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The Clopton Chronicles

A Project of the Clopton Family Genealogical Society

 

 

 

Regarding

 

The Descendants of William deTendring, Knt., of Tendering Hall &

His Wife Dame Katherine Mylde

 

The First Eleven Generations

 

 

Compiled By

Suellen Clopton Blanton,[1] bblanton@fast.net

 

 

 

The information contained in the following genealogy must be judged on the evidence submitted supporting each claim.  Any additional information which will add to our knowledge of this family will be gratefully accepted.

 

Katherine Mylde married first, Sir Thomas.  Following Sir Thomas’ death, Dame Katherine married Sir William deTendring, Knt., of Tendering Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk.  It is believed those claiming Clopton ancestry through William Clopton, Gentleman, of Eastwood, County Essex, and York (now New Kent) County, Virginia and his wife, Ann (Booth) Dennett are descendants of both these marriages.

 

Katherine Mylde + William deTendring

Alice deTendring + John Howard

Henry Howard + Mary Hussey

Elizabeth Howard + Henry Wentworth

Margaret Wentworth + William Waldegrave

George Waldegrave + Anne Drury

Edward Waldegrave + Joan Acworth

Margery Waldegrave + William Clopton

Walter Clopton + Margery Maidstone

William Clopton + Elizabeth Sutcliffe

William Clopton + Ann Booth

 

 

Of interest to those who claim descent from the Claiborne family of Virginia is another line from Katherine Mylde and her second husband, William deTendring:

 

Katherine Mylde + William deTendring

Alice deTendring + John Howard

Robert Howard + Margaret Mowbray

John Howard + Katherine Moleyns

Thomas Howard + Elizabeth Tylney

Elizabeth Howard + Thomas Boleyn

Mary Boleyn + William Carey

Mary Carey + Francis Knolleys

Anne Knolleys + Thomas West

John West, of “West’s Point,” Governor of Virginia + Anne Claiborne

John West, Jr. + Ursula Croshaw

Anne West + Henry Fox

Ann Fox + Thomas Claiborne, Jr., of “Sweet Hall”

 

 

Of interest to those claiming descent from the Mapes family of Southold, Suffolk County Long Island, New York from Katherine Mylde and her second husband, William deTendring:

 

Katherine Mylde + William deTendring

Alice deTendring + John Howard

Robert Howard + Margaret Mowbray

John Howard + Katherine Moleyns

Thomas Howard + Agnes Tylney

Anne Howard + John de Vere

John de Vere + Elizabeth Trussel

Elizabeth de Vere + Thomas Darcy

Mary Darcy + Richard Southwell

Richard Southwell + Bridget Copley

Katherine Southwell + Leonard Mapes

Francis Mapes + Anna Loveday

Thomas Mapes + Sarah Purrier

               

 

 

The Church of Saint Mary, Stoke by Nayland, County Suffolk, is located about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh.  It is next to the timber framed guildhall and is considered one of the loveliest and most ornate churches in Suffolk.  The north chapel is the earliest, dating from the early 14th century.  Brass funeral effigies in the south chapel include those of Dame Katherine Mylde, the widow of Sir Thomas Clopton, and the second wife of Sir William de Tendring, whose brass is near by.  Also in the south chapel are the brasses of their daughter, Lady Alice de Tendring and her husband Sir John Howard.  Near by is brass of Lady Katherine Moleyns, the wife of their grandson, Sir John Howard.  The Register dates from 1545.

 

 

 

Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, was the family home of the Howards, Dukes of Norfolk when they were not imprisoned in the Tower of London.  This castle has overlooked the charming town of Arundel and the River Arun for almost 1,000 years.  The Castle featured beautiful landscaped grounds and a fully restored Victorian kitchen garden.  Arundel contains a Library with a spectacular carved and vaulted ceiling.  There is a restaurant serving lunches and afternoon teas and a delightful gift shop.

 

 

 

Castle Howard is still in the hands of the Howard family, Dukes of Carlisle.  Ann Howard, see below, married her cousin, Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Carlisle, who was also a descendant of Katherine Mylde and William deTendring by Alice deTendring and John Howard.  It is a magnificent palace and one of Britain’s most spectacular stately homes.  The impressive Great Hall and beautiful rooms are filled with fine furniture, paintings, and objects d’art.  The extensive grounds feature lakes, lovely woodland, and a rose garden.  For more details, see www.castlehoward.co.uk

 

 

Generation No. 1

 

        1.  William1 deTendring, Knt, of Tendering Hall1 died Abt. 1421 in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, and buried The Church of St. Mary the Virgin, before the altar in the South Chapel2.  He married Katherine Mylde, of Clare, Suffolk3 Aft. 1383, daughter of William Mylde, of Clare, County Suffolk.  She died Bet. February 24, 1402/03 and June 18, 1403 in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh, and buried The Church of St. Mary the Virgin, before the altar in the South Chapel4.

        After Sir Thomas' death, Dame Katherine took as her second husband Sir William de Tendring of Stoke-by-Nayland.  Through this marriage she became the distant grandmother of three queens of England: two of the unfortunate wives of Henry the VIII, Ann Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and Queen Elizabeth I. Dame Katherine, who died in 1403, is buried at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Stoke-by-Nyland, Suffolk. Their memorial brasses are among the finest in England.  The Clopton Arms:  ermine spot on the bend in base may be seen on the mantle of the depiction of Dame Katherine.  The descendants of William Clopton and his wife, Ann Booth, are direct descendants of Guillaume Peche and Alfwen, his wife, by both the Clopton-Mylde marriage and the Mylde deTendring marriage.  See "Place of Lutons."

       

Child of William deTendring and Katherine Mylde is:

+      2                 i.    Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, born in Tendering Hall, Stoke-by- Nayland, County Suffolk, England; died October 18, 1426 in England and buried in the South aisle of St. Mary the Virgin, Stoke-by-Nayland, County Suffolk.

 

 

Generation No. 2

 

        2.  Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall (William1)5 was born  in Tendering Hall, Stoke-by- Nayland, County Suffolk, England6, and died October 18, 1426 in England and buried in the South aisle of St. Mary the Virgin, Stoke-by-Nayland, County Suffolk7.  She married John Howard, Knt, Sheriff of Essex & Hertford89, son of Robert Howard and Margaret Scales.  He was born in Wiggenhall, County Norfolk, and died November 17, 1436 in Palestine.

       

Children of Alica deTendring and John Howard are:

+      3                 i.    Robert3 Howard, Knt, Lord of Forucet Manor, born Abt. 1384 in Stoke-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, probably, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh, and possibly baptized at The Church of St. Mary the Virgin; died April 1, 1437.

+      4                ii.    Henry Howard, Esq., of Wigenhale, died 1437.

        5               iii.    Roberta Howard, of the Manor of Stoke Neyland10.

 

 

Generation No. 3

 

        3.  Robert3 Howard, Knt, Lord of Forucet Manor (Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)11 was born Abt. 1384 in Stoke-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, probably, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh, and possibly baptized at The Church of St. Mary the Virgin, and died April 1, 1437.  He married Margaret Mowbray12 Abt. 1420, daughter of Thomas Mowbray and Elizabeth FitzAlan.  She died July 8, 1425.

       

Children of Robert Howard and Margaret Mowbray are:

+      6                 i.    John4 Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, 2nd Creation, born Abt. 1420; died August 22, 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field, near Market Bosworth, County Warwickshire.

        7                ii.    Margaret Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk13.  She married Thomas Daniell, Baron of Rathwire of Ireland.

+      8               iii.    Catherine Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, died Aft. June 29, 1478.

 

 

        4.  Henry3 Howard, Esq., of Wigenhale (Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)14 died 1437.  He married Mary Hussey, Lady Howard, daughter of Henry Hussey. 

       

Child of Henry Howard and Mary Hussey is:

+      9                 i.    Elizabeth4 Howard.

 

 

Generation No. 4

 

        6.  John4 Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, 2nd Creation (Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)15 was born Abt. 1420, and died August 22, 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field, near Market Bosworth, County Warwickshire.  He married (1) Katherine Moleyns, of Stoke Poges16,17 Abt. 1442, daughter of William Moleyns and Margery Whalesborough.  She was born in Stoke Poges, County Buckinghamshire, possibly, about 5 miles west of Uxbridge, and died November 3, 1465 in Stoke by Nayland, County Suffolk, and buried at The Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Stoke-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, in the South Chapel18,19.  He married (2) Margaret Chedworth Bef. January 22, 1466/6720, daughter of John Chedworth, Knt..  She died 1494.

                Sir John's first recorded military experience was on July 17, 1453, when he was present at the battle of Chastillon.  He entered into the service of his kinsman, John Mowbray.  He was knighted by Edward IV in 1461 and appointed constable of Colchester Castle, County Essex.  He also served as Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and was one of the King's Carvers, known to have "great fellowship" with the King.  In 1462 he was named constable of Norwich Castle, and received grants of several manors.

        He again participated in battle, first with Lords Fauconberg and Clinton in the battle for Brittany, and took Croquet and the Isle of Rhe.  He also served against the Lancastrians in the north, and  saw battle at Warkworth, and in the spring of 1464 assisted in securing the country for the King.

        Sir John returned home on June 8, 1464 and resumed his friendship with King Edward.  His joy was short lived, however.  On November 3, 1465, his wife, Lady Katherine, died.  She was buried at St. Mary, at Stoke-by-Nayland.  Her elaborate monumental brass was engraved about 1535, which explains her Tudor costume instead of the Lancastrian period of her time.  Her fingers are adorned with several rings, a rarely seen feature on brasses.  Three of the Howard quarters - Brotherton, Howard, and Segrave - appear on the dexter, or left, side of her robe.  The parental arms of the Moleyns are on the sinister, or right, side.  Beneath her Pedimental headdress, her hair is bound in a net. 

        He married the following January and in April was elected knight of the shire for County Suffolk.  He is also made Treasurer of the Household, an office he held until 1474.  He escorted King Edward's sister, Princess Elizabeth, to Flanders for her marriage to Charles, Duke of Burgundy.

        His illustrious career continued when he was created Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshall on June 28 1483.  At the coronation of King Richard III in July, Sir John acted as High Steward, bore the Crown, and as Marshall, rode into Westminster Hall after the ceremony and "voided the hall."  A few days later he was appointed Admiral of England, Ireland, and Aquitaine.

        A Fortnight before his death, he wrote to his friend, John Paston III a letter dated about August 12, 1485.

        "Well-beloved friend, I commend me to you, letting you to understand that the King's enemies be a land [Henry Tudor landed at Milford Haven on August 7], and that the King [Richard III] would have set forth as upon Monday but only for Our lady Day [The Assumption, August 15]; but for certain he goeth forward as upon Tuesday, for a servant of mine brought to me the certainty.

        Wherefore I pray you that ye meet with me at Bury [Bury St. Edmunds, County Suffolk], for by the grace of God I purpose to lie at Bury as upon Tuesday night; and that ye bring with you such company of tall men as ye may goodly make at my cost and charge, beside that ye have promised the King.  And I pray you beside that ye have promised the King.  And I pray you ordain them jackets of my livery, and I shall content you at your meeting with me."

        Sir John is remembered as a wise and experienced politician, and an expert and valiant soldier, careful in the management of his own affairs, and a faithful adherent of the House of York.

 - "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 42-44

       

Children of John Howard and Katherine Moleyns are:

+      10               i.    Thomas5 Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, born Abt. 1443 in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh; died May 21, 1524 in Framlingham Castle and buried at Thetford, County Norfolk, about 14 miles north of Bury St. Edmunds, County Suffolk and buried June 26, 1524 at Thetford Abbey, County Norfolk.

        11              ii.    Anne Howard, of Stoke by Nayland21, born in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh.  She married Edward Gorges, of Wraxall, County Somerset22.

        12             iii.    Isabel Howard, of Stoke by Nayland23, born in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh.  She married Robert Mortimer, Knt., of County Essex.

        13             iv.    Jane Howard, of Stoke by Nayland23, born in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh.  She married John Timperley.

        14              v.    Margaret Howard, of Stoke by Nayland24, born in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh.  She married John Wyndham, of Crownthorpe and Felbrigg; born  in Crownthorpe and Felbrigg, County Norfolk, possibly.  He is an ancestor of the Wyndhams, Earls of Egremont25.

 

       

Child of John Howard and Margaret Chedworth is:

+      15               i.    Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, born in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh; died March 12, 1534/35.

 

 

        8.  Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk (Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died Aft. June 29, 1478.  She married Edward Neville, K.G., Lord Bergavenny26 1448. 

       

Children of Catherine Howard and Edward Neville are:

+      16               i.    Catherine5 Neville.

+      17              ii.    Margaret Neville, Lady Brooke, died September 30, 1506.

 

 

        9.  Elizabeth4 Howard (Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)27.  She married Henry Wentworth, Esq., of Cobham Hall28, son of Roger Wentworth and Margery le Despenser.  He died March 22, 1481/82.

       

Child of Elizabeth Howard and Henry Wentworth is:

+      18               i.    Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, died Abt. May 7, 1540 in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and buried at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

 

 

Generation No. 5

 

        10.  Thomas5 Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)29 was born Abt. 1443 in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh30, and died May 21, 1524 in Framlingham Castle and buried at Thetford, County Norfolk, about 14 miles north of Bury St. Edmunds, County Suffolk and buried June 26, 1524 at Thetford Abbey, County Norfolk31.  He married (1) Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey32 April 30, 147233, daughter of Frederick Tilney and Elizabeth Cheney.  She was born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, about 11 miles southwest of Norwich, and died April 4, 1497.  He married (2) Agnes Tylney, Duchess of Norfolk34 Aft. 1497, daughter of Hugh Tylney and Tailboys.  She was born in Skirbeck, County Lincolnshire, and died Abt. May 31, 1545 in England and buried at Thetford Abbey, County Norfolk.

        Sir Thomas fought at Barnet for Edward IV and was made Steward of the royal household and created Earl of Surrey in 1483 (at the same time that his father was created the 1st Duke of Norfolk). Taken prisoner at Bosworth Field while fighting for Richard III, he remained a captive until January 1489, when he was released and restored to his earldom of Surrey but not to the dukedom of Norfolk. He was then entrusted with the maintenance of order in Yorkshire and with the defense of the Scottish borders.  Sir Thomas was made Lord Treasurer and a Privy Councillor in 1501.  He helped to arrange the marriage between Margaret, the daughter of Henry VII, and James IV of Scotland.  Henry VIII, too, employed him on public business, but the earl grew jealous of Thomas Wolsey and for a short time he absented himself from court. He commanded the army that defeated the Scots at Flodden in September 1513, and was created Duke of Norfolk in February of the following year.  In his later years Sir Thomas worked more harmoniously with Wolsey. He was guardian of England during Henry VIII's absence in France in 1520, and he acted as Lord High Steward at the trial of his friend Edward Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, in 1521 - "Dictonary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 62-64

       

Children of Thomas Howard and Elizabeth Tilney are:

+      19               i.    Thomas6 Howard, K.G., 3rd Duke of Norfolk, born 1473 in Kenninghall, County Norfolk, about 12 miles southwest of Ashwellthorpe and about 12 miles northeast of Thetford; died August 25, 1554 in Kenninghall, County Norfolk,  and buried at St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk, October 2, 1554, in a tomb located south of the High Altar..

        20              ii.    Edward Howard, Lord High Admiral, born Abt. 1476; died Abt. April 25, 1513 in battle against the French in Whitsand Bay.  He married Alice Lovel35.

               Sir Edward began his military experience at the tender age of about fifteen under the command of Sir Edward Poynings.  In 1497 he served under his father in the army in Scotland and was then knighted.  At the jousts held at the coronation of Henry VIII, he was one of the "entertainers."  On May 20, 1509 he was appointed Standard-bearer.

               In July 1511, it is said he commanded, in company with his brother, Thomas, the ships which captured the two Scottish pirates, Robert and Andrew Barton.  There is no official record of this, and many legends have sprung up involving their supposed involvement in this exploit.  The details given in the ballad, "Sir Andrew Barton," which was adopted by Sir Walter Scott, are unquestionably apocryphal.

On April 7, 1512, Sir Edward was appointed Admiral of the Fleet and charged with supporting the Pope and King Ferdinand, King of Aragon against the French.  With a fleet of about twenty large ships, he first landed in Bertheaume Bay, and drove the French out of their bulwards, defeated them in several skirmishes, and marched inland.  On Monday, May 23, he landed at Conquet, torched the town and the house of Sieur de Portzmoguer.

               During a subsequent battle in August, his brother-in-law, Sir Thomas Knyvet, died, and Sir Edward swore revenge.  The following year, on April 25,1513, he had his opportunity.  Taking command of a small barge, Sir Edward and his men rowed through a storm of shot, grappled the galley belonging to Commander, Chevalier Pregent de Bidoux.  Sword in hand, Sir Edward sprang on board followed by about seventeen of his men.

               In the confusion of battle, the grappling hook was cut, and Sir. Edward's boat was swept away by the tide, and he found himself and his companions unsupported.  His other boats, unable to get through the enemy's fire, and unaware that he was in trouble, retired.  It took some time for them to understand that their admiral was missing.  Under a flag of truce they inquired as to what had become of Sir Edward.  They were told that all but one man had been driven overboard.

               Emboldened by their small victory, the French crossed over from Brest and ravaged the coast of Sussex.  Sir Edward's death was considered a national disaster.  In a letter to the King of England, James IV of Scotland wrote:  "Sureley, dearest brother, we think more loss is to you of your late admiral, who deceased to his great honour and laud, than the advantage might have been of the winning of all the French galleys."

               There have been stories circulating for generations that Sir Edward's body was found on a beach and recognized by a small golden horn which he wore suspended from his neck as the mark of his rank and office.  However, if any body had indeed been found, the "small golden horn" may have been merely a pipe or whistle worn by an ensign.

  - "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 10-11

 

+      21             iii.    Edmund Howard, Marshal of the Horse, born Abt. 1480 in Tisbury, County Wiltshire; died March 19, 1535/36.

        22             iv.    Henry Howard, I, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1480 in County Norfolk; died February 2, 1499/00.

        23              v.    John Howard, I, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1482; died March 23, 1501/02.

        24             vi.    Charles Howard, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1483 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk; died March 3, 1511/12.

        25            vii.    Henry Howard, II, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1484; died February 22, 1511/12.

+      26           viii.    Elizabeth Howard, Lady Boleyn, born Abt. 1486 in County Norfolk; died April 3, 1538 in London.

+      27              ix.    Muriel Howard, Countess Lisle, born Abt. 1486; died December 14, 1512 in Lambeth, London and buried January 8, 1513 at Lambeth.

        28               x.    Richard Howard, I, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1486 in Buckenham Castle, County Norfolk; died December 14, 1512 in Lambeth, and buried January 8, 1511 at Lambeth.

 

       

Children of Thomas Howard and Agnes Tylney are:

        29               i.    Katherine6 Howard, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1497 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, about 10 miles southwest of Norwich and christened in 1497; died Abt. May 11, 1554 in England and buried May 11, 1554 in the Howard Chapel at Lambeth, County Surrey.  She married (1) Rhysap Griffith.  She married (2) Henry Daubeney, 1st Earl of Bridgewateer; born 1493; died 1548.

        30              ii.    Elizabeth Howard, Countess of Sussex, born Abt. 1506 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, about 10 miles southwest of Norwich and christened in 1506.  She married Henry Radcliffe, Earl of Sussex; born Abt. 1506; died 1557.

+      31             iii.    William Howard, K.G.,1st Baron of Effingham, born Abt. 1510 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk; died January 11, 1571/72 in Hampton Court, County Herefordshire and was buried January 29, 1572 at Reygate, County Surrey.

        32             iv.    Dorothy Howard, Countess of Derby, born Abt. 1511 in Lathom, County Lancashire.  She married Edward Stanley, Earl of Derby; born 1508; died 1572.

        33              v.    Thomas Howard, of Ashwellthrope, born Abt. 1512 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, about 10 miles southwest of Norwich and christened in 1512; died October 31, 1537 in Tower Hill.  He married Margaret Douglas; born 1515; died 1578 in Hackeny and buried Westminster Abbey36.

               Lord Thomas Howard became engaged to her without the permission of her uncle, King Henry VIII.  They were both imprisoned in the Tower of London as a result.  After Lord Thomas' death, she was released and married Lord Lennox.  She died in poverty at Hackeny and was buried at the expense of her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I.  She and her husband had four daughters and four sons.

        34             vi.    Anne Howard, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1514.

        35            vii.    George Howard, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1514 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, about 10 miles southwest of Norwich and christened in 1514.

        36           viii.    Catherine Howard, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1516.

        37              ix.    Richard Howard, II, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1516 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, about 10 miles southwest of Norwich and christened in 1516; died March 22, 1515/16 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.

        38               x.    John Howard, II, of Ashwellthorpe, born Abt. 1517 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, about 10 miles southwest of Norwich and christened in 1517; died March 23, 1521/22.

+      39              xi.    Anne Howard, Countess of Oxford, born Abt. 1518 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, about 10 miles southwest of Norwich and christened in 1518; died February 22, 1556/57.

        40             xii.    Henry Howard, III, of Ashwellthorpe, born Bef. 1524 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.

 

 

        15.  Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners (John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)37 was born in Tendring Hall, Stokes-by-Nayland, County Suffolk, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 6 miles southwest of Hadleigh, and died March 12, 1534/35.  She married (1) John Norris38.    She married (2) John Bourchier, K.B., 3rd Baron of Berners39, son of Humphrey Bourchier and Elizabeth Tilney.  He died March 19, 1531/32 in Calais.

        Lord Berners was Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1516 through 1527.  He was the translator of Froissart's "Chronicles."  He had only one surviving daughter by his marriage to Katherine Howard, however, by mistress, Elizabeth BAcon, he had other, illegitimate issue.

       

Child of Katherine Howard and John Bourchier is:

+      41               i.    Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners, died February 17, 1560/61 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, England and buried Ashwellthorpe Church in a chapel adjoining the chancel.

 

 

        16.  Catherine5 Neville (Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)  She married Robert Tanfield, Esq., of Gayton, Northampton, son of Robert Tanfield and Elizabeth Brooke. 

       

Child of Catherine Neville and Robert Tanfield is:

+      42               i.    William6 Tanfield, ESq., of Gayton, died 1529.

 

 

        17.  Margaret5 Neville, Lady Brooke (Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)40 died September 30, 1506.  She married John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham41, son of Edward Brooke and Elizabeth Tuchet.  He died March 9, 1510/11.

       

Child of Margaret Neville and John Brooke is:

+      43               i.    Thomas6 Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham, died July 19, 1529.

 

 

        18.  Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex (Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)42 died Abt. May 7, 1540 in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and buried at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.  She married William Waldegrave, K.B., of Smallbridge Manor43, son of Thomas Waldegrave and Elizabeth Fray.  He died Abt. January 30, 1525/26 in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and buried at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

       

Children of Margaret Wentworth and William Waldegrave are:

+      44               i.    George6 Waldegrave, Esq., of Smallbridge Manor, born 1483 in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury; died Abt. July 8, 1528 in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and buried at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

+      45              ii.    Anthony Waldegrave, of the Friers in Bures, born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

+      46             iii.    Margaret Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

        47             iv.    Anne Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.  She married George Waldegrave.

               CAUTION:  The 1612 Visitation of Essex does not list her.

        48              v.    Bridgett Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor44.

        49             vi.    Dorothy Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor44, born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.  She married John Springe, Knt..

 

 

Generation No. 6

 

        19.  Thomas6 Howard, K.G., 3rd Duke of Norfolk (Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)45 was born 1473 in Kenninghall, County Norfolk, about 12 miles southwest of Ashwellthorpe and about 12 miles northeast of Thetford46, and died August 25, 1554 in Kenninghall, County Norfolk,  and buried at St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk, October 2, 1554, in a tomb located south of the High Altar.47.  He married (1) Anne Plantagenet, Duchess of Norfolk February 4, 1494/95 in Westminster Abbey48, daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Wydvilles.  She died Abt. 1512 in England, probably in the winter of consumption49.  He married (2) Elizabeth Stafford, of Northumberland50 Abt. 151351, daughter of Edward Stafford and Eleanor Percy.  She was born 1494, and died November 30, 1583 in Kenninghall, County Norfolk,  possibly, and buried at St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk in her husband's tomb52.

        Sir Howard, the brother-in-law of Henry VII, was made Lord High Admiral in 1513, and helped defeat the Scots at Flodden Field that same year. He became Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1520.  Although he was uncle to Queen Anne Boleyn, as Lord Steward, Sir Howard presided over her trial for adultery in 1536. He lost influence at court when another niece, Katherine Howard, another wife of Henry VIII was beheaded for adultery in 1542. Throughout the reign of Edward VI he was imprisoned on suspicion of the treason for which Henry VIII had executed his eldest son, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, in 1547. He was released on the accession of Mary I, "Blood Mary," in 1553.

       

Children of Thomas Howard and Elizabeth Stafford are:

+      50               i.    Henry7 Howard, Earl of Surrey, born Abt. 1517 in Hunsdon, County Herfordshire; died January 21, 1546/47 in Tower Hill at the command of the queen and was beheaded and buried first at All Hallows' Barking, in Tower Street, but later in the chancel of St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk.

        51              ii.    Mary Howard, Duchess of Richmond, born Abt. 1519; died 1557 in England, and buried at St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk on the north side of the High Altar.  They were first buried at Thetford Priory and removed to St. Michael after the Dissolution of the Monasteries.  She married Henry FitzRoy, Duke of Richmond, illeg.; born June 1519; died 1536 in England, and buried at St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk on the north side of the High Altar.  Framlingham is about 16 miles northeast of Ipswich53.

               When he was born he was given his father's Christian name and the traditional surname of a royal bastard which pointed proudly to his parentage.  Cardinal Wolsey acted as Henry FitzRoy's godfather, a mark of official favor.  The King doted on him.  From time to time it was suggested that his father should legitimize him and make him his heir.  However, the boy was to die of tuberculosis at the age of seventeen.

+      52             iii.    Thomas Howard, 1st Viscount Bindon, born Abt. 1528; died April 5, 1582.

 

 

        21.  Edmund6 Howard, Marshal of the Horse (Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. 1480 in Tisbury, County Wiltshire, and died March 19, 1535/36.  He married (1) Dorothy Trayes.    He married (2) Margaret Jennings.    He married (3) Joyce Culpeper, of Oxenheath Abt. 1515, daughter of Robert Culpeper, Knt., of Oxenheath. 

        Sir Howard was rather lazy and never amounted to very much.  The children were brought up poor despite the grandeur of the Howard lineage.  The Howard clan was a big one.  Lord Edmund had twenty-two brothers and sisters, although 6 of the children died very young and their names are not known.  Jocasta (Joyce) Culpepper, gave birth to six or seven children before dying.  By 1527 he found himself a widower for the second time.  There were ten children in all in his keeping and as was a common practice he immediately started farming them out to various relatives.  His daughter, Katherine, would find herself in the Lambeth household of her step-grandmother, Agnes, Duchess of Norfolk, which would eventually prove to be a fatal mistake.  See "Midnight Romps & Wilted Roses"

       

Children of Edmund Howard and Joyce Culpeper are:

        53               i.    Charles7 Howard.

        54              ii.    Henry Howard.

        55             iii.    Katherine Howard, born Abt. 1525; died February 13, 1540/41 in Tower of London,  beheaded and buried St. Peter ad Vincula, London.  She married Henry VIII, King of England54 July 28, 1540; born June 28, 1491 in Greenwich Palace and crowned king June 24, 1509 at Westminster Abbey; died in Whitehall Palace and buried Windsor, St. George's Chapel,  with Jane Seymour after reigning 38 years.

In light of the family's unerring ability to irritate kings, it was probably a good thing we migrated to Virginia.  With breathtaking regularity one kin or another was being hauled to the Tower of London and threatened with beheading or worse.  The close connections with royalty gave the family ample opportunity to hone this questionable talent.  And our grandparents, Edward Waldegrave and Joan (Acworth) Bulmer established a benchmark in this arena that has not been surpassed by any of their Clopton descendants despite the passage of centuries.  Tempting fate, they careened about the palace with Queen Katherine Howard indulging in amorous escapades right underneath the nose of the infamous Henry VIII.  Had their tender necks not escaped the axe, then their daughter, and our grandmother, Margery, would not have been born.  See "Midnight Romps and Wilted Roses"

+      56             iv.    Margaret Howard.

 

 

        26.  Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn (Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)55 was born Abt. 1486 in County Norfolk, and died April 3, 1538 in London.  She married Thomas Boleyn, K.G., Earl of Wiltshire56 1501 in Blickling, County Norfolk, son of William Boleyn and Margaret Butler.  He was born 1477 in Blickling, County Norfolk, and died March 12, 1538/39 in Hever, Kent.

       

Children of Elizabeth Howard and Thomas Boleyn are:

+      57               i.    Anne7 Boleyn, Marchioness of Pembroke, born Abt. 1507 in Blickling, County  Norfolk; died May 19, 1536 in Tower Green, executed and beheaded and buried Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula in the Tower.

+      58              ii.    Mary Boleyn, born 1508 in Hever, Kent; died June 19, 1543 in Rochford, Essex.

+      59             iii.    George Boleyn, Viscount  Rochford, born 1503 in Blickling, County NOrfolk; died May 17, 1536 in Tower of London.

        60             iv.    Thomas Boleyn.

 

 

        27.  Muriel6 Howard, Countess Lisle (Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)57 was born Abt. 1486, and died December 14, 1512 in Lambeth, London and buried January 8, 1513 at Lambeth.  She married (1) John Grey, Viscount Lisle57 Bef. 150558.    She married (2) Thomas Knyvet, Knt, Master of the Horse59,60 July 9, 1506, son of Edmund Knyvet and Eleanor Tyrrell.  He was born in Buckenham Castle, County Norfolk, about 9 miles east of Norwich, and died August 10, 1512 in battle off the coast of Brest, France61.

        Sir Thomas was knighted by Henry VIII in 1509 and named Master of the Horse February 26, 1509.  He held other offices including that of Keeper of the New Park belonging to the Lordship of Berkeley in August 1510.

In 1511,  Henry VIII, who for many years had longed for distinction in actual warfare, and urged on by a national hatred of the French, signed a treaty with Feerdinand of Spain for a joint invasion of France.

        In 1512, Sir Thomas was captain of the "Regent," the largest ship in the Royal Navy under the command of his brother-in-law, Edward Howard, Lord High Admiral.  During a battle on August 10, the "Regent" was grappled by the "Marie la Cordeliere," the largest ship in the French fleet, commanded by the Sieur de Portzmoguer, whose house had been burnt a few months before.

        During the struggle of the two mighty ships, a fire broke out on board the "Cordeliere," the flames evidently spreading to the "Regent."  Both ships blew up, with the loss of almost all of the men.  It is estimated that seven hundred men were at that time aboard the "Regent," and about one thousand on the "Cordeliere."

        Sir Edward was so distraught by the death of his brother-in-law that he swore he would not see the king's face again until Sir Thomas' death was revenged.  It may be that this desire to see revenge prompted the encounter that would lead to his own death the following April.

        Sir Thomas and Lady Muriel were the grandparents of Sir Thomas Knyvett, who as a Magistrate of the City of Westminster, arrested Guy Fawkes in the vaults of the Houses of Parliament and was afterwards created Baron Knyvett, of Escrick.  See "Two Hundred Men in Velvet"

       

Children of Muriel Howard and Thomas Knyvet are:

        61               i.    Edmund7 Knyvet, Knt., of Buckenham Castle62, died May 1, 1551 in London.

+      62              ii.    Henry Knyvet, Knt., of Charlton by Malmesbury, born 1510 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire; died Bef. March 30, 1547 in East Horsley, County Surrey.

        63             iii.    Ferdinando Knyvet.

 

 

        31.  William6 Howard, K.G.,1st Baron of Effingham (Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)63 was born Abt. 1510 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, and died January 11, 1571/72 in Hampton Court, County Herefordshire and was buried January 29, 1572 at Reygate, County Surrey63.  He married (1) Katherine Boughton, Tuddington, Bedfordshire63 Bef. 1531.  She died 1535 in England and buried in the Howard Chapel at Lambeth.  He married (2) Margaret Gamage, of Colity, Glamorganshire64 Bef. 1535, daughter of Thomas Gamage and Margaret St. John.  She was born in Colity, County Glamorganshire, Wales, and died May 1, 1581 in Ryegate, County Surrey and was buried May 19, 1581 at Reygate.

       

Child of William Howard and Katherine Boughton is:

        64               i.    Agnes7 Howard, Countess Winchester.  She married William Paulet, 3rd Marquess of Winchester65.

 

       

Children of William Howard and Margaret Gamage are:

+      65               i.    Charles7 Howard, K.G.,1st Earl of Nottingham, born December 1536 in Notthingham, County Norttinghamshire; died December 14, 1624 in Haling House, near Croydon, County Surrey and was buried December 18, 1624 at Reygate, County Surrey.

+      66              ii.    William Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lingfield, County Surrey; died September 1, 1600 in Haling House, Croyden, County Surrey and buried September 3 at Reygate.

+      67             iii.    Douglass Howard, Baroness Sheffield, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London; died December 11, 1608 in England and buried at Effingham.

        68             iv.    Mary Howard, Lady Dudley, born in Effingham, County Surrey; died August 21, 1600 in England, and buried August 23 at St. Margaret's, Westminster.  She married (1) Edward Dudley, Lord Dudley.  She married (2) Richard Mompesson, Esquire.

        69              v.    Frances Howard, Countess of Hertford, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London; died May 14, 1598 in England, and buried at Saint Benedict, Westminster.  She married Edward Hertford, Earl of Hertford.

        70             vi.    Martha Howard, Lady Bourchier, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London; died May 14, 1598.  She married George Bourchier, Knight.

        71            vii.    Margaret Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London.

        72           viii.    Catherine Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London; died September 22, 1598.

        73              ix.    Edward Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London; died April 15, 1554.

        74               x.    Henry Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London.

        75              xi.    Thomas Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London.

        76             xii.    Dorothie Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London.

        77            xiii.    Anne Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London.

        78            xiv.    Elizabeth Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London.

        79             xv.    Richard Howard, of Lambeth, born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London.

 

 

        39.  Anne6 Howard, Countess of Oxford (Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. 1518 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, about 10 miles southwest of Norwich and christened in 1518, and died February 22, 1556/57.  She married John de Vere, 14th Earl of Oxford, son of George de Vere and Margaret Stafford.  He was born August 14, 1499, and died July 14, 1526.

       

Child of Anne Howard and John de Vere is:

+      80               i.    John7 de Vere, K.G.,15th Earl of Oxford, died March 21, 1538/39 in Colne, and buried Hedingham Castle, County Essex.

 

 

        41.  Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners (Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)66 died February 17, 1560/61 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, England and buried Ashwellthorpe Church in a chapel adjoining the chancel67.  She married Edmund Knyvet, Sergeant Porter to Henry VIII68 Abt. 1508 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, England69, son of Edmund Knyvet and Eleanor Tyrrell.  He was born Abt. 1490 in Buckenham Castle, County Norfolk, England70, and died May 1, 1539 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, England and buried Ashwellthorpe Church in a chapel adjoining the chancel71.

        Sergeant-Porter to Henry VIII, he is mentioned in 1524 as the Sergeant of the King's Gates, and in 1536 was also made Keeper of the King's woods in Rockingham Forest.  He was also Receiver of the Revenues of the royal domains in Denbigh, North Wales.

        Early in 1541 on the tennis courts of the King's house, he struck Thomas Clere, a Norfolk gentleman and a retainer and friend of the Earl of Surrey, Henry Howard, drawing blood.  It was his bad luck that only recently a statute had declared that the penalty for such an act was the loss of the right hand.

        On February 28, both men were arrested and bound in recognizance of five hundred marks each.  On April 27 they were formally accused.  On June 10, Sir Edmund was arraigned before the King's Justices at Greenwich and found guilty by a quest of yeomen of "maliciously" striking Thomas Clere and condemned to have his right hand amputated.

        The sentence was to be ritually carried out in what was evidently a new form of punishment.  King Henry's Master Cook was to bring a knife.  The Sergeant of the Poultry was directed to cut off the head of a cock on the same block and by the same knife used to remove the hand of the condemned.  The King's Sergeant of the Larder was to do the deed.  Finally, the Sergeant of the Cellar was to bring ale and beer, whether that was to celebrate or to cleanse the wound is not clear.

        The unfortunate Sir Edmund was brought to the scene and humbly confessing his guilt, begged that the left instead of the right hand be removed.  For, he said, "if my right hand be spared I may hereafter do such good service to his Grace as shall please him to appoint."  The justices, pleased by his supplications, interceded with Henry VIII, who, "moved by the gentle heart of the said Edmund and the good report of lords and ladies,," granted him a free pardon.

        The signature 'E.K.' attached to poems in the manuscript collection preserved in the British Museum (Addit. MS. 17492) is said to be that of Sir Edmund.  The principal contributors to the collection are his kinsmen, Sir Thomas Howard and Sir Thomas Wyatt.  See "The Descendants of William deTendring, Knt., of Tendering Hall & His Wife Dame Katherine Mylde, The First Ten Generations"

       

Children of Jane Bourchier and Edmund Knyvet are:

+      81               i.    John7 Knyvet, Esq., of Plumstead, Norfolk, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, England; died Bef. February 17, 1560/61 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, England.

        82              ii.    Thomas Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.  He married Mary Wolverton, of Wolverton, Suffolk.

        83             iii.    Edmund Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.  He married (1) Elizabeth Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe.  He married (2) Elizabeth Gooday.

+      84             iv.    William Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk; died Abt. June 30, 1612 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        85              v.    Alice Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.  She married Oliver Sheers, of Wreningham, Suffolk.

        86             vi.    Christian Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.  She married Thomas Foster.

        87            vii.    Rose Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.  She married Oliver Reymes, of Burnham, Depdale, Norfolk.

        88           viii.    Catherine Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.  She married (1) John Walpole, Sergeant-at-Law.  She married (2) Thomas Scarlet.

        89              ix.    Elizabeth Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.  She married Francis Bohun, of Tressingfield, Suffolk.

        90               x.    Anne Knyvet, of Ashwellthorpe, born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk.  She married Edmund Thimelthorpe, of Worsted, Norfolk.

 

 

        42.  William6 Tanfield, ESq., of Gayton (Catherine5 Neville, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)72 died 1529.  He married Isabel Staveley, of Bignell, Buckingham, daughter of William Staveley, of Bignell, County Buckingham. 

       

Child of William Tanfield and Isabel Staveley is:

+      91               i.    Francis7 Tanfield, of Gayton, died 1588.

 

 

        43.  Thomas6 Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham (Margaret5 Neville, Lady Brooke, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)73 died July 19, 1529.  He married Dorothy Heydon, of Baconsthrope74, daughter of Henry Heydon and Anne Boleyn. 

       

Children of Thomas Brooke and Dorothy Heydon are:

+      92               i.    George7 Brooke, 9th Lord Cobham.

+      93              ii.    Elizabeth Brooke.

 

 

        44.  George6 Waldegrave, Esq., of Smallbridge Manor (Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)75 was born 1483 in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury, and died Abt. July 8, 1528 in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and buried at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury76,77.  He married Anne Drury, of Hawstead, County Suffolk78 Bef. 1514, daughter of Robert Drury and Anne Calthorpe.  She was born in Hawstead, probably, about 4 miles southwest of Bury St. Edmunds, and probably baptized at All Saints, Hawstead, and died June 8, 1572 in Depden, County Suffolk,  probably,  about 7 miles southwest of Bury St. Edmunds, and buried at St. Mary,  Depden, in the north wall of the Nave79.

        Upon George Waldegrave's death, Anne, the executrix of his will, was left with the manors of Smallbridge, Silvesters, Overhall, and Freps, during the minority of her eldest son, William.

        T. M. Felgate's, "Suffolk Heraldic Brasses," notes her memorial is unusual because it contains an identical effigy of herself for each husband.  He writes, "She wears a French Bonnet with short lappets falling behind, and her high puffed shoulders reflect the haute-pieces on the shoulders of her husbands.  Frills encircle her neck and wrists, and a bow-knotted sash girdles her waist, below which the gown divides to show a plain undergarmet.  (In one pose) She kneels at a prayer desk with her two daughters (by George Waldegrave) behind her.  They are similarly attired, except they have the more simple close-fitting bonnet."

        Both husbands wear almost identical armour.  George Waldegrave's hair is of medium length and he is clean shaven, popular during the Tudor period of his time.  Sir Jermyn is shown with the short hair, a moustache and beard of his Elizabethan time.  Each appear with their own sons kneeling behind them, all in Elizabethan costumes.

        Her husbands were not buried with her unless they were removed from their original tombs and brought to Depden.

        The inscription reads:  "Here under lyeth buried the boddy of the Lady Anne Jermyn, widdowe, daughter of Syr Robert Drewry, of Halsted in the Countie of Suff. Knight & Anne his wife, whiche Anne was first married to Geroge Waldegve, of Smallbridge in the saide Countie, Esquier, and after married to Syr Thomas Jermyn, of Rushebrooke, in the said Countie, Knight, and died the viii daye of June, in the yere of oure Lorde God a Thowsand five hundred seventy two."  Note it does not say the husbands share her tomb.

               

 

Children of George Waldegrave and Anne Drury are:

+      94               i.    Edward7 Waldegrave, I, Esq., of Lawford Hall, born 1514 in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury; died August 13, 1584 in Lawford Hall, County Essex, probably, about 8 miles northeast of Colchester.

+      95              ii.    William Waldegrave, Knt. of Smallbridge Manor, born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury; died May 2, 1554 in Callys, France where his body is buried at St. Maries Church.

        96             iii.    George Waldegrave, of Witherton Manor, Hitcham80, born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury; died Abt. 1551 in Hitchem, County Suffolk, probably, about 7 miles northwest of Hadleigh, and probably buried at All Saints, Hitcham81.  He married Mary Corbett, of Assington, County Suffolk82; born in Assington, County Suffolk, probably, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury, and probably baptized at St. Edmund; died Abt. 1562 in London, and probably buried at All Saints, Hitcham83.

+      97             iv.    Anne Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury; died Abt. April 24, 1590 in Thornage, County Norfolk, possibly, about 26 miles northwest of Norwich, and buried at Thornage.

+      98              v.    Phyllis Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

        99             vi.    Richard Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor84, died Aft. July 8, 1528.

        100          vii.    Thomas Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor85, born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

 

 

        45.  Anthony6 Waldegrave, of the Friers in Bures (Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)86 was born  in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury87.  He married Elizabeth Gray, of Burnt Pelham, Hertford, daughter of Ralph Gray, a Baron of the Exchequer. 

       

Children of Anthony Waldegrave and Elizabeth Gray are:

+      101             i.    Thomas7 Waldegrave, of Bures St. Mary, Suffolk, born in Bures St. Mary, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury; died in Bures St. Mary, probably, and buried at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

        102            ii.    Julian Waldegrave, of Bures St. Mary, Suffolk88.

        103           iii.    Barnabe Waldegrave, of Bures St. Mary, Suffolk88.

+      104           iv.    William Waldegrave, Esq., of Illford, born in Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury; died in Illford, probably, now considered part of Greater London.  It is about 8 miles northeast of Walthamstowe, his son's home.

 

 

        46.  Margaret6 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor (Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)89 was born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.  She married John St. John, of Bletsoe, Bedfordshire90, son of John St. John and Sybil Jenkyn.  He was born in Bletsoe, County Bedfordshire, about 24 miles west of Cambridge, County Cambridgeshire, and died Abt. 1535 in Smallbridge Manor, County Suffolk.

       

Children of Margaret Waldegrave and John St. John are:

+      105             i.    Oliver7 St. John, Baron of Bletshoe, died 1582.

+      106            ii.    Margaret St. John, of Bletshoe, born in Bletsoe, County Bedfordshire, about 24 miles west of Cambridge, County Cambridgeshire; died August 27, 1562 in Woburn, County Bedfordshire, about 12 miles northwest of Luton.

 

 

Generation No. 7

 

        50.  Henry7 Howard, Earl of Surrey (Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)91 was born Abt. 1517 in Hunsdon, County Herfordshire92, and died January 21, 1546/47 in Tower Hill at the command of the queen and was beheaded and buried first at All Hallows' Barking, in Tower Street, but later in the chancel of St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk93,94.  He married Frances de Vere, Countess of Surrey95 Bet. February 13, 1530/31 and April 153196, daughter of John de Vere and Elizabeth Trussel.  She died June 30, 1577 in Soham Earl, County Suffolk, and buried at St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk in the tomb with her husband97.

        He was a great favorite at court and known for his sonnets.  He established a form that was used by Shakespeare and that has become known as the English sonnet form:  three quatrains and a couplet, rhyming abab cdcd efef gg. Even more significant, he was the first English poet to publish in blank verse-unrhymed iambic pentameter-a verse form so popular in the succeeding four centuries that it seems almost indigenous to the language. The work in which he used this "strange meter," as the publisher called it, was a translation of part of Virgil's "Aeneid."  Sir Henry's poetry circulated in manuscript form in court circles for years.  He published his "Epitaph on Sir Thomas Wyatt, his kinsman, but most of his poetry first appear in 1557, ten years after his death in "Songs and Sonnets," now referred to as "Tottel's Miscellany."

        Sir Henry and his wife are buried in an elaborate painted alabaster tomb.  At one end of the tomb figures of their sons, Thomas, the fourth Duke, and Henry, Earl of Northampton, kneel.  At the other end are the figures of their daughters, Jane, Katherine and Mary.  It was Sir Howard's misfortune to be executed only nine days before the death of Henry VIII who was both his judge and jury.  To signify that he was beheaded, a replica of his coronet lies beside his effigy on the tomb.  See "Where Mightier Do Assault Than Do Defend"

       

Children of Henry Howard and Frances de Vere are:

+      107             i.    Thomas8 Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, born March 10, 1537/38 in Kenninghall, County Norfolk; died June 2, 1572 in Tower Hill by execution for high treason and buried in the chapel of the Tower.

        108            ii.    Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton98, born February 25, 1538/39 in Shottesham, County Norfolk99; died June 15, 1614 in His house in the Strand following an unskillful operation and was buried first in the chapel of Dover Castle and later, in 1696, removed to the chapel of Greenwich College by the Mercers' Company100.

               When John White, the Bishop of Lincoln, replaced his old tutor, John Foxe, Sir Henry took an instant liking to the Bishop, an ardent Catholic.  And when the Bishop removed to Winchester in 1556, Sir Henry Went with him.  There Sir Henry studied philosophy, civil law, divinity, and history, and seems to have acquired a strong sympathy with Roman Catholicism.

               On the death of Queen Mary, "Blood Mary," and the accession of her half sister, Queen Elizabeth, the "Virgin Queen," the Catholic clergy were stripped of their titles.  Bishop White found himself deprived of his bishopric, and Queen Elizabeth undertook supervision of Sir Henry's education.

               At the Queen's expense, he proceeded to King's College, Cambridge, where he graduated M.A., in 1564.  He afterwards joined Trinity Hall, earned the reputation as a fine scholar.  His interests were varied and were not limited to intellectual pursuits.  He enjoyed music and learned from a master to play the lute.

               Having little money and conscious that he was living 'beneath the compass of his birth,' he came to court about 1570.  But his brother, Thomas, was in hot water and Sir Henry found his prospects of a brilliant life at court were dim.

               Sir Henry found himself suspect and found himself arrested.  After repeated examinations, he established his innocence to Queen Elizabeth's satisfaction.  He was readmitted to court and granted a yearly pension.  This reprieve, however, came with a terribly price; for the rest of his life he would be suspected of giving evidence against his brother in exchange for his freedom.

               After his brother's execution, Sir Henry retired to Audley End, and directed the education of his brother's children.

               He had established a close relationship with Mary, Queen of Scots.  This was a dangerous liaison.  He desperately tried to assure Queen Elizabeth, who was dreadfully suspicious of the friendship.  He attempted to assure Elizabeth that he merely supplied her with political information and that he gave her the prudent advice to "abate the sails of her royal pride."

               It was his bad luck to have a violent quarrel with his kinsman, Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, and De Vere, seeking revenge, fanned the flames of suspicion and convinced the Queen that Sir Henry was guilty of heresy and of having treasonable correspondence with the Scottish Queen.

               Sir Henry was once more arrested and defended himself at length in a letter to Elizabeth in which he admitted that he had taken part in a Roman Catholic worship because of conscientious difficulties "in sacramentary points," but declared that it was ridiculous to believe that "so mean a man" as he could win Queen Mary's "liking."

               His convoluted defense worked, however, and he was soon free.  He wisely left court and retired to St. Albans and spent a year writing "Preservative against the Poison of supposed Prophecies," an attack on judicial astrology.  The book, published in 1583, was revised and reissued in 1621, was suspected of containing veiled references which could be interpreted as treason, and Sir Henry was sent to Fleet Prison.  It was whispered that Queen Mary had sent him a ring with a message that she "did repute him as his brother."

               His luck held out, and he was released, but he soon found that his questionable reputation made him something of a pariah, a "papist and a Spaniard," and found himself without any means livelihood.

               At length he wormed his way into the confidence of James Stuart, the son of his old friend, Queen Mary.  Upon the death of Elizabeth, Sir Henry found himself firmly and happily ensconced in the court of James, now James I, King of Great Britain.  He attended King James at Theobalds, and was made a Privy Councillor.  By 1604 he was now Baron Howard of Marnhull, Dorestshire, and Earl of Northampton.

               Perhaps not the must sensitive politician, he found himself competing with Prince Charles for the Chancellorship of Cambridge University.  His wealth and learning seem to have easily secured his election.  A tad bit late, he realized that King James resented the university's action, and he immediately resigned.  He spent the next few months convincing the King he meant no disrespect to the royal family.  A master at suppleness and flattery, he not only succeeded but was reappointed to the Chancellorship at a new election.

               He continued a favorite at court and spent the rest of his life fully immersed in the endless and traitorous intrigues.  Despite his lack of principles, Sir Henry was a brilliant and versatile talent.  A witty and charming man, he was acknowledged as the most learned nobleman of his day.  His taste in architecture is evidenced by his enlargement of Greenwich Castle, and by the magnificence of his London resident, now known as Northumberland House,.  He planned and endowed three hospitals, one at Clun, Shropshire, a second at Castle Rising, County Norfolk, and a third at Greenwich, called Norfolk College.  He personally laid the foundation stone of Greenwich College. – “Dictionary of National Biography,” Volume 10

        109           iii.    Jane Howard, Lady Neville101.  She married Charles Neville, Earl of Westmorland.

        110           iv.    Katherine Howard, Lady Berkeley102.  She married Henry Berkeley, Lord Berkeley.

        111            v.    Margaret Howard, Lady Scrope102.  She married Henry Scrope, Lord Scrope of Bolton.

 

 

        52.  Thomas7 Howard, 1st Viscount Bindon (Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)103 was born Abt. 1528, and died April 5, 1582.  He married (1) Elizabeth Marney, Viscountess Bindon, daughter of John Marney and Christian Newburgh.  She was born Abt. 1517.  He married (2) Gertrude Lytle, Viscountess Bindon, daughter of William Lyte, of Billesdon.  She died Bef. 1576.  He married (3) Mabel Burton, Viscountess Bindon, daughter of Nicholas Burton, Esq., of Carshalton.    He married (4) Margaret Manning, Viscountess Bindon, daughter of Henry Manning, Esquire, of Greenwich.  She was born 1559, and died 1635.

       

Children of Thomas Howard and Elizabeth Marney are:

+      112             i.    Henry8 Howard, 2nd Viscount Bindon, died 1590.

        113            ii.    Thomas Howard, K.G., 3rd Viscount Bindon, died 1610.  He married Grace Duffield, Viscountess Bindon.

        114           iii.    Francis Howard.

        115           iv.    Giles Howard.

        116            v.    Elizabeth Howard.

        117           vi.    Grace Howard, Lady Horsey.  She married John Horsey, the Younger, of Clifton.

 

       

Child of Thomas Howard and Gertrude Lytle is:

+      118             i.    Charles Lyte8 Howard.

 

       

Child of Thomas Howard and Mabel Burton is:

        119             i.    Frances8 Howard, Duchess of Richmond.  She married (1) Henry Pranel, Esquire, of Barkway.  She married (2) Edward Seymour, Earl of Hertford.  She married (3) Lodowick Stuart, Duke of Richmond.

 

 

        56.  Margaret7 Howard (Edmund6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)104.  She married Thomas Arundel, Knt., of Wardour Castle.  He died February 26, 1551/52 in London.  He was beheaded.

       

Child of Margaret Howard and Thomas Arundel is:

+      120             i.    Matthew8 Arundel, Knt., of Wardour Castle, died December 1598.

 

 

        57.  Anne7 Boleyn, Marchioness of Pembroke (Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)105 was born Abt. 1507 in Blickling, County  Norfolk, and died May 19, 1536 in Tower Green, executed and beheaded and buried Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula in the Tower106.  She married Henry VIII, King of England107 Abt. January 25, 1532/33 in England and she was crowned queen at Westminster Abbey June 1, 1533, son of Henry and Elizabeth Plantagenet.  He was born June 28, 1491 in Greenwich Palace and crowned king June 24, 1509 at Westminster Abbey, and died in Whitehall Palace and buried Windsor, St. George's Chapel,  with Jane Seymour after reigning 38 years.

        In light of the family's unerring ability to irritate kings, it was probably a good thing we migrated to Virginia.  With breathtaking regularity one kin or another was being hauled to the Tower of London and threatened with beheading or worse.  The close connections with royalty gave the family ample opportunity to hone this questionable talent.  And our grandparents, Edward Waldegrave and Joan (Acworth) Bulmer established a benchmark in this arena that has not been surpassed by any of their Clopton descendants despite the passage of centuries.  Tempting fate, they careened about the palace with Queen Katherine Howard indulging in amorous escapades right underneath the nose of the infamous Henry VIII.  Had their tender necks not escaped the axe, then their daughter, and our grandmother, Margery, would not have been born.  See "Midnight Romps and Wilted Roses"

       

Child of Anne Boleyn and Henry is:

        121             i.    Elizabeth I8, the "Virgin Queen"108, born September 7, 1533 in Greenwich Palace and crowned queen January 15, 1559 at Westminster Abbey109; died March 24, 1602/03 in Richmond Palace and buried Westminster Abbey  after reigning 44 years110.

               Queen Elizabeth, undertook twenty-five "progresses" through her kingdom, usually during the months of July and August, when the hot and steamy weather played excellent host to plagues in London.  These holidays represented a rest from the usual court routines and offered an opportunity for her to meet her people and win their hearts and assure their loyalty.  In August of 1578, she chose to descend in all her glory on Long Melford.  See "Two Hundred Men in Velvet"

 

 

        58.  Mary7 Boleyn (Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born 1508 in Hever, Kent, and died June 19, 1543 in Rochford, Essex.  She married William Carey, Gentleman of the Privy Chamber111 February 4, 1519/20, son of Thomas Carey and Margaret Spencer.  He was born in Chilton Folis, County Wiltshire, and died June 22, 1528 in Bristol, County Somerset.

        Mary Boleyn replaced "Bessie" Blount, as King Henry VIII's very special friend.  Like Bessie, she was among the Maids of Honor at Court.  Contrary to later rumors, none of her children were the result of her affair with the king.  At the end of her royal fling, she married William Carey, and the long-suffering Queen Catherine, would attend the wedding festivities just as she had the celebrations surrounding the birth of Henry FitzRoy.  In later years King Henry was chided for having had an affair with three Boleyns, two daughters and a mother.  His reply, 'Never with the mother.'

       

Children of Mary Boleyn and William Carey are:

        122             i.    Katherine8 Carey, born 1524; died January 15, 1567/68.

+      123            ii.    Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon, born March 4, 1525/26 in Hengrave, County Suffolk, about 4 miles west of Bury St. Edmunds, and possibly baptized at St. John Lateran; died July 23, 1596 in Somerset House, the Strand and buried at Westminster Abbey.

+      124           iii.    Mary Carey, Lady Knolleys, born in Chilton Folis, County Wiltshire; died August 15, 1568.

        125           iv.    John Carey, born in Hengrave, County Suffolk, about 4 miles west of Bury St. Edmunds.

        126            v.    George Carey, born in Hengrave, County Suffolk, about 4 miles west of Bury St. Edmunds.

        127           vi.    Robert Carey, born in Bristol, County Somerset; died 1570 in Bristol, County Somerset.

        128          vii.    Catherine Carey.

 

 

        59.  George7 Boleyn, Viscount  Rochford (Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born 1503 in Blickling, County NOrfolk, and died May 17, 1536 in Tower of London.  He married Jane Porter, Viscountess Rochford, daughter of Morley.  She died 1542.

        He was tried along with his sister, Anne, on the charge of incest.  A rather clumsy attempt at character assassination, the only purpose of the arraignment was to blacken the name of his sister to the point where the public would accept her terrible reputation as a matter of faith.  He was permitted to address the large crowd which had gathered to view this popular form of entertainment.  He said "Masters all, I am come hither not to preach and make a sermon but to die, as the law hath found me, and to the law I submit me.'

        Possibly more than any other witness, it was the words of Jane Porter which damned Anne Boleyn, her sister-in-law, and her husband, to a certain and terrible, death.  She alleged that his wife and Anne had enjoyed 'undue familiarity  Her motives aren't clear.  Her father, Lord Morley,  was a devoted supporter of Queen Catherine and possibly she thought her testimony would help Catherine's daughter, Mary.  Or it might have been a less complicated reason:  survival.  She simply wanted to remain on the winning side.

       

Child of George Boleyn and Jane Porter is:

        129             i.    George8 Boleyn, Dean of Lichfield.

 

 

        62.  Henry7 Knyvet, Knt., of Charlton by Malmesbury (Muriel6 Howard, Countess Lisle, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)112 was born 1510 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire113, and died Bef. March 30, 1547 in East Horsley, County Surrey.  He married Anne Pickering, of Killington, Westmorland114 1538 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire, daughter of Christopher Pickering, Knt., of Killington.  She was born 1510 in Risbridge, and died 1582.

       

Children of Henry Knyvet and Anne Pickering are:

        130             i.    Margaret8 Knyvet, of Charlton by Malmesbury, born 1537 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire.

        131            ii.    Elizabeth Knyvet, of Charlton by Malmesbury.

+      132           iii.    Henry Knyvet, Knt., Sheriff of Wiltshire, died June 14, 1598 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire, and buried at Charlton by Malmesbury.

        133           iv.    Thomas Knyvet, Baron Knyvet of Escrick114, died in England, and was buried at Stanwell in the chancel of the church, where there is today a large monument with effigies.  He married Elizabeth Hayward July 21, 1597 in St. Pancras Church, Soper Lane, London114; died September 5, 1622 in England, and was buried at Stanwell in the chancel of the church, where there is today a large monument with effigies.

               Sir Thomas was educated at Jesus College, Cambridge, and became a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber to Queen Elizabeth and was created M.A. on her visit to October on September 29, 1592.  He represent Thetford in Parliament in 1601.  On August 5, 1603 James I gave him the manor of Stanwell, Middlesex, to which a neighboring property was added by royal grant in 1613.

               He was knighted in the Tower of London on March 14, 1603.  It was in his capacity as Justice of the Peace of Westminster that he made an astonishing discovery.

A group of disgruntled Catholics decided it was their Holy Duty to blow up the King, the Royal Family, and the English government.  When the plot was discovered, Sir Thomas headed the search party of the Westminster cellar.  There they discovered around midnight on Monday November 4, a figure in a cloak and hat, booted and spurred as though for flight, and surrounded by thirty-six barrels of powder in casks and hogsheads, all primed and ready to blow.  On examining the prisoner's garments, they found tinder and three match cords.  He immediately confessed to the crime adding that it was just as well they had found him "before the hour" as he was all ready to light the gunpowder.  Guy Fawkes coolly passed himself off as John Johnson, a servant, a story he would cling to for the next forty eight hours.  Sir Thomas' distant Clopton kinsman, Ambrose Rookwood, would ultimately share the fate of Guy Fawkes for his involvement in the Gunpowder Plot.  See "Two Hundred Men in Velvet"

Shortly afterwards he was appointed a Privy Councillor, a member of the Council of Queen Anne, and Warden of the Mint.  King James confided his daughter, Princess Mary to him to oversee her education.  Princess Ann died at Stanwell on September 16, 1607.

Sir Thomas was summoned to Parliament July 4, 1607 as Baron Knyvet of Escrick, Yorkshire.  He was a frequent visitor to the court and seems to have had a town house on King Street, Westminster.  He attended the funerals of the Prince of Wales in 1612 and the queen in 1619.

               He and his wife had two daughter who preceded her in death.  In his will Sir Thomas provided for a yearly payment to be made to a school for boys at Stanwell.  He left Stanwell Manor to his nephew, John Cary, and on his niece, Catherine, who married for her second husband, Thomas Howard, First Earl of Suffolk.  – "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 11, p. 340

 

 

        65.  Charles7 Howard, K.G.,1st Earl of Nottingham (William6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)115 was born December 1536 in Notthingham, County Norttinghamshire, and died December 14, 1624 in Haling House, near Croydon, County Surrey and was buried December 18, 1624 at Reygate, County Surrey.  He married (1) Katherine Carey, Countess of Nottingham116 July 1563, daughter of Henry Carey and Anne Morgan.  She was born in Hunsdon, County Hertfordshire, and died February 25, 1601/02 in Arundel House, London and buried February 28, 1602 at Chelsea, London.  He married (2) Margaret Stuart Bef. June 1604117, daughter of James Stuart, Earl of Murray. 

        Sir Charles, is believed to have served at sea under the command of his father during the reign of Queen Mary, I, "Bloody Mary."  On the accession of her half sister, Elizabeth I, Sir Charles stepped at once into a prominent position at court.  His high birth and connections, the Queen was his first cousin once removed, helped not to mention the fact that he was very handsome.  And Queen Mary, "the Virgin Queen," who wasn't, loved to surround herself with witty, charming, and handsome men.

        In 1559 Sir Charles was sent as Ambassador to France to congratulate Francis, II, on his accession.  In the Parliament of 1562 he represented County Surrey, and in 1569 was named General of the Horse, under the Earl of Warwick, in the suppression of a Catholic led rebellion in the north.

        Upon the death of his father, he succeeded as 2nd Lord Howard of Effingham.  On April 24, 1574, he was made a Knight of the Garter, and about the same time was named Lord Chamberlain of the Household, a position he held until May 1585, when he was appointed Lord Admiral of England.

        He participated in the trial of Mary, Queen of Scots, and it appears that Queen Elizabeth was persuaded to sign Mary's death warrant at his urging.

        It was under Sir Charles' command that the Spanish Armada was destroyed, although history has not always given him the credit that was his due.  Sir Walter Raleigh certainly thought so.  Some had found fault with some of Sir Charles decisions, but Raleigh leapt to his defense and steadfastly maintained that Sir Charles was "better advised than a great many malignant fools were that found fault with his demeanour.  The Spaniards had an army aboard them, and he had none; they had more ships than he had, and of higher building and charging; so that had he entangled himself with those great and powerful vessels, he had greatly endangered this kingdom of England. . . but our admiral knew his advantage and held it; which had he not done, he had not been worthy to have held his head."

        Before the English ships could return, the seamen began to fall sick, primarily suffering from an infectious fever, possibly typhus, aggravated by eating putrid beef and sour beer.  Putting the sick on shore at Margate, Sir Charles found no one would house them, and it was only by his personal efforts that he found lodging for them in barns and outbuildings.  He wrote, "it would grieve any man's heart to see them that have served so valiantly to die so miserably."

        The Queen was not moved and Sir Charles, who had already paid part of the cost of maintaining the fleet at Plymouth, found himself responsible for the cost of the men's care.  His assets almost exhausted, he none the less "will myself make satisfaction as well as I may. . . so that her Majesty shall not be charged withal."

        The following years found him occupied with the defense of the country and the administration of the navy.  He organized the charity known as The Chest at Chatham, which was founded in 1590 'by the incitement, persuasion, approbation, and good liking of the lord admiral and of the principal officers of the navy."

        In 1596 Sir Charles once again was called upon to battle Spain at sea, and once again was successful.  Queen Elizabeth, however, was, after he wont, angry when he had the nerve to request that she pay the sailors their promised wages. She asserted that the men had paid themselves by plunder, and that she had received no benefit from the expedition!  The following year Sir Charles was created Earl of Nottingham.

        He held numerous important positions throughout his life, dying at the ripe old age of eighty eight.

        His wife, Catherine, was a great favorite of Queen Elizabeth, and when Lady Catherine died in February 1602/3 the Queen feel into a great depression and died a few weeks later. - "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 1-6

 

       

Children of Charles Howard and Katherine Carey are:

+      134             i.    Elizabeth8 Howard, I, of Effingham, born Abt. 1570 in Effingham, County Surrey; died Bef. January 31, 1645/46 in Greenwich and buried January 31, 1646.

        135            ii.    Frances Howard, of Effingham118, born Abt. 1569 in Effingham, County Surrey; died Bef. July 11, 1628 in England, and buried at Westminster Abbey.  She married Henry Fitzgerald, Earl of Kildare.

               CAUTION:  "Dictionary of National Biography" claims Frances married Sir Robert Southwell, and that her sister, Elizabeth, married Henry Fitzgerald.

        136           iii.    Elizabeth Howard, II, of Effingham, born Abt. 1570 in Effingham, County Surrey; died Bef. January 31, 1645/46 in England and buried January 31, 1645.

        137           iv.    Margaret Howard, of Effingham118, born September 21, 1572 in Ryegate, County Surrey.  She married Richard Leveson, Vice-Admiral of England118.

        138            v.    Mary Howard, of Effingham, born Abt. 1574 in Effingham, County Surrey; died 1614.

+      139           vi.    William Howard, Baron Ho, born December 27, 1577 in Effingham, County Surrey and was christened January 13, 1578 at Effingham; died November 28, 1615 in Hampton, Middlesex, and buried Chelseh, London.

        140          vii.    Charles Howard, 2nd Earl of Nottingham118, born September 17, 1579 in Ryegate, County Surrey, and was christened September 24, 1579; died October 3, 1642 in Leatherhead, County Surrey, and was buried October 8, 1642 at Ryegate.

 

       

Children of Charles Howard and Margaret Stuart are:

        141             i.    James8 Howard119, died 1610.

        142            ii.    Charles Howard, 3rd Earl of Notthingham, born December 25, 1610119; died 1681.

 

 

        66.  William7 Howard, of Lambeth (William6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)120 was born in Lingfield, County Surrey, and died September 1, 1600 in Haling House, Croyden, County Surrey and buried September 3 at Reygate.  He married Frances Gouldwell, Lady Howard, daughter of William Gouldwell, Esq., of Gouldwell Hall. 

       

Children of William Howard and Frances Gouldwell are:

        143             i.    Edward8 Howard, Knight, of Lingfield, died 1620.

+      144            ii.    Frances Howard, Knight, of Great Bookham.

        145           iii.    Charles Howard, Knight, of Lingfield.

 

 

        67.  Douglass7 Howard, Baroness Sheffield (William6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born in Lambeth, County Surrey, now part of greater London, southwest of the City of London, and died December 11, 1608 in England and buried at Effingham.  She married (1) John Sheffield, Baron Sheffield 1573.    She met (2) Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, son of John Dudley and Jane Guildford.  He was born June 24, 1532 in Northumberland and christened at Northumberland, and died September 4, 1588 in Cornbury, County Oxfordshire and buried at Collegiate Church, Warwick.  She married (3) Edward Stafford, Knt., of Grafton Bef. 1603.  He was born in Grafton, County Northamptonshire, and died February 5, 1603/04.

       

Child of Douglass Howard and Robert Dudley is:

+      146             i.    Robert8 Dudley, illeg., born August 7, 1574 in Sheen Palace, County Surrey; died September 6, 1649 in Forence, Italy and buried at Boldrone, Italy.

 

 

        80.  John7 de Vere, K.G.,15th Earl of Oxford (Anne6 Howard, Countess of Oxford, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)121 died March 21, 1538/39 in Colne, and buried Hedingham Castle, County Essex.  He married Elizabeth Trussel, Countess Vere Abt. 1508, daughter of Edward Trussel, Knight, of Cublesdon. 

       

Children of John de Vere and Elizabeth Trussel are:

+      147             i.    Elizabeth8 de Vere, of Hedingham Castle, died in England and buried at St. Osyth Priory, County Essex.

+      148            ii.    Frances de Vere, Countess of Surrey, died June 30, 1577 in Soham Earl, County Suffolk, and buried at St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk in the tomb with her husband.

        149           iii.    John de Vere, 16th Earl of Oxford.

        150           iv.    Aubrey de Vere, of Hedingham Castle.

        151            v.    Robert de Vere, of Hedingham Castle.

        152           vi.    Geoffrey de Vere, of Hedingham Castle.

        153          vii.    Anne de Vere, of Hedingham Castle.

 

 

        81.  John7 Knyvet, Esq., of Plumstead, Norfolk (Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners, Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)122 was born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, England, and died Bef. February 17, 1560/61 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, England123.  He married Agnes Harcourt, of Stanton Harcourt124 Abt. February 28, 1512/13, daughter of John Harcourt and Margaret Barentyn.  She was born in Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire, England, and died 1579.

       

Children of John Knyvet and Agnes Harcourt are:

+      154             i.    Abigail8 Knyvet, Lady Sedley, died December 15, 1623.

        155            ii.    Thomas Knyvet, Knt., Lord Berners125, born Abt. 1539; died February 9, 1615/16126.  He married Muriel Parry, Lady Knyvet127; died April 25, 1616.

 

 

        84.  William7 Knyvet, of Fundenhall (Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners, Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, and died Abt. June 30, 1612 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.  He married Dorothy Thimelthorpe, of Tunstead.  She died March 2, 1615/16.

       

Children of William Knyvet and Dorothy Thimelthorpe are:

+      156             i.    John8 Knyvet, I, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. May 1560 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died Abt. August 18, 1640 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        157            ii.    Thomas Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. July 1563 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died November 12, 1595.

        158           iii.    Edmund Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. December 1565 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        159           iv.    Henry Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. October 1569 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        160            v.    Joanna Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. March 1560/61 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        161           vi.    Amphillis Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.  She married William Baldwin April 16, 1611.

        162          vii.    Ann Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        163         viii.    Muriel Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.  She married Geffrey Abbs September 9, 1591.

        164            ix.    Margaretia Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born 1573 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

 

 

        91.  Francis7 Tanfield, of Gayton (William6, Catherine5 Neville, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)128 died 1588.  He married Bridget Cave, of Stanford, daughter of Thomas Cave, of Stanford. 

       

Child of Francis Tanfield and Bridget Cave is:

+      165             i.    Anne8 Tanfield, of Gayton.

 

 

        92.  George7 Brooke, 9th Lord Cobham (Thomas6, Margaret5 Neville, Lady Brooke, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)

       

Child of George Brooke, 9th Lord Cobham is:

        166             i.    Elizabeth8 Brooke, Countess Parr, born 1526; died 1565.  She married William Parr, Earl of Essex, Marquess of Northam; born August 14, 1513; died 1571.

 

 

        93.  Elizabeth7 Brooke (Thomas6, Margaret5 Neville, Lady Brooke, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)  She married (1) Thomas Wyatt, Knt., of Allington Castle, Kent, son of Henry Wyatt and Anne.  He was born 1503 in Allington Castle, near Maidstone in Kent, and died October 10, 1542 in Sherborne, Dorset.  She married (2) Edward Warner. 

        Sir Thomas' first court appearance was as Sewer Extraordinary to Henry VIII in 1516, in which year he also entered St. John's College, Cambridge.  He was engaged by King Henry VIII to fulfill various offices at home and abroad.2

        Around 1525, Wyatt separated from his wife, charging her with adultery.  Which is also the year Anne Boleyn caught his eye.  He accompanied Sir Thomas Cheney on a diplomatic mission to France in 1526 and, the following year, accompanied Sir John Russell to the papal court in Rome, and to Venice.  From 1528 to 1530, Sir Thomas served as High Marshal of Calais, and in 1532, Commissioner of the Peace of Essex, and accompanied Henry and Anne Boleyn, now the king's mistress, to Calais later the same year. In January 1533 Anne Boleyn married Henry; and Sir Thomas served in her coronation in June.

        Wyatt was knighted in 1535, but in 1536 he was imprisoned in the Tower for quarreling with his kinsman, Henry Howard, then Duke of Suffolk, and possibly also because he was suspected, with good reason, of being one of Anne Boleyn's lovers. During this imprisonment Sir Thomas witnessed the execution of Anne Boleyn on May 19, 1536 from the Bell Tower.  He was released later that year, and in November of the year his father, Henry, died.

        Sir Thomas found himself back in favor at court and was made ambassador to the court of the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V, in Spain.  He returned to England in June 1539, and later that year was again ambassador to Charles until May 1540. Wyatt's praise of country life, and the cynical comments about foreign courts, in his verse epistle  "Mine Own John Poins"  derive from his own experience.

        In 1541 he was charged with treason on a revival of charges originally leveled against him in 1538 by Edmund Bonner, now Bishop of London.  It was said that while ambassador, Sir Thomas had had dealings with Cardinal Pole and been rude about the King's person.   Sir Thomas once more languished in the Tower, where he wrote an impassioned "Defence." . He received a royal pardon, perhaps at the request of Queen Katharine Howard, and was fully restored to favor in 1542.  Sir Thomas  was given various royal offices after his pardon, but he became ill after welcoming Charles V's envoy at Falmouth and died at Sherborne.

        Sir Thomas, along with Sir Henry Howard, was the first to introduce the sonnet into English, with its characteristic final rhyming couplet. He wrote extraordinarily accomplished imitations of Petrarch's sonnets, including "I find no peace"' ('Pace non trovo') and "Whoso List to Hunt," the latter, quite different in tone from Petrarch's 'Una candida cerva', has often been seen to refer to Anne Boleyn as the deer with a jewelled collar. Wyatt was also adept at other new forms in English, such as the terza rima and the rondaeu.

        None of Wyatt's poems had been published in his lifetime, with the exception of a few poems in a miscellany entitled The Court of Venus. His first published work was Certain Psalms, in 1594, a metrical translations of the penitential psalms. It wasn't until 1557, 15 years after Wyatt's death, that a number of his poetry appeared alongside Henry Howard's in printer Richard Tottel's "Songs and Sonnets written by the Right Honorable Lord Henry Howard late Earl of Surrey and other."  Until modern times it was called simply Songs and Sonnets; but now it is generally known as "Tottel's Miscellany.  The rest of Wyatt's poetry, lyrics, and satires remained in manuscript until the 19th and 20th centuries "rediscovered" them.   See “Dictionary of National Biography”

       

Child of Elizabeth Brooke and Thomas Wyatt is:

+      167             i.    Thomas8 Wyatt, Knt., died April 11, 1554 in London.

 

 

        94.  Edward7 Waldegrave, I, Esq., of Lawford Hall (George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)129 was born 1514 in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury, and died August 13, 1584 in Lawford Hall, County Essex, probably, about 8 miles northeast of Colchester130.  He married Joan Acworth, of Luton, Bedfordshire131 Abt. 1556, daughter of George Acworth and Margaret Wilberforce.  She was born Abt. 1519 in Luton, Bedfordshire County, about 70 miles southwest of Bury St. Edmunds, and died Abt. December 10, 1590 in Lawford Hall, County Essex, probably, about 8 miles northeast of Colchester132.

        In 1560, Edward Waldegrave owned Rivers Hall in Boxted, County Essex, about seven miles northwest of Lawford Hall.  An impressive wall monument in Lawford Church features kneeling effigies, the arms of Waldegrave and Wilberforce, and the following inscription:  "Here resteth the bodies of Edward Waldegrave Esquier the yongest soone of George Waldegrave of Smalbridge Esquier he deceased the 13 of August A.o  1584 having had one sonne and foure daughters.  A.o aetatis suae 70.  Also of Iohan his wife who deceased . . . This Iohan was the daughter of George Ackworth of Luton in the Countie of Bedford Esquier and of Mgret his wife, which Mgret was the daughter and heire of . . . Wilborefoss Esquier of the Bisshoprick of Duresme, of which Mgret this Iohan was heire."

       

Children of Edward Waldegrave and Joan Acworth are:

+      168             i.    Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, born in Lawford Hall, Lawford, County Essex, probably, about six miles northeast of Colchester; died Aft. 1616 in Groton, County Suffolk, about 10 miles southeast of Long Melford, buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton.

        169            ii.    Edward Waldegrave, Esq. II, of Lawford Hall133, died February 12, 1620/21.

        170           iii.    Mary Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall133.  She married (1) Izacke Astley, Esq..  She married (2) William Kighley, of Essex.

 

 

        95.  William7 Waldegrave, Knt. of Smallbridge Manor (George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)134 was born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury, and died May 2, 1554 in Callys, France where his body is buried at St. Maries Church.  He married Julian Rainesford, of Bradfield Hall, County Ess135, daughter of John Rainesford, Knt., of County Essex. 

       

Children of William Waldegrave and Julian Rainesford are:

+      171             i.    Dorothy8 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor.

+      172            ii.    William Waldegrave, Knt. of Smallbridge Manor, died 1613 in Bures St. Mary, probably, and buried at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

 

 

        97.  Anne7 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor (George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)136 was born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury, and died Abt. April 24, 1590 in Thornage, County Norfolk, possibly, about 26 miles northwest of Norwich, and buried at Thornage137.  She married (1) Henry de Bures, Knt., of Acton Hall Bef. 1516.  He was born in Acton Hall, County Suffolk, probably, about 3 miles southeast of Long Melford, and possibly baptized at All Saints, Acton, and died Abt. 1528 in Acton Hall, County Suffolk, probably and buried at All Saints in a lovely canopied and pinnacled alter-tomb138.  She married (2) Clement Heigham, Chief Baron of the Exchequer Aft. 1528, son of Clement Heigham and Maude Cooke.  He died March 9, 1569/70 in Barrow, County Suffolk, about 6 miles west of Bury St. Edmunds, and buried at All Saints, Barrow, in a canopied tomb in the chancel139.

        Lady Anne and Sir Henry had four daughters.  An ancestor of Sir Henry's, Sir. Robert de Bures, is buried at All Saints at Acton and features one of the finest and most famous brass effigies in England.  Anne's second husband, Sir Clement Higham, was Chief Baron of the Exchequer to Queen Mary.  He was the last Speaker of the House of Commons.  By his second wife, Anne Waldegrave, he had three sons and two daughters.  In his elaborate brass he is shown kneeling at a prayer desk.  His first son who died at a young age is shown behind him in a shroud.  His wives, Anne and Anne Monings, of Bury St. Edmund, are represented in two separate brasses, each wearing identical costumes, both kneeling at a prayer desk.  Their children kneel behind their mothers.

        Anne Waldegrave's brass at Thornage is inscribed:  "Heare lieth Anne lady and wife to Sir Clement Heigham Knight of whom mention is made in his tome at Barrow in Suffolke.  Dissesed Aprilis 24 A.D.o 1590 aet. Suae 84"

 

       

Child of Anne Waldegrave and Henry de Bures is:

+      173             i.    Anne8 de Bures, of Acton Hall, County Suffolk, born Abt. 1516; died December 21, 1609 in England and buried St. Botolph's, Redgrave, County Suffolk, at the south side of the Sanctuary.

 

 

        98.  Phyllis7 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor (George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)140 was born in Smallbridge Manor, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Mary, Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.  She married Thomas Higham, of Higham Green & Denham141, son of John Higham and Mary Teringham.  He was born in Higham Green, now Higham, probably, about 7 miles west of Bury St. Edmunds, and died Abt. December 14, 1554 in Gazeley, County Suffolk, possibly, and buried at All Saints, Gazeley, about 5 miles southeast of Newmarket.

        CAUTION:  The 1612 Visitation of Essex does not list her.

       

Children of Phyllis Waldegrave and Thomas Higham are:

        174             i.    Thomas8 Higham, of Higham Green & Denham142.

        175            ii.    George Higham, of Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire142, born in Higham Green, now Higham, probably, about 7 miles west of Bury St. Edmunds; died in Sawbridgeworth, County Hertfordshire, possibly, about 16 miles northwest of Chelmsford, County Essex.  He married Anne Bromley, of Hunsdon, Hertfordshire; born in Hunsdon, Hertfordshire County, possibly, about 4 miles southwest of Sawbridgeworth.

        176           iii.    Francis Higham, of St. Anthony Parish, London143.

        177           iv.    Henry Higham, of Higham Green144.  He married Anne Lucas, of Little Saxham Manor & Horringer; born in Little Saxham Manor, probably, about 4 miles southwest of Bury St. Edmunds, and baptized, probably at St. James, Little Saxham; died April 13, 1614144.

        178            v.    John Higham, of Higham Green144.

        179           vi.    Anne Higham, of Higham Green144, died in Gazeley, County Suffolk, possibly, and possibly buried at All Saints, about 5 miles southeast of Newmarket.  She married Thomas Randall July 14, 1553 in All Saints, Gazeley, County Suffolk, about 5 miles southeast of Newmarket.

+      180          vii.    Bridget Higham.

 

 

        101.  Thomas7 Waldegrave, of Bures St. Mary, Suffolk (Anthony6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)145 was born in Bures St. Mary, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury, and died in Bures St. Mary, probably, and buried at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.  He married (1) Elizabeth Gurdon, of Waldingfield & Assington145, daughter of Robert Gurdon, of Waldingfield & Assington.  She was born in Assington, County Suffolk, probably, and probably baptized at St. Edmund, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury, and died 1578 in Bures St. Mary, probably, and buried at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.  He married (2) Mary Badby. 

        St. Edmund, at Assington, boasts many monuments to the Gurdon family who rose to wealth and influence when Sir Adam Gurdon was befriended by Edward I after losing to him in single combat during the Barons War. They included memorials to Robert Gurdon, who died in 1577 and his wife; John Gurdon, who died in 1623, and his wife; a double memorial dated circa 1625; Brampton Gurdon, who died in 1648, John Gurdon who died in 1758, and his wife, who died in 1710; and, Philip Gurdon who died in 1817 and his wife.  The Register dates from 1558.  There is a brass showing a Knight and his Lady, dated circa 1500, thought to represent members of the Wingfield family.

       

Children of Thomas Waldegrave and Elizabeth Gurdon are:

+      181             i.    Thomas8 Waldegrave, of Mount Bures, Essex, born in Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury; died September 4, 1640 in Mount Bures, County, Essex, probably, about 5 miles southwest of his mother's ancestral home, Assington, County Suffolk.

        182            ii.    Elizabeth Waldegrave, of Bures St. Mary, Suffolk145, born in Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.  She married Isaac Wincoll, of Twinsted, County Essex145; born in Twinsted, County Essex, probably, about 5 miles northwest of Elizabeth's brother's home at Mount Bures.

        183           iii.    John Waldegrave, of Bures St. Mary, Suffolk146, born in Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

        184           iv.    William Waldegrave, of Bures St. Mary, Suffolk146, born in Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury.

 

 

        104.  William7 Waldegrave, Esq., of Illford (Anthony6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)146 was born in Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury, and died in Illford, probably, now considered part of Greater London.  It is about 8 miles northeast of Walthamstowe, his son's home.  He married Gamond or Garnon, of Barking.  She was born in Barking, probably, now considered part of Greater London.  It is about 5 miles southeast of Ilford.

       

Child of William Waldegrave and Gamond is:

+      185             i.    William8 Waldegrave, of Walthamstowe, died in Walthamstowe, probably, now considered part of Greater London.

 

 

        105.  Oliver7 St. John, Baron of Bletshoe (Margaret6 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died 1582.

       

Children of Oliver St. John, Baron of Bletshoe are:

+      186             i.    John8 St. John, 2nd Lord of Bletshoe, died 1596.

        187            ii.    Oliver St. John, 3rd Baron of Bletshoe, died 1618.

 

 

        106.  Margaret7 St. John, of Bletshoe (Margaret6 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)147 was born in Bletsoe, County Bedfordshire, about 24 miles west of Cambridge, County Cambridgeshire, and died August 27, 1562 in Woburn, County Bedfordshire, about 12 miles northwest of Luton.  She married (1) Thomas Gamage, Knt., of Coity, Glamorganshire148.    She married (2) Francis Russell, the Elder Abt. 1546, son of John Russell and Anne Sapcote.  He was born 1527 in Chenies, County Buckinghamshire, about 10 miles southwest of St. Albans, and died July 28, 1575 in Bedford House, the Strand.

       

Child of Margaret St. John and Thomas Gamage is:

+      188             i.    Margaret8 Gamage, of Colity, Glamorganshire, born in Colity, County Glamorganshire, Wales; died May 1, 1581 in Ryegate, County Surrey and was buried May 19, 1581 at Reygate.

 

       

Children of Margaret St. John and Francis Russell are:

        189             i.    Edward8 Russell.

        190            ii.    John Russell.

        191           iii.    William Russell.

        192           iv.    Elizabeth Russell.

        193            v.    Margaret Russell.

        194           vi.    Anne Russell, born December 1548.

+      195          vii.    Francis Russell, the Younger, born 1553 in Badby, County Northamptonshire, about 12 miles west of Northampton.

 

 

Generation No. 8

 

        107.  Thomas8 Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk (Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)149 was born March 10, 1537/38 in Kenninghall, County Norfolk150, and died June 2, 1572 in Tower Hill by execution for high treason and buried in the chapel of the Tower.  He married (1) Mary Fitzalan151 March 30, 1555, daughter of Henry Fitzalan, 12th Earl of Arundel.  She was born Abt. 1541152, and died August 25, 1557 in Arundel House, London, two months after giving birth to her son.  She was sixteen years old153.  He married (2) Margaret Audley, of Walden154 1558154, daughter of Thomas Audley, Lord Audley of Walden.  She died January 1563/64 in Audley End, County Essex, three weeks after giving birth to her son, William.  He married (3) Elizabeth Leyburne January 29, 1565/66.  She died September 4, 1567 in Kenninghall, County Norfolk in childbirth, and buried September 18, 1567 at Kenninghall.

        After the execution of his father in 1547, Sir Thomas and his siblings were removed from his mother by order of the privy council and committed to the guardianship of his aunt, Mary Fitzroy, Duchess of Richmond, to ensure his education in protestant principles.

        His tutor was John Foxe, later the author of "Fox's Book of Martyrs, A History of the Lives, Sufferings and Triumphant Deaths of the Early Christian and the Protestant Martyrs."  The two would remain lifelong friends, Sir Thomas serving as his benefactor.  Foxe would dedicate his first version, in Latin, to Sir Thomas.

        Upon the release of his grandfather from prison, Foxe was dismissed and replaced by Bishop White of Lincoln.

        Sir Thomas was restored to his father's title on the accession of Queen Mary, the Queen of Scots.  In 1553, he succeeded his grandfather as Duke of Norfolk in 1554.  He remained in the good graces of both Queen Mary and her successor, her half sister, Elizabeth I, the "Virgin Queen. He commanded the English forces that invaded Scotland in 1559-60, and he presided over the commission that inquired in 1568 into the quarrel between Mary Stuart and Scotland's Protestant nobility.

        Sir Thomas listened readily to suggestions from the Scottish statesman William Maitland and others that the difficulties between England and Scotland could be resolved if Sir Thomas would wed Mary and have her declared Elizabeth's successor. Sir Thomas, however, was neither bold enough to ask Elizabeth's consent for the match nor disloyal enough to raise an insurrection against her. Instead, several Roman Catholic nobles in northern England revolted in an attempt to free the Queen of Scots, marry her to Sir, and restore Roman Catholicism to England. The uprising was suppressed, and in October 1569 Elizabeth had Sir Thomas arrested. He was released the following August, but he soon allowed himself to be drawn into the plot of Roberto Ridolfi, an Italian merchant living in London, for a Spanish invasion of England and installation of Mary on the English throne.  Discovery of the plot led to Sir Thomas' imprisonment and execution.  "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 27

 

       

Child of Thomas Howard and Mary Fitzalan is:

+      196             i.    Phillip9 Howard, 1st Earl of Arundel, born June 28, 1557 in Arundel House, London; died October 19, 1595 in Tower of London and buried first in the chapel of the Tower, and his body removed to Arundel in 1624.

 

       

Children of Thomas Howard and Margaret Audley are:

+      197             i.    Thomas9 Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk, born August 24, 1561; died 1626.

+      198            ii.    William Howard, "Bauld (Bold) Willie", born December 19, 1563 in Audley End, County Essex; died October 7, 1640 in Greystock, Cumberland.

        199           iii.    Margaret Howard.

 

 

        112.  Henry8 Howard, 2nd Viscount Bindon (Thomas7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died 1590.  He married Frances Mewtas, Viscountess Bindon, daughter of Peter Mewtas, Knight, of Essex. 

       

Child of Henry Howard and Frances Mewtas is:

        200             i.    Douglass9 Howard, Lady Gorges.  She married Arthur Georges, Knight.

 

 

        118.  Charles Lyte8 Howard (Thomas7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)

       

Child of Charles Lyte Howard is:

+      201             i.    Catherine9 Howard.

 

 

        120.  Matthew8 Arundel, Knt., of Wardour Castle (Margaret7 Howard, Edmund6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)155 died December 1598.  He married Margaret Willoughby, of Wollaton156, daughter of Henry Willoughby, Knt., of Wollaton.  She was born in Wollaton, County Nottinghamshire, probably, about 5 miles southwest of Notthingham.

       

Child of Matthew Arundel and Margaret Willoughby is:

+      202             i.    Thomas9 Arundel, Lord Arundell of Wardour, born Abt. 1560; died November 7, 1639.

 

 

        123.  Henry8 Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon (Mary7 Boleyn, Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born March 4, 1525/26 in Hengrave, County Suffolk, about 4 miles west of Bury St. Edmunds, and possibly baptized at St. John Lateran, and died July 23, 1596 in Somerset House, the Strand and buried at Westminster Abbey.  He married Anne Morgan May 21, 1545, daughter of Thomas Morgan and Elizabeth Whitney.  She was born 1529 in Arkestone, County Herefordshire, and died January 19, 1604/05 in England and buried at Westminster Abbey.

       

Children of Henry Carey and Anne Morgan are:

        203             i.    George9 Carey, 2nd Baron Hunsdon, born 1547 in Hengrave, County Suffolk, about 4 miles west of Bury St. Edmunds, and was christened at Clovelly; died September 9, 1603.

+      204            ii.    Katherine Carey, Countess of Nottingham, born in Hunsdon, County Hertfordshire; died February 25, 1601/02 in Arundel House, London and buried February 28, 1602 at Chelsea, London.

        205           iii.    Michael Carey, born in Clovelly, County Devon.

        206           iv.    Philadelphia Carey, born in Bolton, County Lancashire; died February 3, 1625/26 in Langer, County Notthinghamshire, and buried at Langer.

        207            v.    John Carey, born in Castle Cary, County Somerset; died Abt. April 1617 in Hunsdon, County Herfordshire, and buried April 7, 1617, at Hunsdon, Hertfordshire.

        208           vi.    Edmund Carey, born in Hunsdon, County Herfordshire; died September 12, 1637 in Culham, County Oxfordshire, and buried February 13, at Culham.

        209          vii.    Thomas Carey, born in Clovelly, County Devon.

        210         viii.    Henry Carey, born Abt. September 1564 in Clovelly, County Devon, and christened at Clovelly, September 15, 1564.

        211            ix.    William Carey, born Abt. May 1570 in Hunsdon, County Herfordshire, and christened at County Buckinghamshire, May 10, 1570; died 1600 in Hunsdon, County Herfordshire.

 

 

        124.  Mary8 Carey, Lady Knolleys (Mary7 Boleyn, Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)157 was born in Chilton Folis, County Wiltshire, and died August 15, 1568.  She married Francis Knolleys, K.G. 1539.  He was born Abt. 1514, and died Abt. 1596.

 

Notes for Mary Carey, Lady Knolleys:

        Lady Mary was the Chief Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth.

       

Children of Mary Carey and Francis Knolleys are:

+      212             i.    Anne9 Knolleys, Lady West.

        213            ii.    Lettice Knolleys, born 1540; died 1569.

        214           iii.    William Knolleys, born 1547; died 1632.

 

 

        132.  Henry8 Knyvet, Knt., Sheriff of Wiltshire (Henry7, Muriel6 Howard, Countess Lisle, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)158 died June 14, 1598 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire, and buried at Charlton by Malmesbury.  He married Elizabeth Stumpe159.  She died July 14, 1585.

        Sir Henry was High Sheriff of County Wiltshire in 1577.  In 1596 he wrote, "The Defence of the Realme," first published in 1906 by Oxford and edited by Charles Hughes.

       

Child of Henry Knyvet and Elizabeth Stumpe is:

+      215             i.    Catherine9 Knyvet, of Charlton by Malmesbury, born 1564 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire; died September 12, 1638 in Aldenham, County Hertfordshire and buried at Saffron Walden, County Essex.

 

 

        134.  Elizabeth8 Howard, I, of Effingham (Charles7, William6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)160 was born Abt. 1570 in Effingham, County Surrey, and died Bef. January 31, 1645/46 in Greenwich and buried January 31, 1646.  She married Robert Southwell, Commander161 1583 in Effingham, County Surrey, son of Thomas Southwell and Mary Mansell.  He was born Abt. March 23, 1560/61 in Effingham, County Surrey and christened March 23, 1561, Mereworth, Kent, and died November 12, 1599 in England and buried at Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 8 miles southeast of East Dereham and 16 miles southwest of Norwich.

        CAUTION:  "Dictionary of National Biography" states that Elizabeth Howard married Henry Fitzgerald, Earl of Kildare and that Frances Howard, her sister, married Robert Southwell.  Robert Southwell commanded the "Elizabeth Jonas" against the Spanish Armada in 1588.

       

Children of Elizabeth Howard and Robert Southwell are:

+      216             i.    Elizabeth9 Southwell, of Woodrising, born in Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 8 miles southwest of East Dereham about about 16 miles southwest of Norwich; died September 13, 1631 in Italy.

        217            ii.    Catherine Southwell, of Woodrising, born in Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 8 miles southwest of East Dereham about about 16 miles southwest of Norwich.

 

 

        139.  William8 Howard, Baron Ho (Charles7, William6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born December 27, 1577 in Effingham, County Surrey and was christened January 13, 1578 at Effingham, and died November 28, 1615 in Hampton, Middlesex, and buried Chelseh, London161.  He married Anne St. John, Lady Howard161 1597161, daughter of John St. John, 2nd Lord of Bletshoe. 

       

Child of William Howard and Anne St. John is:

        218             i.    Elizabeth9 Howard, Lady Mordaunt.  She married John Mordaunt, Earl of Peterborough.

 

 

        144.  Frances8 Howard, Knight, of Great Bookham (William7, William6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)  He married Jane Monson, of Kinnersley, Lady Howard, daughter of William Monson, Sir Monson, of Kinnersley. 

       

Child of Frances Howard and Jane Monson is:

+      219             i.    Charles9 Howard, of Great Bookham, died 1672.

 

 

        146.  Robert8 Dudley, illeg. (Douglass7 Howard, Baroness Sheffield, William6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born August 7, 1574 in Sheen Palace, County Surrey, and died September 6, 1649 in Forence, Italy and buried at Boldrone, Italy.  He married Elizabeth Southwell, of Woodrising 1605 in Lyons, France, daughter of Robert Southwell and Elizabeth Howard.  She was born in Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 8 miles southwest of East Dereham about about 16 miles southwest of Norwich, and died September 13, 1631 in Italy.

        In many cases in history there have been instances were love prevailed against all odds of its success.   Such is the case of Sir Robert Dudley and Lady Elizabeth Southwell.  Their love would transcend all obstacles and prevail.

        Sir Robert, the illegitimate son of Robert Dudley and his amore, Douglass Howard, had been acknowledged by his father since his birth, who supervised his upbringing and education.  Sir Robert entered Christ Church, Oxford, and when his father died in 1588, the Castle Kenilworth was inherited by Robert.

        Sir Robert was a friend of Thomas Cavendish the explorer.  When Cavendish died in 1593 he left two ships to his friend.  Sir Robert put them to use in 1594 with a voyage of discovery to the West Indies where he destroyed two Spanish ships and explored the Orinoco River and Guyana.  In 1596 he went with Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, and a cousin of Queen Elizabeth, to attack the Spanish at Cadiz.  The English under Lord Charles Howard of Effingham, Earl of Nottingham, attacked the Spanish town of Cadiz to destroy the Spanish fleet so there would not be a repeat of the Spanish Armada of 1588.  It was an overwhelming success.  Devereux knighted Sir Robert for his efforts.  Queen Elizabeth criticized him for creating too many knights, but all was forgiven.

        Sir Robert's first wife died and he remarried Alice Leigh.  He decided to reopen the question of his legitimacy supported by his mother and his step mother Lettice Knollys, the Dowager Countess of Leicester.  The support of his stepmother, however, may have been a mistake and doomed his efforts from the start.  Lettice Knollys was the second wife of the Earl of Leicester.  She had married the Earl after her first husband Walter Devereux the 1st Earl of Essex died mysteriously.  Queen Elizabeth hated her and called her 'that she-wolf'. She was never forgiven for secretly marrying Leicester.  Sir Robert's bill failed in the Star Chamber, the law court at Westminster, and he was ordered to pay a 100 pound fine.

        Elizabeth Southwell had been his mistress for some time, and Sir Robert, distressed by his failure to win legitimacy, angrily decided to abandon England and asked Elizabeth to come with him.

        They secretly left England, Elizabeth disguised as his page boy.  When they arrived in France they became Roman Catholics and they applied for Papal dispensation to marry, from Pope Paul V, because they were cousins, the couple conveniently forgetting Sir Robert was still married to Alice Leigh.  It is possible that the Roman Catholic church did not recognize the protestant wedding of Robert and Alice Leigh as being a legal wedding and therefore not binding.  Sir Robert and Lady Elizabeth were married in 1605 at Lyon, France in a Roman Catholic ceremony.  When Sir Robert refused to return to England his estates were sold.  Henry, Prince of Wales, bought Kenilworth Castle. 

        By 1613 the couple had settled in Florence where Sir Robert was to become the Chamberlain to the Duchess of Tuscany.  While he was there he invented new designs of shipbuilding and drained the swamps between Pisa and the sea allowing Livorno to become a great port.  He also wrote several works on navigation that gained him recognition as a navigator.

        The titles held by his grandfather John Dudley who had been executed for his part in trying to usurp the throne from Queen Mary with his candidate, Lady Jane Grey, when Edward VI died. Guilford Dudley, John Dudely's son, was the husband of Lady Jane.  Jane was queen for nine days before being arrested and eventually executed by Queen Mary.

        The Holy Roman Emperor, Ferdinand II, revived the old Dudley titles of Earl of Warwick and Duke of Northumberland which permitted Sir Robert to these titles in the Holy Roman Empire.

        He was also given Villa Rinieri at Castello as a reward for his services.  The newly made Duke and Duchess had thirteen children who were all married into the Italian nobility. They lived happily in Italy and were buried in their adopted country with all the honors of the nobility.

- "Who's Who in Shakespeare's England," p. 71-72 & 236

       

Children of Robert Dudley and Elizabeth Southwell are:

        220             i.    Henry9 Dudley, of Florence, born in Forence, Italy.

        221            ii.    Anna Southwell Dudley, of Florence, born in Forence, Italy; died 1629.

        222           iii.    Mary Dudley, of Florence, born in Forence, Italy.

        223           iv.    Ambrose Dudley, of Florence, born in Forence, Italy.

        224            v.    Charles Carlo Dudley, of Florence, born in Forence, Italy; died October 26, 1686.

        225           vi.    Fernando Dudley, of Florence, born in Forence, Italy.

        226          vii.    Teresa Dudley, of Florence, born in Forence, Italy.

        227         viii.    Cosmo Dudley, of Florence, born in Forence, Italy.

        228            ix.    Anthony Enrico Dudley, of Florence, born September 12, 1631 in Forence, Italy.

 

 

        147.  Elizabeth8 de Vere, of Hedingham Castle (John7, Anne6 Howard, Countess of Oxford, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died in England and buried at St. Osyth Priory, County Essex.  She married Thomas Darcy, K.G., 1st Lord Darcy, son of Roger Darcy and Elizabeth Wentworth.  He was born in Osyth, County Essex, about 12 miles southeast of Colchester, and died in England and buried at St. Osyth Priory, County Essex.

       

Children of Elizabeth de Vere and Thomas Darcy are:

+      229             i.    Mary9 Darcy, of Danbury, County Essex, born in Danbury, County Essex, about 6 miles east of Chelmsford, and about 8 miles west of Maldon; died in Windham Manor, probably, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich.

        230            ii.    John Darcy, died in England and buried at St. Osyth Priory, County Essex.

        231           iii.    Thomasine Darcy.

        232           iv.    Constance Darcy.

        233            v.    Robert Darcy.

        234           vi.    Alberic Darcy.

        235          vii.    Richard Darcy.

 

 

        148.  Frances8 de Vere, Countess of Surrey (John7, Anne6 Howard, Countess of Oxford, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)162 died June 30, 1577 in Soham Earl, County Suffolk, and buried at St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk in the tomb with her husband163.  She married (1) Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey164 Bet. February 13, 1530/31 and April 1531165, son of Thomas Howard and Elizabeth Stafford.  He was born Abt. 1517 in Hunsdon, County Herfordshire166, and died January 21, 1546/47 in Tower Hill at the command of the queen and was beheaded and buried first at All Hallows' Barking, in Tower Street, but later in the chancel of St. Michael, Framlingham, County Suffolk167,168.  She married (2) Thomas Steyning, Earl Soham Manor169 Aft. 1546.  He died Aft. October 20, 1575170.

        He was a great favorite at court and known for his sonnets.  He established a form that was used by Shakespeare and that has become known as the English sonnet form:  three quatrains and a couplet, rhyming abab cdcd efef gg. Even more significant, he was the first English poet to publish in blank verse-unrhymed iambic pentameter-a verse form so popular in the succeeding four centuries that it seems almost indigenous to the language. The work in which he used this "strange meter," as the publisher called it, was a translation of part of Virgil's "Aeneid."  Sir Henry's poetry circulated in manuscript form in court circles for years.  He published his "Epitaph on Sir Thomas Wyatt, his kinsman, but most of his poetry first appear in 1557, ten years after his death in "Songs and Sonnets," now referred to as "Tottel's Miscellany."

        Sir Henry and his wife are buried in an elaborate painted alabaster tomb.  At one end of the tomb figures of their sons, Thomas, the fourth Duke, and Henry, Earl of Northampton, kneel.  At the other end are the figures of their daughters, Jane, Katherine and Mary.  It was Sir Howard's misfortune to be executed only nine days before the death of Henry VIII who was both his judge and jury.  To signify that he was beheaded, a replica of his coronet lies beside his effigy on the tomb.  See "Where Mightier Do Assault Than Do Defend"

       

Children are listed above under (50) Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey.

       

Child of Frances de Vere and Thomas Steyning is:

        236             i.    Mary9 Steyning171.  She married Charles Seckford.

 

 

        154.  Abigail8 Knyvet, Lady Sedley (John7, Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners, Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)172 was born 173, and died December 15, 1623.  She married (1) Martin Sedley, Sir Martin of Morley, Norfolk.  He was born 1531, and died 1609.  She married (2) Edmund Moundeford December 16, 1600. 

       

Children of Abigail Knyvet and Martin Sedley are:

+      237             i.    Muriel9 Sedley, born 1583; died 1661.

        238            ii.    Martin Sedley, the Younger, of Morley174.

 

 

        156.  John8 Knyvet, I, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk (William7, Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners, Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. May 1560 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk, and died Abt. August 18, 1640 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.  He married Joanna.  She was born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

       

Children of John Knyvet and Joanna are:

+      239             i.    John9 Knyvet, II, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. April 1598 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died Abt. June 25, 1665.

        240            ii.    Mary Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. June 1594.

        241           iii.    Katherine Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. December 31, 1595.

        242           iv.    Margaret Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. April 1605.

        243            v.    Elizabeth Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. December 1608; died January 5, 1631/32.

        244           vi.    Frances Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. October 1612.

 

 

        165.  Anne8 Tanfield, of Gayton (Francis7, William6, Catherine5 Neville, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)  She married Clement Vincent, of Harpole, County Northampton175, son of George Vincent, of Peekleton. 

       

Child of Anne Tanfield and Clement Vincent is:

+      245             i.    Elizabeth9 Vincent, of Harpole.

 

 

        167.  Thomas8 Wyatt, Knt. (Elizabeth7 Brooke, Thomas6, Margaret5 Neville, Lady Brooke, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died April 11, 1554 in London.  He married Jane Hawte, Lady Wyatt 1537, daughter of William Hawte and Mary Guilford. 

        In January 1554, when Queen Mary's intention to marry Philip II of Spain was announced, Sir Thomas joined a planned insurrection against the queen. His allies in other parts of the country were arrested or dispersed, but Wyatt raised a small army in Kent. Troops were sent against him at Rochester, but most of them deserted to Sir Thomas' side. He set out for London and arrived early in February, but defections and the loyalty of Londoners to Queen Mary prevented him from capturing her and taking the city.  He surrendered and was executed as a traitor. It was supposed by many that Princess Elizabeth was involved, but Wyatt's last statement exonerated her.

       

Children of Thomas Wyatt and Jane Hawte are:

+      246             i.    George9 Wyatt, of Allington Castle & Boxley Abbey, born 1550; died 1625.

+      247            ii.    Anne Wyatt.

        248           iii.    Jane Wyatt.  She married Charles Scott176.

 

 

        168.  Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall (Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)177 was born in Lawford Hall, Lawford, County Essex, probably, about six miles northeast of Colchester, and died Aft. 1616 in Groton, County Suffolk, about 10 miles southeast of Long Melford, buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton178.  She married William Clopton, armiger Lord of Castlings Manor179 in Lawford Hall, probably.  The 1558 Visitation of Essex refers to William of Bretton in Essex.  There is no Bretton in Essex, however, the Visitation of 1612 refers to "Castlyns in Grotton", son of Richard Clopton and Margaret Playters.  He died August 19, 1616 in Castlings Manor, Groton, County Suffolk, about 10 miles southeast of Long Melford, and buried August 19,1616  at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk180.

        In light of the family's unerring ability to irritate kings, it was probably a good thing we migrated to Virginia.  With breathtaking regularity one kin or another was being hauled to the Tower of London and threatened with beheading or worse.  The close connections with royalty gave the family ample opportunity to hone this questionable talent.  And our grandparents, Edward Waldegrave and Joan (Acworth) Bulmer established a benchmark in this arena that has not been surpassed by any of their Clopton descendants despite the passage of centuries.  Tempting fate, they careened about the palace with Queen Katherine Howard indulging in amorous escapades right underneath the nose of the infamous Henry VIII.  Had their tender necks not escaped the axe, then their daughter, and our grandmother, Margery, would not have been born.  See "Midnight Romps & Wilted Roses"

       

Children of Margery Waldegrave and William Clopton are:

        249             i.    Francis9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton181.

+      250            ii.    George Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton.

+      251           iii.    Anna Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. January 29, 1579/80 in Castlings Manor and baptized January 29, 1579 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk; died in Boxted, possibly, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, possibly, although there is no memorial to her in the church.

+      252           iv.    Bridgett Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. January 29, 1580/81 in Castlings Manor and baptized January 29, 1581 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk; died March 1673/74 in Kersey, possibly, and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk.

+      253            v.    Thomasine Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. February 5, 1581/82 in Castlings Manor and baptized February 5, 1582 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk; died December 11, 1616 in Winthrop Manor, England and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, in the Chancel, Groton, County Suffolk, December 11, 1616.

+      254           vi.    William Clopton, Esq, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. April 9, 1584 in Castlings Manor and baptized April 9, 1584 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk; died November 7, 1640 in Castlings Manor and buried November 7, 1640 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk.

+      255          vii.    Walter Clopton, Gent., of Coggeshall, Essex, born Abt. June 30, 1585 in Castlings Manor and baptized June 30, 1585 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk; died Aft. December 24, 1622 in Coggeshall, County Essex, possibly, about 6 miles southwest of Colchester, and probably buried at St. Nicholas, Little Coggeshall.

+      256         viii.    Waldegrave Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. May 18, 1587 in Castlings Manor and baptized May 18, 1587 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk.

        257            ix.    Mary Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton182, born Abt. January 15, 1587/88 in Castlings Manor and baptized January 15, 1588  at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk183; died Abt. May 19, 1632 in Groton, County Suffolk, England and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton184.  She married George Jennings, Gentleman, of London December 20, 1624185.

+      258             x.    Margery Clopton, of Castlings Manor, born Abt. June 18, 1590 in Castlings Manor and baptized June 18, 1590 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk; died Abt. October 30, 1633 in Groton, County Suffolk, England and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton.

+      259            xi.    Thomas Clopton, Rector of Ramsden-Belhouse, born Abt. September 18, 1593 in Castlings Manor and baptized September 18, 1593 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk; died February 13, 1662/63 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, about 3 miles north of Ramsden Bellhouse, and buried at St. Mary the Virgin, Ramsden Bellhouse, about seven miles south of Chelmsford.

        260           xii.    Elizabeth Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton186, born Abt. July 9, 1601 in Castlings Manor and baptized July 9, 1601 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk187; died Abt. November 6, 1627 in Groton, County Suffolk, England and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton188.  She married George Cocke, Gentleman, of Ipswich September 19, 1627189; born in Ipswich, County Suffolk, possibly, about 12 miles east of Groton.

 

 

        171.  Dorothy8 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor (William7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)190.  She married Arthur Harris, Esq., of Woodham Mortimer, son of William Harris, Sir William of Creeksea. 

 

Notes for Dorothy Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor:

        CAUTION:  The 1612 Visitation of Essex does not list her.

       

Child of Dorothy Waldegrave and Arthur Harris is:

+      261             i.    Dorothy9 Harris.

 

 

        172.  William8 Waldegrave, Knt. of Smallbridge Manor (William7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)191 died 1613 in Bures St. Mary, probably, and buried at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury192.  He married Elizabeth Mildmay.  She died 1581 in Bures St. Mary, probably, and buried at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury192.

       

Children of William Waldegrave and Elizabeth Mildmay are:

+      262             i.    Mary9 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, died December 19, 1599 in England and buried St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London.

        263            ii.    William Waldegrave, Knt, The Younger.

 

 

        173.  Anne8 de Bures, of Acton Hall, County Suffolk (Anne7 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. 1516, and died December 21, 1609 in England and buried St. Botolph's, Redgrave, County Suffolk, at the south side of the Sanctuary193.  She married Edmund Butts Abt. 1541, son of William Butts, Physician to King Henry VIII.  He died Abt. 1548.

        T. M. Felgate, in his "Suffolk Heraldic Brasses," notes the details in her monumental brass:  "Over her French Bonnet Anne wears a Calash, a large veil spreading attractively over her shoulders to her waist.  She has a large starched ruff around her neck, and plain close-fitting cutts at her wrists.  Her patterned bodice has a round-ended stomacher, below which her farthingale skirt displays an elaborately embroidered panel open to her feet.  She has round-toed heeled shoes, fastened with bow laces, and stands on an unattractive circular pedistal."  The inscription beneath her brass states:  "The weaker sexes strongest precedent lyes here belowe; seaven fayer years she spent in wedlock sage; and since that merry age sixty one years she lived a widdowe sage.  Hvmble as great as fvll of grace as elde A second Anna had she bvt beheld Christ in His flesh whom now she gloriovs sees belowe that first in time not in degree."  The marginal inscription reads:  "Anne Bvtts widdowe changed this mortall life for an importall the 21 of December 1609 She was the davghter and coheyre of Henrye Bvres Esq:  Wife to Edmond Bvtts Esq and mother to the Lady Anne Bacon wife of S(ir) Nicholas Bacon Knight who was her onlye child."

       

Child of Anne de Bures and Edmund Butts is:

        264             i.    Anne9 Butts, of Acton Hall, County Suffolk, died in England and buried St. Botolph's, Redgrave, County Suffolk, in a magnificent marble memorial in the north aisle.  She married Nicholas Bacon, Lord of the Manor of Redgrave; died in England and buried St. Botolph's, Redgrave, County Suffolk, with his wife in the north aisle.

 

 

        180.  Bridget8 Higham (Phyllis7 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)194.  She married Thomas Burrough, Esq., of Wickhambrook, Suffolk, son of William Burrough, Gent..  He died June 19, 1597.

       

Child of Bridget Higham and Thomas Burrough is:

+      265             i.    George9 Burrough, LL.B. Rector Pettaugh & Gosbeck, born Abt. October 26, 1579; died Abt. February 24, 1652/53 in England and buried at Pettaugh, February 24, 1653.

 

 

        181.  Thomas8 Waldegrave, of Mount Bures, Essex (Thomas7, Anthony6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)195 was born in Bures St. Mary, County Suffolk, probably, and probably baptized at St. Mary, about 5 miles southeast of Sudbury, and died September 4, 1640 in Mount Bures, County, Essex, probably, about 5 miles southwest of his mother's ancestral home, Assington, County Suffolk.  He married Margaret Homstead, of Halsted, County Essex196, daughter of John Homstead, of Halsted, County Essex.  She was born in Halsted, County Essex, probably, about 6 miles northwest of Mount Bures, and died in Mount Bures, County, Essex, probably.

       

Child of Thomas Waldegrave and Margaret Homstead is:

        266             i.    Jemima9 Waldegrave197, died 1639.  She married Herbert Pelham Abt. October 13, 1626.

               It is believed Jemima died either during or shortly after the voyage to New England.  Her marriage license stated her age as 20.  While the 1558 Visitation of Essex does list her, the later Visitation of 1612, does not.

 

 

        185.  William8 Waldegrave, of Walthamstowe (William7, Anthony6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)198 died in Walthamstowe, probably, now considered part of Greater London.  He married Dorathe Donington, of Hackney, daughter of Richard Donington, of Hackney.  She was born in Hackney, possibly, now considered part of Greater London.  Hackney is about 5 miles southwest of Walthamstowe.

       

Children of William Waldegrave and Dorathe Donington are:

        267             i.    Margaret9 Waldegrave, of Walthamstowe198, born in Walthamstowe, probably, now considered part of Greater London.

        268            ii.    Dorathe Waldegrave, of Walthamstowe198, born in Walthamstowe, probably, now considered part of Greater London.

 

 

        186.  John8 St. John, 2nd Lord of Bletshoe (Oliver7, Margaret6 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died 1596.

       

Child of John St. John, 2nd Lord of Bletshoe is:

+      269             i.    Anne9 St. John, Lady Howard.

 

 

        188.  Margaret8 Gamage, of Colity, Glamorganshire (Margaret7 St. John, of Bletshoe, Margaret6 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)199 was born in Colity, County Glamorganshire, Wales, and died May 1, 1581 in Ryegate, County Surrey and was buried May 19, 1581 at Reygate.  She married William Howard, K.G.,1st Baron of Effingham200 Bef. 1535, son of Thomas Howard and Agnes Tylney.  He was born Abt. 1510 in Ashwellthorpe, County Norfolk, and died January 11, 1571/72 in Hampton Court, County Herefordshire and was buried January 29, 1572 at Reygate, County Surrey200.

       

Children are listed above under (31) William Howard, K.G.,1st Baron of Effingham.

 

        195.  Francis8 Russell, the Younger (Margaret7 St. John, of Bletshoe, Margaret6 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)201 was born 1553 in Badby, County Northamptonshire, about 12 miles west of Northampton.  He married Ann Forrester, of Badby in Badby Parish, Northamptonshire.  She was born in Badby, County Northamptonshire, about 12 miles west of Northampton, and died Abt. 1605 in Badby, County Northamptonshire, about 12 miles west of Northampton.

       

Child of Francis Russell and Ann Forrester is:

+      270             i.    Ann9 Russell, of Badby, born April 18, 1574 in Badby, County Northamptonshire, about 12 miles west of Northampton; died in Badby, County Northamptonshire.

 

 

Generation No. 9

 

        196.  Phillip9 Howard, 1st Earl of Arundel (Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born June 28, 1557 in Arundel House, London202, and died October 19, 1595 in Tower of London and buried first in the chapel of the Tower, and his body removed to Arundel in 1624203.  He married Anne Darcy 1571204, daughter of Thomas Darcy, Lord Darcy of Gilsland.  She was born Abt. 1557.

        Sir Philip's mother died two months after his birth.  King Philip was one of his godfathers, and the child was regarded as heir to two of the greatest families in England.  In his youth he was known by the courtesy title of Earl of Surrey.  His education was overseen by Gregory Martin, a Fellow of St. John's College, Oxford.

        In 1569, at the age of twelve, he was formally betrothed to his father's ward, Anne Darcy, one of the three coheiresses of Thomas, Lord Darcy of Gilsland.  She was about twelve years old.  The marriage did not take place until 1571, when the couple were about fourteen.  The following year his father was executed for high treason.

        Upon completion of his studies at Cambridge, he returned to London and threw himself enthusiastically into the gay life at court, leaving behind his young wife because the Queen Elizabeth, I, the "Virginia Queen" who wasn't, did not like her favorites to be married.  He was very reckless which caused a great deal of concern to his maternal grandfather, Henry Fitzalan, the 12 Earl of Arundel.  Sir Philip ran into debt by his extravagances and by the entertainment he provided to Queen Elizabeth at Kenninghall.

On the death of his maternal grandfather, Henry Fitzalan, the 12th Earl, in February 1580 Sir Philip became Earl of Arundel. Possibly weary of his profligate life, the death of his grandfather no doubt brought him face to face with reality.  He returned to domestic life in the country with his wife, a woman of strong character.

In 1582 his wife, Lady Anne, became a Roman Catholic and was committed to the charge of Sir Thomas Shirley of Wiston, County Sussex, by Queen Elizabeth.  She would remain under his guard for a year.  He first child, Elizabeth, was born during her confinement.

He was himself suspected of disloyalty and was regarded by the discontented Roman Catholics as the center of the plots against the Queen's government and even as a possible successor. In 1583 he was with some reason suspected of complicity in Francis Throckmorton's plot and prepared to escape to Flanders, but his plans were interrupted by a visit from Elizabeth I at his house in London and by her subsequent order to confine himself there.

        In September 1584 he, too, became a Roman Catholic.  His cousin, Robert Southwell, became his chaplain and spiritual advisor.  Queen Elizabeth was deeply hurt that one of her nobles would venture openly t take up opinions of which she disapproved.

        Later he was then brought before the Star Chamber and sentenced to a fine and imprisonment for life. He was released for a time but was again arrested on a charge of high treason and, on April 14, 1589, condemned to death.  The sentence was not executed, and he died in the Tower of London.  He died after taken ill after dinner in August 1595, and it is not surprising that his illness was attributed to poison.  During this final illness he begged to be able to see his wife and children, whom he had not seen throughout his imprisonment, and to be able to go to church once more.  His requests were refused.

In 1929 he was beatified and would be made a Saint in 1970.  See "Where Mightier Do Assault Than Do Defend"

 

       

Children of Phillip Howard and Anne Darcy are:

        271             i.    Elizabeth10 Howard, of Arundel, born Abt. 1582 in Winston, County Sussex, while her mother was confined under the guard of Sir Thomas Shirley204; died 1600205.

+      272            ii.    Thomas Howard, 2nd Earl of Arundel, born 1585 in Finchingfield, County Essex; died October 4, 1646 in Padua, Italy and buried at Arundel House.

 

 

        197.  Thomas9 Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk (Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)206 was born August 24, 1561206, and died 1626.  He married Catherine Knyvet, of Charlton by Malmesbury207 1583207, daughter of Henry Knyvet and Elizabeth Stumpe.  She was born 1564 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire, and died September 12, 1638 in Aldenham, County Hertfordshire and buried at Saffron Walden, County Essex.

        Sir Thomas was educated at St. John's College, Cambridge, and.  He accompanied as a volunteer the fleet sent to oppose the Spanish Armada, and in the attack off Calais displayed such valor that he was knighted at sea by the Lord High Admiral on June 25, 1588.  He was soon made Captain of a man-of-war.  On March 5, 1591, he was appointed commander of the squadron which attached, in the face of overwhelming difficulties, the Spanish treasure ships off the Azores.  On his return from battle he was created a Knight of the Garter on April 23, 1597.  The following June he sailed as Vice Admiral of the fleet dispatched to the Azores.

        His ability and courage caught the attention of Queen Elizabeth, I, the "Virgin Queen" who wasn't, and he became a great favorite at court.  In her letters to him she referred to him as her "good Thomas."  On December 5, 1597 he was summoned to Parliament as Baron Howard de Walden, and became Lord Lieutenant of County Cambridgeshire and the Isle of Ely the following year.

        He was sworn High Steward of the University of Cambridge in February 1601; Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire on June 26, 1602; and, acting Lord Chamberlain of the Household on December 28.

        On one of her famous "progresses," in 1603, Queen Elizabeth was sumptuously entertained by Sir Thomas at Charterhouse.  For an account of another of her progresses, this time at Long Melford, see "Two Hundred Men in Velvet."

        He continued to rise, culminating in being named Lord High Treasurer of England, in July 11, 1614, an office he would hold until July 19, 1619.  In the autumn of 1618 grave irregularities were discovered in the treasurer.  Sir Thomas was suspended from his office, being accused of embezzlement, defrauding the king, and extorting money from the king's subjects.  Once again a Howard was in danger of execution.

        His wife, Lady Catherine, was indicted for extorting money from persons having business at the treasury through Sir John Bingley, Remembrancer of the Exchequer..  She was of strong character and undoubtedly used his high office to enrich herself.  During the proceedings in the Star Chamber, she was compared to an exchange woman who kept her shop while her creature, Sir J. Bingley, cried "Whad'ye lack?"

        Sir Thomas and Lady Catherine were found guilty and fined and ordered to restore all money wrongfully extorted and were sentenced to be imprisoned in the Tower from which they were released after ten days.  Popular opinion of the day placed most of the blame squarely on the shoulders of Lady Catherine.  Her beauty was remarkable but in 1619 an attack of small pox destroyed any vestige of loveliness.

- "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 71-72

       

Children of Thomas Howard and Catherine Knyvet are:

+      273             i.    Edward10 Howard, K.B., 1st Baron Howard of Escrick, died April 24, 1675 in England and was buried in the Savoy.

        274            ii.    Elizabeth Howard208, died April 17, 1658.

        275           iii.    Emily Howard.

        276           iv.    John Howard.

+      277            v.    Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Berkshire, died July 16, 1669.

+      278           vi.    Theophilus Howard, K.G., 2nd Earl of Suffolk, born Bef. August 13, 1584 in England, and was baptized August 13, 1584; died June 3, 1640 in Suffolk House, the Strand, and buried at Saffron Walden, County Essex.

        279          vii.    Gertrude Howard, born Abt. 1585.

        280         viii.    Henry Howard209, born Abt. 1586; died 1616.

        281            ix.    William Howard, K.B.210, born Abt. 1587; died Bef. April 7, 1672.

        282             x.    Catherine Howard, Countess of Salisbury211, born Abt. 1588; died August 23, 1675.

+      283            xi.    Charles Howard, Knt., of Clun Castle, born Abt. 1590; died September 22, 1622 in Clun Castle, County Shropshire.

        284           xii.    Frances Howard, Countess of Somerset212, born September 30, 1589 in Saffron Walden, County Essex; died August 23, 1632 in England, and buried August 22 or 27, 1632 at Saffron Waldon, County Essex.  She married (1) Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex213 January 5, 1604/05 in Whitehall Chapel, London213; born 1591 in Seething Lane, London and baptized January 22, 1591 at St. Olave's, Hart Street, London; died October 19, 1646 in Essex House, the Strand, Lond and buried October 19, 1646 at Westminster Abbey.  She married (2) Robert Carr, Earl of Somerset December 26, 1613 in Chapel Royal, Whitehall Palace, London; died September 14, 1646.

               A portrait thought to be of Lady Frances, and attributed to William Larkin, shows a young woman of great beauty.  Frances Howard was unquestionable seductive, considered by Arthur Wilson as "a beauty of greatest magnitude in the horizon of the Court . . . every tongue grew an orator at that shrine."  She was also willful and spoiled.  Indulged from her youth, she had a certain crude impatience in attaining her desires.

               At the age of thirteen she had been married against her will, to the young Earl of Essex  WHO IS HE?  One can sympathize with her refusal to make do with a groom whom she had seen only once before their marriage.  And her subsequent infidelity, including a brief spell as the mistress of Prince Henry, was understandable given the free wheeling, devil may care attitudes of the court of James I.

               Her sights soon set on Robert Carr, Earl of Somerset and a great favorite of King James (and possibly once the King's lovers).  When their romance bloomed, and Frances realized that matrimony to the prized favorite was within her grasp, she showed an unbecoming ruthlessness.

               In 1613, she recruited the assistance of her grand uncle, Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton.  Having successfully argued the cases again Sir Walter Raleigh and Guy Fawkes, Sir Henry certainly found this latest project a piece of cake.

               Lady Frances' father and Sir Henry secured an interview with Essex at Whitehall in May in the hope of obtaining his assent to a divorce.  The Earl proved to be less than receptive and dug in his heels.

               His stubbornness did nothing to dampen the enthusiasm of the merry little band, and Frances, determined to secure a proper annulment with the assistance of one of the most brilliant legal minds of the day, went for the groin.

               She changed 'propter frigidiatem,' total impotence of her husband towards all women.  It would have been kinder had she charged him with 'propter maleficiium versus hanc," which meant he was simply impotent towards her personally, but sensitivity was never her long suit.  Her husband's reputation lay in tatters, King James, knuckling under the celebrated pressure of the Howard Clan, granted the annulment.

               One can imagine the surprise and outrage when Sir Robert's great friend, Sir Thomas Overbury, fearing his influence would be diluted by the Howards, persuaded him from pursuing the marriage with Lady Frances.  Her great uncle quickly came to the rescue, and on a very slight pretext, had the unfortunate Overbury imprisoned in the Tower.

               With Sir Thomas safely tucked away, Sir Robert wed his love.  Although one contemporary grumped, "the holy state of matrimony was made but May game,"  John Donne, poet and divine, later Chaplain to King James, wrote an exquisite poem in honor of the blushing bride"

 

First, her eyes kindle other ladies' eyes

Then from those beams their jewels; luster rise;

And from their jewels torches do take fire;

And all is warmed and light and good desire.

 

               Not one to forgive and forget, our little Frances was not through with the imprisoned Sir Thomas.  Good Uncle Henry had conveniently made arrangements for a close friend of the Howard family, Sir Gervase Helwys, to be named lieutenant of the Tower.  Her plan was simple:  poison him.  He was gradually poisoned by a series of disgusting jellies, one or two of which not being consumed, turned green before the eyes of observers.  She slowly and successfully did him in.

               In 1615, when the matter was judicially investigated, Frances cut a poignant figure in black "with cobweb lawn ruff and cuffs," and made a great show of remorse.  All was in vein, and both she and her husband were condemned to death.  King James commuted the sentence to life imprisonment and the unhappy pair were left languishing in the Tower.  They were released in 1622.

               And what of jolly Uncle Henry Howard?  Although his political enemies credited him with a direct hand in the murder, it was never proven that he nor Sir Gervase had been made explicitly aware of Lady France' plot to murder their prisoner.

- "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 31; "King James," Antonia Fraser, p. 152-163; Complete Peerage of England, Volume 12, p. 1 & 462-466, Volume 11, pl 590, and Volume 10, p. 142-145 & 329

+      285          xiii.    Robert Howard, K.B., of Clun Castle, born 1598; died April 22, 1653 in Clun Castle, County Shropshire, probably, and buried at Clun.

        286          xiv.    Mary or Margaret Howard, born Abt. 1599.

 

 

        198.  William9 Howard, "Bauld (Bold) Willie" (Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)214 was born December 19, 1563 in Audley End, County Essex, and died October 7, 1640 in Greystock, Cumberland.  He married Elizabeth Dacre October 28, 1577, daughter of Thomas Dacre and Elizabeth Leyburne. 

        Following the death of his mother, three weeks after his birth, Lord William remarried and betrothed his children to Dacre heiresses, and William found himself contracted to marry Elizabeth Dacre at the age of eight.  The marriage did not take place until 1577.

        He went to St. John's College, Cambridge.  In 1581, the young couple lived in a home called "Mount Pleasant," in Enfield Chase, Middlesex where their eldest son was born.

        Their pleasant life was interrupted, however, when William find himself in prison with his half-brother, Philip.  Although he was released, he found himself in prison several times on a variety of charges, hounded primarily because he was a Catholic when the Catholics were not in favor.

        In 1603 Lord William and his Lady took up residence at Naworth Castle, Cumberland.  Unlike many of the Howards, Lord William had the reputation of a man of the highest character.  He displayed sound judgment and brought his cultivated mind to the work of restoring order and furthering civilization in the wild districts of the borders.

        He greatly improved his estates, encouraged agriculture, and attempted to promote the well being of the people in general.  His praise worthy efforts were not always appreciated by his neighbors, and many attempts were made to get him into trouble as a recusant; someone who refused to attend the services or recognize the authority of the Church of England.  Because he was a Catholic, he was not permitted to hold any public position until 1618, when he was made one of the commissioners for the borders.

        He insisted on the due execution of the laws, and by his perseverance, he annoyed greatly the neighboring justices, but his proceedings were always in strict accordance with the law.  He has been betrayed in "Lay of the Last Minstrel" as a mythical hero by the name of "Belted Will," but he was known in his day as "Bauld (bold) Willie," and his wife as "Bessie with the braid (broad) apron," meaning she had an ample behind.

        Lord Howard had begun to collect books very early in life, and he formed at Naworth a large library.  When a proposal was made in 1617 to revive the Society of Antiquaries, which King James I had for some reason suppressed, a memorial in favor of the project places Lord Howard's name first in the list of its probably members.

        The couple also maintained a lovely garden. Living close to the Roman Wall, they collected Roman altars and inscriptions and placed them throughout the garden.  Unfortunately, they are no longer found there, subsequently scatter or destroyed.

 - "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 79-81

       

Children of William Howard and Elizabeth Dacre are:

+      287             i.    Philip10 Howard, born December 6, 1581 in Mount Pleasant, Enfield Chase, Middlesex.

        288            ii.    Francis Howard, Knt., of Corby Castle, born August 29, 1588; died April 11, 1660.  He married (1) Margarete Preston.  He married (2) Mary Widdrington.

        289           iii.    William Howard, Knt., of Brafferton, Yourkshire.

        290           iv.    Charles Howard, Knt..  He married Dorothy Widdrington.

        291            v.    Thomas Howard, died in Piercebridge.

 

 

        201.  Catherine9 Howard (Charles Lyte8, Thomas7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)  She married Thomas Thynne, Esquire. 

       

Children of Catherine Howard and Thomas Thynne are:

        292             i.    Henry10 Thynne, Bart. Thynne.

        293            ii.    Anne Thynne, Lady Thornyhurst.  She married William Thornyhurst, Knt., of Agencourt.

 

 

        202.  Thomas9 Arundel, Lord Arundell of Wardour (Matthew8, Margaret7 Howard, Edmund6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)215 was born Abt. 1560, and died November 7, 1639.  He married Anne Phillpson, of Crook, Westmorland216, daughter of Miles Phillpson, of Crook, Westmorland. 

       

Child of Thomas Arundel and Anne Phillpson is:

+      294             i.    Anne10 Arundel, died July 23, 1649.

 

 

        204.  Katherine9 Carey, Countess of Nottingham (Henry8, Mary7 Boleyn, Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)217 was born in Hunsdon, County Hertfordshire, and died February 25, 1601/02 in Arundel House, London and buried February 28, 1602 at Chelsea, London.  She married Charles Howard, K.G.,1st Earl of Nottingham218 July 1563, son of William Howard and Margaret Gamage.  He was born December 1536 in Notthingham, County Norttinghamshire, and died December 14, 1624 in Haling House, near Croydon, County Surrey and was buried December 18, 1624 at Reygate, County Surrey.

        Sir Charles, is believed to have served at sea under the command of his father during the reign of Queen Mary, I, "Bloody Mary."  On the accession of her half sister, Elizabeth I, Sir Charles stepped at once into a prominent position at court.  His high birth and connections, the Queen was his first cousin once removed, helped not to mention the fact that he was very handsome.  And Queen Mary, "the Virgin Queen," who wasn't, loved to surround herself with witty, charming, and handsome men.

        In 1559 Sir Charles was sent as Ambassador to France to congratulate Francis, II, on his accession.  In the Parliament of 1562 he represented County Surrey, and in 1569 was named General of the Horse, under the Earl of Warwick, in the suppression of a Catholic led rebellion in the north.

        Upon the death of his father, he succeeded as 2nd Lord Howard of Effingham.  On April 24, 1574, he was made a Knight of the Garter, and about the same time was named Lord Chamberlain of the Household, a position he held until May 1585, when he was appointed Lord Admiral of England.

        He participated in the trial of Mary, Queen of Scots, and it appears that Queen Elizabeth was persuaded to sign Mary's death warrant at his urging.

        It was under Sir Charles' command that the Spanish Armada was destroyed, although history has not always given him the credit that was his due.  Sir Walter Raleigh certainly thought so.  Some had found fault with some of Sir Charles decisions, but Raleigh leapt to his defense and steadfastly maintained that Sir Charles was "better advised than a great many malignant fools were that found fault with his demeanour.  The Spaniards had an army aboard them, and he had none; they had more ships than he had, and of higher building and charging; so that had he entangled himself with those great and powerful vessels, he had greatly endangered this kingdom of England. . . but our admiral knew his advantage and held it; which had he not done, he had not been worthy to have held his head."

        Before the English ships could return, the seamen began to fall sick, primarily suffering from an infectious fever, possibly typhus, aggravated by eating putrid beef and sour beer.  Putting the sick on shore at Margate, Sir Charles found no one would house them, and it was only by his personal efforts that he found lodging for them in barns and outbuildings.  He wrote, "it would grieve any man's heart to see them that have served so valiantly to die so miserably."

        The Queen was not moved and Sir Charles, who had already paid part of the cost of maintaining the fleet at Plymouth, found himself responsible for the cost of the men's care.  His assets almost exhausted, he none the less "will myself make satisfaction as well as I may. . . so that her Majesty shall not be charged withal."

        The following years found him occupied with the defense of the country and the administration of the navy.  He organized the charity known as The Chest at Chatham, which was founded in 1590 'by the incitement, persuasion, approbation, and good liking of the lord admiral and of the principal officers of the navy."

        In 1596 Sir Charles once again was called upon to battle Spain at sea, and once again was successful.  Queen Elizabeth, however, was, after he wont, angry when he had the nerve to request that she pay the sailors their promised wages. She asserted that the men had paid themselves by plunder, and that she had received no benefit from the expedition!  The following year Sir Charles was created Earl of Nottingham.

        He held numerous important positions throughout his life, dying at the ripe old age of eighty eight.

        His wife, Catherine, was a great favorite of Queen Elizabeth, and when Lady Catherine died in February 1602/3 the Queen feel into a great depression and died a few weeks later.

        - "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 1-6

 

       

Children are listed above under (65) Charles Howard, K.G.,1st Earl of Nottingham.

 

        212.  Anne9 Knolleys, Lady West (Mary8 Carey, Lady Knolleys, Mary7 Boleyn, Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)219.  She married Thomas West, Knt. 2nd Lord Delaware220 November 19, 1571 in Wherwell, County Hants, England, son of William West and Elizabeth Strange.  He died March 24, 1600/01.

       

Children of Anne Knolleys and Thomas West are:

+      295             i.    Elizabeth10 West, of Wherwell, Hampshire, born September 11, 1573 in Wherwell, Hampshire; died January 12, 1631/32.

        296            ii.    Robert West, born January 3, 1574/75.

        297           iii.    Thomas West, 3rd Lord Delaware & Gov of Virginia220, born July 9, 1577 in England; died July 7, 1618 in sea en route to Virginia.

               Sir Thomas graduated from Queen's College, Oxford in 1605.  He was an M.P., a Knight, and 3rd Lord Delaware.  He was the Governor of Virginia from March 1610 and 1611.

        298           iv.    Anne West, born May 21, 1581 in Westover, Hampshire.  She married John Pellatt.

        299            v.    Penelope West221, born September 9, 1582.

        300           vi.    Catherine West, born December 27, 1583 in Winchester, Hampshire.

        301          vii.    Francis West, Governor of Virginia222, born October 28, 1586 in Salisbury, England; died February 1632/33.

        302         viii.    Helena West, born December 15, 1587 in Wherwell, Hampshire.

        303            ix.    Laetitia West, born November 24, 1589.

+      304             x.    John West, of "West's Point," Gov of Virginia, born December 14, 1590 in Testwood, Wiltshire; died Abt. 1659 in Possibly New Kent County, Virginia.

        305            xi.    Nathaniel West222, born November 30, 1592 in Lansium, Hampshire; died 1623 in Virginia.

        306           xii.    Eleanor Elizabeth West, born 1593 in Lansium, Hampshire.

 

 

        215.  Catherine9 Knyvet, of Charlton by Malmesbury (Henry8, Henry7, Muriel6 Howard, Countess Lisle, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)223 was born 1564 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire, and died September 12, 1638 in Aldenham, County Hertfordshire and buried at Saffron Walden, County Essex.  She married (1) Richard Rich223 1580 in Charlton by Malmesbury, County Wiltshire, son of Robert Rich, Lord Rich.    She married (2) Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk224 1583225, son of Thomas Howard and Margaret Audley.  He was born August 24, 1561226, and died 1626.

        Sir Thomas was educated at St. John's College, Cambridge, and.  He accompanied as a volunteer the fleet sent to oppose the Spanish Armada, and in the attack off Calais displayed such valor that he was knighted at sea by the Lord High Admiral on June 25, 1588.  He was soon made Captain of a man-of-war.  On March 5, 1591, he was appointed commander of the squadron which attached, in the face of overwhelming difficulties, the Spanish treasure ships off the Azores.  On his return from battle he was created a Knight of the Garter on April 23, 1597.  The following June he sailed as Vice Admiral of the fleet dispatched to the Azores.

        His ability and courage caught the attention of Queen Elizabeth, I, the "Virgin Queen" who wasn't, and he became a great favorite at court.  In her letters to him she referred to him as her "good Thomas."  On December 5, 1597 he was summoned to Parliament as Baron Howard de Walden, and became Lord Lieutenant of County Cambridgeshire and the Isle of Ely the following year.

        He was sworn High Steward of the University of Cambridge in February 1601; Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire on June 26, 1602; and, acting Lord Chamberlain of the Household on December 28.

        On one of her famous "progresses," in 1603, Queen Elizabeth was sumptuously entertained by Sir Thomas at Charterhouse.  For an account of another of her progresses, this time at Long Melford, see "Two Hundred Men in Velvet."

        He continued to rise, culminating in being named Lord High Treasurer of England, in July 11, 1614, an office he would hold until July 19, 1619.  In the autumn of 1618 grave irregularities were discovered in the treasurer.  Sir Thomas was suspended from his office, being accused of embezzlement, defrauding the king, and extorting money from the king's subjects.  Once again a Howard was in danger of execution.

        His wife, Lady Catherine, was indicted for extorting money from persons having business at the treasury through Sir John Bingley, Remembrancer of the Exchequer..  She was of strong character and undoubtedly used his high office to enrich herself.  During the proceedings in the Star Chamber, she was compared to an exchange woman who kept her shop while her creature, Sir J. Bingley, cried "Whad'ye lack?"

        Sir Thomas and Lady Catherine were found guilty and fined and ordered to restore all money wrongfully extorted and were sentenced to be imprisoned in the Tower from which they were released after ten days.  Popular opinion of the day placed most of the blame squarely on the shoulders of Lady Catherine.  Her beauty was remarkable but in 1619 an attack of small pox destroyed any vestige of loveliness.

- "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 71-72

       

Children are listed above under (197) Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk.

 

        216.  Elizabeth9 Southwell, of Woodrising (Elizabeth8 Howard, I, of Effingham, Charles7, William6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born in Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 8 miles southwest of East Dereham about about 16 miles southwest of Norwich, and died September 13, 1631 in Italy.  She married Robert Dudley, illeg. 1605 in Lyons, France, son of Robert Dudley and Douglass Howard.  He was born August 7, 1574 in Sheen Palace, County Surrey, and died September 6, 1649 in Forence, Italy and buried at Boldrone, Italy.

               

Children are listed above under (146) Robert Dudley, illeg..

 

        219.  Charles9 Howard, of Great Bookham (Frances8, William7, William6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died 1672.  He married Frances Courthope, of Wyleigh, Lady Howard, daughter of George Courthope, Sir George, of Wyleigh. 

       

Child of Charles Howard and Frances Courthope is:

        307             i.    Francis10 Howard, 5th Lord of Effingham.

 

 

        229.  Mary9 Darcy, of Danbury, County Essex (Elizabeth8 de Vere, of Hedingham Castle, John7, Anne6 Howard, Countess of Oxford, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born in Danbury, County Essex, about 6 miles east of Chelmsford, and about 8 miles west of Maldon, and died in Windham Manor, probably, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich.  She married Richard Southwell, Knt., of Woodrising227 Aft. 1556, son of Francis Southwell and Dorothy Tendering.  He was born 1504 in Windham Manor, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich, and died January 11, 1562/63 in Windham Manor, probably, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich228.

        Sir Richard became a very wealthy young man at the age of ten upon the deaths of his father and uncle.  In 1519 he entered the household of Sir Thomas Wyndham and shared the home with Henry Howard.  Henry, a distant cousin of the Southwalls by the Darcy family, would one day become the Earl of Surrey.  Sir Richard was made Sheriff of Norfolk in 1534.  He spent much of his life as an intimate of the royal family, which led to his being named to represent County Norfolk in Parliament in 1539.

                While still married to his first wife, Thomasine Darcy, he fathered two illegitimate sons with Mary Darcy, whom he married after the death of Thomasine.  See "Where Mightier Do Assault Than Do Defend"

 

       

Children of Mary Darcy and Richard Southwell are:

+      308             i.    Richard10 Southwell, Knt Horsham S. Faith's, illeg, born 1548 in Danbury, County Essex, and christened in 1550 at  Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich.

        309            ii.    Thomas Southwell, of Monton, illeg, born 1552 in Danbury, County Essex, about 6 miles east of Chelmsford, and about 8 miles west of Maldon; died April 8, 1609.

        310           iii.    Mary Southwell, of Woodrising, born 1556 in Windham Manor, probably, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich, and was christened in 1556; died 1622.

        311           iv.    Dorothy Southwell, of Woodrising, born in Danbury, County Essex, about 6 miles east of Chelmsford, and about 8 miles west of Maldon.

        312            v.    Katherine Southwell, of Woodrising, born in Danbury, County Essex, about 6 miles east of Chelmsford, and about 8 miles west of Maldon; died October 29, 1611.

 

 

        237.  Muriel9 Sedley (Abigail8 Knyvet, Lady Sedley, John7, Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners, Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)229 was born 1583, and died 1661.  She married Brampton Gurdon, Esq, of Assington Hall, Suffolk July 8, 1606230, son of John Gurdon and Amy Brampton.  He died 1649.

 

Notes for Brampton Gurdon, Esq, of Assington Hall, Suffolk:

His will was made October 10, 1647 and proved in 1649.  He served as Sheriff of Suffolk from 1625 through 1629, and was M.P., iin 1620.

       

Child of Muriel Sedley and Brampton Gurdon is:

        313             i.    Muriel10 Gurdon231.  She married Richard Saltonstall, Maj. June 1633.

 

 

        239.  John9 Knyvet, II, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk (John8, William7, Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners, Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. April 1598 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk, and died Abt. June 25, 1665.  He married Ann.  She was born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk, and died Aft. 1665.

       

Children of John Knyvet and Ann are:

        314             i.    Elizabeth10 Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died 1641.

+      315            ii.    John Knyvet, III, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died January 3, 1703/04.

        316           iii.    Ann Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. March 1641/42 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died Bef. 1714.

        317           iv.    Thomas Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. November 5, 1644; died Bef. 1704.  He married Phoebe of Fundenhall; died Abt. August 29, 1713.

        318            v.    Frances Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. March 1644/45 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        319           vi.    Nathaniel Knyvet, of Tacolneston, County Norfolk, born Abt. January 1646/47 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died 1716 in Tacolneston, County Norfolk.

        320          vii.    Jane Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. February 27, 1650/51 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

 

 

        245.  Elizabeth9 Vincent, of Harpole (Anne8 Tanfield, of Gayton, Francis7, William6, Catherine5 Neville, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)  She married Richard Lane, of Courteenhall, Northampton, son of Francis Lane, of Bromley Hall, County Stafford. 

       

Child of Elizabeth Vincent and Richard Lane is:

+      321             i.    Dorothy10 Lane, of Courteenhall, born Abt. September 4, 1589.

 

 

        246.  George9 Wyatt, of Allington Castle & Boxley Abbey (Thomas8, Elizabeth7 Brooke, Thomas6, Margaret5 Neville, Lady Brooke, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born 1550, and died 1625.  He married Jane Finch232, daughter of Thomas Finch, Sir Thomas, of Eastwell, Kent. 

       

Children of George Wyatt and Jane Finch are:

        322             i.    Hawte10 Wyatt, Jamestown Minister233, born 1596; died July 31, 1638 in Boxley, and buried August 1, 1638.  He married (1) Barbara Elizabeth Mitford 1619; died October 31, 1626.  He married (2) Ann Cox Aft. 1626.

               He came to Virginia with his brother, Francis, on the "George," in 1621.  He served as minister at Jamestown, 1621-1625.  He returned to England where the inscription on his tomb states that he had "Issue living in Virginia."

        323            ii.    Francis Wyatt, Sir Francis, Governor of Virginia, died Abt. August 1644 in England and buried at Boxley, August 24, 1644.  He married Margaret Sandys, of Ombersley, County Worcester.

 

 

        247.  Anne9 Wyatt (Thomas8, Elizabeth7 Brooke, Thomas6, Margaret5 Neville, Lady Brooke, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)  She married Roger Twysden, of Roydon Hall, Kent233. 

       

Child of Anne Wyatt and Roger Twysden is:

+      324             i.    Margaret10 Twysden, of Roydon Hall.

 

 

        250.  George9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton (Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)234.

       

Children of George Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton are:

        325             i.    Thomas10 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, died Abt. September 28, 1620235.

        326            ii.    Marie Clopton, of Groton, died Abt. May 19, 1923 in Groton, probably, and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton.

CAUTION:  The Parish Register notes her burial, however, it is not clear who her father is.

 

 

        251.  Anna9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton (Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)236 was born Abt. January 29, 1579/80 in Castlings Manor and baptized January 29, 1579 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk237, and died in Boxted, possibly, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, possibly, although there is no memorial to her in the church.  She married John Maidstone, of Great Horkesley & Boxted238 April 25, 1605239, son of Robert Maidstone and Elizabeth Chambers.  He was born Aft. 1589 in Great Horkesley, County Essex, probably, about 4 miles northwest of Colchester, Essex, and about 2 miles south of Boxted, and probably baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, and died in Boxted, possibly, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, possibly, although there is no memorial to him in the church.

       

Children of Anna Clopton and John Maidstone are:

+      327             i.    John10 Maidstone, the Elder, of Boxted, born in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted; died 1666 in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, in the floor by the altar.

        328            ii.    Robert Maidstone240, born in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted.

        329           iii.    Anne Maidstone240, born in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted.

        330           iv.    Martha Maidstone240, born in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted.

        331            v.    Margery Maidstone240, born in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted.

        332           vi.    Mary Maidstone240, born in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted.

 

 

        252.  Bridgett9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton (Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)241 was born Abt. January 29, 1580/81 in Castlings Manor and baptized January 29, 1581 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk242, and died March 1673/74 in Kersey, possibly, and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk243.  She married John Sampson, I, Esq., of Sampson Hall, Kersey244 June 27, 1598 in Castlings Manor, Groton, County Suffolk245, son of Robert Sampson and Elizabeth Wingfield.  He was born in Kersey, County Suffolk, probably, about 2 miles northwest of Hadleigh, and about 3 miles northeast of Groton, and probably baptized St. Mary, Kersey, and died Aft. May 21, 1647 in Kersey, County Suffolk, probably, and possibly buried at St. Mary, in the Sampson Chapel, Kersey246.

       

Children of Bridgett Clopton and John Sampson are:

        333             i.    Robert10 Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey, Suffolk247.

               Robert, came to Boston with John Winthrop.  The Sampsons were related to Henry Sampson and Humilty Cooper, cousins of John Tilly, the Mayflower pilgrim.

        334            ii.    John Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey, Suffolk248, born January 1599/00249.

        335           iii.    Samwell Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey Suffolk250.

        336           iv.    William Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey Suffolk250.

        337            v.    Thomas Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey, Suffolk250.

        338           vi.    Symon Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey, Suffolk250.

        339          vii.    Mary Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey, Suffolk250.

        340         viii.    Sarah Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey, Suffolk250.

        341            ix.    Susan Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey, Suffolk250.

        342             x.    Elizabeth Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey250.

        343            xi.    Margery Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey Suffolk250.

        344           xii.    Bridgett Sampson, of Sampson Hall, Kersey250.  She married Thomas Cudmore, of Kelvedon, County Essex; born in Kelvendon, County Essex, possibly, about 8 miles southwest of Colchester.

 

 

        253.  Thomasine9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton (Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)251 was born Abt. February 5, 1581/82 in Castlings Manor and baptized February 5, 1582 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk252, and died December 11, 1616 in Winthrop Manor, England and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, in the Chancel, Groton, County Suffolk, December 11, 1616253.  She married John Winthrop, Governor of Massachusetts254 December 6, 1615 in Castlings Manor, Groton, County Suffolk255, son of Adam Winthrop and Anne Browne.  He was born January 12, 1587/88 in Edwardston, County Suffolk, England and baptized January 16, 1587 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton256, and died March 26, 1649 in Boston, Massachusetts and buried at King's Chapel Burial Ground257,258.

        John married into a family stationed well above the parvenu, nouveau riche Winthrops, Lords of the Manor of Groton, which they had obtained by purchase from the Crown.  The Winthrops, judged by Clopton standards of the day, were second rank arrivistes, whom historians describe as 'mere' parish gentry.  But the Winthrops were looking beyond England to new opportunities across the sea and possibly William Clopton saw an advantage in this marriage.  Although both Thomasine and her infant daughter would die, the Winthrops intermarried with descendants of her siblings.

        Death was an accepted part of life.  By the sixteenth century, men lived to an average of around fifty, with about one fifth surviving to their sixties. Women could only expect to live to an average of thirty.  It is possible up to fifty per cent of children did not reach the age of twenty.  The children of the wealthy families had a greater chance of survival than those of the peasant woman, but death following the birth of a child killed queens and commoners alike at about the same rate.  Thanks to the Massachusetts Historical Society, a touching and graphic account of Thomasine Clopton's death following the birth of her daughter has survived.  See "Brief Communion."

       

Child of Thomasine Clopton and John Winthrop is:

        345             i.    Baby Girl10 Winthrop, of Winthrop Manor, Groton, born November 30, 1616 in Winthrop Manor, Groton, County Suffolk, England259; died December 2, 1616 in Groton, County Suffolk, England and buried the same day at St. Bartholomew's Church.  She was reburied December 11, 1616, in the Chancel with her mother260.

 

 

        254.  William9 Clopton, Esq, of Castlings Manor, Groton (Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)261 was born Abt. April 9, 1584 in Castlings Manor and baptized April 9, 1584 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk262, and died November 7, 1640 in Castlings Manor and buried November 7, 1640 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk263.  He married Alice Doyley, of Pond Hall, Hadleigh, Suffolk264 August 3, 1615 in St. Margaret, Whatfield Parish, County Suffolk, about 3 miles northeast of Hadleigh265, daughter of Edmund Doyley, Esq., of Pond Hall, Hadleigh.  She was born in Shottisham,  County Norfolk, and raised at Pond Hall, Hadleigh, about 5 miles southeast of Groton, and died Aft. November 7, 1640266.

       

Children of William Clopton and Alice Doyley are:

        346             i.    William10 Clopton, the Elder Castlings Manor, born Abt. September 17, 1616 in Hadleigh, County Suffolk and baptized September 17, 1616, at St. Mary's Church, Hadleigh267; died Abt. September 19, 1616 in Hadleigh, County Suffolk and buried September 19, 1616  at St. Mary's Church, Hadleigh268.

+      347            ii.    William Clopton, Esq., of Castlings Manor, born Abt. 1618; died Abt. April 25, 1666 in Castlings Manor and buried April 25, 1666 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk.

        348           iii.    Walter Clopton, Rector of Boyton, County Suffolk269, born Abt. September 21, 1619 in Castlings Manor and baptized September 21, 1619 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk270; died Aft. October 26, 1664271.

        349           iv.    Edmund Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. November 5, 1620 in Castlings Manor and baptized November 5, 1620 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk272.

        350            v.    Marie Clopton, of Castlings Manor, born Abt. February 10, 1619/20 in Castlings Manor and baptized February 10, 1620 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk273.  She married Wakeman, Clerk, Garboldisham, County Norfolk274; born in Garboldisham, County Norfolk, possibly, about 12 miles northeast of Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, and about 10 miles east of Thetford, Norfolk.

        351           vi.    Catherine Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton275, born December 21, 1621.  She married Robert Cutler, Gent. November 2, 1641 in Groton, County Suffolk, England276; born in Leavenheath, County Suffolk, about 2 miles south of Groton.

+      352          vii.    Elizabeth Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. May 8, 1626 in Hadleigh, County Suffolk,  and baptized May 8, 1626, at St. Mary's Church, Hadleigh.

        353         viii.    Frances Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton277, born Abt. June 11, 1627 in Hadleigh, County Suffolk and baptized June 11, 1627, at St. Mary's Church, Hadleigh278.  She married Joseph Alston, Gent., of Hindelweston, Norfolk.

        354            ix.    George Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. March 8, 1628/29 in Hadleigh, County Suffolk and baptized March 8, 1628, at St. Mary's Church, Hadleigh279.

        355             x.    Richard Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. March 1, 1633/34 in Castlings Manor and baptized March 1, 1633 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk280; died Abt. September 14, 1639 in Groton, County Suffolk, England and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton281.

        356            xi.    Thomas Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. December 26, 1636 in Castlings Manor and baptized December 26, 1636 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk282; died Abt. July 4, 1666 in Castlings Manor and buried July 4, 1666 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk283.

        357           xii.    Alice Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. April 22, 1638 in Castlings Manor and baptized April 22, 1638 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk284.

 

 

        255.  Walter9 Clopton, Gent., of Coggeshall, Essex (Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)285 was born Abt. June 30, 1585 in Castlings Manor and baptized June 30, 1585 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk286, and died Aft. December 24, 1622 in Coggeshall, County Essex, possibly, about 6 miles southwest of Colchester, and probably buried at St. Nicholas, Little Coggeshall287.  He married Margery Maidstone, of Great Horkesley, Essex April 21, 1612 in Boxted, County Essex, England about 2 miles northeast of Great Horkesley, daughter of Robert Maidstone and Elizabeth Chambers.  She was born Abt. January 11, 1588/89 in Great Horkesley, County Essex, probably, about 4 miles northwest of Colchester, Essex, and about 2 miles south of Boxted, and probably baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted.

       

Children of Walter Clopton and Margery Maidstone are:

+      358             i.    William10 Clopton, M.A., Rector of Rettendon, born October 9, 1613 in Boxted, County Essex, about 2 miles northeast of Great Horkesley, and probably baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted by Thomas Cleeson; died Bef. June 14, 1671 in Eastwood, County Essex, about 10 miles northeast of Rettendon.

        359            ii.    Walter Clopton, of Boxted, County Essex, born in Boxted, County Essex, about 2 miles northeast of Great Horkesley, and probably baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted by Thomas Cleeson; died Aft. 1645.

        360           iii.    Margaret Clopton, of Boxted, County Essex, born in Boxted, County Essex, about 2 miles northeast of Great Horkesley, and probably baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted by Thomas Cleeson; died Aft. 1645.

 

 

        256.  Waldegrave9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton (Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)288 was born Abt. May 18, 1587 in Castlings Manor and baptized May 18, 1587 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk289.  He married Elizabeth Wincoll.  She died Abt. November 6, 1622 in Groton, probably, and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton290.

       

Child of Waldegrave Clopton and Elizabeth Wincoll is:

        361             i.    Margery10 Clopton.

 

 

        258.  Margery9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor (Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)291 was born Abt. June 18, 1590 in Castlings Manor and baptized June 18, 1590 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk292, and died Abt. October 30, 1633 in Groton, County Suffolk, England and buried St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton293.  She married Thomas Doggett, Gentleman April 22, 1617 in Castlings Manor, Groton, County Suffolk294, son of William Doggett and Avis Lappadge.  He was born Abt. December 31, 1596 in Boxford,  County Suffolk,  about 1 miles south of Groton, and baptized St. Mary's Church, Boxford December 1, 1594295.

        Thomas inherited much of his father's estate.  And as son and heir, his social standing was greater than that of his younger brothers, so he made an "acceptable" husband to the more powerful Cloptons.  His brother, John, traveled with John Winthrop to New England.  The Doggets, Gosnolds and Winthrops, all kinsmen of the Cloptons,  intermarried.  A list of the original settlers of Jamestown written by Captain John Smyth, records the names of three Gosnolds, including their Captain, Bartholomew Gosnold.   See "Brief Communion"

       

Children of Margery Clopton and Thomas Doggett are:

+      362             i.    William10 Doggett, I, Rector of Stoke-by-Clare, born Abt. January 5, 1617/18 in Groton, County Suffolk and baptized St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, January 5, 1618.

        363            ii.    Margery Doggett, of Groton, born 1619.

        364           iii.    Avis Doggett, of Groton, born 1621.

        365           iv.    Thomasine Doggett, of Groton, born 1624.

 

 

        259.  Thomas9 Clopton, Rector of Ramsden-Belhouse (Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)296 was born Abt. September 18, 1593 in Castlings Manor and baptized September 18, 1593 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk297, and died February 13, 1662/63 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, about 3 miles north of Ramsden Bellhouse, and buried at St. Mary the Virgin, Ramsden Bellhouse, about seven miles south of Chelmsford298.  He married (1) Thomazine Godfrey, of Ramsden-Belhouse June 23, 1624 in Ramsden-Bellhouse, daughter of Edwarde Godfrey and Joane.  She died Bef. 1644 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, probably, and possibly buried at St. Mary the Virgin, Ramsden Bellhouse, about seven miles south of Chelmsford.  He married (2) Bridget Bef. 1644.  She died Abt. October 30, 1659 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, and buried at St. Mary the Virgin, Ramsden Bellhouse299.

        Following his graduation from Cambridge in 1616, Thomas Clopton was ordained Deacon at London September 26 of that year and named Curate of the Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Ramsden Bellhouse.  Although he was initially listed at "ejected," in Calamy's List of Nonconformists, his name did not appear in later lists.  Church records show he served until his death and that a William Clopton was Patron.

        According to church records, Ramsden Bellhouse is mentioned in the Doomsday Book as "Ramesdana," a name combining the words 'rames' and 'dana.'  It is believed the most probable derivation of 'rames," is 'The Valley of the Ravens.'  A third century Teutonic prince, Hrafin, led a tribe, The Ravens, who fought battles across Europe.  Just before the Norman conquest, a man named Ravengar is known to have lived in the vicinity of Ramsden Bellhouse.  Although this is certainly the most romantic explanation,  it may come from the Old Norse word, 'Ramsoms,' for wild garlic, or, simply, it may have once been known as the Valley of the Rams.  Dana, is the old English word for 'valley.' 

        Records indicate that Richard de Belhous was granted the lands of Ramsden Bellhouse and Ramsden Health, in 1201 by King John.  The male line became extinct and the lands passed to Isolda de Belhous, who married John Chastelyn.  Their daughter, Margaret, also called Johana, ( -1376) married Robert Knyvet ( -1418), the son of John Knyvet, Lord Chancellor of England, and his wife, Alinore or Eleanor Basset, of Great Weldon, Northamptonshire.

        Much of the ancient manor house, which is located just northwest of the church, has been destroyed, although a portion was incorporated into the present dwelling.  Several ponds in front of the home are believed to be all that remains of the moat.

        Thomas' great-great grandmother, Thomasine Knyvet ( -1536), of Great Stanway, County Essex, brought Bellhouse Manor to the Clopton family following her marriage to William Clopton, Knt. (1450-1529), of Long Melford, County Suffolk.

        The tower of the church is an outstanding example of free standing Essex timber belfry of which only ten now exist.  Although extensively restored in 1995, much of the original 1413 structure was retained.  The carved west door, also original, features a carved rose and a shield of arms.  The rose representing the rent paid to the Bishop by the Knyvet family, and the shield as a symbol of the Knyvet family's willingness to bear arms in support of the Crown.  The rose can still be clearly seen, but only the shape of the shield of arms may be seen.

 

       

Children of Thomas Clopton and Thomazine Godfrey are:

+      366             i.    Dorothy10 Clopton, born Abt. December 14, 1630 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, probably, and baptized December 14, 1630, at St. Mary and St. Edward, West Hanningfield, possibly by Edward Aylmer, DD or her father; died in Stambourne, County Essex, probably, about 9 miles southwest of Sudbury and about 12 miles south west of Long Melford.

        367            ii.    Susanna Clopton, born Abt. March 27, 1633 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, probably, and baptized March 27, 1633, at St. Mary and St. Edward, West Hanningfield, possibly by Edward Aylmer, DD or her father300.

        368           iii.    Thomasinge Clopton, born Abt. March 1633/34 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, probably, and baptized March 1633, at St. Mary and St. Edward, West Hanningfield, possibly by Edward Aylmer, DD or her father301; died Abt. August 30, 1701 in Stambourne, County Essex, probably, and buried at St. Peter and St. Thomas, Stambourne, August 30, 1701302.

        369           iv.    Thomas Clopton, born Abt. May 9, 1635 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, probably, and baptized May 9, 1635, at St. Mary and St. Edward, West Hanningfield, possibly by Edward Aylmer, DD or his father303.

        370            v.    William Clopton, Esq.304, born Abt. March 3, 1636/37 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, probably, and baptized March 3, 1636, at St. Mary and St. Edward, West Hanningfield, possibly by Edward Aylmer, DD or his father305.

 

       

Child of Thomas Clopton and Bridget is:

+      371             i.    Bridget10 Clopton, born Abt. September 8, 1644 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, and baptized at St. Mary the Virgin, Ramsden Bellhouse, about seven miles south of Chelmsford; died Bef. May 4, 1665.

 

 

        261.  Dorothy9 Harris (Dorothy8 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, William7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)306.  She married Robert Kempe, Esq., of Gissing, son of Richard Kempe and Alice Cockram.  He was born Abt. 1565, and died 1612 in England and buried Gissing Church, Gissing, Norfolk at 47 years of age.

       

Children of Dorothy Harris and Robert Kempe are:

        372             i.    Richard10 Kempe, Secretary of Virginia307, died Bef. December 6, 1656.  He married Elizabeth Lunsford.

        373            ii.    Edmund Kempe, Esq.307.  He married Anne.

        374           iii.    Robert Kempe, 1st Baronet.

 

 

        262.  Mary9 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor (William8, William7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)308 died December 19, 1599 in England and buried St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London309.  She married Thomas Clopton, the Younger, of Kentwell Hall310 September 13, 1590311, son of William Clopton and Mary Peryent.  He died Abt. February 16, 1596/97 in England and buried Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford in the Clopton Chapel312.

       

Children of Mary Waldegrave and Thomas Clopton are:

        375             i.    Elizabeth10 Clopton, of Kentwell Hall, born June 1591 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened June 21, 1591 at Holy Trinity313.  She married Jerome Bayliff April 18, 1615 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, England314.

+      376            ii.    William Clopton, Knt, of Kentwell Hall, born February 27, 1591/92 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened March 13, 1592 at Holy Trinity; died March 4, 1617/18 in Horsheath, Cambridge and buried Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford, March 12, 1618 in the Clopton Chapel.

        377           iii.    Mary Clopton, of Kentwell Hall, born Abt. December 1594 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened December 4, 1594, at Holy Trinity315.

+      378           iv.    Walter Clopton, Esq., of Kentwell Hall, born Abt. April 1596 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened April 14, 1596, at Holy Trinity; died 1627 in Fordham, County Cambridgeshire, about 26 miles northwest of Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk.

 

 

        265.  George9 Burrough, LL.B. Rector Pettaugh & Gosbeck (Bridget8 Higham, Phyllis7 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. October 26, 1579, and died Abt. February 24, 1652/53 in England and buried at Pettaugh, February 24, 1653316.  He married Frances Sparrow, of Wickhambrook316, daughter of Nicholas Sparrow, the Elder, of Wickhambrook. 

       

Child of George Burrough and Frances Sparrow is:

+      379             i.    Nathaniel10 Burrough.

 

 

        269.  Anne9 St. John, Lady Howard (John8, Oliver7, Margaret6 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)317.  She married William Howard, Baron Ho 1597317, son of Charles Howard and Katherine Carey.  He was born December 27, 1577 in Effingham, County Surrey and was christened January 13, 1578 at Effingham, and died November 28, 1615 in Hampton, Middlesex, and buried Chelseh, London317.

       

Child is listed above under (139) William Howard, Baron Ho.

 

        270.  Ann9 Russell, of Badby (Francis8, Margaret7 St. John, of Bletshoe, Margaret6 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)318 was born April 18, 1574 in Badby, County Northamptonshire, about 12 miles west of Northampton, and died in Badby, County Northamptonshire.  She married John Root, the Elder, of Badby July 23, 1600 in Badby Parish, Northamptonshire, son of Thomas Root and Ann Burrell.  He was born June 24, 1574 in Badby, County Northamptonshire, and died June 3, 1683 in Badby, County Northamptonshire.

       

Children of Ann Russell and John Root are:

        380             i.    John10 Root, the Younger, of Badby.

        381            ii.    Mary Root, of Badby.

        382           iii.    Susannah Root, of Badby.

        383           iv.    Thomas Root, of Badby, born January 16, 1603/04 in Badby, County Northamptonshire, about 12 miles west of Northampton; died July 7, 1694.

 

 

Generation No. 10

 

        272.  Thomas10 Howard, 2nd Earl of Arundel (Phillip9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)319 was born 1585 in Finchingfield, County Essex, and died October 4, 1646 in Padua, Italy and buried at Arundel House.  He married Alathea Talbot, of Shrewsbury September 30, 1606320, daughter of Gilbert Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury. 

        Sir Thomas was only ten when his father died in the Tower, having lost all of his lands and titles.  Sir Thomas was, however, called Lord Maltravers by courtesy.  He was carefully brought up by his mother, "a lady of great eminent virtures," with his only sister, who died at the age of sixteen.

        After attending Westminster Scholl, he went to Trinity College, Cambridge.  When James I ascended the throne, he was granted his father's titles of Arundel and Surrey, but the King retained the family property, so that he remained in "embarrassed circumstances."

By 1604 he was back in good graces and was in 1605 first formally introduced at court.  At the age of twenty he married Alathea, the third daughter and ultimately heiress of Gilbert Talbor, Earl of Shrewsbury, and with the help of her fortune, gradually bought back some of the family property, including Arundel House in 1608.

        For the next few years he led a gay life at court, and his name constantly appears among the "performers" in masques and jousts.  On June 17, 1607, King James stood as godfather to his first son, James.

        Sir Thomas went abroad and it was there, evidently, that he first acquired a serious interest in art.  On his return he was installed as a Knight of the Garter at ceremonies at Windsor on May 13, 1611.  At the marriage of Princess Elizabeth in February 1613, Sir Thomas carried the Sword of State, and was appointed one of the four noblemen to escort her abroad.

Like his wife, Sir Thomas was brought up as a Roman Catholic, but on December 25, 1615, he embraced the English church, and took the Sacrament in the King's Chapel at Whitehall, to the great distress of his mother.

        In July of the following year he was admitted to the Privy Council, and the next year was made a Privy Councillor of Scotland and Ireland.   Although he supported the 1617 expedition of Sir Walter Raleigh, he still had some doubts of Sir Walter's sincerity, and visited his ship, the "Destiny," as it was leaving the River Thames to obtain the explorer's promise that he would return to England however the enterprise might turn out.  In November 1620 Sir Thomas became a member of a committee for the plantations of New England.

        When King James died, he was succeeded by Charles I, and Sir Thomas at first supported him.  However, Sir Thomas, with his plain dress and rather haughty manner, was no favorite with the new king.  To further strain their relationship, his eldest surviving son, Henry Frederick, Lord Maltravers, married Elizabeth, daughter of Esme Stuart, 3rd Duke of Lennox, for whom Charles had arranged another match.

        The enraged King sent the young couple into confinement at Lambeth, and to further underscore his unhappiness with Sir Thomas, ordered he and his wife to be confined first in the Tower of London, and afterwards, in their country house at Horseley, County Sussex.  This move upset the Lords, who demanded Sir Thomas' release, and King Charles, taken aback by their anger, set them at liberty in June of 1626.

        Once again Sir Thomas found himself in confinement in his house, although it is not clear what the charges were.  Once more he won release at the insistence of the Lords.

Sir Thomas eventually wound his way back into the King's good graces and by 1634 found himself escorting Charles to his coronation in Scotland.  King Charles granted him the title of Earl of Norfolk by patent, dated June 6, 1644, from Oxford.  But in the ebb and flow of court life, Sir Thomas was still on shaky grounds.  Knowing this, Sir Thomas left the country, escorting Queen Henrietta Maria and Princess Mary.  He was never to return.  He permanently settled at Padua, Italy.  Although he was recalled by an order of the House of Lords, he remained abroad and died following a brief illness.

        Sir Thomas formed the first large collection of works of art in England.  From 1615 onward, he diligently collected works throughout Europe.  "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 54

 

       

Children of Thomas Howard and Alathea Talbot are:

        384             i.    James11 Howard, K.B., Lord Mowbray, died 1624 in Ghent321.

+      385            ii.    Henry Frederick Howard, K.B, 3rd Earl of Arundel, born August 15, 1608; died April 17, 1652.

+      386           iii.    William Howard, K.B., Viscount Stafford, born November 30, 1614; died December 29, 1680 in Tower Hill by execution for high treason and buried in the chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula in the Tower on the same day.

 

 

        273.  Edward10 Howard, K.B., 1st Baron Howard of Escrick (Thomas9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)322 died April 24, 1675 in England and was buried in the Savoy.  He married Mary Boteler323 December 1623324, daughter of John Boteler, Lord Boteler. 

       

Children of Edward Howard and Mary Boteler are:

        387             i.    Thomas11 Howard, 2nd Baron Howard of Escric325, died 1678.

+      388            ii.    William Howard, 3rd Baron Howard of Escric.

+      389           iii.    Anne Howard, died December 1696.

 

 

        277.  Thomas10 Howard, 1st Earl of Berkshire (Thomas9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died July 16, 1669.  He married Elizabeth Cecil. 

       

Children of Thomas Howard and Elizabeth Cecil are:

        390             i.    Charles11 Howard, 2nd Earl of Berkshire.

        391            ii.    Thomas Howard, 3rd Earl of Berkshire.

        392           iii.    Henry Howard.

        393           iv.    William Howard.

+      394            v.    Robert Howard, born Abt. 1626; died 1698.

        395           vi.    Philip Howard, born 1629.

        396          vii.    Elizabeth Howard.

        397         viii.    Frances Howard.

        398            ix.    Mary Howard.

        399             x.    Edward Howard, born Abt. November 2, 1624 in England and baptized November 2, 1624 at St Martin's-in-the-Fields326.

 

 

        278.  Theophilus10 Howard, K.G., 2nd Earl of Suffolk (Thomas9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)327 was born Bef. August 13, 1584 in England, and was baptized August 13, 1584, and died June 3, 1640 in Suffolk House, the Strand, and buried at Saffron Walden, County Essex328.  He married Elizabeth Home March 1611/12328, daughter of George Home, Earl of Dunbar. 

       

Child of Theophilus Howard and Elizabeth Home is:

        400             i.    James11 Howard, 3rd Earl of Suffolk328.

 

 

        283.  Charles10 Howard, Knt., of Clun Castle (Thomas9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)329 was born Abt. 1590, and died September 22, 1622 in Clun Castle, County Shropshire330.  He married Mary Fitz, of Fitzford, Devonshire 1612331, daughter of John Fitz, of Fitzford, Devonshire. 

       

Children of Charles Howard and Mary Fitz are:

        401             i.    Elizabeth11 Howard331, born Bet. 1612 and 1622.

        402            ii.    Mary Howard332, born Bet. 1612 and 1622.

 

 

        285.  Robert10 Howard, K.B., of Clun Castle (Thomas9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)333 was born 1598, and died April 22, 1653 in Clun Castle, County Shropshire, probably, and buried at Clun.  He met (1) Frances Coke, Viscountess Purbeck, daughter of Edward Coke.  She died 1645.  He married (2) Catherine Neville 1648334, daughter of Henry Neville, 7th Baron Abergavenny. 

        Robert and his younger brother, William were made Knights of the Bath November 4, 1616, when Prince Charles, later King Charles I, was created Prince of Wales.  At the death of his elder brother, Charles, he was granted letters of administration to Clun Castle where he took up residence.

        True to the traditions of the Howards, Sir Robert became notorious by his affairs, particularly with Frances, the Viscountess Purbeck.  Lady Frances, the daughter of Sir Edward Coke, had been forced into a marriage with Sir John Villiers, 1st Viscount Purbeck, and the brother of George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham.

        A Viscount and a Duke beat a Knight of the Bath any day, and Sir Robert soon found himself skating on thin ice but unwilling to break off the affair.  After living some time apart from her husband, Lady Frances quietly gave birth to a son, baptized "Robert Wright."

        Outraged, Sir George had the pair cited before the High Commission Court, known as the Star Chamber, on February 19, 1625, only a few months after the birth.

        Sir Robert was tossed into Fleet Prison and was publicly excommunicated at Paul's Cross for refusing to answer questions regarding the romance.  At the coronation of Charles I, he evidently was pardoned.  For her part, Lady Frances was given a fine and to be incarcerated, but she evaded the penalties by escaping to France.

        When the storm had died down, she returned to England and boldly set up housekeeping with Sir Robert in Shropshire and had other children by him.  The pairs defiance did not amuse the powers that be, and in 1635 the Star Chamber proceedings were renewed.  Sir Robert refused to produce his mistress and was ordered again to Fleet Prison, this time without the use of pen, ink, or paper, for three months.  He was ordered to stay away from her and was fined.

        Following the death of Lady Frances, Sir Robert married in 1648, Catherine, daughter of Sir Henry Neville, 7th Baron Abergavenny, by whom he had two sons and a daughter.

 - "Dictionary of National Biography," Volume 10, p. 58-59

 

       

Child of Robert Howard and Frances Coke is:

        403             i.    Robert11 Wright, illeg.335, born October 19, 1624 in England and baptized at Cripplegate under the name of "Robert Wright," of which Sir Robert was the reputed father.

 

       

Child of Robert Howard and Catherine Neville is:

        404             i.    Henry11 Howard, of Clun Castle.

 

 

        287.  Philip10 Howard (William9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)336 was born December 6, 1581 in Mount Pleasant, Enfield Chase, Middlesex337.  He married Margaret Carryl. 

       

Children of Philip Howard and Margaret Carryl are:

+      405             i.    William11 Howard, Knt., of Naworth, Cumberland, died 1640.

        406            ii.    Philip Howard.

        407           iii.    Alathea Howard.

 

 

        294.  Anne10 Arundel (Thomas9, Matthew8, Margaret7 Howard, Edmund6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died July 23, 1649.  She married Cecil Calvert, 2nd Lord Baltimore338 Abt. March 20, 1626/27339.  He was born Abt. March 2, 1604/05, and died December 1675.

       

Child of Anne Arundel and Cecil Calvert is:

+      408             i.    Charles11 Calvert, 3rd Lord Baltimore, born August 27, 1637; died February 21, 1713/14.

 

 

        295.  Elizabeth10 West, of Wherwell, Hampshire (Anne9 Knolleys, Lady West, Mary8 Carey, Lady Knolleys, Mary7 Boleyn, Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)340 was born September 11, 1573 in Wherwell, Hampshire, and died January 12, 1631/32.  She married Herbert Pelham, I, of Fordingham, Co. Dorset February 12, 1592/93 in Wherwell, County Hants, England.  He died April 12, 1620.

       

Child of Elizabeth West and Herbert Pelham is:

+      409             i.    Elizabeth11 Pelham, of Hellingly, born April 27, 1604 in Hellingly; died November 1, 1628.

 

 

        304.  John10 West, of "West's Point," Gov of Virginia (Anne9 Knolleys, Lady West, Mary8 Carey, Lady Knolleys, Mary7 Boleyn, Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)341 was born December 14, 1590 in Testwood, Wiltshire, and died Abt. 1659 in Possibly New Kent County, Virginia.  He married Anne Claiborne Abt. 1639. 

       

Child of John West and Anne Claiborne is:

+      410             i.    John11 West, Jr., of Virginia, born June 6, 1632 in "Chiskack/Bellfield" on the York River; died 1689 in New Kent County, Virginia.

 

 

        308.  Richard10 Southwell, Knt Horsham S. Faith's, illeg (Mary9 Darcy, of Danbury, County Essex, Elizabeth8 de Vere, of Hedingham Castle, John7, Anne6 Howard, Countess of Oxford, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)342 was born 1548 in Danbury, County Essex, and christened in 1550 at  Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich.  He married Bridget Copley, of Roughway, Sussex, daughter of Roger Copley and Elizabeth Shelley. 

        Sir Richard followed in his father's footsteps in supporting the King. He practiced the protestant faith of the Church of England. Richard married Bridget Copley who was the Governess of Queen Elizabeth.  Bridget's mother was Elizabeth Shelley. Another branch of this same Shelley family was to produce Percy Bysshe Shelley, the great poet of the early 1800's.  The priory of Horsham St Faiths had been turned into a Benedictine monastery after the Knights Templar were dissolved.  Sir Richard obtained it and his son, Richard, occupied it as his home.  Sir Richard became a Roman Catholic convert at the urging by his son, Robert.

       

Children of Richard Southwell and Bridget Copley are:

+      411             i.    Richard11 Southwell, III, of Spixworth, Norfolk, born in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich.

+      412            ii.    Katherine Southwell, of Horsham St. Faith, born 1566 in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich, and christened 1566 at Norwich, County Norfolk; died 1618 in County Norfolk.

        413           iii.    Thomas Southwell, of Horsham St. Faith, born in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich.

        414           iv.    Robert Southwell, of Horsham St. Faith, born Abt. 1561 in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich343; died February 22, 1594/95 in Tyburn.  He was hanged for preaching the Catholic faith.

               A devoted Jesuit Priest, Robert Southwell would pay for his unyielding faith dearly.  Through his poetry, prudently signed "R.S.," he expressed his love for Christ and the Roman Catholic Church.  Although his name was not publicly associated with any of his writings, Queen Elizabeth's minions were suspicious of him and watched him closely.  He took refuge in the home of his great friend Richard Bellamy, a staunch Catholic.  Young Anne Bellamy, first arrested, then seduced by the infamous Richard Topcliffe, would betray him.  He was brutally tortured and his execution went horribly wrong.   See "Where Mightier Do Assault Than Do Defend"

        415            v.    Elizabeth Southwell, of Horsham St. Faith, born in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich.

        416           vi.    Anne Southwell, of Horsham St. Faith, born in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich.

        417          vii.    Frances Southwell, of Horsham St. Faith, born in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich; died 1643.

        418         viii.    Mary Southwell, of Horsham St. Faith, born in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich.

 

 

        315.  John10 Knyvet, III, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk (John9, John8, William7, Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners, Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk, and died January 3, 1703/04.  He married (1) Elizabeth Woodcock Abt. October 18, 1667.    He married (2) Johanna Sutton Abt. October 25, 1677. 

       

Children of John Knyvet and Elizabeth Woodcock are:

        419             i.    Mary11 Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died Aft. 1704.  She married Thomas Brown November 13, 1690; died Bef. 1704.

        420            ii.    Elizabeth Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died Abt. July 1670.

 

       

Children of John Knyvet and Johanna Sutton are:

        421             i.    Johanna11 Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. March 1677/78 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died Abt. April 26, 1708.

+      422            ii.    William Knyvet, I, Coroner of County Norfolk, born Abt. July 1681 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk, England; died August 17, 1751.

        423           iii.    John Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. September 1682 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        424           iv.    Thomas Knyvet, of Fundenhall, County Norfolk, born Abt. January 1682/83 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

 

 

        321.  Dorothy10 Lane, of Courteenhall (Elizabeth9 Vincent, of Harpole, Anne8 Tanfield, of Gayton, Francis7, William6, Catherine5 Neville, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. September 4, 1589.  She married (1) Thomas West, of Cotton End, near Northampton344 January 16, 1608/09.  He died Abt. January 26, 1613/14.  She married (2) William Randolph, of Little Houghton March 30, 1619. 

       

Children of Dorothy Lane and William Randolph are:

+      425             i.    Richard11 Randolph, of Morton Hall, County Warwick, born Abt. February 24, 1620/21; died May 1678 in Dublin, Ireland.

        426            ii.    Henry Randolph, Clerk of Virginia Assembly344, born Abt. November 27, 1623 in Little Houghton, County Northampton; died 1673 in Henrico County, Virginia.  He married (1) Judith Soane; born December 12, 1661.  He married (2) Elizabeth October 12, 1652; died October 12, 1660.

 

 

        324.  Margaret10 Twysden, of Roydon Hall (Anne9 Wyatt, Thomas8, Elizabeth7 Brooke, Thomas6, Margaret5 Neville, Lady Brooke, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)  She married Henry Vane, of Hadlow, Kent345 1584. 

       

Child of Margaret Twysden and Henry Vane is:

+      427             i.    Henry11 Vane, Sir Henry, born 1589; died 1654.

 

 

        327.  John10 Maidstone, the Elder, of Boxted (Anna9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)346 was born in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and possibly baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, and died 1666 in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, in the floor by the altar347.  He married Ann.  She died 1656 in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, in the floor by the altar.

       

Children of John Maidstone and Ann are:

        428             i.    John11 Maidstone, the Younger, of Boxted, born Abt. 1650 in Boxted, possibly, and probably baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted; died 1650 in Boxted, possibly, at the age of 22, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, near the altar.

        429            ii.    Daughter Maidstone, born in Boxted, County Essex, probably; died 1678 in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, in the floor by the altar347.

+      430           iii.    Mary Maidstone, born Abt. 1651; died 1679 in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, in the floor by the altar.

 

 

        347.  William10 Clopton, Esq., of Castlings Manor (William9, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)348 was born Abt. 1618349, and died Abt. April 25, 1666 in Castlings Manor and buried April 25, 1666 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk350.  He married Bridgett Bernard, of County Norfolk351.  She died Abt. March 20, 1673/74 in Castlings Manor and buried March 20, 1674 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk352.

       

Children of William Clopton and Bridgett Bernard are:

        431             i.    A11 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton353, born Abt. December 12, 1661 in Castlings Manor and baptized December 12, 1661 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk.

        432            ii.    Jamima Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, born Abt. September 22, 1663 in Castlings Manor and baptized September 22, 1663 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, County Suffolk354.

        433           iii.    Hannah Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton.

        434           iv.    Bridgett Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton.

 

 

        352.  Elizabeth10 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton (William9, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)355 was born Abt. May 8, 1626 in Hadleigh, County Suffolk,  and baptized May 8, 1626, at St. Mary's Church, Hadleigh.  She married Robert Cutler, Gent, of Letheringham, Suffolk. 

       

Child of Elizabeth Clopton and Robert Cutler is:

        435             i.    Amy11 Cutler, of Letheringham, County Suffolk356.

 

 

        358.  William10 Clopton, M.A., Rector of Rettendon (Walter9, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)357 was born October 9, 1613 in Boxted, County Essex, about 2 miles northeast of Great Horkesley, and probably baptized at St. Peter's Church, Boxted by Thomas Cleeson, and died Bef. June 14, 1671 in Eastwood, County Essex, about 10 miles northeast of Rettendon358.  He married Elizabeth Sutcliffe359 Bef. 1653, daughter of Izaiah Suttcliffe and Elizabeth Jolye.  She died Bef. October 8, 1683 in Paglesham, County Essex, England, about 8 miles northeast of Eastwood360.

        William graduated from Emmanuel College, Cambridge, considered by his time to be "a nursery of Puritanism."  The Cloptons had married and remarried into a network of the great Puritan families of East Anglia;  their timing could not have been worse.  Charles II regained the monarchy in 1660 and proceeded to make life miserable for the Puritans.  William was one of more than 2,000 clergymen who refused to embrace the High Church or Anglo-Catholic rituals, and were "ejected from their livings."   To see how this changed the course of Clopton History see,  "For Conscience Sake."

       

Children of William Clopton and Elizabeth Sutcliffe are:

+      436             i.    William11 Clopton, Gentleman, born Abt. 1655 in Eastwood, County Essex, England; died Bef. 1733 in New Kent County, Virginia and buried at St. Peter's Parish Church.

+      437            ii.    Margaret Clopton, of London, died 1724.

 

 

        362.  William10 Doggett, I, Rector of Stoke-by-Clare (Margery9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. January 5, 1617/18 in Groton, County Suffolk and baptized St. Bartholomew's Church, Groton, January 5, 1618361.  He married Margaret Tuttle. 

 

Notes for William Doggett, I, Rector of Stoke-by-Clare:

William graduated from Cambridge.  He was ordained as an Anglican minister and was rector of Stoke-by-Clare, Suffolk.

       

Children of William Doggett and Margaret Tuttle are:

        438             i.    Susan11 Doggett, born 1639.  She married John Spering 1662.

        439            ii.    Avis Doggett, born 1643.  She married (1) John Williams.  She married (2) Daniel Bright.

        440           iii.    Richard Doggett.

        441           iv.    Ann Doggett.  She married Jefferson.

        442            v.    Benjamin Doggett.

        443           vi.    William Doggett II.

        444          vii.    Robert Doggett.

 

 

        366.  Dorothy10 Clopton (Thomas9, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. December 14, 1630 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, probably, and baptized December 14, 1630, at St. Mary and St. Edward, West Hanningfield, possibly by Edward Aylmer, DD or her father362, and died in Stambourne, County Essex, probably, about 9 miles southwest of Sudbury and about 12 miles south west of Long Melford.  She married Henry Havers, B.A., of Stambourne, County Essex September 27, 1653.  He was born Abt. 1620, and died Abt. October 25, 1707 in Stambourne, County Essex, and buried at St. Peter and St. Thomas, Stambourne363.

        Unlike Dorothy's father, The Rev. Thomas Clopton, Rector of Ramsden Bellhouse, her husband chose to be ejected from the Anglican Church rather than conform.  Upon his ejection as Rector of St. Peter and St. Thomas in Stambourne, August 23, 1662, Rev. Havers was not, oddly, formally defrocked.

He and a flock of fellow Puritans began to meet in homes in the Stambourne area.  They referred to their gatherings not as "worshiping," but as "meeting," thus, the term "Meeting House" was born.  Exhausted from the Civil Wars, the authorities ignored the little bands "meeting" throughout the country as long as they were discreet.  The congregation eventually evolved into the Congregational Church, a few miles south of Stambourne, near the village of Birdbrook.

        There is in the safety deposit box of the Congregational Church, a sterling silver porringer, dated 1672, which is decorated with the Clopton Coast of Arms.  A porringer is a vessel used to serve communion wine.  Unlike a chalice, a porringer has no stem.  The Clopton Porringer is round and has a handle on either side of the bowl.  It is very beautiful, and is considered too valuable to use.

        When Rev. Havers died, there was, of course, no cemetery because there could be no burying ground behind a house that was used for "meetings."  The Rector of St. Peter and St. Thomas made arrangements for Rev. Havers to be buried in the cemetery at Stambourne.  There is no record of Dorothy's death nor burial site.

        It is interesting, although a little confusing, to note that Martin Sparrow, of Birdbrook, the churchwarden of the parish church, was the father of Elizabeth Sparrow.  Elizabeth married Thomas Clopton, Esq., of Liston Hall.  As his father's heir, Thomas became the owner of the advowson that appointed his second cousin, twice removed, Thomas Clopton, Dorothy's father, as Rector of St. Mary the Virgin, Ramsden Bellhouse.  This Thomas remained in the good graces of the Anglican Church, although for a time he was held in great suspicion because so many Cloptons and their allied families were staunch supporters of the Puritans.

 

       

Children of Dorothy Clopton and Henry Havers are:

+      445             i.    Clopton11 Havers, Sr., M.D., F.R.S., born February 24, 1655/56 in Stambourne, County Essex, probably; died April 1702 in England, probably, and buried at Willingale Doe, Essex.

        446            ii.    Dorethy Havers, born February 24, 1657/58 in Stambourne, County Essex, about 5 miles southwest of Clare, County Suffolk363; died December 29, 1661 in Stambourne, County Essex363.

        447           iii.    Tamesinge Havers, born February 24, 1657/58 in Stambourne, County Essex, about 5 miles southwest of Clare, County Suffolk363.  She married Francis Ford June 26, 1684.

        448           iv.    Elesebath Havers, born Abt. May 20, 1661 in Stambourne, County Essex, about 5 miles southwest of Clare, County Suffolk, and baptized May 20, 1661363; died Bef. December 23, 1661 in Stambourne, County Essex, and buried at Stambourne December 23, 1661363.

        449            v.    Dorothy Havers, born December 26, 1662 in Stambourne, County Essex, about 5 miles southwest of Clare, County Suffolk, and baptized December 27, 1662363.

        450           vi.    Judith Havers, died Abt. November 16, 1691 in Stambourne, County Essex, probably, and buried at St. Peter and St. Thomas, Stambourne, November 16, 1691.

               CAUTION:  It is not clear that Judith is the child of Dorothy Clopton and her husband, The Rev. Henry Havers.  The parish register reads:  "Mrs. Judith Havers bureed in woolen 16 November."  The entry may mean, "The spinster, Mistress Judith Havers."  Or, she could be the widow who moved to Stambourne.

 

 

        371.  Bridget10 Clopton (Thomas9, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. September 8, 1644 in West Hanningfield, County Essex, and baptized at St. Mary the Virgin, Ramsden Bellhouse, about seven miles south of Chelmsford364, and died Bef. May 4, 1665365.  She married William Ballet, of Hatfield Broadoak Abt. 1658 in Ramsden Bellhouse by license of the Archbishop of Centerbury.  He was born in Hatfield Broadoak, County Essex, possibly, about 10 miles northwest of Chelmsford.

       

Child of Bridget Clopton and William Ballet is:

        451             i.    John11 Ballet, of "Sowter", born Abt. 1664.

 

 

        376.  William10 Clopton, Knt, of Kentwell Hall (Mary9 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, William8, William7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)366 was born February 27, 1591/92 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened March 13, 1592 at Holy Trinity367, and died March 4, 1617/18 in Horsheath, Cambridge and buried Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford, March 12, 1618 in the Clopton Chapel368.  He married (1) Anne Barnardistone, of Clare, Suffolk January 1, 1609/10 in Clare Church, County Suffolk, England369, daughter of Thomas Barnardistone and Anne.  She was born Abt. 1595 in Clare, County Suffolk, England and baptized November 7, 1605 at St. Peter and St. Paul, Clare, about 6 miles west of Long Melford370, and died February 4, 1614/15 in England and buried Holy Trinity Church, February 1615 in the Clopton Chapel371.  He married (2) Elizabeth Allington, of Horsheath372 Aft. 1615, daughter of Giles Allington, Knt. of Horseheath. 

        The Barnardistons are an ancient family.  The family continued as patrons of both the Recotry of Kedington (Ketton) and the Barnardiston Recotry for over 400 years.  They resided much of the time in Lincolnshire and were patrons of Gt. Cotes.  They were sheriffs and representatives in Parliament for that county at different periods.  This accounts for the pedigree not being entered in the "Suffolk Visitation of 1561."  There is a frament of glass in the church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Clare, showing the Clopton shield of arms.

       

Child of William Clopton and Anne Barnardistone is:

+      452             i.    Anne11 Clopton, of Kentwell Hall, born Abt. March 1611/12 in Clare, County Suffolk, and baptized March 2, 1612, St. Peter and St. Paul, Clare; died Abt. August 1, 1641 in Stowlangtoft Hall, Lavenham, possibly.

 

       

Children of William Clopton and Elizabeth Allington are:

        453             i.    Edward11 Clopton, of Kentwell Hall373, born Abt. August 1618 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened August 25, 1618, at Holy Trinity; died Abt. September 1618 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and buried Holy Trinity Church September 12, 1618374.

        454            ii.    William Clopton, of Kentwell Hall, born Abt. 1619 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened September 1, 1619, at Holy Trinity375.

 

 

        378.  Walter10 Clopton, Esq., of Kentwell Hall (Mary9 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, William8, William7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. April 1596 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and christened April 14, 1596, at Holy Trinity376, and died 1627 in Fordham, County Cambridgeshire, about 26 miles northwest of Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk377.  He married (1) Anne Thornton, of Snailwell378, daughter of Roger Thornton, Knt., of Snailwell.  She was born in Snailwell, County Cambridgeshire, probably, about 12 miles northeast of Bury St. Edmunds and about 3 miles north of Newmarket, Suffolk.  He married (2) Martha Barrow, of Spinney Abbey, daughter of Isaac Barrow, of Spinney Abbey County Cambridge. 

        A transcript of an undated letter from Walter Clopton to John Winthrop has been preserved in the "Winthrop Papers."

 

Good Cosen, Sir Symone Dewes promised me last terme vpon his honesty that he woulde ioyne this terme for publication I desier to haue the bookes sent downe my father will pay you the charges and satisfy your man, if you please to command him to follow it for me:  the debt I owe you I desier you would deferre till the assized where I shalbee and cleere all: I would intreat you to make a motion for those writinges that I was commanded to bringe into the Court that they may be deliuered againe to me.  The deed of entayle is that I cheefly ayme at, made by William Clopton to Thomas Clopton I haue forgott the names of the rest but I thinke they are all together with that I pray excuse me that I am thus troublsome. With my best love truly I rest your faythfull friend and kindsman

                                Walt:  Clopton

 

Sir if you please, I shall intreat you to lay out what moneyes my Cosen Winthrop shall demand for the takinge out of the depositiones and I will restore them at your returne:  also that you would command your man to solicite Mr. Winthrop that I may not fayle of my desires in this letter, which I haue left open for you to read Sir I wish you a prosperous iourney and a safe returne, resting your louing sonne in law to command

                                Walter Clopton

 

See "Brief Communion"

       

Children of Walter Clopton and Anne Thornton are:

        455             i.    Roger11 Clopton, Rector of Downham379.

        456            ii.    Daniel Clopton, of Kentwell Hall.

        457           iii.    Benjamin Clopton, of Kentwell Hall.

        458           iv.    William Clopton, of Kentwell Hall.

        459            v.    Cecillia Clopton, of Kentwell Hall.

 

       

Children of Walter Clopton and Martha Barrow are:

        460             i.    Thomas11 Clopton, Rector of Castle Caereinion380, died in Christleton, County Cheshire, just east of Chester.

               "Bishop Barrow (showed many) kindnesses to his nephews.  ....Thomas was appointed Schoolmaster of Oswestry in 1672, Sinecure Rector of Cilcain in 1673, Cannon in 1675, Sinecure Rector of Llanrwst and Prebendary of Meifod in 16777, and Rector of Castle Caereinion in 1678--good pickings for an East Anglian!  It was, however, evidentially too much for Barrow's successor as Bishop of St. Asaph, who managed to drive him into the diocese of Chester in 1683.  Bishop Lloyd's letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury, dated 4th May in that year, gives an amusing account of Clopton's reading a Welsh sermon, 'that he might be able to say he had preached in Welsh; but he read it so that none that heard him could understand anything in it no more than himself.'"

Pryce, Thomas, "The History of Llandysilio Parish,"  1899-1902

        461            ii.    John Clopton, of County Cambridgeshire.

        462           iii.    Bernard Clopton, of County Cambridgeshire381.

        463           iv.    Isaac Clopton, of County Cambridgeshire.

+      464            v.    Walter Clopton, Registrar & Chapter Clerk.

        465           vi.    William Clopton, of County Cambridgeshire.

 

 

        379.  Nathaniel10 Burrough (George9, Bridget8 Higham, Phyllis7 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)

       

Child of Nathaniel Burrough is:

        466             i.    George11 Burrough, A.B..

 

 

Generation No. 11

 

        385.  Henry Frederick11 Howard, K.B, 3rd Earl of Arundel (Thomas10, Phillip9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born August 15, 1608382, and died April 17, 1652.  He married Elizabeth Stuart March 7, 1625/26382, daughter of Esme Stuart, 3rd Duke of Lennox. 

       

Children of Henry Howard and Elizabeth Stuart are:

        467             i.    Thomas12 Howard, born 1627; died 1677.

        468            ii.    Henry Howard, 6th Duke of Norfolk383, born July 12, 1628; died January 11, 1683/84 in Arundel House and buried at Arundel.  He married (1) Anne Somerset Bef. 1655.  He married (2) Jane Bickerton Bef. 1678384; died August 28, 1693.

               Following the devastating fire that burned much of London, Sir Henry offered the Royal Society the use of rooms at his Arundel House in the Strand.  Although a good natured and generous man, he wasn't the most intellectual of men.  At Arundel house he neglected his splendid library,  and on January 2, 1667, he gave the Society a large portion of his library.  A portion of the manuscripts were given to the College of Arms.  The Society sold their share of the manuscripts to the trustees of the British Museum in 1830 and used the money to purchase scientific books.

               In 1668, when it was agreed to build a college for the Society's meetings, Sir Henry, who was on the committee, gave a piece of ground in the garden of Arundel House for a site and drew designs for the building.  Marble sculptures in the garden were given to the Oxford University.

               Sir Henry was raised to the peerage on March 27, 1669, with the title of Baron Howard of Castle Rising in County Norfolk, and in April went as Ambassador Extraordinary to Morocco.

               Upon the death of his first wife, he fell into a deep depression.  Seeking relief, he embarked on a serious of disastrous adventures that left his reputation and fortune in tatters.  Following the death of his brother in 1677, he became the 6th Duke of Norfolk.

               Before 1678 he married his mistress, Jane Bickerton, the daughter of Robert Bickerton, Gentleman of the Wine Cellar to Charles II.  - "Dictionary of National Biography, Volume 10, p. 32-33

        469           iii.    Philip Thomas Howard, Cardinal.

 

 

        386.  William11 Howard, K.B., Viscount Stafford (Thomas10, Phillip9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born November 30, 1614385, and died December 29, 1680 in Tower Hill by execution for high treason and buried in the chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula in the Tower on the same day386.  He married Mary Stafford, Countess of Stafford Abt. October 11, 1637387, daughter of Edward Stafford.  She died January 13, 1693/94.

        Brought up as a Catholic, Sir William was made a knight of the Bath at the coronation of Charles I in February 1626.  On November 12, 1640, he took his seat for the first time in the House of Lords one day after being created Viscount Stafford.

        When the  civil war broke out, he and his wife left the country and went to Antwerp, but he made the fateful decision to return.  On January 18, 1665, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1672 served as a member of the Society's council, and for a few years he led a rather uneventful life, but this peace was not to last for long.

        In 1680, Sir William, along with four other Lords, all Catholic were arrested.   On May 21, he found himself confined to the Tower and was refused bail.  Of the five "Popish Lords," Sir William was considered the least able to defend himself, and so his trial was the first to be heard.  On November 30, his trial for high treason began in Westminster Hall.

        The trial lasted for seven days, and he was permitted to consult his counsel only when points of law arose.  To his credit, Sir William defended himself with a greater degree of ability than had been anticipated.  He was accused, among other things, of raising money for an army which was to be raised "for the promoting of the Catholic interest."  Several witnessed swore that Sir William had encouraged them to murder King Charles, II.

        He was found guilty on December 7 by a vote of 55 to 31.  He was to be hung, drawn and quartered.  Every one of his kinsmen who participated in the trial, with the exception of Henry Howard, K.G., 7th Duke of Norfolk, voted guilty.  Whether this was because they really believed in his guilt or were just trying to save their own necks is not known.

        He was beheaded on Tower Hill, the King remitting the other barbarous penalties.  He was buried in the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula in the Tower on the same day, but the exact spot is unknown.

 - "Dictionary of Nationa Biography," Volume 10, p. 81-83

       

Child of William Howard and Mary Stafford is:

        470             i.    Henry12 Howard, Earl of Stafford388.  He married Claude Charlotte April 3, 1694 in France389.

 

 

        388.  William11 Howard, 3rd Baron Howard of Escric (Edward10, Thomas9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)390.  He married Frances391. 

       

Child of William Howard and Frances is:

        471             i.    Charles12 Howard, 4th Bardon Howard of Escric392, died 1715.

 

 

        389.  Anne11 Howard (Edward10, Thomas9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died December 1696393.  She married Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Carlisle, son of William Howard and Mary Eure.  He was born 1629, and died February 24, 1684/85 in England and buried in York Minster394.

       

Children of Anne Howard and Charles Howard are:

        472             i.    Edward12 Howard, 2nd Earl of Carlisle395.  He married Elizabeth Uvedale, of Wickham, Southampton.

        473            ii.    Frederick Christian Howard395, died 1684.

        474           iii.    Charles Howard395, died 1670.

 

 

        394.  Robert11 Howard (Thomas10, Thomas9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)396 was born Abt. 1626, and died 1698.  He married Honora O'Brien. 

       

Child of Robert Howard and Honora O'Brien is:

        475             i.    Thomas12 Howard, Teller of Exchequer.

 

 

        405.  William11 Howard, Knt., of Naworth, Cumberland (Philip10, William9, Thomas8, Henry7, Thomas6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)397 died 1640.  He married Mary Eure, daughter of William, Lord Eure. 

       

Children of William Howard and Mary Eure are:

        476             i.    William12 Howard, born 1627.

        477            ii.    Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Carlisle, born 1629; died February 24, 1684/85 in England and buried in York Minster398.  He married Anne Howard; died December 1696399.

        478           iii.    Philip Howard.

        479           iv.    Thomas Howard.

 

 

        408.  Charles11 Calvert, 3rd Lord Baltimore (Anne10 Arundel, Thomas9, Matthew8, Margaret7 Howard, Edmund6, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)400 was born August 27, 1637, and died February 21, 1713/14.  He married Jane Lowe, of Denby, County Derbyshire Abt. 1667.  She died Abt. January 19, 1699/00.

        Lord Calvert was first Lord Proprietor of Maryland and then Governor of Maryland from 1661-1684

       

Child of Charles Calvert and Jane Lowe is:

        480             i.    Benedict Leonard12 Calvert.

 

 

        409.  Elizabeth11 Pelham, of Hellingly (Elizabeth10 West, of Wherwell, Hampshire, Anne9 Knolleys, Lady West, Mary8 Carey, Lady Knolleys, Mary7 Boleyn, Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born April 27, 1604 in Hellingly, and died November 1, 1628.  She married John Humphrey, Gent., of Chaldon401 September 4, 1621 in Sallsbury. 

       

Child of Elizabeth Pelham and John Humphrey is:

        481             i.    Anne12 Humphrey, of Fordingham401, born Abt. December 17, 1625.  She married (1) William Palmes.  She married (2) John Miles, of Swansea, Massachusetts.

 

 

        410.  John11 West, Jr., of Virginia (John10, Anne9 Knolleys, Lady West, Mary8 Carey, Lady Knolleys, Mary7 Boleyn, Elizabeth6 Howard, Lady Boleyn, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born June 6, 1632 in "Chiskack/Bellfield" on the York River, and died 1689 in New Kent County, Virginia.  He married Ursula Croshaw, of York November 4, 1667. 

       

Children of John West and Ursula Croshaw are:

        482             i.    Anne12 West.  She married Henry Fox, Gentleman; died in "Huntington," King William County, Virginia.

        483            ii.    Nathaniel West, born Bef. 1675; died Abt. 1724 in Probably West Point, Virginia.  He married Martha Woodward May 14, 1702.

        484           iii.    Thomas West.

        485           iv.    John West III.

 

 

        411.  Richard11 Southwell, III, of Spixworth, Norfolk (Richard10, Mary9 Darcy, of Danbury, County Essex, Elizabeth8 de Vere, of Hedingham Castle, John7, Anne6 Howard, Countess of Oxford, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)402 was born in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich.  He married Alice Cornwallis, of Brome, County Suffolk403 August 23, 1552 in Brome, County Suffolk404, daughter of Thomas Cornwallis and Anne Jernegan.  She was born in Brome, County Suffolk, about 2 miles north of Eye, and baptized at St. Mary, Brome.

        St. Mary's Church retains its original Norman round tower, although the rest of the church was entirely rebuilt in 1863.  Tombs of the Cornwallis dominate the interior.  The finest is that of Alice Cornwallis' grandparents, Sir John Cornwallis and his wife, Lady Mary, in the chancel.  It is a cenotaph armorial altar tomb with recumbent effigies bearing the inscription "Iohannes Cornwaleis Miles Willmi Cornwaleis Armigeri filius in Domo Principis Edowardi oeconomus:  et uxor eiusdem Maria Edowardi Suliarde de Eassex Armigeri filia, qui quid Iohannes, 23 Aprils Anno Domini 1544 obiit Astrugie incomitatu Buckingham cum ibidem Princeps Edovardus versaretur."  A cenotaph is an empty tomb erected in honor of the deceased who is buried elsewhere.

        The tomb of her parents, Sir Thomas Cornwallis and Lady Anne, is an armorial altar tomb with their effigies, the inscription reading "Sr. Thomas Cornwaleys Soone of Sr. Ihon was of Queen Mary her Prevy Councell and Treasurer of Caleys after Comptroller of her houshold in special Grace and trusts of his Mrs. Who Untimely lousing her Life retired him self to this Towne wher he spent the rest of his own priviately and loyally all the rayne of Queen Elizabeth her sister and died heer the second yeer of King Iames the 26 of December 1604 in the 86 yeer of his age."

 

       

Children of Richard Southwell and Alice Cornwallis are:

        486             i.    Thomas12 Southwell, of Woodrising, born in Windham Manor, probably, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich; died June 12, 1626.

        487            ii.    Henry Southwell, of Woodrising, born Abt. December 14, 1576 in Windham Manor, probably, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich, and was christened December 14.

        488           iii.    Elizabeth Southwell, of Woodrising, born Abt. February 8, 1576/77 in Windham Manor, probably, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich, and was christened February 8.

        489           iv.    Anthony Southwell, of Woodrising, born Abt. May 3, 1579 in Windham Manor, probably, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich, and was christened May 3; died 1623 in County Cork, Ireland.

        490            v.    Robert Southwell, of Woodrising, born Abt. August 17, 1580 in Windham Manor, probably, Woodrising, County Norfolk, about 16 miles southwest of Norwich, and was christened August 17.

 

 

        412.  Katherine11 Southwell, of Horsham St. Faith (Richard10, Mary9 Darcy, of Danbury, County Essex, Elizabeth8 de Vere, of Hedingham Castle, John7, Anne6 Howard, Countess of Oxford, Thomas5, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)405 was born 1566 in Horsham St. Faith, County Norfolk, about 4 miles north of Norwich, and christened 1566 at Norwich, County Norfolk, and died 1618 in County Norfolk.  She married Leonard Mapes, of Beeston, son of John Mapes and Ann Moore.  He was born 1562 in Beeston, County Norfolk, about 12 miles northwest of Norwich, and died February 4, 1618/19 in Beeston, County Norfolk, about 12 miles northwest of Norwich.

       

Child of Katherine Southwell and Leonard Mapes is:

        491             i.    Francis12 Mapes, born 1588; died March 19, 1637/38 in Rolles Hall, County Norfolk, and buried on March 21, 1638.  He married Anna Loveday; died June 13, 1657.

 

 

        422.  William11 Knyvet, I, Coroner of County Norfolk (John10, John9, John8, William7, Jane6 Bourchier, Baroness Berners, Katherine5 Howard, Baroness of Berners, John4, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. July 1681 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk, England, and died August 17, 1751.  He married Jane of Fundenhall.  She died Aft. August 17, 1751.

       

Children of William Knyvet and Jane are:

        492             i.    Jane12 Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. December 1702 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        493            ii.    William Knyvet, II, of Fundenhall, born Abt. July 1704 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died Abt. April 26, 1708.

        494           iii.    Mary Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. July 1706 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died August 8, 1732.

        495           iv.    John Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. August 1709 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        496            v.    Charles Knyvet, of Westminster, born Abt. March 1709/10 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died September 22, 1785 in Westminster.

        497           vi.    Elizabeth Knyvet, I, of Fundenhall, born Abt. December 1712 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        498          vii.    William Knyvet, III, of Fundenhall, born Abt. July 1714 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        499         viii.    Elizabeth Knyvet, II, of Fundenhall, born Abt. November 1715 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk.

        500            ix.    Philip Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. May 1718 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died Abt. July 5, 1718.

        501             x.    Lucy Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. June 1720 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died September 19, 1739.

        502            xi.    James Knyvet, of Fundenhall, born Abt. September 1721 in Fundenhall, County Norfolk; died March 20, 1737/38.

 

 

        425.  Richard11 Randolph, of Morton Hall, County Warwick (Dorothy10 Lane, of Courteenhall, Elizabeth9 Vincent, of Harpole, Anne8 Tanfield, of Gayton, Francis7, William6, Catherine5 Neville, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)406 was born Abt. February 24, 1620/21, and died May 1678 in Dublin, Ireland.  He married Elizabeth Ryland, of County Warwick, daughter of John Ryland, of County Warwick. 

       

Child of Richard Randolph and Elizabeth Ryland is:

        503             i.    William12 Randolph, Attorney-General of Virginia407, born 1651; died April 11, 1711.  He married Mary Isham, of "Bermuda Hundred" 1678.

               Colonel Randolph came to Virginia about 1660 and settled at "Tuckey Island."  He was Clerk of HEnrico County; Attorney-General of Virginia, 1670-1671; Burgess and Speaker; Presient of the Council; Captain, 1680; and Lieutent Colonel, 1699.

 

 

        427.  Henry11 Vane, Sir Henry (Margaret10 Twysden, of Roydon Hall, Anne9 Wyatt, Thomas8, Elizabeth7 Brooke, Thomas6, Margaret5 Neville, Lady Brooke, Catherine4 Howard, of Fersfield, Norfolk, Robert3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born 1589, and died 1654.  He married Frances Darcy, Lady Vane.  She died 1663.

       

Child of Henry Vane and Frances Darcy is:

        504             i.    Henry12 Vane, Governor of Massachusetts Bay408.  He married Frances Wray.

 

 

        430.  Mary11 Maidstone (John10, Anna9 Clopton, of Castlings Manor, Groton, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. 1651, and died 1679 in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, in the floor by the altar409.  She married Hawes. 

       

Child of Mary Maidstone and Hawes is:

        505             i.    Mary12 Hawes, born Abt. 1674; died 1687 in Boxted, County Essex, probably, and buried at St. Peter's Church, Boxted, in the floor by the altar409.

 

 

        436.  William11 Clopton, Gentleman (William10, Walter9, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. 1655 in Eastwood, County Essex, England, and died Bef. 1733 in New Kent County, Virginia and buried at St. Peter's Parish Church410.  He married Ann Booth Abt. 1677411, daughter of Robert Booth and Frances.  She was born Abt. 1646, and died March 4, 1715/16 in New Kent County, Virginia and buried at St. Peter's Parish Church412.

        Raised on tales of the exciting adventures of his kinsmen in the American Colonies, the urge to escape his straight laced Puritan family got the better of him, and at fifteen, William Clopton, of Eastwood, County Essex, apprenticed himself to one Joshua White of London.  He would eventually settle at St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County, Virginia and begin living the life of a Virginia planter with his wife, Ann Booth.  See "The Story of An American Patriarch"

 

       

Children of William Clopton and Ann Booth are:

        506             i.    Ann12 Clopton, of "Callowell", born 1676 in York County, Virginia; died Aft. June 11, 1754.  She married Nicholas Mills, II, of St. Martin's Parish413 Abt. 1691 in New Kent County, Virginia; born Abt. 1670 in St. Martin's Parish,  New Kent (now Hanover County), Virginia; died Abt. 1741.

        507            ii.    Elizabeth Clopton, of "Callowell"414, born Bef. 1682 in York County, Virginia; died Aft. November 1745.  She married (1) Alexander Moss; born in Probably England; died Abt. April 1772 in Cumberland County, now Powhatan, Virginia415.  She married (2) William Walker, Sr. January 19, 1712/13 in New Kent County, Virginia416; died September 12, 1718417.

In his will dated September 10, 1772 (Cumberland County, Virginia, Records, Will Book II, page 53) Proved April 27, 1772, he leaves his grandson, George Diuguid, 30 acres of his plantation and all farms, houses, and woodland "lying in Great Britain, which I am now possessed of, when he is twenty-one."

        508           iii.    Robert Clopton I418, born January 27, 1682/83 in York County, Virginia419; died December 30, 1742420.  He married (1) Sara Ann Scott December 18, 1711421; born 1692422; died October 24, 1719423.  He married (2) Mary Crump March 22, 1719/20424; died Aft. 1732424.

               Through the Robert Clopton-Mary Crump line, descendants can trace their ancestry to the Rev. Richard Buck, who came to Virginia in 1610.  According to "Adventurers of Purse and Persons, Virginia, 1607-1624/25," 3rd Edition, Rev. Buck was the colonial clergyman who officiated at the marriage of the Indian princess Pocahontas to John Rolfe at Jamestown on April 5, 1614.  Rev. Buck also opened with prayer the initial meeting of the first representative legislative assembly held in the New World on July 30, 1619 at Jamestown.

        509           iv.    William Clopton, of St. Paul's Parish, Hanover425, born Abt. 1685; died Bef. 1733426.  He married Joyce Wilkinson, of Black Creek January 27, 1717/18427.

               He was the Collector of Taxes and Deputy Sheriff of St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, from 1706 to 1716.  The home may have been named "Merry Oak"

 

               "There was in my father's possession a golden horseshoe which the tradition of the family said was worn by William Clopton, Jr. above mentioned.  That it had seven (7) diamonds set in it in the place of nail heads, was inscribed on one side "Sic Juvat Transcenderi Montes" and on the other "William Clopton, Knight."  That as a child I have had it laid in my hand to look at and that it was of a size to encircle the center of my palm.  And that this horseshoe was stolen by Pickpocket Smith, a notorious character, who operated among the fashionable of Richmond in 1842 or 3."

 

Witness my hand and seal this ninth day of August, 1897.

               Signed:  Joyce Wilkinson Wallace

 

For more on William Clopton and Joyce Wilkinson, see " Knight Of The Golden Horseshoe"

        510            v.    Walter Clopton, The Elder, of "Callowell"428, born Abt. 1687 in New Kent County, Virginia; died Aft. June 26, 1758 in New Kent County, Virginia429.  He married Mary Jarratt September 4, 1711 in St. Peter's Parish Church, New Kent County, Virginia430.

               There are many troubling elements regarding the listing of the children currently found in both the Lucy Erwin and Gene Clopton, Clopton genealogies.  The Erwin book did not list Elizabeth or Richard. Gene Clopton notes the Parish Registry is mutilated, and Richard is listed as Richard son of Walter and Mary------, and concludes Richard "must be "Clopton" as no other Walter and Mary is known in St. Peter's Parish at the time."  The registry notes the birth or baptism of Anne, a son, Mary, Walter, and Rob(ert).   No proof has been offered that Walter (born 1720, died in infancy).  Cordelia Belle Clopton, lists the children as Walter, Mary, Robert, Deve(reaux), Naomi, Margaret, and Anne.  There is a strong belief that at least some of the children may belong to another Clopton male.  There are a number of Clopton adults of this period who have not yet been connected with a family.

 

 

        437.  Margaret11 Clopton, of London (William10, Walter9, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) died 1724431.  She married Henry Hammond, of London August 1677431, son of Hammond and Savage.  He died Aft. 1713.

       

Child of Margaret Clopton and Henry Hammond is:

        511             i.    William12 Hammond, Gentleman, died 1732431.

 

 

        445.  Clopton11 Havers, Sr., M.D., F.R.S. (Dorothy10 Clopton, Thomas9, Margery8 Waldegrave, of Lawford Hall, Edward7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born February 24, 1655/56 in Stambourne, County Essex, probably432, and died April 1702 in England, probably, and buried at Willingale Doe, Essex.  He married Dorcas Fuller, of "The Worthies" January 12, 1691/92, daughter of Thomas Fuller, of "The Worthies". 

        Dr. Havers studied first at Catharine Hall, Cambridge, received his M.D. at Utrecht, July 3, 1685, and was admitted to the College of Physicians December 22, 1687.  He began his medical practice in London.  His chief anatomical work is considered, 'Osteologia Nova, or some New Observations of the Bones and the parts belonging to them.'   In it he gave the first thorough account of the structure of the bone.  His name is commemorated in the term 'Haversian canals," used for the minute channels of bone in which the blood vessels run.  A lesser but interesting work was his 'An Account of an Extraordinary Bleeding from the Lachrymal Gland," (shedding tears of blood).   He founded the Royal Society, which is still Great Britain's top honor.

       

Children of Clopton Havers and Dorcas Fuller are:

        512             i.    Elisabeth12 Havers, born 1692; died 1693.

        513            ii.    Fuller Havers, born 1694; died 1696.

        514           iii.    Thomas Havers, born 1695; died 1696.

        515           iv.    Dorkis Havers, born 1697.

        516            v.    Henrietta Havers, born 1698; died 1700.

        517           vi.    Mary Havers, born 1700; died 1702.

        518          vii.    Clopton Havers, Jr., born 1702; died 1705.

 

 

        452.  Anne11 Clopton, of Kentwell Hall (William10, Mary9 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, William8, William7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1) was born Abt. March 1611/12 in Clare, County Suffolk, and baptized March 2, 1612, St. Peter and St. Paul, Clare433, and died Abt. August 1, 1641 in Stowlangtoft Hall, Lavenham, possibly.  She married Simonds D'Ewes, Bart. October 24, 1626 in Blackfriars Church434, son of Paul D'Ewes and Cecilia Simonds.  He was born December 18, 1602 in Chardstock Parish, Dorsetshire, at Coxden435, and died April 8, 1650 in Stowlangtoft Hall, Lavenham, County Suffolk.

        Shortly after his marriage to Ann Clopton, Simonds D'Ewes  found himself with everything he had ever wished for:  a title, money, and a lovely old estate.  He was keenly aware that through his marriage to Anne he was now linked 'either nearlie or more remotely to all the ancient nobilitie of England.'  But time ultimately revealed to him what really was, and was not, important.  One day he would lament, "I began to consider that this great affliction was sent upon me still to humble me more and more, and to wean me from the love of the profits and preferments of this life."  See "A Goodly Sweet Child."

       

Children of Anne Clopton and Simonds D'Ewes are:

        519             i.    Clopton12 D'Ewes I, born Abt. 1627; died Abt. July 10, 1631 in Lavenham and buried in the chancel of St. Peter and St. Paul Church, Lavenham, July 10, 1631436.

        520            ii.    Anne D'Ewes437, born Bet. 1628 and 1630.

        521           iii.    Adrian D'Ewes, born March 10, 1632/33 in Bury St. Edmund and baptized in his mother's chambers March 11, 1632/33438; died March 14, 1632/33 in Bury St. Edmunds and buried at St. Peter and St. Paul Church, Lavenham, March 14, 1632 in the chancel in his eldest brother's grave439.

        522           iv.    Geeradt D'Ewes, born March 10, 1632/33 in Bury St. Edmunds, County Suffolk and baptized in his mother's chambers March 10, 1632/33440; died Abt. March 12, 1632/33 in Bury St. Edmunds, and buried in the chancel in his brother's grave at St. Peter and St. Paul Church, Lavenham March 12,1632441.

        523            v.    Cecilla D'Ewes, of Kentwell Hall, Lady Darcy, born November 25, 1633 in Stow Hall, County Suffolk442; died May 29, 1661 in Long Melford, County Suffolk, and buried Holy Trinity Church June 1661443.  She married Thomas Darcy, Knt. & Baronette.

        524           vi.    Clopton D'Ewes II, born July 1634; died May 9, 1636 in Stow Hall, County Suffolk and buried May 10, 1636, Stowlangtoft chancel, close to the west end of his grandfather's gravestone444.

        525          vii.    Isolda D'Ewes.

 

 

        464.  Walter11 Clopton, Registrar & Chapter Clerk (Walter10, Mary9 Waldegrave, of Smallbridge Manor, William8, William7, George6, Margaret5 Wentworth, of Codham Hall, Essex, Elizabeth4 Howard, Henry3, Alica2 deTendring, of Tendering Hall, William1)  He married Sarah Penrhyn, of Rhysnant 1676, daughter of William Penrhyn and Mary Wynne. 

        "It was no doubt through the good offices of his uncle the bishop (Bishop Barrow, brother of Walter's mother, Martha Barrow Clopton, that Clopton married, in 1676, Sarah, daughter and co-heir of William Penrhyn of Rhysnant by his wife Mary, daughter of Edward Wynne of Eunant... The Bishop evidentially continued to take interest in his nephew after his fortunate marriage.  In 1677 Walter Clopton was appointed Registrar of the diocese and Chapter Clerk.  The appointment undoubtedly savoured of nepotism since Clopton was removed from these posts in 1681 by the Chapter (the Bishop having died the previous year)."  Thomas Pryce, "The History of LlandysInilio Parish,"  1899-1902

        Being the fifth son of a second son, Walter's prospects were dismal.  It seems his best way out was to marry money and position.  Fortunately Uncle Barrow came to the rescue.  When Kentwell Hall passed out of the Clopton family c. 1630, evidentially the personal contents were dispersed to remaining members of the family living in the vicinity.  When Walter went to Wales some 40 years later he seems to have taken his share.. or maybe more.

        Evidently he took with him various portraits of Clopton family members, among which was the lovely painting of Lady Bridgett Crane Clopton.  In June, 1900, an auction was held at Rhysnant Hall.  At this sale a member of the Starkie-Bence family, then the owners of Kentwell Hall, attended the sale, purchased the portrait of Lady Bridgett and returned it to Kentwell Hall.

        Walter Clopton Wingfield (1833-1912), the inventor of the modern game of tennis, is a descendant of this marriage.  Although the line of descent needs more research to fill in some gaps, some facts are known.   The Winfields migrated from their home in County Suffolk, about 35 miles north of Long Melford, today the site of Wingfield Castle, Wingfield College and St. Andrews, the family church.  In April 1799, Rowland Wingfield married Margaret Prhys, the daughter of Clopton Prhys of Llandrinio and Rhysnant.  Following her father's death in 1800, Margaret inherited both Llandrinio, which they sold, and Rhysnant Estate, properties in Montgomeryshire, Wales.  In 1801, The Reverend Wingfield became vicar of the Parish of Rhiwabon in the adjacent Welsh county of Denbigh.  Rhysnant Hall, located near the turnpike to Chester, was an Elizabethan half-timber building.  It was in a bad state, so a new home was built.  It is recorded that the new Rhysnant featured much carved oak, some from the older halls of the Cloptons.

        Margaret was to give her husband three sons, Clopton Lewis in 1800, Watkin in 1803, and Rowland, in 1808.  To Clopton Lewis Wingfield and his wife, Jane Eliza Michell Wingfield, was born a son, and on November 1, 1833.  He was baptized by his grandfather and named, Walter Clopton Wingfield.  Estimating the time line, it appears that Clopton Prhys was the grandson of Walter Clopton and his wife, Sarah Penrhyn.

       

Child of Walter Clopton and Sarah Penrhyn is:

        526             i.    Issac12 Clopton, B.A., of Llandysilio445, born Abt. 1678.

 

Endnotes

 

 



[1]The Descendants of William deTendring, Knt., of Tendering Hall & His Wife Dame Katherine Mylde, the First Ten Generations,  is an excerpt from The Clopton Chronicles, the Ancestors and Descendants of Sir Thomas Clopton, Knt., & Katherine Mylde, and is the property of the Clopton Family Genealogical Society which holds the copyright on this material.  Permission is granted to quote or reprint articles for noncommercial use provided credit is given to the CFGS.  Prior written permission must be obtained from the Society for commercial use.

Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton, Founder and Executive Director of The Clopton Family Genealogical Society & Clopton Family Archives, is a direct descendant of this line.

The Society wishes to thank The Massachusetts Historical Society; Francis Bremer, Ph.D. of Millersville University, Editor, Groton Gazette, The Newsletter of the Winthrop Papers Projects, a project of the Massachusetts Historical Society.  The Winthrop Papers may be found on-line at http://www.millersv.edu/~winthrop/index.html; James Doggett, webmaster of the English Antecedents of The Rev. Benjamin Doggett who maintains a website at http://www.doggettfam.org/england.htm; Martin Wood, LL. B., M.A., author and historian living in Groton, County Suffolk, England, who serves on the United Kingdom Editorial Board, The Winthrop Papers, A Project of the Massachusetts Historical Society; Gladys Partridge of Groton Hall; Joyce L. (Wilman) Hutchinson and James L. Wilman, descendants of the Winthrop family; Bert Hampton Blanton, Jr.;  Len Ferris, Church Warden, St. Mary’s Church, Ramsden Bellhouse, County Essex, England; Dr. J. B. Enticknap, former Church Warden, Stambourne Church, County Essex, England; Robin Meares, Landers Bookshop, Hall Street, Long Melford, County Suffolk, England; The Rev. Linda Steward, Rector, The Parish Church of All Saints, Rettendon, County Essex, England; Linda B. MacIver, Reference Librarian, Social Sciences Department, Boston Public Library, Boston, Massachusetts; George F. Sanborn, Jr., Reference Librarian, International Studies Department, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts; and, Bruce M. Rodenberger, M.D., Sacred Heart OB/GYN, Allentown, Pennsylvania.  Also thanks to Clopton descendants, Gene Carlton Clopton; Jeffery B. Clopton; Wallace Chandler Clopton; Katherine Elizabeth (DeLoach) Eubanks, B.S., R.N.; Mary Diane Hull; John Henry Knowlton, Jr.; James M. McMillen; and, Isabel Lancaster (Clopton) Steiner.