham)8 was born August 18, 1822 at Fauquier County, Virginia, and died Aft. 1910 at Mitchell County, North Carolina.  She married William Newbold Bispham, D.D.S.9 October 1, 1846 at Grassdale, Fauquier County, Virginia10, son of Stacey Bispham and Ann Newbold.  He was born June 6, 1814 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and died May 10, 1869 at Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia.

       

Children of Mary Clopton and William Bispham are:

        6                 i.    Stacey Budd22 Bispham, C.S.A.11, born July 20, 1847 at "Grassdale," Fauquier County, Virginia; died April 28, 1909 at Charlotte, North Carolina.  He married Ellen Lewis Hill July 2, 1874 at Culpeper County, Virginia; born May 25, 1848 at Culpeper County, Virginia; died August 19, 1921.

He served at the Civil War with Mosby's Battalion.  Following the war he became a traveling salesman and later a merchant at Warrenton, Virginia.  In 1878 he was a First Lieutenant of the "Warrenton Riflemen."  His wife was the niece of Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill, General Robert E. Lee's famous lieutenant, who played such a significant role in the War.  Fort A.P. Hill in Virginia is named for him.

        7                ii.    Sallie Clopton Bispham, born September 9, 1849 at "Edge Hill," Fauquier County, Virginia; died February 16, 185012.

        8               iii.    William Aubrey Bispham, born September 26, 1850 at "Edge Hill," Fauquier County, Virginia; died Aft. 1923 at Palmetto, Florida.  He married (1) Annie Mooney September 26, 1881; died September 16, 1886.  He married (2) Martha Farabee January 2, 1887.

        9               iv.    Nathaniel Clopton Bispham, Sr.13, born February 21, 1852 at Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia; died Aft. 1923.  He married Mary Spotswood Richards, of "Pleasant Hill" April 20, 1892 at Pleasant Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia; born October 26, 1867 at Pleasant Hill, Albemarle County, Virginia; died June 25, 1919 at "Bleak House," Fauquier County, Virginia.

        10              v.    James Skinker Bispham, born May 20, 1853 at Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia; died Aft. 1923 at Gordonsville, Virginia.

        11             vi.    Ann Newbold Bispham, born April 5, 1858 at Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia; died January 2, 1921 at Camden, New Jersey.  She married L.L. McKay June 5, 1880.

 

        3.  John Marshall Skinker21 Clopton, of "Mount Ida" (Nathaniel Vanderwall20, David19, Waldegrave18, William17, William16, William15, Walter14, William13, Richard12, William11, John10, William9, Thomas8, Walter7, William6, Walter5, William4, Walter3, William2, Guillaume1 Pecche, Lord Of Cloptunna and Dalham) was born December 1, 1824 at "Spring Farm", Fauquier County, Virginia, and died January 15, 1900 at "Mount Ida," Fauquier County, Virginia and buried at Remington Cemetery14.  He married Susan Grant Keith, of "Woodbourne" Fauquier November 7, 1849 at Fauquier County, Virginia15, daughter of James Keith and Mary Morris.  She was born 1831 at Woodbourne, Fauquier County, Virginia16, and died April 4, 1887 at "Mount Ida," Fauquier County, Virginia of pneumonia at the age of 56, and buried at Remington Cemetery17.

       

Children of John Clopton and Susan Keith are:

        12               i.    Nathaniel Vanderwall22 Clopton, of "Grassdale", born December 24, 1850 at Grassdale, Fauquier County, Virginia18.  He married (1) Annie Lewis Martin April 26, 1894 at Fauquier County, Virginia19; died December 29, 1899 at Virginia.  He married (2) Mary Virginia Kemper June 5, 1901 at Virginia; born July 28, 1879 at Virginia20.

        13              ii.    Mary Keith Clopton, of "Mount Ida" Fauquier, born Abt. April 1864 at Mount Ida, Fauquier County, Virginia; died October 10, 1865 at Mount Ida, Fauquier County, Virginia of inflammation of the stomach at the age of 18 months21.

        14             iii.    Thomas Alford Clopton, of "Mount Ida" Fauquier, born August 21, 1865 at Mount Ida, Fauquier County, Virginia22; died September 9, 1895 at Selma, Alabama23.

        15             iv.    James Keith Clopton, of "Mount Ida" Fauquier, born February 26, 1868 at Mount Ida, Fauquier County, Virginia24; died December 23, 1938 at Remington, Fauquier County, Virginia, and buried Remington Cemetery24.  He married Annie Chilton James December 2, 1891 at Orange County, Virginia25; born June 19, 1873 at Orange County, Virginia26; died May 12, 1942 at Remington, Fauquier County, Virginia, and buried Remington Cemetery.

 

5.        Nathaniel Alford21 Clopton, C.S.A., of "Grassdale" (Nathaniel Vanderwall20, David19, Waldegrave18, William17, William16, William15, Walter14, William13, Richard12, William11, John10, William9, Thomas8, Walter7, William6, Walter5, William4, Walter3, William2, Guillaume1 Pecche, Lord Of Cloptunna and Dalham)27 was born January 9, 1832 at Remington, Fauquier County, Virginia28, and died April 7, 1886 at Grassdale, Fauquier County, Virginia of softening of the brain at the age of 52, and is buried at Remington Cemetery29.  He married Mollie David Lupton, of "Repose" November 7, 1878 at Repose, Orange County, Virginia, daughter of David Lupton and Sarah Cockerill.  She was born May 27, 1852 at Virginia30, and died August 22, 1937 at Virginia, probably, and buried at Remington Cemetery, Fauquier31.

 

Children of Nathaniel Clopton and Mollie Lupton are:

        16               i.    Sarah G.22 Clopton, of "Grassdale" Fauquier, born July 17, 1879 at Grassdale, Fauquier County, Virginia; died December 22, 1968 at Fauquier County, Virginia, and is buried at Remington Cemetery, Fauquier32.  She married John Marshall James June 27, 1906 at Remington, Fauquier County,  Virginia; born November 16, 1871 at Virginia33; died June 16, 1938 at Fauquier County, Virginia, and is buried at Remington Cemetery, Fauquier34.

        17              ii.    Infant Daughter Clopton, of "Grassdale" Fauquier, born August 21, 1882 at Fauquier County, Virginia35; died August 21, 1882 at Fauquier County, Virginia.

        18             iii.    Henry L. Clopton, of "Grassdale" Fauquier County, born February 1884 at Fauquier County, Virginia36; died June 1884 at Rappahannock Station (Remington), Fauquier County, Virginia at the age of 4 months of cholera infection37.

 

 

Endnotes

 

1.  Named in his father's will.

2.  Skinker, Samuel Skinker and His Descendants,  An Account of the Skinker Family and All Their Kindred Who Have the Blood of Samuel Skinker in Their Veins, Published by the Author, 1923, (Courtesy of Annie Chilton (Ott) Wood), p. 66, States he was "born near Richmond."

3.  Fauquier County Virginia Death Records,  (Located Fauquier County Courthouse, Warrenton, Virginia.  Abstracts and microfilm located Fauquier County Library, Warrenton.  Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Page 19, Line 16, States he was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, which is incorrect.  He is a farmer and the husband of Sally Clopton.  His death was reported by his son, N.A. Clopton.

4.  GS Film 031828 (7566 pt. 38) Book 75, p. 349, The Clopton Family Archives contains a copy of this deed dated November 27, 1860 between S.S.G. Clopton (a widow), Wm. N. Bispham and Mary Ann [Clopton], his wife; J. S. Clopton and his wife and N. A. Clopton, the widow and heirs of N. V. Clopton of the first part and Henry D Taylor of the second.  Refers to land in the division of the estate of David Clopton.  It is signed, Sarah S. G. Clopton, W N Bispham, Mary Ann Bispham, J. S. Clopton, Susan G. Clopton, and N. A. Clopton.

5.  Fauquier County, Virginia, Marriage Book,  (Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Date of bon was October 15, 1821; bondsman named William.

6.  Skinker, Samuel Skinker and His Descendants,  (Courtesy of Annie Chilton (Ott) Wood), p. 66.

7.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton"

8.  Skinker, Samuel Skinker and His Descendants,  (Courtesy of Annie Chilton (Ott) Wood), p. 70-71, Lists all the children of Sarah and David Clopton and the children of Mary Ann and William Bispham's children.

9.  Leonard Alton Wood provided this information unless otherwise noted.

10.  Fauquier County, Virginia, Marriage Book,  (Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Date of bond is September 28, 1846; bondsman is Nathaniel V. Clopton, her father.

11.  Skinker, Samuel Skinker and His Descendants,  (Courtesy of Annie Chilton (Ott) Wood), p. 71.

12.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton"

13.  Leonard Alton Wood provided this information unless otherwise noted.

14.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton"

15.  Fauquier County, Virginia, Marriage Book,  (Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Bond was made November 5, 1849.  No bondsman was named.

16.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton"

17.  Fauquier County Virginia Death Records,  (Located Fauquier County Courthouse, Warrenton, Virginia.  Abstracts and microfilm located Fauquier County Library, Warrenton.  Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Page 127, Line 8, Her death was reported by her husband, John S. Clopton.  Her parents are James & Mary M. Keith.

18.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton," Presented to the Clopton Family Association, September 17, 1997.

19.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton"

20.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton,"

21.  Fauquier County Virginia Death Records,  (Located Fauquier County Courthouse, Warrenton, Virginia.  Abstracts and microfilm located Fauquier County Library, Warrenton.  Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Page 50, Line 7, States she was born in Fauquier and that her death was reported by her father, John S. Clopton.  Her mother named as Susan Clopton.

22.  Fauquier County Virginia Birth Records,  (Located Fauquier County Courthouse, Warrenton, Virginia.  Abstracts and microfilm located Fauquier County Library, Warrenton.  Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Page 85, Line 17, States his father is a farmer in Morrisville.

23.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton,"

24.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton"

25.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton”

26.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton"

27.  Virginia Historical Society Microfilm and Manuscript Collections, Additional references may be found in the Minor Family Papers, MSS1 M663 c112-2973.

28.  Skinker, Samuel Skinker and His Descendants,  (Courtesy of Annie Chilton (Ott) Wood), p. 75.

29.  Fauquier County Virginia Death Records,  (Located Fauquier County Courthouse, Warrenton, Virginia.  Abstracts and microfilm located Fauquier County Library, Warrenton.  Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Page 123, Line 3, States his death reported by his wife, Mollie L. Clopton and he is the son of N.V. & Sallie Clopton.

30.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton"

31.  Skinker, Samuel Skinker and His Descendants,  (Courtesy of Annie Chilton (Ott) Wood), p. 75.

32.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton,"

33.  King, The Cropp Family in America.

34.  Leonard A. Wood, Essay,  "Descendants of Waldegrave Clopton,"

35.  Fauquier County Virginia Birth Records,  (Located Fauquier County Courthouse, Warrenton, Virginia.  Abstracts and microfilm located Fauquier County Library, Warrenton.  Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Page 184, Line 18, States her father was a farmer in Rappa Station and that she was born dead.

36.  Fauquier County Virginia Birth Records,  (Located Fauquier County Courthouse, Warrenton, Virginia.  Abstracts and microfilm located Fauquier County Library, Warrenton.  Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Page 203, Line 26, States his parents are, N.A. & Mary L. Clopton and his father is a farmer in Rappa Station.  His birth is reported by his uncle John S. Clopton.

37.  Fauquier County Virginia Death Records,  (Located Fauquier County Courthouse, Warrenton, Virginia.  Abstracts and microfilm located Fauquier County Library, Warrenton.  Courtesy of Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.), Page 115, Line 7, States he was born in Fauquier County and that his death was reported by his uncle, John S. Clopton.

 

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[1] Fun and Games in Old Fauquier is an excerpt from The Clopton Chronicles, the Ancestors and Descendants of Sir Thomas Clopton, Knight & Dame Katherine Mylde, and is the property of the Clopton Family Genealogical Society which holds the copyright on this material.  Permission is granted to quote or reprint articles for noncommercial use provided credit is given to the CFGS and to the authors.  Prior written permission must be obtained from the Society for commercial use.

Leonard Alton Wood, is a founding member of the Society and serves on the Society’s Board of Directors.  He is the husband of Annie (Ott) Wood.  Mrs. Wood is the great-great-granddaughter of Nathaniel Vanderwall Clopton, M.D. and his wife, Sarah Susan Grant Skinker.  She is also a founding member of The Clopton Family Genealogical Society and Clopton Family Archives. Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton is Founder and Executive Director of  the Society.

The Society wishes to thank Barbara Donley, Virginiana Room Librarian, Fauquier County Public Library, and Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr., B.S., for their assistance.  Also thanks to Clopton descendants James M. McMillen, M.S., Stella Hutoka (Richardson) Thomas, and Annie Chilton (Ott) Wood..

[2] Dr. Clopton was the son of David Clopton, Sr., and his wife, Mary Ann Vanderwall.  An abbreviated genealogy follows.  Eighteen year old Private David Clopton left the comfort of his New Kent County, Virginia home and soon found himself embroiled in a trial, not by fire, but by bitter cold and inadequate rations, for which he received 6 2/3 dollars a month for pay and subsistence..  The Continental Army commanded by General George Washington first arrived at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania on December 19, 1777. They stayed there until June 19 1778. Men from each colony were at Valley Forge, and there were regiments from 11 of the 13 colonies. There soldiers lost their lives fighting the elements rather than the enemy.  Gouverneur Morris said of a visit to Valley Forge that "An Army of skeletons appeared before our eyes, naked, starved, sick, discouraged."  Seldom, if ever, had or would the prospects for America gaining its independence seem darker.  See An Army of Skeletons . For a complete genealogy of this Clopton line, see  William Clopton of St. Paul’s Parish & His Wife Joyce Wilkinson of Black Creek.  For another story regarding Fauquier County, see Three Little Cloptons In Virginia.  The Fauquier County, Virginia, USGENWEB Homepage is found at http://www.surnames.com/burgess/fqva.htm

[3] True Index, Warrenton, Virginia, July 25, 1874

[4] John and Nathaniel agreed to pay their sister, Mary Ann, who lived in Warrenton with her husband and children, “one third part of the value of the land with interest thereon from the death of the said Sally G. Clopton at the rate of 6% per annum until paid.”

[5] Warrenton is the county seat

[6] Old Homes and Families of Fauquier County, Virginia, the W. P. A. Records, Virginia Book Company, Berryville, Virginia, p. 679.

[7] Old Homes, p. 679.  The Hickerson house was located “perhaps a quarter of a mile south of Remington on the neck of land between Route #651 and the Rappahannock River.”  Another house was built on that site by John Hickerson in 1890.  “Grassdale” was about two miles from the Rappahannock River and about two miles east of Remington as the crow flies.

[8] Old Homes, p. 679.  Notes his wife was Martha Burroughs.  She inherited “Water Dale” from her father.

[9] Old Homes, p. 679.  According to family tradition, following the War Mr. Hickerson, was eventually able to tame the horse.

[10] Old Homes, p. 680  [note:  “Grassdale” however, did burn in the 1920’s and was rebuilt on the same foundation.]

[11]Joseph Arthur Jeffries,  Directory of Warrenton In the Latter Part of the 1880’s, Information Gathered from the Papers of Joseph A. Jeffries, Index prepared in 1988-89 by Fauquier County Public Library volunteer Philip A. White. p. 134.  States “In the seventh decade of the present century.”

[12]Joseph Arthur Jeffries, p. 134.  Discussing a night spent camping, “only the few slept who had learned to do so a few years prior under cannon’s boom”

[13] Joseph Arthur Jeffries, p. 135