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The Clopton Chronicles

A Project of the Clopton Family Genealogical Society

 

 

 

A GOODLY SWEET CHILD

 

 

Regarding

 

Anne Clopton of Kentwell Hall & Her Husband

Simonds D’Ewes, Bart., of Stowlangtoft

 

By Suellen Clopton Blanton,[1] bblanton@fast.net

 

 

 

The Last Clopton

 

Nature made stones, but opinion jewels

 

Shortly after his marriage to Ann Clopton, Simonds D’Ewes[2] found himself with everything he had ever wished for:  a title, money, and a lovely old estate.  He was keenly aware that through his marriage to Anne he was now linked ‘either nearlie or more remotely to all the ancient nobilitie of England.’  But time ultimately revealed to him what really was, and was not, important.  One day he would lament, “I began to consider that this great affliction was sent upon me still to humble me more and more, and to wean me from the love of the profits and preferments of this life.”

Sir William Clopton[3] married Anne Barnardistone,[4] “a gentlewoman of exact beauty and comeliness and of exemplary piety.”[5]   He was Lord of the Manor of the magnificent Kentwell Estates, home of the Cloptons for hundreds of years.[6]  The young knight’s wife would die after four years of marriage, leaving an infant daughter, Anne.  Married a second time to Elizabeth Allington[7]  Sir William died at the age of twenty seven, leaving a widow, and no male heirs.  Anne, therefore, became the heir to Kentwell.

                Anne Clopton was carefully brought up by her maternal grandmother, Dame Anne Barnardistone.[8]  Simonds D’Ewes, twenty-four years old, ardently pursued her.  A slightly ridiculous love letter,[9] was fortunately, preserved.

 

 

Fairest,

Blest is the heart and hand that sends these meaner lines, if another heart and eye graciously deign to pity the wound that of the first and the numbness of the latter; and thus may this other poor inclosed carcanet, if not adorn the purer neck, yet lie hidden in the private cabinet of her whose humble sweetnness and sweet humility deserves the justest honor, the greatest thankfulness.  Nature made stones, but opinion jewels; this without your wilder acceptance and opinion, will prove neither stone nor jewel.  Do not but enhappy him that sent it, in the ordinary use of it, who, though unworthy in himself, resolves to continue our humble servant.

Simmonds d’Ewes

31st August 1626

 

 

                In his autobiography,[10] Sir Simonds gives a lengthy account of his romantic pursuit of the young woman.  It must be noted that he had not seen Anne since she was about seven years old.  Her primary appeal to him seemed to be that she was a “female inheratrice,” of great estates.  Because she was ten years and two months younger than himself, he also mused that it was less likely he would grow weary of her.  He also coveted the alliance such a marriage would bring him with the gentry of County Suffolk.  Although he had money, it was new money, and he needed the prestige of the old Clopton money to be accepted within the community, snobs every one.  The fact that she had been religiously educated was considered another plus.  He notes, “in her were met all those qualifications I desired to meet with in a wife,” and “nothing now remained to make up a full and happy conclusion to the business but our mutual consents and likings upon an interview.”

                The interview did take place shortly, and he was pleased by what he saw.  “Her person gave me absolute and full content as soon as I had seriously viewed it:  for though I had seen her twice or thrice, some seven years before in 1619, when she was a child, yet I did then little observe her, save in general I did well remember she was a pretty little thing.”

                But Dame Anne Barnardiston stood between he and his prey, and it was through her that he must negotiate.  Although she praised ‘the good beginninge of grace’ that she saw in him, pressed him to acquire a knighthood; such “litle additions,' she wrote delicately, might gain him 'further respecte amonkst her kindred.”  Indeed, On December 6, only weeks after his marriage, he received the honor of knighthood at Whitehall.   He realized he must be sensitive and most diplomatic to win his suit.  He was anxious to close the deal as soon as possible for “I feared some great offer might be made to tempt the old lady who was naturally as most of her sex, marvelous inconstant.”

It may have been his letter, or the collar set with jewels or precious stones, the “poor inclosed carcanet,” which did the trick, but he won her heart.  Not yet fifteen, the heiress of Kentwell, married her “humble servant.”[11] 

In this time when pedigree outranked achievement, Sir Simonds was, in fact, himself a snob of the first order.  Clopton kinsman, Robert Reyce,[12] was not impressed.  The Churchwarden and Lord of the Manor of Preston St. Mary, Reyce decorated the interior of his church with the Coats of Arms of his gentry neighbors in West Suffolk.  He was absorbed by heraldry and by the coat armor of families who reached back to the time of the Norman invasion.  Prominent among those shields is that of the Cloptons.  But there, in a very inferior location in Preston St. Mary church, in the base of the tower, Sir Simonds found his family arms were displayed, along with parish gentry of Suffolk, who were for the most part, lawyers and wool merchants.  Although a Puritan who eschewed heraldic display, he conducted a furious correspondence with Robert Reyce in a vain attempt to persuade him to move the arms to a more prominent position in the nave of the church.  Many of the arms have disappeared through the years; ironically, the D’Ewes arms still languish in the tower.

 

 

 

 

D’Ewes impaling Clopton

Displayed at Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford

 

 

Sir Simonds embarked on extensive study of the Clopton pedigree, and much of what we know about the ancient Cloptons has been obtained from his work.[13]  He was meticulous in his research, and resisted the temptation to accept the work of others without thoroughly investigating each claim.

 

Tuesday, January the 22nd [1633], I went to Burnhan, in Norfok, from Bury, to Sir John Tracy, Knt., who had married my wife’s mother-in-law,[14] who delivered unto me the same day, at night, a book in parchment, in folio, in divers ancient depicted coat-armours, and of many new drawn, some forty or fifty years before, of the several matched of the Cloptons and the kindred.  This book had been Sir William Clopton’s, my wife’s father, and was much esteemed by him, which made me very desirous to become master of it; in which, though I soon discovered divers errors in the latter’s depictions, yet I saw much good use might be made of it.[15]

 

                Robert Reyce, who shared Sir Simonds’ interest in genealogy also had some problems with the Clopton pedigree and so noted in his Suffolk in the XVIIth Century, The Breviary of Suffolk.[16]  It was a manuscript prepared and circulated amongst gentry friends in Suffolk and is one of the few surviving examples of a contemporary manuscript of antiquarian and genealogical interest.  The Clopton family is, indeed, lucky to have so much information upon which to draw.

 

 

Heavy Tears

 

. . . Monday he rendered up his blessed

and innocent soul into the hands of his

heavenly Father, and left me the most

sad and disconsolate father that could

possibly be.

 

 

Their first son, named Clopton d’Ewes, “a goodly sweet child,” died soon after his birth, “through the curesed ignorance or neglect of such as were employed about the lady during her confinement.”[17]  A touching memorial in the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Lavenham, Suffolk, is the “baby brass” located at the front of the altar rail.  It dates from 1631 and shows a small, mummy-like figure in its chrisom robe, a white square of linen, bound by a cere-cloth, signifying that he died during the first 30 days of life.  Only the face of the infant is seen.[18] 

 

 

The transcription of the Latin inscription reads:  “By untimely death, save that it was so decreed by Almighty God, was snatched away out of his miserable life the ninth day of July, ten days after his birth and four after his baptism, Clopton d’Ewes, Esquire, son and heir apparent of Symonds d’Ewes, Baronet, and lady Anne, his wife, only daughter and heiress of William Clopton, Military Officer: whose blessed soul imbued with faith by means best known to Himself, the Eternal father of mercies (as we fully trust) has given a place in the blessed choir of Saints in Heaven.”

 

 

 

                With the exception of royalty, it is unusual to find infant’s tombs inside churches dating back to medieval days, much less one boasting a monumental brass.[19]  The most touching element is how tiny the brass is resting on the floor.[20]  Everything in the church is so large.  Built from the wealth of the local clothiers, it is a massive monument filled with impressive furnishings.  And yet it is this delicate little piece, this evidence of genuine pain and abiding faith, that touches the heart.

 

 

 

 

St. Peter and St. Paul’s Church, Lavenham

 

 

                Lady Anne next gave birth to a daughter, Anne, who was living when, in 1633, tragedy struck again.

 

 

. . . Sunday, March the 10th [1633] about seven of the clock in the morning, my wife was safely delivered of two sons before her due time, in the eighth month, so as we enjoyed them but a few hours, to our great grief and sorrow.  Our only daughter Anne had fallen sick of the measles, on Monday, February 25th foregoing, of which disease, though she began to recover within two days after, yet my wife was so affrighted with fear of having the same sickness, in respect of her being with child, as she especially conceived that to have hastened the fatal abortion.  I feared also that she had received some hurt by traveling in her coach in Bury streets.

The discovery of some certain symptoms of death near approaching in the youngest, was the cause I had him baptized the same morning before divine service began, between seven and eight of the clock, in my wife’s chamber.  He was called Gerrardt, after mine own grandfather’s name.  He deceased the same afternoon, between twelve and one of the clock, and was carried in my coach to Lavenham, and there buried in the chancel on Tuesday, March the 12th, in his eldest brother’s grave.

On the 11th day of March, being Monday, was my eldest twin baptized also in my wife’s chamber, and called Adrian, being my father’s grandfather’s name.  The witnesses were, Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston, Knt., my wife’s cousin-german by her mother’s side, Wiseman Bokenham, Esq., my brother-in-law, and my youngest sister, Elizabeth D’Ewes, who had been with us the late festival time at Bury, was now at London expecting me;  for whose safety and business I had undertaken that trust, and this present unseasonable journey, and some others.  I cam safe thither the next day, well hoping of the continuance of the life of my little Adrian; but God, in his infinite wisdom and goodness, had otherwise decreed; and that tender infant rendered up his soul into His hands, March the 13th, Wednesday, much about the time and hour his brother Gerrardt D’Ewes had deceased on the Friday foregoing; and was interred, March the 14th, Thursday, in Lavenham chancel, also in the same grave with Clopton D’Ewes, his brother.[21]

 

 

                Baptism was an important sacrament.  Even midwives were allowed to baptize a child at birth if the child was in danger.  Unbaptised children were excluded from burial within consecrated ground.[22]

                Horrifically, within weeks after giving birth to twins, Lady Anne, now aged twenty one, was once again pregnant.

 

 

. . . I returned from London on Friday, March the 15th, [1633] very wet and weary, I found my dear wife all in tears and lamentations.  And though I were struck with a sad apprehension of mine own extreme losses, having buried now three sons, yet I comforted her what I might, and concealed part of my grief and disconsolation from her.

I spent Saturday, November the 14th, in religious exercises with my wife and the greatest number of my family.  She was now big with child, and near her time, and much affrighted, November the 24th, being Tuesday, about eight of the clock at night, when I was sitting with her by the fire in our little parlor at Stow Hall, because she suddenly felt that humour which usually followed the birth of her former children; so as she certainly feared it would be fatal to herself or her child.  That humour intermitting its course awhile after, she slept well some part of the night, and was not delivered of her second daughter till between eight and nine of the clock the next day, in the evening.

The child was so ill, (although my wife was very safe and well,) as fearing it would have speedily died, we sent for Mr. Danford, the minister of the town, who baptized it about nine of the clock, in my wife’s chamber, some half an hour after the birth.  I caused it, in memory of my dear mother, to be named Cecilia, and she still remaineth, this present 1638, in the life and health, a great comfort to us.[23]

 

 

Upon her marriage to Sir Thomas D’Arcy, daughter Cecillia, took up residence at Kentwell,[24] about three miles from Lavenham.[25]  They had one child who died, and Cecillia herself died when she was thirty.  Sir Thomas, his wife’s heir, inherited Kentwell Estate.  He married again and had another nine children, six of whom died young.  In his grief, he blamed the estate for his misfortunes, and sold it in 1676 to Sir Thomas Robinson.

                Eight months after the birth of Cecillia, Lady Anne gave birth to another son, also named Clopton.

 

 

[I remember] the loss of my most dear, tender, and only son, Clopton D’Ewes, being one year and nine months old.  I have before shewed, in July, 1634, when he was born, that by our [hiring] a proud, fretting, ill-conditioned woman for a nurse, it was doubtless the chief cause of his falling into fits of convulsions – for the remedying of which an issue had been opened in his neck, and divers other means had been used; but those means having been too violently and unskilfully applied by Dr. Despotine, and Italian physician in Bury, so wasted the young and weak body of the sweet child, as it drove him into another disease, called the rickets, by which his lower parts consumed and wasted away, and his life was no less endangered than by his epileptic fits:  so as he rested unquietly each night almost, for two or three months before he deceased, which made all persons of judgment that saw him give him up for a dead child, although I and my dear wife still fed ourselves with hope that he might recover.

Forty and four convulsion fits he had undergone from the 3rd of April, in the year 1635, to the 4th of March then next ensuing being near upon a year’s space, although they came thicker at some times than at others.  But the 8th day of this instant May, being Sunday, he had one convulsion fit, a little before two of the clock in the afternoon, of which I fearing no great danger went to Hunston Church, being near me.  A little after my return, between five and six of the clock the same day, he had two other fits, in an instant almost one after the other, which he never had before, but that always there had been some [intervening] distance of half an hour or more between them.

Before six of the clock the ensuing morning at times he was assaulted with twelve fits more, amongst which some were so long and terrible, as his very heart-strings seemed to break within him.  I was near him all the time, bestowing my heavy tears, deep sights, and humble prayers, upon him.  From the said hour of six till about two in the afternoon he lay drawing on for the most part quietly, about which hour the same Monday he rendered up his blessed and innocent soul into the hands of his heavenly Father, and left me the most sad and disconsolate father that could possibly be – so as I had no other comfort for the present but in my good God, on whom I looked as the author of this chastisement, and therefore fled by prayers for supportation and consolation; and though I wanted my dear wife to mourn with me (who had departed from Stow Hall on Thursday, May the 5th, and was now at London, little dreaming of the loss which had befallen her), yet even that want ministered some comfort unto me, being glad she was absent from those terrors and dolours I had been sensible of, which would even have oppressed her tender heart.

On Tuesday morning, May the 10th, between eight and nine of the clock, was my deceased infant’s corpse buried in Stowlangtoft chancel, close to the west end of my father’s gravestone.  I had spent Saturday, May the 7th, in my ordinary course of religious fasting and humiliation, and therein especially and purposely interceded with God for the life of my poor and affectionate infant who loved me most ardently; and now that I had lost him, I began to consider that this great affliction was sent upon me still to humble me more and more, and to wean me from the love of the profits and preferments of this life.  I had also some more sad presaging thoughts that God would not vouchsafe me any male offspring to leave behind me, to inherit my name and perpetuate my family:  nay, I began to consider that a higher Providence might ere long call me to suffer for his name and Gospel, or might prepare a way for my passage into America.[26]  I desired in all to submit to God’s will, and often implored this mercy of him – that I might never suffer as an evil-doer, and that he would never lay more upon me in suffering for a good cause than I should be able to bear.

Saturday, May the 14th, I rode early in the morning from Stow Hall to Much Bromley, in the county of Essex, to my brother and sister Bowes,[27] whither I cam about ten of the clock the same forenoon, and found my loving sister there, especially sympathizing with me in my tears and condolements, which the same day in the evening met with a more hearty mourner also; for about six of the clock that afternoon, my wife, accompanied with my brother and sister Poley,[28] was returned so far homewards from London.  I looked out of the south window of the dining-room upon her, as she entered into the inner court, and saw her look so cheerfully and confidently, as I muc pitied her in respect of her near approaching lamentation.  She yet knew nothing of her inestimable loss, nor of my being there; which made her, as soon as she came into the dining-room and saw me, instantly to fall a-shaking, and, scarce being able to speak in respect of the abundance of tears that issued from her, intermixed with many sobs, preventing my said relation, by interrupting me with, “Is the boy dead?”

I had not yet spent my store of sorrow so far, but that I could have joined afresh in lamenting with my dearest; but being desirous to minister comfort to her, I suppressed the outward expressions of mine own grief as much as possibly I could, and used the best arguments I had to mould and frame her to patience and moderation.  We both found the sorrow for the loss of this child, on whom we had bestowed so much care and affection, and whose delicate favour and bright grey eye was so deeply imprinted in our hearts, far to surpass our grief for the decease of his three elder brothers, who, dying almost as soon as they were born, were not so endeared to us as this was:  and as I ended the third book of my life with the relation of the death of my father, so I will shut up this with the decease of my sweet and only son.

 

 

A baronetcy was conferred on Sir Simonds July 15, 1641.  His enjoyment of this honor was short lived; Lady Anne died of smallpox two weeks later at the age of twenty nine after an illness of ten days.  Although their marriage had been arranged, his writings indicated he deeply loved her.  He married as his second wife Elizabeth Willoughby, the daughter of Sir Henry Willoughby, Baronet, of Risley in Derbyshire.  He died at Stowlangtoft Hall on April 8, 1650.  Their son, Willoughby, succeeded Sir Simonds in his title and estates.  The baronetcy became extinct in 1731.[29]

               

 

 

 

        1.  William15 Clopton, Knt, of Kentwell Hall  (Thomas14, William13, John12, William11, John10, William9, Thomas8, Walter7, William6, Walter5, William4, Walter3, William2, Guillaume1 Peche, Lord Of Cloptunna and Dalham) was born February 27, 1591/92 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened March 13, 1592 at Holy Trinity1, and died March 4, 1617/18 in Horsheath, Cambridge and buried Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford, March 12, 1618 in the Clopton Chapel2.  He married (1) Anne Barnardistone, of Clare January 1, 1609/10 in Clare Church, County Suffolk, England3, daughter of Thomas Barnardistone, Knt..  She was born Abt. 1595 in Clare, County Suffolk, England and baptized November 7, 1605 at Clare Church4, and died February 4, 1614/15 in England and buried Holy Trinity Church, February 1615 in the Clopton Chapel5.  He married (2) Elizabeth Allington, of Horsheath, Lady Clopton6 Aft. 1615, daughter of Giles Allington, Knt. of Horseheath. 

       

Child of William Clopton and Anne Barnardistone is:

+      2                 i.    Anne16 Clopton, of Kentwell Hall, born Abt. March 1611/12 in Clare, County Suffolk, and baptized March 2, 1612; died Abt. August 1, 1641.

       

Children of William Clopton and Elizabeth Allington are:

        3                 i.    Edward16 Clopton, of Kentwell Hall7, born Abt. August 1618 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened August 25, 1618, at Holy Trinity; died Abt. September 1618 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and buried Holy Trinity Church September 12, 16188.

        4                ii.    William Clopton, of Kentwell Hall, born Abt. 1619 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened September 1, 1619, at Holy Trinity9.

 

 

Generation No. 2

 

        2.  Anne16 Clopton, of Kentwell Hall (William15, Thomas14, William13, John12, William11, John10, William9, Thomas8, Walter7, William6, Walter5, William4, Walter3, William2, Guillaume1 Peche, Lord Of Cloptunna and Dalham) was born Abt. March 1611/12 in Clare, County Suffolk, and baptized March 2, 161210, and died Abt. August 1, 1641.  She married Simonds D'Ewes, Bart. October 24, 1626 in Blackfriars Church11, son of Paul D'Ewes and Cecilia Simonds.  He was born December 18, 1602 in Chardstock Parish, Dorsetshire, at Coxden12, and died April 8, 1650 in Stowlangtoft Hall, Lavenham, County Suffolk.

 

Children of Anne Clopton and Simonds D'Ewes are:

        5                 i.    Clopton17 D'Ewes I, born Abt. 1627; died Abt. July 10, 1631 in Lavenham and buried in the chancel of St. Peter and St. Paul Church, Lavenham, July 10, 163113.

        6                ii.    Anne D'Ewes14, born Bet. 1628 and 1630.

        7               iii.    Adrian D'Ewes, born March 10, 1632/33 in Bury St. Edmund and baptized in his mother's chambers March 11, 1632/3315; died March 14, 1632/33 in Bury St. Edmunds and buried at St. Peter and St. Paul Church, Lavenham, March 14, 1632 in the chancel in his eldest brother's grave16.

        8               iv.    Geeradt D'Ewes, born March 10, 1632/33 in Bury St. Edmunds, County Suffolk and baptized in his mother's chambers March 10, 1632/3317; died Abt. March 12, 1632/33 in Bury St. Edmunds, and buried in the chancel in his brother's grave at St. Peter and St. Paul Church, Lavenham March 12,163218.

        9                v.    Cecillia D'Ewes, of Kentwell Hall, Lady Darcy, born November 25, 1633 in Stow Hall, County Suffolk19; died May 29, 1661 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and buried Holy Trinity Church June 166120.  She married Thomas Darcy, Knt. & Baronette.

        10             vi.    Clopton D'Ewes II, born July 1634; died May 9, 1636 in Stow Hall, County Suffolk and buried May 10, 1636, Stowlangtoft chancel, close to the west end of his grandfather's gravestone21.

        11            vii.    Isolda D'Ewes.

 

 

Endnotes

 

1.  Long Melford Register of Baptisms, 1559-1774,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), March 1592.  "Wm. Clopto, sonn to Thomas Clopto, Esq., was bap. the 13th of this month, and borne the 27th of ffebruary."

2.  Howard, et al., The Cloptons of Suffolk, The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 7, Extracts from Melford Registers commencing 1559.  "1618.  March.  Sir Wm. Clopton, Knt. was bur. the 12th."  Inscription on monument in the Clopton chapel - Here lyeth interred the bodies of Sr. William Clopton, Knight, who died the --- day of March, in the yeare of our Lord, 1618, and of his age 27; And of Dame Anne his first wife, the daughter of Sir Thomas Barnardiston, of Clare, Knt., who had by ye said Sr. William one daughter, and died the 4th day of February, the 20th year of her age, 1615.

3.  Howard, et al., The Cloptons of Suffolk, The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 9, Extracts from Clare Registers commencing 1558.  "A.D. 1610.  Januarii.  Master William Clopton, sone and heire to the right worshipfull Master Thos. Clopton et Mistress Ann Barnardiston, daughter to the right worshipful Sir Thomas Barnardiston, knt., was married in Clare church, the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand six hundred and ten."

4.  Howard, et al., The Cloptons of Suffolk, The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 9, Extracts from Clare Registers commencing 1558.  "Mistres Ann Barnardiston, filia to the right worshipfull Sir Thos. Barnardiston, knt., baptized the seventh day of November, in the year of our Lord 1605."

5.  Howard, et al., The Cloptons of Suffolk, The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 7, 9, Extracts from Melford Registers commencing 1559.  "1615.  February.  The Lady wiffe of Sir Wm. Clopto' Knt., was bur."  Extracts from Clare Registers commencing 1558.  "That verteous and righte worshipfull Lady An Cloptone, wyffe and Lady to the righte worshipfull Sir William Cloptone, whiche Lade deaceased the fourth day of February, A.D. 1615, and lieth buried in Melford Chapel.

6.  Second husband of Sir William Clopton.

7.  Long Melford Register of Baptisms, 1559-1774,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), August 1618. " Edward, son to the Rt. worshipful Sr Wm. Clopton, Knt., was baptized ye 25th."

8.  Howard, et al., The Cloptons of Suffolk, The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 7, Extracts from Melford Registers Commencting 1557, "1618, Edward, the sonn to the right wors'p Sir Will. clopton, Knt., was bur. ye 12th day."

9.  Howard, et al., The Cloptons of Suffolk, The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 7, Extracts from Melford Reigsters commencing 1559.  "1619.  September.  William, son to Sir Wm. Clopton, Knt., was bap. the first day."  Notes by editors "This son was born afgter his father's death.  The widow being his 2nd wife, Elizabeth, da. of Sir Giles Allington, of Horsehealth, Knt., and widow of Sir Henry Pallavicine, by whom he had two sons who died infants.  She marr. a 3rd husband, Sir John Tracy, Knt.".

10.  Howard, et al., The Cloptons of Suffolk, The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 9, Extracts from Clare Registers commencing 1558.  "Mystres Ann Clopton, daughter to Master William Clopton, Esquire, was baptized in Clare Church, the 2nd day of March, A.D., 1612."

11.  Dictionary of National Biography, p. 902.

12.  Dictionary of National Biography, p. 900.

13.  Lavenham Registers of St. Peter and St. Paul Church, Commencing 1558,  (Courtesy Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), Burials:  "1631.  July 10.  Clopton, son of Sr. Simonds D'Ewes, Bart.

14.  D'Ewes, The Autobiography of Simonds D'Ewes,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 88, Refers to "our only daughter Anne."

15.  D'Ewes, The Autobiography of Simonds D'Ewes,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), Volume II, p. 88-89, "Sunday, March the 10th about seven of the clock in the morning, my wife was safely delivered of two sons before her due time, in the eight month, so as we enjoyed them but a few hours, to our great grief and sorrow."  and "On the 11th day of March, being Monday, was my eldest twin baptized also in my wife's chamber, and called Adrian, being my father's grandfather's name.  The witnesses were, Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston, Knt., my wife's cousin-german by her mother's side, Wiseman Bokeham, Esq., my borother-in-law, and my youngest sister, Elizabeth D'Ewes."

16.  Lavenham Registers of St. Peter and St. Paul Church, Commencing 1558,  (Courtesy Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), Burials:  "1632.  March.  Geerardt D'Ewes, being the younger of two twinns, and the thirde sonne of Sr. Simonds D'Ewes, and Dame Anne D'Ewes, his wife, was buried March 12.  Adrian D'Ewes, the elder twinne, and second sonne of the same Sr. Simonds and Dame Anne, was buried March 14."

17.  D'Ewes, The Autobiography of Simonds D'Ewes,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), Volume II, p. 89, "The discovery of some certain syumptoms of death near approaching in the youngest, was the cause I had him baptized the same morning before divine service began, between seven and eight of the clock, in my wife's chamber.  He was called Geerardt, after mine own grandfather's name."

18.  "He deceased the same afternoon, between twelve and one of the clock, and was carried in my coach to Lavenham, and there buried in the channcel on Tuesday, March the 12th, in his eldest brother's grave."

19.  D'Ewes, The Autobiography of Simonds D'Ewes,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), ".... (she was) delivered of her second daughter (between) eight and nine of the clock (November 25), in the evening.  The child was so ill, although my wife were very safe and well, as fearing it would have speedily died, we sent for Mr. Danford, the minister of the town, who baptized it about nine of the clock, in my wife's chamber, some half an hour after the birth.  I caused it, in memory of my dear mother, to be named Cecilia. . ."

20.  Howard, et al., The Cloptons of Suffolk, The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 7, Extracts from Melford Reigsters commencing 1559.  "1661.  June.  The Honored Lady Cicilla, and wife to Sir Thomas Darcey, Knt. and Barronett, bur, ye first."  Editors note states "only child of Sir Symonds D'Ewes and Anne Clopton.  In the Clopton chapel, Melford church, on a black marble slab (with the arms of Darcy, impaling D'Ewes quartering Clopton) is the following inscription:  -- This preserves the memory of Dame Sissillia, wife of Sr. Thos. Darcy, Bart., whom he had by Anne, ye sole daughter and heire of Sir William Clopton, Knt., who deceased the 29th day of May, MDCLXL."

21.  D'Ewes, The Autobiography of Simonds D'Ewes,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 145.

 

 

 

        1.  Paul1 D'Ewes, Esq., of Milden, County Suffolk1 died March 1630/312.  He married Cecilia Simonds, of Coxden, Dorsetshire3. 

       

Children of Paul D'Ewes and Cecilia Simonds are:

        2                 i.    Simonds2 D'Ewes, Bart., born December 18, 1602 in Chardstock Parish, Dorsetshire, at Coxden3; died April 8, 1650 in Stowlangtoft Hall, Lavenham, County Suffolk.  He married (1) Anne Clopton, of Kentwell Hall October 24, 1626 in Blackfriars Church4; born Abt. March 1611/12 in Clare, County Suffolk, and baptized March 2, 16125; died Abt. August 1, 1641.  He married (2) Elizabeth Willoughby6 Abt. 1642.

        3                ii.    Mary D'Ewes7.  She married Thomas Bowes, Knt, of Much Bromley, County Essex.

        4               iii.    Elizabeth D'Ewes8.  She married William Poley, Knt., of Boxted Hall, Suffolk March 15, 1633/349.

        5               iv.    Richard D'Ewes10.

 

 

Endnotes

 

1.  Dictionary of National Biography, p. 900.

2.  Dictionary of National Biography, p. 901.

3.  Dictionary of National Biography, p. 900.

4.  Dictionary of National Biography, p. 902.

5.  Howard, et al., The Cloptons of Suffolk, The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 9, Extracts from Clare Registers commencing 1558.  "Mystres Ann Clopton, daughter to Master William Clopton, Esquire, was baptized in Clare Church, the 2nd day of March, A.D., 1612."

6.  Dictionary of National Biography, p. 902.

7.  D'Ewes, The Autobiography of Simonds D'Ewes,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 146.

8.  D'Ewes, The Autobiography of Simonds D'Ewes,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 89, Refers to her as "my youngest sister."

9.  D'Ewes, The Autobiography of Simonds D'Ewes,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 127.

10.  D'Ewes, The Autobiography of Simonds D'Ewes,  (Courtesy of Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton), p. 89, Refers to "my brother, Richard D'Ewes."

 

 

 

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[1] A Goodly Sweet Child is an excerpt from The Ancestors and Descendants of Sir Thomas Clopton, Knight & Dame Katherine Mylde, and is the property of the Clopton Family Genealogical Society which holds the copyright on this material.  Permission is granted to quote or reprint articles for noncommercial use provided credit is given to the CFGS and to the author.  Prior written permission must be obtained from the Society for commercial use.

Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton is Founder and Executive Director of The Clopton Family Genealogical Society & Clopton Family Archives.

Special thanks to Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.; Sally W. Burkman, Documents Librarian, Social Science Reference Center, Firestone Library, Princeton University;  Jane Cummins, Search Room Assistant, Suffolk Records Office, Bury St. Edmund’s, County Suffolk, England; Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Phillips, “Kentwell Hall,” Long Melford, County Suffolk, England; Bruce M. Rodenberger, M.D., Sacred Heart OB/GYN, Allentown, Pennsylvania;  (The Reverend Cannon) Christopher J. Sansbury, Rector until 2000 of the Parish of Long Melford, County Suffolk, England, including Holy Trinity Church with St. Catherine’s and Visiting Priest with Shimpling and Alpheton; and,  Martin Wood, LL.B., M.A., author and historian living in Groton, County Suffolk, England, who serves on the United Kingdom Editorial Board, The Winthrop Papers, A Project of the Massachusetts Historical Society

Also thanks to Clopton descendants James M. McMillen and Isabel Lancaster (Clopton) Steiner.

[2] The son of Paul D’Ewes, Esq., and his wife, Cecilia Simonds, an abbreviated genealogy follows.

[3] The son of Thomas Clopton, the Younger, of Kentwell Hall, and his wife, Mary Waldegrave, of Smallbridge, County Suffolk, an abbreviated genealogy follows.

[4] The daughter of Thomas Barnardistone, Knt.  The name is sometimes spelled Barnardiston in ancient documents.  The Barnardistones are an ancient family.  The family continued as patrons of both the Rectory of Kedington (Ketton) and the Barnardiston Rectory for over 400 years.  They resided much of the time in Lincolnshire and were patrons of Gt. Cotes.  they were sheriffs and representatives in parliament for that county at different periods.  This accounts for the pedigree not being entered in the "Suffolk Visitation of 1561."

[5] Suffolk Manorial Families, Being the County Visitations and other Pedigrees, Edited with Extensive Additions by Joseph James Muskett, Corresponding Member of the Historic Genealogical Society of New England, Privately Printed, William Pollard & Co., Inc., Exeter, 1900, p. 181

[6] The estate was acquired by Sir Thomas Clopton (1382-1383) through marriage.  The main house, Kentwell Hall, which is still standing, was begun in 1520 and completed about 1560.  See The Place of the Lutons:  Kanewella.

[7] Suffolk Manorial Families, p. 181, the daughter of Giles Allington, Knt., of Horseheath and widow of Sir Henry Pallavicini, of Barbraham,

[8] Mary Walsingham, of Scadbury, County Kent, daughter of Edward Walsingham, Lieutenant of the Tower, the wife of Thomas Barnardistone, Knt., of Kedington.  See The Visitation of Suffolk 1561 Made by William Hervy, Charenceux King of Arms, Transcribed and Edited by Joan Corder, F.S.A., London, 1981; The Visitations of Suffolk Made by Hervey, Charenceux, 1561, Cooke, Clarenceux, 1577, and Raven, Richmond Herald, 1612, with Notes and an Appendix of Additional Suffolk Pedigrees, Walter C. Metcalfe, F.S.A., Editor, Privately printed for the Editor by William Pollard, Exeter, 1882; and, The Cloptons of Suffolk, Extracted from The Visitation of Suffolke, Joseph Jackson Howard, Esq., LL.D., F.S.A., &c. and William Henry Hart, Esq., F.S.A., &c., Editors, Samuel Tymms, Lowestoft, M.DCCC.LXV, for the Barnardiston-Walsingham Pedigree.

[9] Sir Simonds was very proud of this letter and preserved a copy of it in his autobiography as “a letter . . . which being the only lines I sent her during my wooing-time and but short, I have thought good to insert in this place.”  British Library Manuscripts.  Letters, Sir Simmonds d’Ewes to Anne Clopton at Clare Priory.  31st August 1626.  D’Ewes Papers, BL. Harl. Ms 127 & 385, fo.23.  A typed copy located Clopton Family Archives courtesy of Martin Wood, LL.B., M.A.  A transcript of the letter is also included in The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D’Ewes, Bart., During the Reigns of James I. And Charles I., James Orchard Halliwell, Esq., F.R.S., F.S.A., Hon. M.R.I.A., Hon. M.R.S.I., Etc., Richard Bentley, London, 1845.  The British Museum contains a large collection of D’Ewes’ writings and voluminous transcripts from monastic registers, early wills and records which constitute a very valuable source for the history of English antiquities and law.

[10] The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D’Ewes, Bart., During the Reigns of James I. And Charles I., James Orchard Halliwell, Esq., F.R.S., F.S.A., Hon. M.R.I.A., Hon. M.R.S.I., Etc., Richard Bentley, London, 1845.  D’Ewes was educated at St. John's college, Cambridge under the tutorship of Richard Holdsworth, his greatest work is considered by scholars the parliamentary history of Queen Elizabeth's reign.  See Dictionary of National Biography, Founded in 1882 by George Smith; Sir Leslie Stephen and Sir Sidney Lee, Editors; Published since 1917 by the Oxford University Press, London: Humphrey Milford, Volume V, p. 900-903 for an overview of his life and career.

[11] Suffolk Manorial Families, p. 181, states that before her marriage to D’Ewes, negotiations appear to have been entered into for her marriage to the eldest son of Sir Thomas Coventry, the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, and with James Fiennes, son of Lord Say and Sele.

[12] His sister, Margaret Reyce, of Preston, County Suffolk, married John Clopton, of Monks Eleigh, County Suffolk.

[13] Harleian Manuscripts.  The Harleian Library is a manuscript collection of more than 7,000 volumes and more than 14,000 original legal documents, compiled by Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford, and his son, Edward, 2nd Ear of Oxford.  In 1753 the collection was purchased for 10,00 pounds by the British government and with the collections of Sir Robert Bruce Cotton and Sir Hans Sloane, comprised the basis of the British Museum Library.  Included in the Harleian Manuscripts are the Clopton family papers formed by Sir Simonds D’Ewes.  Sir Simonds married Ann Clopton and subsequently compiled a genealogy of the family from papers found at Kentwell Hall, the Clopton family’s home at Long Melford, County Suffolk.

[14] He is referring to his wife’s stepmother,  Elizabeth Allington, who married John Tracy, Knt. Of Burnham, County Norfolk, following the death of Anne’s father, William Clopton.

[15], The Autobiography of Simonds D’Ewes, p. 87-88.

[16] Robert Robert, Suffolk in the XVIIth Century, The Breviary of Suffolk, reprint with notes by Lord Francis Hervey, John Murray, London, 1902.  The “Breviary” of Robert Reyce was probably written in the period 1603-1618.  This 1902 edition is based on the original manuscript in the British Library. 

[17] The Autobiography of Simonds D’Ewes.  For a discussion of childbirth, see Brief Communion,  See Black Death for a discussion of infant and children deaths.

[18] Richard LeStrange, A Complete Descriptive Guide to British Monumental Brasses, Thames and Hudson, Guildford and London, 1972, p. 14. 

[19] See Five Centuries In Christ, The Great Church of the Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford for a discussion on burial practices.

[20] It is found on the floor just west of the sanctuary rail.

[21] The Autobiography of Simonds D’Ewes, p. 88-89.

[22] Christopher Daniell, Death and Burial in Medieval England, 1066-1550, Routledge, London and New York, 1998, p. 127, notes a 1398 royal license was given to enclose Hereford Cathedral cemetery, in part, to stop “the secret burials of unbaptised infants.”

[23] The Autobiography of Simonds D’Ewes, p. 126.

[24] While Sir Simonds was very proud of Kentwell Estate, he preferred Stowlangtoft Hall, and lived there most of the time. 

[25] As the crow flies, according to Ordnance Survey, Pathfinder 1029, Sudbury & Lavenham, Ordance Survey, Southampton, Great Britain, Crown copyright, 1993.  2 1/2 inches to one mile.  Ancient footpaths and bridleways still crisscross between Long Melford and Lavenham. 

[26] This was the time when the Puritans were leaving the religious persecution in England for America.  See A Brief Communion.

[27] His sister, Mary, married Thomas Bowes, Knit., of Much Bromley, County Essex.  Sir Thomas was a notorious witch-persecutor.  Her son edited the manuscript work of Sir Simonds’, entitled The Journals of all the Parliaments during the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, both of the House of Lords and House of Commons.”

[28] His sister, Elizabeth, married William Poley, Knt., of Boxted Hall, County Suffolk.

[29]Dictionary of National Biography, Founded in 1882 by George Smith; Sir Leslie Stephen and Sir Sidney Lee, Editors; Published since 1917 by the Oxford University Press, London: Humphrey Milford, p. 902.