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Clopton Family Genealogical Society

 

 

 

CLOPTON LINKS IN CYBERSPACE

 

 

 

 

Revised February 6, 2001

 

 

 

Before you plan your Dead Clopton Tour, you must visit the Suffolk County Council site, http://www.suffolkcc.gov.uk/ .   This is your one stop shopping place supplying you with all the information you will need to organize a visit to our ancestral homeland.  Hint!  Plan to stay at Long Melford, County Suffolk, http://www.longmelford.co.uk/frontpage.html , where you will find more dead Cloptons than any other place in England.  The lovely medieval village of Long Melford boasts several wonderful old hotels and many enchanting bed and breakfasts and a town filled with people who bend over backwards to make the visitor’s stay special.  Another helpful stop is found at http://www.SmoothHound.co.uk/hotels/theredh.html.  This will take you to a listing of the best of Great Britain’s Bed and Breakfast and Hotel lodging beginning with The Red House in Cavendish, about four miles west of Long Melford.  

 

The Clopton family ancestral church, Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford, County Suffolk, http://www.stedmundsbury.anglican.org/longmelford/index.html , has a very active membership and no self-respecting Clopton descendant should miss the opportunity to stop by for a tour of this historical and beautiful church.

 

The official site of Kentwell Hall, the magnificent ancestral home of the Clopton family in Long Melford, County Suffolk, England, is found at http://www.kentwell.co.uk/map.htm.  This site features a lovely selection of photographs of Kentwell Estates.  A second site featuring a number of photographs of the estate is found at http://www.brentwoodit.demon.co.uk/kentwell.htm .

 

Those who are researching Suffolk County roots will find membership in the Suffolk Family History Society, http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/SFK/sfhs/sfhs.htm  invaluable.  The Society has thoughtfully set up membership agents in many countries so that dues may be paid in the currency of the applicant and/or member.

 

Roger Alan Bartlett, Esq., a descendant of Walter Clopton, The Elder, of “Callowell,” and his wife, Mary Jarratt by Benjamin Michaux Clopton, C.S.A., of Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tennessee, and Navarro County, Texas and his wife, Mary Elizabeth McLin, is the webmaster of The Jesse Bartlett and Frances Callaway Bartlett web site at http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~bartlett/bartlett-jesse-homepage.htm

 

The Clopton Family Association, http://www.seanet.com/~clopton/  is an organization dedicated to the descendants of Virginia’s William Clopton and his wife, Ann Booth.  The club sponsors regional reunions and bi-yearly national reunions.  Members receive a newsletter at least three times a year featuring reunion information and announcements of Clopton births, marriages and deaths.   Fund raising activities are devoted to the restoration and preservation of churches with historical connections to the Clopton family.

 

Carole Elizabeth Scott, Ph.D., a descendant of William Clopton, of St. Paul’s Parish, and his wife, Joyce Wilkinson, of Black Creek, by Alford Clopton, M.D., of New Kent County, Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia, and Tuskegee, Macon County, Alabama, and his wife, Sarah Kendrick, of Putnam County.  In addition to her Clopton lines, she is researching the ancestors and descendants of John McGough, of White Plains, Georgia, and his wife, Elizabeth Carson.  Dr. Scott is the webmaster of The McGough Family Page at http://www.westga.edu/~scott/gene/mcgough.html; as well as The Laissez Fair Page, http://www.westga.edu/~csott; Southron Ring, http://members.tripod.com/~car0lesc0tt; and, a counterfactual history, entitled Clopton’s Short History of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1925, at http://www.members.tripod.com/~car0lesc0tt/clopton.html

 

Upon the death of Judge David C. Clopton, in 1892, a great flurry of commentary blanketed newspapers throughout the South.  In addition to the expected recitation of his career, his ancestry from a “conspicuous Virginia Family,” was duly noted, and, oddly, the shape of his head, complexion and eyes received praise.  Of his wives, it was his third who is best remembered, the unflappable Virginia Caroline Tunstall, widow of Clement Claiborne Clay, who was himself, a descendant of the ancient Cloptons.  Virginia wrote a book entitled A Belle of the Fifties:  Memoirs of Mrs. Clay, of Alabama, Covering Social and Political Life in Washington and the South,  1825-1915.  The complete text plus photographs are found at http://metalab.unc.edu/docsouth/clay/clay.html   Boasting 255 pages it takes a couple of minutes to open so be patient!

 

Descendants of Walter Clopton, The Elder, of “Callowell,” and his wife, Mary Jarratt by Susannah Clopton of Goochland County, Virginia and her husband, Philemon Bradford, Sr., of Granville County, North Carolina won’t want to miss The Bradfords of Charles City County, Virginia and Some of Their Descendants 1653-1993, by David Thomas Bradford, at http://www.members.home.net/kylawyer/

 

Cemetery Records Online, http://interment.net/  has a listing of Cloptons buried in cemeteries.  They also provide links to obituaries on line.

 

Descendants of Sarah Elizabeth (Reid) Saffold, daughter of  Marianne Clopton and her husband, Andrew Reid, featured in the essay Tempest In The Briar Patch, will find a visit to the Saffold Family Society at http://home.earthlinnk.net/~msaffold/sfshmpg.htm well worth the time.

 

Michael D. Gorman created and maintains a website, “Civil War Richmond,” at http://www.mdgorman.com/  which includes  information relating to the Clopton Hospital which was founded by the wife of The Honorable John Bacon Clopton’s wife, Maria Gaitskell Foster, the subject of the essay, “In Praise of Mint Juleps.”  The index to this material is found at http://www.mdgorman.com/clopton_hospital.htm

 

 

 

 

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