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The Clopton Chronicles

A Project of the Clopton Family Genealogical Society

 

 

 

O WORSHIP THE KING

 

 

Regarding

 

Concord United Methodist Church

Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia

 

By Suellen Clopton Blanton,[1] bblanton@fast.net

 

 

 

Hallowed Grounds and Sacred Traditions

 

And the said John Robertson, also, further grants them

the said Members of the Methodist Episcopal Church,

a free & direct pass way of ten feet wide from the said

Lot or parcel of land, to the Spring, that John Wynne

now makes use of (which is the most convenient spring

to the Place) & free privilege of  drinking water from

the same forever after …[2]

               

 

The oldest Methodist Church west of the Oconee River, Concord is located in Putnam County Georgia, on Pea Ridge Road in the eastern portion of the county.  In the fall of 1810, Thomas Jefferson Johnston, Esq. and William B. Pritchard began building a house of worship.  The little log cabin, when finished, was named Victory, but a few years later, the name was changed to Concord.  At that time, it was a Methodist Episcopal Church on the Sparta Circuit.    The land was donated by John Robertson.  The first Trustees were Thomas Jefferson Johnston, Richard Burt, Joseph Turner, James Burt, and Josiah Flournoy.

                In 1825 a frame structure was built.  The present church building was built in 1886 by Thomas J. Winslette. Resting on rock pillars, the floor joists are pine logs hewn flat on the top for stable flooring.  The framework is of rough lumber just as it came from the sawmill.  Beginning in 1987 an addition was built at the rear of the church.  The pews were moved forward, the aisle, widened.  Great pains were taken to match the interior and exterior architectures as closely as possible with the older section.

It is a Holy Place; sanctified not by the high flow words of ministers but voices raised in laughter and song, purified by the tears of generations of  Arnolds, Bustins, Callaways, Claibornes, Cloptons, Johnstons, Kings, Knights, McLeroys, Wrights and their kith and kin.  Their faith is a eloquent testimony that though the building is, indeed, sweet and precious, these good people are The Church.  Benjamin Arnold Bustin[3] often wrote about the church.

 

Putnam has always been strong in Methodism.  In fact, we are told that the first white minister of the Gospel was a Methodist preacher on the Sparta Circuit who first began to preach two or three miles south of Hillsboro, which was somewhere in the vicinity of Concord church.  This was not a regular appointment, however.  Probably it is not generally known that in its early days the Methodist church was not called a church at all but a Methodist Society.  The little band of settlers around Concord about the year 1804 formed one of these societies. 

                All the country between the Oconee and Ocmulgee was divided between the Sparta and Milledgeville Circuits.  The little Society near Concord was placed on the Sparta Circuit and named Victory.

                There were no published records of the Methodist church in those days.  The Minutes of the Conference was not even published until the year 1836.  Previously the minutes of the Conference were written down in long hand with pen and ink and some of them hardly legible even when written.  Many of them are lost and we can only get appointments by searching the personal sketches of the lives of the ministers as they appeared in the obituary columns of the church papers.  There has recently come to light data which makes it a little clearer to me the early history of some of these Methodist societies in Putnam. …

                Victory had its first log meeting house in 1811 and the name was changed to Concord. . .

The next question was what kind of buildings were these log churches?  How were they constructed and how was the interior furnished.  All these log churches were constructed on the same plan.  A large log house with cracks daubed with mud with a clapboard roof, sometimes held in place with pine poles laid on each course but nailed on with nails made in a blacksmith shop when they could be procured. . . The earliest churches had only mother earth for a floor with a large rock chimney at one end in which fires were built sometimes with lightwood logs placed with one end in the fireplace and the other extending out on the floor. . .

                The pews were split logs with the split side hewn smooth with an ax holes bored with an augur with legs inserted, making a bench without back.  The pulpit was made in the same way only a little higher so the Bible could be placed on it.  These benches must have been extremely uncomfortable for the sermons were nearly always from one and a half to two hours in length. . .

My grandmother went to school in this building, that is why I am so familiar with its structure.  It stood just back of the cemetery and near what is now the Melton (family) lot.  A frame structure was erected in 1825 just back of what is now the Knight cemetery. . .

                On April 21, I attended quarterly conference at Old Concord church in Putnam County.

                I was a member of that church for almost thirty years.  I even occupied the same old pew that was mine in the long ago, and I want to chronicle some things that I heard and felt.  And even some memories of childhood days that cluster around this sacred old edifice.

                In the afternoon the business session was held, and I heard again the voices that fell pleasantly on my ears, and reminded me of the days when I was a Methodist steward on the Eat Putnam circuit. …

                Of course there were the Cloptons who answered for Concord.  Of course there would not be very much left of Concord without “Boo” Clopton[4] and Uncle “Johnnie.”[5]  There was another Clopton there, G. H.[6] by name; and yes, perhaps there was a little twitching of the heart strings as our hands clasped, for we are both handicapped by the same physical disability.[7]

                [Concord] with its hallowed grounds and sacred traditions is still the mother church, and long may she remain a beacon light to guide the rest of the churches into the paths of righteousness. …

 

 

AT THE BATTLE’S FRONT

 

I’ve enlisted for life in the army of the Lord,

Tho’ the fight may be long and the struggle fierce and hard;

With the armor of God and the Spirit’s trusty sword,

At the front of the battle you will find me.

                Hymn by Mrs. C.H.M.

 

 

Benjamin Arnold Bustin recalled the ministers who served so faithfully through the years:

 

There were no church buildings in all of the territory for many years but there were regular appointments at private dwellings, (and) Lewis Myers, a full blooded German, as preacher in charge and Stith Mead, presiding elder.

The first regular appointed preachers on the Sparta Circuit were Jesse Lee and James Russell.  This was for the year 1807.  Lee seems to have been a roving evangelist and a great organized of new churches.  So James Russell filled the regular appointments at Victory.  He was one of the most celebrated preachers who ever graced a Georgia pulpit and became one of the most eloquent, although he was taught to read and write by his children. . .  Abdo Christian was sent as junior preacher.

The two preachers appointed on the Sparta Circuit and incidentally were the Methodist pastors at Victory for the year 1808 were Wm. Arnold (my great-grandfather) and Joseph Trouse.  There were always a senior and junior preacher because there were thirty or forty appointments and often both preachers preached as many as twenty sermons on these circuits each month. . .

 

 

 

Taken in 1980 this photograph shows the church as it looked after construction in 1886, the third church building on this site.  In 1987 an addition was built at the rear of the church and a ramp was added to the front.

 

 

Several future ministers came from this country church family.  James A. Baugh was ordained a Methodist minister in 1863 and became a missionary to isolated portions of the North Georgia mountains.  He later devoted himself to ministering to the black population of Putnam County.  Wallace Theodore “Ted” Jones became a Presbyterian minister and retired as Regional Director of Christian Education for the South Carolina Synod of the Presbyterian Church (USA).[8]

                Although the earliest records are missing, it is known that Drury Powell was Concord’s first minister.  And while no records have been found to confirm the identifies of Concord’s ministers for the years 1902 through 1906, the personal correspondence of members indicates J. H. Pace and Thomas Luke may have been the ministers at that time.[9]

 

 

THE ROLL OF PASTORS 1876 THROUGH 1996[10]

 

W T Cardwell - 1876

T P Brown - 1878

L M Wooten - 1879

W T Cardwell - 1881

T A Seals - 1885

W A Parks - 1886

W T Hamilton - 1887

H M Quillian - 1892

S B Ledbetter - 1893

W T Cardwell - 1896

Crawford Jackson - 1900

T S Edwards - 1901

No Records for 1902 - 1906

A C Cantrell - 1907

Lewis B. Linn - 1909

G Turner - 1913

J L Hall - 1914

M B Wentaker - 1920

W R England - 1922

J G Davis - 1923

V B Hamrick - 1926

W B Hughes - 1927

R E Lyle - 1928

W H Boring 1932

L P Huckaby - 1933

H O Greene - 1935

H B Landrum - 1938

G C Knowles - 1941

J G Lupo - 1942

Z V Hawkes - 1944

S D Cherry, Jr. - 1946

F C Hicks - 1947

B B Berry - 1953

W Marvin Poe - 1954

F E Jenkins, Sr. - 1956

Charles G. Johnson - 1957

W E Grimes - 1960

W C Flurry - 1964

J L Harrell - 1968

M L Willard - 1974

Ben Strength 1981 -

 

 

Until the 1970’s, Concord consisted of the one, one room building.  The children were expected to sit quietly during the preaching and behave themselves.  The oversight of their demeanor rested with the women.  For most of Concord’s history, the men of the church have been farmers, getting up well before light to take care of the livestock, and they would arrive at the church very tired.  Following the opening hymns and announcements, the preacher would begin his sermon, which was the signal for the males to promptly fall asleep.  The old divided pews made it considerably easier for a hard working man to get in a good nape without being punched by a woman; today, this is almost impossible.

 

 

A Pea Ridge Wedding

 

Well, the more he stammered out his love for her

and how all those ten years he had worked

and saved with that one single purpose,

Sister increasingly realized

she was falling in love with him. 

 

 

It is remarkable that by 1990 the lovely old church had only two recorded marriages solemnized within its doors.  When Joseph E. Brown was Governor of Georgia,[11] he had a young secretary by the name of E. T. Putnam, who met, wooed, and won Miss Mary Harton.  The ceremony took place in Concord Church while the Governor’s carriage stood at the door to carry the young people away.  Then in 1903, Mr. Tracy King Callaway and Lucy Jones[12]  were united in marriage there.[13]  An eye witness account of the event was her brother, Ted.

 

In the summer of 1903 a handsome young man, age 27, drove up to our house with horse and buggy rented from the livery stable.  No one recognized him but he explained that he was King Calloway (Callaway) had left home ten years previously and had been working in his uncle’s grocery store in Temple, Texas.  He wanted Sister to go for a ride.  She did, and he lost no time in proposing marriage, and insisted that the marriage take place without delay, since he was on a two-week vacation.  Sister, age 24, protested:  “Why, King, I don’t really know you.  I remember you only as ‘one of the big boys in Union School’ when I was, I believe, in the fifth grade!”  He told her he was desperately in love with her then but too bashful to say or do anything to let her know.  He vowed then he was going to marry her if possible as soon as he was old enough and able to support her.  She asked why in all those ten years he had never once written to her, and didn’t even write before making the long trip.  He said he started many letters but just couldn’t make himself write the way he felt.  He had written someone else to inquire whether Sister was already married.

                Well, the more he stammered out his love for her and how all those ten years he had worked and saved with that one single purpose, Sister increasingly realized she was falling in love with him.  So within hours she happily agreed to the marriage, but it must be a church wedding, and it would require at least a week to make all the preparations … So the church wedding was held [at Concord] just as Sister planned it, and off they went to Temple, Texas.[14]

                               

 

The Young and the Restless

 

Children are the crown of old men; and the glory of

the children are their fathers.

                Proverbs 17:6

 

The concept of Sunday School evolved from the mutual concern of the preachers and their flock for the need to continually reinforce the Christians teachings, especially in those churches which saw their minister only once a month, at best.

                The Georgia Annual Conference of the Methodist Church established the Sunday School Society in 1851.  These Sunday Schools provided theological instructions, and by their very nature, encouraged the furtherance of literacy skills.

                Women dominated those Sabbath School classes of children and thus began to become more and more active in the overall decisions making process, however, it would be many years before women were permitted to hold any official offices within the Methodist Church.  Reliably Ted also remembered fondly Sunday School at Concord.

 

Now Sunday, even though cows, horses, mules, pigs, and chickens required the same attention as on every other day - well, Sunday was a welcome relief!  We only had preaching one Sunday per month, for our church, Concord Methodist, was one of four churches on a “circuit” with one preacher for all four.  But we had Sunday School every Sunday, and it was a pleasure to “dress up in Sunday clothes’ and see the girls all dressed up pretty.  There were two entrances from the porch to the church.  Women and girls sat in the right half and men and boys in the left.  Down the middle atop the pews a railing was nailed.  For regular courting couples seats on either side of, and next to, the railing were always available by common courtesy.

Mama[15] was familiar with the Bible, taught in the Sunday School for many years, kept posted on missionaries and their activities, hoped at least one of her children would receive and accept a call of God to be a ‘foreign’ missionary; she was also thoroughly familiar with the history and polity of the Methodist Church and, if they had had women officers in those days, I’m confident she would have been one.  She made the Communion wine from our grapes, prepared the elements, and kept the cups and plates and cloths clean and ready for use.  Also she saw that her sons cleaned the Church regularly, including muddauber nests.  I shall always treasure the memory of her singing hymns while working.  She memorized the music and words of more hymns than anyone else I’ve ever known.[16]

 

 

 

 

The youngsters not only attended church together but school as well.  A photograph taken about 1908 of the pupils of Union School preparing to attend a Putnam County School Rally at Wesley Chapel School is in the Clopton Family Archives.  It is not known who originally identified each participants.  It is obvious by the “Sunday Best” clothing and the very fact an expensive photograph was commissioned to record the event that much importance was placed on the grand adventure.  The children and adults are seen piled into a carriage drawn by two horses, a black man (unidentified), the driver.  Pictured are Lucy Rossee; Sara Elizabeth Callaway; Ruth King; Sallie Mae Shaw; Lemuel Thomas Clopton; Luther Clements; Lambdin Jones; Walker Shaw; Carl Knight; Homer Shaw; Ada Lucille “Pink” (Knight) Clopton; Lucy Willis Callaway; Ruby Rossee; Wallace Theodore “Ted” Jones; Thomas Wooten Callaway; Miss Katie Snipes, Teacher; Hattie John (Callaway) Burnett; Joby Rossee; William King Clopton; Malcolm Jones; James Knight; unknown; James Gabriel Callaway; Walter Johnston Clopton; Emory Van Manley; John Winfield Manley; unknown.

 

 

Lemuel Thomas Clopton loved to relate a story involving his younger brother, Walter Johnston Clopton’s difficulties at church.

 

               

                Until the 1970’s, Concord Methodist Church, where the Pea Ridge Cloptons worshipped, consisted of one, one room building. The families were very large prior to the mid-1940’s.  Families often boasted eight or ten or more children.  The church sometimes fairly burst at the seams with all the young people.  However, the young ones were very quiet and well mannered.  This had absolutely nothing to do with reverence for things spiritual. The oversight of their demeanor rested with the women.  Discipline was uncomplicated.  The women did not practice “time out,” nor did they attempt to engage the child in meaningful dialogue regarding inappropriate behavior.  If a child was fool hardy enough to ignore warning glances cast his way from a mother, grandmother or aunt, the unfortunate was unceremoniously taken outside and soundly switched.  This method worked quite well.

The old Churches had two doors.  The women entered on one side, the men on the other. The pews were also divided, the men sat on one side, the women and little children on the other. For most of Concord’s history, the men of the church have been farmers, getting up well before light to take care of the livestock so by the time church started they were already pretty tuckered out.  Following the opening hymns and announcements, the preacher would begin his sermon, which was the signal for the males to promptly fall asleep.  The sexually segregated pews made it considerably easier for a hard working man to get in a good nap without being punched by a woman; today, this is almost impossible.

It was considered a hallmark of sorts when a boy was permitted to sit on the men’s side, something he could not do until he could be relied upon not to draw attention to himself, and thus remind all the women the men were asleep.  But Uncle Walter, kept getting sent back to the women’s side because he had an unfortunate tendency, when asleep, to fall out of the pew.

 

 

 

Three of the Notorious Young and Restless Gang

Brothers Walter Johnston Clopton, William King Clopton, and Lemuel Thomas Clopton

 

 

                The pews were terribly uncomfortable, and in the 1950’s new ones were installed, the old ones given away.  Some became cherished possessions.  The pews were the subject of an article in the local newspaper, The Eatonton Messenger.

 

In sunny Florida, sits a Georgia Pine tree - or rather, a part of one - its birthplace, the original forests around Pearidge community in Putnam County, many, many generations ago - its home now, the residence of the President of the University of Miami, Dr. Henry King Stanford and his family … As you enter their front door there sits the old pine - in the form of a church pew - its broad back, one slab of wood, shows its antiquity - for one doesn’t see lumber that width - in this day and time … Dignified, and apparently content to be a part of the busy, modern whirl that necessarily much be doing on around it - I wonder if it could talk would it sigh and wish for the days when it sat in the quiet of Old Concord Church and each Sabbath held the members whose fathers before them started in 1811 to worship as Methodists at the same spot - holding their children, then their grandchildren and so on down the years until a few years ago, when modern pews replaced the old hand made ones and Dr. Stanford’s mother and aunt - members of Old Concord - made him a present of the old pew.   Dr. Stanford likes to think this was the one where his grandfather Callaway[17]  sat - front row on the left, by the window … I feel sure when the Pearidge kin met (for) a reunion at the president’s home this month that the old pew put out loving shadowy arms about each member as they sat in its lap!”[18]c 1950’s

 

                Friendships were forged among the children which would last throughout their lives, and they got together for parties at the drop of the hat.

 

 

 

 

In 1995, Mildred (Knight) McLeroy identified a gay crowd attending a party given by May (Knight) Clements July 4, 1927.  From left to right:  Nell Cowan (Gilmer) Clopton; Mary Carpenter; Louise Altman; Ruth (King) Sparks; Mary Elizabeth (Clopton) Feaster; Idell Carpenter Emery; Rosa Kate (Lewis) Clements; Mary King (Knight) Coleman; Dorothy (Knight) Smith; Tommy Ford; Elizabeth “Tootsie) Knight; and, Mary King.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standing from left to right: Glen Knight; Luther Clements’ son; Cecil Altman; Louise Altman; Idell Carpenter; Elizabeth “Tootsie” Knight; Mae (Knight) Clements); Stella (Knight) Knight; Berta (Knight) Altman; and, Kizzie (Knight) Carpenter.  Kneeling from left to right: Stella Altman; Dorothy (Knight) Smith; Mary king (Knight) Coleman; and sitting, Mildred (Knight) McLeroy; Mary Carpenter; and, Doris Carpenter holding Luther Clements, Jr.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standing from left to right:  Emory Van Manley; Sarah Elizabeth (King) Pinkerton; Minnie Flora (King) Clopton; Leon Manley; Ernest Funderburke; unknown; Mr. Leverette;  Cecil butts; Mrs. Leverette; John Manley; Virgil Holloman;  Tommie Holloman; Nell Cowan (Gilmer) Clopton; Mrs. John Manley; Rosa King; Isabel (Wilson) Adams;  Doris Carpenter is holding Luther Clements, Jr.; Mildred (Knight) McLeroy;  and, the identity of the last two young ladies is unknown.

 

 

 

 

Consecrated By The Blood of the Lamb

 

Soon after this the church began to tremble

as the quake increased, and people became

panic stricken, rushing over one

another to get the children outside. 

 

 

            Concord has nurtured many, many generations of children.  Some spent their entire lives within the comforting Pea Ridge Community, however, many left for new cities and towns, marriages, jobs, or military service.  But each summer Concord’s June Homecomings beckon them back.

Historically, revivals and homecomings were always eagerly anticipated, as much for the opportunity to socialize as a spiritual event.  The hell fire and brimstone preaching was often followed by ice cream suppers or dinner on the ground, and sometimes a surprise or two, as Mrs. Annie Kate McLeroy recalled:

 

At the time of the great Charleston earthquake there was a revival in progress in a church on each of the two circuits.  The time was August, 1886 … at Concord the pastor, the Reverend Parks, had just reproached his congregation for its lack of interest and lukewarm reception of his message, declaring, “It would take something that would shake this church to its foundations to bring you to a realization of your condition.”  Soon after this the church began to tremble as the quake increased, and people became panic stricken, rushing over one another to get the children outside.  Young girls were screaming and the pastor was unable to quiet them.  In the midst of it all Mr. Jesse T. Batchelor arose and with his arms uplifted, he begged the people to calm themselves, assuring them that it was only a slight earthquake and would soon be over.  After a little they were quieted and there was a great revival.[19]

 

Ted Jones, of course, had a memory or two of revivals at Concord.

 

Concord is where I “joined the church” at about age 9, in a revival, with The Reverend Thomas Luke, a young man who preached in words and spirit that appealed to children.  I’ll never forget “Brother Luke,” who at our home peeled off his coat and tie and rolled up his sleeves and played catch ball with us boys.  Oh boy, what a nice way for a preacher to act![20]

 

               

Doing The Lord’s Work

 

Although Miss Annie Kate never learned to drive

And did not possess an automobile, she did

Not let that prevent her from being at church

On Sunday, doing the Lord’s work.

 

 

The dedication and hard work of the members have not been overlooked, and from time to time special notice is taken of those who have been especially faithful through the years.

 

 

 

 

Marshall Lynn McLeroy, Sr.

1909-1986

 

The Administrative Board of Concord United Methodist Church

Has Passed a Resolution to Honor Mr. Lynn McLeroy, Sr.

Our Sunday School Building, built in 1966 largely by Lynn,

Will be Dedicated and Named “Lynn Hall”

At a Special Dedication Service on

Sunday, September 12, 1982 at 3:00 P.M.

It is our Hope and Prayer that You will be Present

To help us pay Tribute to Lynn

For his Loving and Diligent Work

In the Construction of this Building.

It would be very meaningful to Lynn and Mildred to have you There

 

 

 

WE DEDICATE THE 1900 CHURCH DIRECTORY

TO THE MEMORY OF

ANNIE KATE BUSTIN McLEROY

 

 

Annie Kate Bustin McLeroy

1883-1962

 

                Annie Kate Bustin McLeroy was born in 1883 in Putnam County, Georgia.  The daughter of Mary E. Arnold and Thomas C. Bustin.  She was married to Ed Brown McLeroy and they had a family of 8 sons and 3 girls.  Miss Annie Kate, as she was affectionately known by all in the community, was widowed in 1941.  She was a life long member of Concord Church.

                Although Miss Annie Kate never learned to drive and did not possess an automobile, she did not let that prevent her from being at church on Sunday and doing the Lord’s work.

                Her love for her church is before us every day.  She is credited with obtaining the bronze historical marker in front of the church.  It was the spring of the year and Conference was in session.  Miss Annie Kate rode a bus to Atlanta to attend Conference and while she was there made a trip downtown to the capitol to lay the ground work for the marker to be placed in front of the church.  She wanted to be sure that Concord Church would be remembered as the oldest Methodist Church in Putnam County and to be assured that it would be preserved.

                When the anniversary of the church’s one hundred and fiftieth year was approaching amiss Annie Kate set to work to compile a history of Concord.  She dedicated this history to the memory of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Annie McLeroy Lewis, who was a long time member of Concord Church.

                Later on she saw a need to do a history of the Methodist religion in Putnam County and this she did with much hard work and many hours spent talking with members of all the churches in the county and pouring over all the old church records that could be found.

                Miss Annie Kate was a beloved shining star in Concord Church and she was a true disciple of God.  She is remembered for her quiet, pleasant and unassuming manner.  When there was a need she was willing to arise to that need.

                Therefore, we dedicate this the first directory of Concord Church to the Memory of Mrs. Annie Kate Bustin McLeroy, who gave so much of herself to this church.

                How proud she would be to know that Concord is once again one of the most prosperous Churches in Putnam County. – 1990

 

IN DEDICATION TO THE

HONOR OF

JAMES CUYLER CLOPTON

 

 

James Cuyler Clopton

1903-1995

 

Cuyler Clopton, a true pillar of Concord Church.  He has been a member of the church all of his life and at times he and his family were the only ones in attendance for Sunday services.  Concord has seen many lean years.  So lean, in fact, that there was a time that there was some talk of consolidating Concord with one of the other churches on the charge.  It was through the untiring and uncomplaining efforts of Mr. Clopton that Concord is still standing.  There were many years when there was no money in the till and there was work to be done on the church building.  Mr. Clopton did the work and paid for the materials out of his pocket.  Very few people are aware of just how much this one person has done for this church and the members of this church.  It is worthy that we take this opportunity to honor one of our oldest and most faithful members.  A person who has spent his entire life in this church and has given everything that we asked of him and more when needed.  -1990

 

 

O WORSHIP THE KING

 

So all Israel were reckoned by genealogies;

and behold, they were written in the book.

                                I Chronicles 9:1

 

 

The first membership list has disappeared.  Through other documents, oral tradition, and personal memories the names of some of the early members have been preserved and are listed below.  This list is far from complete. Families would move from church to church as new congregations were started closer to their homes, resulting in more than one church claiming families as their own, thus making the task of accurate identification more difficult.  In his wonderful scrapbook Benjamin Arnold Bustin mentions some of those who made up the Methodist Society which eventually became Concord.  These names have been included below.

 

Daniel Baugh

Kate Baugh

Mae Baugh

Richard Burt

James Burt

Benjamin F. Bustin married ----

Christopher “Kit” Bustin married ----Hays

James Claiborne married Sarah Brooking

Lucy Wright Claiborne married Alexander Brown Harrison

Mary Claiborne married Blumer White

Sarah P. Claiborne married John C. Bearden

Harriet Isabel “Hattie Belle” Clopton married William Horne Girtman

Josh Flournoy

Mary Ann Clopton married Greenbury Wynn

James Thomas Clopton

Waldegrave Clopton

(Dr.) Thomas B. Clopton married (1) Martha Harwell, (2) Harriet B. Claiborne, and (3) Cornelia A. H. Palmer

Benjamin Gilbert married Nancy Gilbert

Patsy Gilbert married Coleman Pendleton

Nathaniel Harrison married Martha Kennon Brodnax

Nathaniel Claiborne Harrison married (1) Mary Emily Baugh and (2) Sarah Edna Waller

Mary Frances Harrison married James Pinkerton

Sarah Evalina Harrison married (2) Henry J. Butts

Lucy Alexander Harrison

Martha Rebecca Harrison

James Gabriel Harrison

James B. Holt

Bushrod Johnston married Lucy Marshall

Thomas Johnston married  (2) Mary “Polly” Gilbert

Lucius Marshall Jones married Mary Brooks Bearden

Lucy “Sister” Jones married Tracy King Callaway

Estelle Jones married Clyde Maxwell

William Jones

Lucinda Louisa King

William L. King

Rebecca King married Robert Hutchings

Patty Harris King

Lueinen(?) Judson King

Elisha King, Sr., married (1) Mary --, (2) Kesiah Sanders, and (3) Margaret Hall

Elisha King, Jr., married Elizabeth Ann Johnston

Mary A. King married (Dr.) James Knight

Campbell T. King married Stella Odille Hunt

William H. King

Annie T. King married James Callaway

Sarah B. King

Cuyler E. King

Edmund Johnston King married Rosa Harper

Fannie Fletcher King

Lemuel Lancaster married Isabel Stinson

Martha Isabel “Mattie” Lancaster married William Henry Harrison “Billy” Clopton

Annie McLeroy married W. Edgar Lewis

Presley Pritchard

William B. Pritchard

Peter Roquemore

Joseph Turner

John H. Walker

Warren West

Sarah M. White

Stephen White

William R. White married Sallie –

Mary T. White married – Holloman

Robert D. White

William Worthy

(The Rev.) John Wright

 

 

 

 

The information contained in the oldest surviving Register of Members covers two pages.  Additional information has been added for clarification below each entry.  The first entry for W. H. Clopton is number 1, and the last entry is number 125.  The earliest date is 1856. The newest date is 1955.  Information regarding members still living has not been included. [21]

 

 

 

Clopton, W. H.      Dead 1916

William Henry Harrison Clopton married Martha Isabel Lancaster

 

 

Gabe H Clopton …… Deceased

Gabriel Harrison Clopton married Elizabeth Celine Girtman

 

 

Clopton, W. T……..Deceased

William Thomas “Boo” Clopton married Minnie Flora King

 

 

Clopton, J. G……… Deceased 1947

John Godkin Clopton

Clopton, L. S………...Removed by Certificate….Dead

Lemuel Stinson Clopton married Annie Myrtle Palmer

 

 

Clopton, Minnie King……….. Death Apr. 10, 1942

Minnie Flora King married William Thomas “Boo” Clopton

Clopton, Corrine…………Dead 1915

Corrine Grimes married Robert Emmett “Shug” Clopton

Clopton, Mrs. L. S……….Removed by Certificate 20 Dec 08 Miami Fla

Annie Myrtle Palmer married Lemuel Stinson Clopton

Callaway, J. W………… Dead 1920

James Willis Callaway married (1) Carrielu Clopton “Lucie” Callaway  (2) Annie T. King

 

 
Callaway, Carrie L…… Death Mar. 27, 1918

Carrielu Clopton “Lucie” Callaway married James Willis Callaway

 

 

Callaway, Annie Bell…….. married Stanford…..Removed by Withdrawal to Atlanta Ga. Pearce Ave

Annie Bell Callaway married Henry King Stanford, Sr.

Callaway, Thom W………. Removed by Certificate

Thomas Wooten Callaway married Esther Lee Dearman

Callaway, Sarah E………….Removed by Certificate

Sarah Elizabeth Callaway

Clopton, S. Fanny………… Death July 1923

Sarah Fannie Melton married Thomas Alexander Clopton

Pinkerton, Mary H……………Dead

Mary Frances Harper married James Pinkerton

Pinkerton, Mary E.

Mary E. Pinkerton

Jones, Mary B………Removed by Certificate….Death May 1927

Mary Brooks Bearden married (1) Lucius Marshall Jones (2) R. B. Harrison

Jones, Charlie G……………..Removed by Certificate

Charlie G. Jones married Florence Boone

Jones, Albert L………..Removed by Certificate

Albert L. Jones

Jones, W. Hut………….Removed by Certificate….Death 1943

W. Hudson “Hut” Jones

Jones, Malcolm………….Removed by Certificate

Malcolm Jones

Jones, Lambdin……..Removed by Certificate

Lambden L. Jones

Jones, Theodore………..Removed by Certificate

Wallace Theodore “Ted” Jones married Kathryn Eloise Knight[22]

Arnold, Sallie A…………..Death Sept. 1913

Sallie A. Arnold

Arnold, John W…………….Death Oct. 1913

John W. Arnold

Arnold, Mattie M…….. Married Adams… Baptized 20 Aug 56   Vows 16 Aug 56…..Death Sept 1924

Mattie M. Arnold married –Adams

Winslette, Lizzie Baugh………….Death May 1935

Lizzie Baugh Winslette

King, Sarah E.. Married Pinkerton…...Baptized 26 Aug 70….Vows 7 Aug 70…Received by Rev. W. W. Orlins(sp?)….Death Aug. 7, 1943

Sarah Elizabeth King married Henry R. Pinkerton

King, E. J…… Dead 1924

E. J. King

Dunn, S. Ida……. Dead 1936

S  Ida Dunn

Brake, Maria L…………Dead

Maria Louise “Lou” Clopton married John H. Brake

Holloman, Lucy C…………Received by Rev. S. B. Ledbetter……….Death 1931

Lucy C. White married William Joseph Holloman

Lucy (sp?) Arnold Byrnum

Lucy Arnold Byrum

Holloman, Annie L……..Married Knight….Baptized 25 Aug 90…Vows 16 Sept 90….Received by Rev. W. T. Hamilton….Death June 1918

Annie L. Holloman married Will Knight

Holloman, Tommie…..Baptism 25 Aug 90…Vows 16 Sept 90…Received by Rev. W. T. Hamilton….Death Feb 23, 1939

Tommie Holloman

Holloman, Carrie L……Married Knight……Received by S. B. Ledbetter…….Death June 1918

Carrie Lucy Holloman married Thomas Pierce Knight.  Following her death, Thomas married Thommie Earle Humphries of Jones County, Georgia

Lewis, Annie McLeroy………Received by Certificate 1899

Annie McLeroy married W. Edgar Lewis

Bynum, L. B…….Married Hudson……Baptism 20 Aug 94….Vows Aug 94..Received by Rev. J. J. Ansley…Removed by Withdrawal 10 Sept. 13

L B Byrum

Spivey, Annie L. Rossee…….Received by Certificate……Removed by Certificate

Annie L. Rosser Spivey

Bustin, B.A…..Received by Baptism 16 Sept. 93…Vows 18 Aug 93…Received by Rev. S. B. Ledbetter…..Removed by Certificate June 1925….Death Dec 25, 1938

Benjamin Arnold Bustin married Alice Adams

Bustin, J. M………Baptism 20 Sept. 00….Vows 26 Aug 00…..Received by Rev. W. E. Venable……Removed by Certificate June 12, 1925

J M Bustin

Bustin, Mary E……Vows 20 Aug 07….Received by Rev. J. H. Pace…..Death Mar 16, 1927

Mary E. Arnold married Thomas Christopher Bustin

Bustin, Alice V……..Baptism 16 Aug 94…Vows 20 May 08….Certificate 20 May 08…Received by Rev. L. B. Linn……Removed by Certificate

Alice V. Bustin

Grimes, Lou C……Received by Rev. W. T. Hamilton

Lou C. Grimes

 
 
McLeroy, Annie K. (Bustin)….Baptized 1902……Vows 1902….Received by W. E. Venable

Annie Kate Bustin married Ed Brown McLeroy

Bachelor, Emma C. (Lominach)….Certificate 20 Aug 07….Received by Rev. J. H. Pace…Dead

Emma C. Lominach Batchelor

Knight, May E………Married Clements….Received by Rev. S. B. Ledbetter….Removed by Certificate 1924

May E. Knight married Arthur Clements

Bustin, Mary Sue…Married Durden….Baptized 28 Aug 13….Vows 25 Aug. 13..Received by L. B. Linn…Removed by Certificate Feb 1924

Mary Sue Bustin married Durden and F. M. Matthews

Adams, C. W……..Received by Certificate 10 Jan. 1902….Received by Rev. W. E. Venable…..Removed by Certificate 1925 Baptist

C. W. Adams

Adams, J. A……Baptized 25 Aug 1911…Vows 20 Aug 1911….Received by Rev. L. B. Linn……Dead

J. A. Adams

Manly, Annie J. (Clements)……Baptized 3 Sept 14….Vows 3 Sept 14.…..Received by Rev. J. L. Hall

Annie J. Manly Clements

Callaway, Hattie J…….Married Burnett….Baptized 3 Sept 14….Vows 3 Sept. 14…Received by Rev. J. L. Hall…Removed by Certificate 1923

Hattie John Callaway married Charles M. Burnett

Callaway, Lucy W…..Baptized 3 Sept 14..Vows 3 Sept. 14…….Received by Rev. J. L. Hall

Lucy Willis Callaway

Marchman, Walter P……..Certificate 3 Sept. 14….Death 1923

Walter P. Marchman

Lewis, Rosa Kate….Married Clements…Baptized 3 Sept 14…Vows 3 Sept 14…Received by Rev. J. L. Hall

Rosa Kate Lewis married James Luther Clements, Sr.

McLeroy, Mary Ibbie…….Married Brown….Baptism 3 Sept 14…Vows 3 Sept 14….Received by Rev. J. L. Hall

Mary Ibbie McLeroy married Brown

Knight, James A……Baptized 3 Sept 14….Vows 3 Sept 14…..Received by Rev. J. L. Hall….Removed by Certificate 1927……Dead

James A. Knight married Mary A. King

Knight, Ada L………Married Clopton….Baptized 3 Sept 14…Vows 3 Sept 14….Received by Rev. J. L. Hall…..Dead

Ada Lucille “Pink” Knight married William King Clopton

Critz, R. D…..Baptized 28 Aug 13…Vows 25 Aug 13….Received by Rev. G. H. Turner…..Removed by Certificate 1914

RD Critz

Critz, Mrs. Fannie….Baptized 28 Aug 13….Vows 25 Aug 13…Received by Rev. G. H. Turner…Removed by Certificate 1914

Mrs. Frannie Critz

Critz, Cecil….Baptized 28 Aug 13….Vows 25 Aug 13…Received by Rev. G. H. Turner…Removed by Certificate 1914

Cecil Critz

Critz, Rupert Baptized 28 Aug 13….Vows 25 Aug 13…Received by Rev. G. H. Turner…Removed by Certificate 1914

Rupert Critz

Knight, Carl….. Baptized 28 Aug 13….Vows 25 Aug 13…Received by Rev. J. L. Hall

Carl Knight married Corrine Webb

Clements, J. L. ….. Baptized 28 Aug 13….Vows 25 Aug 13…Received by Rev. J. L. Hall

James Luther Clements, Sr. married Rosa Kate Lewis

Morris, Marie…..Married Zimmerman….Received by Rev. J. L. Hall….Removed by Certificate April 1925.

Marie Morris married Porter Zimmerman

Manley Emory V…..Baptized 1914…Vows 1914…Dead

Emory Van Manley married Dot Gregory

Lucy E. Rossee…married Webb…Baptized 1914….Vows 1914

Lucy E. Rossee married Cecil Webb

Rossee, Joseph…Baptized 1914…Vows 1914….Removed by Certificate

Joseph Rossee married Mina Maddox

 

 

Rossee, Ruby….Married Howard…Baptized 1914….Vows 1914

Ruby Rossee married Hulon Howard

Shaw, Joe H……Removal date uncertain

Joe H. Shaw married Ada Bruce

Shaw, Walker

Walker Shaw

Winslett, Mrs. Bessie…….Dead

Bessie W. Winslett married Carey Winslett

 

 

Clopton, Lem T.

Lemuel Thomas Clopton married Nell Cowan Gilmer

 

 

Clopton, Mrs. Nelle G….Received by Certificate 1918…..Received by Rev. J. E. Russell….Removed by Certificate

Nell Cowan Gilmer Married Lemuel Thomas Clopton

 

 

Callaway, Gabe…Received by Rev. G. W. Tumlin….Removed by Certificate 1929(?)

James Gabriel “Gabe” Callaway

Callaway, Lucius

Lucius duBose Callaway married Recia Carroll Inman

 

 
Clopton, Walter J…..Removed by Certificate Date Uncertain

Walter Johnston Clopton

 

 

Clopton, King W.

William King Clopton married Ada Lucille “Pink” Knight

 

 
Clopton, Rufus T…..removed by Certificate July 31

Rufus Terrell Clopton married Martha Alice Bailey

 

 
Clopton, J. Cuyler

James Cuyler Clopton

Lewis, Emmie….Married Manley Martin…Baptized 1919….Vows 1919….Received by Rev. G. W. Tumlin.

Emmie Lewis married  (1) Leon Manley (2) Bill Martin

Winslette, Elizabeth…..Married Yearwood…Baptized 1919….Vows 1919….Received by Rev. G. W. Tumlin.

Elizabeth Winslett married Howard Yearwood

Bustin, Louise….Married Moran…Baptized 1919….Vows 1919….Received by Rev. G. W. Tumlin…Removed by Certificate June 1925

Louise Bustin married –Moran

Bustin, Thomas M….…Baptized 1919….Vows 1919….Received by Rev. G. W. Tumlin….Removed by Certificate June 1925

Thomas M. Bustin married Lizzie Bullington

Callaway, Martha…..Married Scrivener…Baptized 1919….Vows 1919….Received by Rev. G. W. Tumlin….Removed by Certificate

Martha Clopton Callaway married Hugh Russell Scrivener

McLeroy, Lewis…Baptized 1919….Vows 1919….Received by Rev. G. W. Tumlin…Removed by Certificate

Lewis McLeroy married Lucy Alma Hawkins

McLeroy, Sara…..Married Hill…Baptized 1926….Vows 1926….Received by Rev. G. W. Tumlin…..Removed by Certificate

Sara McLeroy married Ray Hill

Knight, Dorothy….Baptized 1926…Vows 1926….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes….Removed by Certificate 1935

Dorothy Knight married Robert C. Smith

Manley, John W….Baptized 1926…Vows 1926….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes….Dead

John Winfield Manley married Annie Clements

Copelan, Tom N. Baptized 1926…Vows 1926….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes….Dead

Tom N. Copelan married Maggie A. Copelan

Copelan, Maggie A….Baptized 1926…Vows 1926….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes…Removed by Certificate

Maggie A. Copelan

Copelan, Florence…. Baptized 1926…Vows 1926….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes…Removed by Certificate

Florence Copelan married Hudson “Hut” Baugh

Copelan, Dorothy….Married Hesslyn Baptized 1926…Vows 1926….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes…Removed by Certificate 1937

Dorothy Copelan married Jim Hesslyn

Copelan, Russell…….Withdrawn

Russell Copelan married Evelyn Carnes

Wilson, Isabel…..Married Meadows…..Baptized 9-13-1928….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes

Isabel Wilson married  (1) Tom Meadows (2) Harvey Adams

McLeroy, Lillian…..Married Spiller…..Baptized 9-13-1928….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes

Lillian McLeroy married Robert Spiller

Susie C. Callaway…..Married Bedgood…..Baptized 9-13-1928….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes…Removed by Certificate 1936

Susan Caroline “Susie” Callaway married Ed Bedgood

Callaway, Esther Dearman…..Baptized 9-13-1928….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes…Removed by Certificate 1936

Esther Dearman Callaway

 

 

Wm. Purcell Clopton………..Baptized 9-13-1928….Received by Rev. W. B. Hughes…Removed by Certificate

William Purcell Clopton married Peggy Charlotte Schleucher

 

 

McLeroy, Marshall Lynn….Baptized 1921……Received by Rev. M. B. Whitaker

Marshall Lynn McLeroy married Mildred Knight

Knight, Mildred….Married McLeroy……Received by Certificate 1933….Received by Rev. L. P. Huckaby

Mildred Knight married Marshall Lynn McLeroy

 


THE CEMETERY

 

Grieve not for lost ones gone

To join the heavenly choir,

But patiently press on,

Their heavenly bliss to share.

 

 

Four graves lie unmarked in the little cemetery behind Concord.  No words are engraved identifying the final resting place of Thomas Alexander Clopton, John Melton, Tom Hart, or Fannie Fletcher King.  Of all the children buried here, the lack of any identification seems especially poignant regarding the King infant.  There is no known photograph of this child, no mention in a letter, and no marked stone to note her little life, but someone was inspired by her passing to write the following memorial which appeared in a newspaper of the day.

 

DIED

 

                FANNIE FLETCHER KING, daughter of Elisha and Elizabeth King, departed this life June 25, 1871, after a short illness.

                Another rose-bud departed, gone in the sweet Blush of childhood.  Fletcher’s disease was very severe, and baffled the efforts of our most eminent physicians, but little Fletcher was too perfect for this wicked world.  She said to her mother a few hours before her death, “I want to go home,” and her wish was soon realized.  She is now a shin(ing) angel in Heaven.

                Grieve not loved ones, for your little cherub, but rather rejoice that she has gone from the evil to come.  We sympathize deeply with the afflicted family.

 

Another new made grave,

Another vacant chair,

Another soul has gone

To join the heavenly choir.

 

The spirit took its flight

Where sorrow cannot come;

Gone in its beauty bright,

To its celestial home.

 

It has passed through the valley,

Crossed safely o’er the river,

And with the loved ones gone,

Will dwell in peace forever.

 

Look up!  beyond the blue sky,

Beyond the lovely starts of night,

Is that happy home,

That sphere of pure delight.

 

Grieve not for lost ones gone

To join the heavenly choir,

But patiently press on,

Their heavenly bliss to share.

 

A FRIEND

 

 

CONCORD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH CEMETERY

1810 - 1999

 

The knowledge of kindred

and the genealogies of the old

families of a community deserve

high praise.  Herein consists a part

of the knowledge of a man’s own self.

It is a great spew to look back on the worth of our  line.

                Lord Bacon

 

 

 

 

 

Nell Gilmer Clopton

Nell Cowan Gilmer Clopton; October 9, 1898-March 30, 1965; Daughter of William Alford Gilmer & Mary E. Bell Gilmer; Wife of Lemuel Thomas Clopton

 

 

Lemuel Thomas Clopton

Lemuel Thomas Clopton; January 25 1898-September 5, 1977; Son of William Thomas Clopton & Minnie Flora King Clopton; Husband of Nell Cowan Gilmer Clopton

 

 

Minnie Julia Clopton

Minnie Julia Clopton; November 4, 1920-March 24, 1924; Infant daughter of Lemuel Thomas Clopton & Nell Cowan Gilmer Clopton

 

 

William Purcell Clopton

World War II Veteran

November 27, 1918-January 23, 1998; Son of Lemuel Thomas Clopton & Nell Cowan Gilmer Clopton; Husband of Peggy Charlotte Schleucher Clopton

 

 

Peggy Charlotte Schleucher Clopton

Peggy Charlotte Schleucher Clopton, May 9, 1919-February 27, 2001, Daughter of John Henry Schleucher &

Zada Hedrick, Wife of William Purcell Clopton

 

 

William Thomas Clopton

William Thomas “Boo” Clopton; April 25, 1863-September 6, 1955; Son of William Henry Harrison Clopton & Martha Isabel Lancaster Clopton; Husband of Minnie Flora King Clopton

 

 

Minnie King Clopton

Minnie Flora King Clopton; January 7, 1869-April 10, 1942; Daughter of Elisha King, Jr., & Elizabeth Ann Johnston King; Wife of William Thomas Clopton

 

 

Walter J. Clopton

World War II Veteran

Walter Johnston Clopton; October 1, 1902-April 26, 1989; Son of William Thomas Clopton & Minnie Flora King Clopton

 

 

William King Clopton

“King”

William King Clopton; July 21, 1901 -December 24, 1990; Son of William Thomas Clopton & Minnie Flora King Clopton; Husband of Ada Lucille Knight Clopton

 

 

Lucille Knight Clopton

“Pink”

Ada Lucille “Pink” Knight Clopton; September 6, 1902-April 13, 1983; Daughter of Will Knight & Annie Holloman Knight; Wife of William King Clopton

 

 

Rufus Terrell Clopton, Sr.

“Papason”

World War II Veteran (POW)

Rufus Terrell Clopton; January 21, 1907-September 9, 1992; Son of William Thomas Clopton & Minnie Flora King Clopton; Husband of Martha Alice Bailey Clopton

 

 
Alice Bailey Clopton

Martha Alice Bailey Clopton, September 23, 1924-October 8, 1998; Daughter of Thomas Archie Bailey and Barnie Harrison Bailey; Wife of Rufus Terrell Clopton, Sr.

 

Julia Clyde King

Julia Clyde King; September 8, 1899-August 24, 1901; Infant daughter of Edmund Johnston King & Rosa Harper King

 

Cuyler King

Cuyler E. King; August 31, 1865-May 9, 1940; Son of Elisha King, Jr. & Elizabeth Ann Johnston King

 

 

Elisha King

Elisha King, Jr.; 1829-1911; Son of Elisha King, Sr. & Margaret Hall King; Husband of Elizabeth Ann Johnston King

 

 

Elizabeth Johnston King

Elizabeth Ann Johnston King; 1824-1901; Daughter of Thomas Johnston & Mary Gilbert Johnston; Wife of Elisha King, Jr.

 

 

Lizzie King Pinkerton

Sarah Elizabeth King Pinkerton; October 3, 1861-August 7, 1943; Daughter of Elisha King, Jr. & Elizabeth Ann Johnston King; Wife of Henry R. Pinkerton

 

No Marker

Fannie Fletcher; -June 25, 1871; Infant daughter of Elisha King, Jr. & Elizabeth Ann Johnston King

 

Annie Lula Morris

Annie Lula Morris; September 15, 1879-May 5, 1911

 

James A. Knight

James Asbury Knight; I, M.D., June 5, 1849-May 10, 1906; Husband of (1) Mary A. King Knight, and (2) Mamie Spivey Knight

 

Mary A. Knight

Mary A. King Knight; February 25, 1851-August 23, 1891; Daughter of Elisha King, Jr. & Elizabeth Ann Johnston King; Wife of James A. Knight

 

James A. Knight

James Asbury Knight; II, August 30, 1906-July 24, 1907, Son of Dr. James Asbury Knight & Mamie Spivey Knight

 

James Curry Knight

James Curry Knight; December 14, 1895-July 10, 1907

 

Glynn Knight

Glynn Knight; December 1904-February 23, 1970; Son of Thomas Pierce Knight & Carrie Lucy Holloman Knight

 

 

Marshall Lynn McLeroy, Sr.

Marshall Lynn McLeroy, Sr.; June 23, 1909-July 30, 1986; Son of Ed Brown McLeroy & Annie Kate Bustin McLeroy; Husband of Mildred Knight McLeroy

 

Mildred Knight McLeory

Mildred Knight McLeroy, June 25, 1918-March 20, 1999, Daughter of Thomas Pierce Knight & Carrie Lucy Holloman Knight, Wife of Marshall Lynn McLeory, Sr.

 

Thomas Pierce Knight

Thomas Pierce Knight; February 5, 1874-October 27, 1930; Son of James A. Knight & Mary A. King Knight; Husband of Carrie Lucy Holloman Knight and following her death, Thommie Earle Humphries

 

 

Carrie Lucy Knight

Carrie Lucy Holloman Knight; June 23, 1876-June 26, 1918; Daughter of William Joseph Holloman & Lucy C. White Holloman;  First wife of Thomas Pierce Knight

 

 

Dorothy Knight Smith

Dorothy Knight Smith; Daughter of Thomas Pierce Knight & Carrie Holloman Knight; Wife of Robert Clinton Smith, Sr.

 

Philip Andrew Coleman

Philip Andrew Coleman; November 18, 1917-February 16, 1989; Husband of Thelma Coleman

 

Ed Bedgood

December 21, 1917-July 19, 1987

 

Eunice Wagner Bustin

May 11, 1920-May 12, 1965

 

Percy Bustin

September 5, 1918-December 24, 1988; son of Benjamin Arnold Bustin & Alice Virginia Adams

 

William A. Black

July 19, 1904-June 20, 1920

 

Charlie Grimes

Charlie Grimes

October 20, 1870-November 20, 1920

 

Mae Baugh

April 30, 1828-December 12, 1904

 

Kate Baugh

1829-1902

 

Lizzie Clopton Godkin

Sarah Elizabeth “Lizzie” Clopton Godkin; September 5, 1837-1924; Daughter of Thomas B. Clopton & Harriet B. Claiborne Clopton; Wife of John R. Godkin

 

Esther D. Callaway

Esther Dearman Callaway; July 2, 1926-April 23, 1929; Infant daughter of Thomas Wooten Callaway & Esther Lee Dearman Callaway

 

 

Gabe Callaway

James Gabriel Callaway; May 11, 1901-May 21, 1971; Son of James Willis Callaway & Caroline Louise Clopton Callaway

 

 

Lucy Clopton Callaway

Carrielu Clopton “Lucie” Callaway; December 17, 1865-February 27, 1918; Daughter of William Henry Harrison Clopton & Martha Isabel Lancaster; Clopton; Wife of James Willis Callaway

 

Jim Callaway

James Willis Callaway; January 12, 1851-June 14, 1920; Husband of (1) Carrielu Clopton Callaway (2) Annie T. King

 

Robert Clopton

Confederate War Veteran

Robert Emmett “Shug” Clopton; February 10, 1844-July 9, 1908; Son of Thomas B. Clopton & Harriet B. Claiborne Clopton; Husband of Corrine Grimes Clopton

 

 

John Godkin Clopton

John Godkin “Uncle Johnnie” Clopton; August 3, 1867-April 18, 1947; Son of William Henry Harrison Clopton & Martha Isabel Lancaster Clopton

 

 

Gabe Clopton

Gabriel Harrison Clopton; September 14, 1870-October 1, 1950; Son of William Henry Harrison Clopton & Martha Isabel Lancaster Clopton; Husband of Elizabeth Celine Girtman Clopton

 

 

J. B. Clopton

“Boss”

James Brown “Boss” Clopton; February 14, 1876-February 6, 1956; Son of William Henry Harrison Clopton & Martha Isabel Lancaster Clopton

 

 

Harvey Clopton

Harvey Gordon Clopton; August 9, 1886-January 27, 1952; Son of William Henry Harrison Clopton & Martha Isabel Lancaster Clopton; Husband of Mildred Lucille Chandler Clopton

 

 

Mildred Clopton

Mildred Lucille Chandler Clopton; October 24, 1899-March 11, 1983; Daughter of William H. Chandler & Eudora G. Brand Chandler; Wife of Harvey Gordon Clopton

 

 

William H. Clopton

Confederate War Veteran

William Henry Harrison Clopton; March 4, 1839-October 14, 1916; Son of Thomas B. Clopton & Harriet B. Claiborne Clopton; Husband of Martha Isabel Lancaster Clopton

 

 

Martha Isabel Clopton

Martha Isabel Lancaster Clopton; 1845-October 26, 1895; Daughter of Lemuel Lancaster & Isabel Stinson Lancaster; Wife of William Henry Harrison Clopton

 

 

James Cuyler Clopton

James Cuyler Clopton; August 30, 1903-September 25, 1995; Son of William Thomas Clopton & Minnie Flora King Clopton; Husband of Petrona Gillian Hawkins Clopton

 

Hattie Belle Clopton

Harriet Isabel “Hattie Belle” Clopton Girtman; December 7, 1860-October 21, 1891; Daughter of William Henry Harrison Clopton & Martha Isabel Lancaster Clopton; Wife of William Horne Girtman

 

Lem Lancaster

Lemuel Lancaster; February 12, 1795-March 8, 1873; Husband of Isabel Stinson Lancaster

 

Isabel Stinson Lancaster

Isabel Stinson Lancaster; 1800-June 22, 1871; Wife of Lemuel Lancaster

 

Mae Pinkerton

Mary Francis Pinkerton; May 19, 1837-1907; Daughter of Alexander Brown Harrison & Lucy Wright Claiborne Harrison; Wife of James Pinkerton

 

Jessie Melton

Jessie Melton; March 28, 1866-December 8, 1928

 

Mattie Melton

Mattie Lane Melton; November 7, 1880-May 20, 1900, Wife of J. F. Melton

 

Mary Melton Haley

Mary Melton Haley

About 1848-May 26, 1896

 

Luella Hunnicutt

Luella Hunnicutt

About 1854-March 15, 1886

 

James A. Melton

James A. Melton; about 1863-July 4, 1882

 

Mae Melton

Mae Melton; about 1852-April 7, 1887

 

J. J. Melton

J.J. Melton; about 1840July 26, 1882, Husband of Martha A. Barnard Melton

 

Martha Melton

Martha A. Barnard Melton; about 1828-November 5, 1905, wife of J. J. Melton

 

No Marker

Confederate War Veteran (POW)

Thomas Alexander Clopton;

August 25, 1841- ; Son of Thomas B. Clopton & Harriet B. Claiborne Clopton; Husband of Sarah Fannie Melton Clopton

 

No Marker

John Melton

 

No Marker

Tom Hart

 

Sara P. Harrison

Sara P. Harrison

October 8, 1825-December 9, 1898

 

Mary Bearden Jones

Mary Brooks Bearden Jones; 1861-1927; Daughter of James C. Bearden & Sarah Claiborne Bearden; Wife of (1) Lucius Marshall Jones (2) R. B. Harrison

 

Lucius Jones

Lucius Marshall Jones; February 14, 1858-February 10, 1902; Husband of Mary Brooks Bearden Jones

 

William Jones

William Jones; March 26, 1888-July 4, 1904; Son of Lucius Marshall Jones & Mary Brooks Bearden Jones

 

 

Will The Circle Be Unbroken

 

                William Thomas Clopton and his wife, Minnie Flora King, raised six boys in the shadow of Concord Church.  The Church served as a backdrop for many photographs of “Minnie’s Boys” through the years.   By 2000, all except Frank lay at rest in the shadow of their beloved Concord.  They have joined their mother and father, their Clopton and King grandparents, and all their Pea Ridge kith and kin beneath the ancient trees.  Oh, Amazing Grace!

 

 

 

 

Photographed on the steps of Concord United Methodist Church before death claimed Lem, the first of “Minnie’s Boys,” in 1977.  From left to right, front row:  James Cuyler Clopton; Rufus Terrell Clopton; and Frank Campbell Clopton.  From left to right, back row:  William King Clopton; Walter Johnston Clopton; and, Lemuel Thomas Clopton.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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[1] O Worship the King, is an excerpt from  The Clopton Chronicles, The Ancestors and Descendants of Sir Thomas Clopton, Knt., & Katherine Mylde, and is the property of the Clopton Family Genealogical Society which holds the copyright on this material.  Permission is granted to quote or reprint articles for noncommercial use provided credit is given to the CFGS and to the author.  Prior written permission must be obtained from the Society for commercial use.

Suellen (Clopton) DeLoach Blanton is Founder and Executive Director of The Clopton Family Genealogical Society & Clopton Family Archives.

The Society wishes to thank Peggy Charlotte (Schleucher) Clopton; James Penick Marshall, Jr., President, Eatonton-Putnam County Historical Society; and, Nancy Humphries Owensby.  And special thanks to Clopton descendants Lemuel Thomas Clopton; William Purcell Clopton; and, Mildred (Knight) McLeroy

[2] From the original deed which is located at the Putnam County Courthouse, Eatonton, Georgia.  A copy is located Clopton Family Archives, courtesy Eatonton Putnam County Historical Society.

[3] The son of Thomas Christopher Bustin and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Arnold.  He was the husband of Alice Virginia Adams.  For many years he wrote articles which appeared in local newspapers.  Remarkable, in his later years he was blind but would continue to write out his stories by hand.  See Pea Ridge Memories.  This is an excerpt from an unidentified and undated story. A complete set of these articles are located Clopton Family Archives.

[4] William Thomas Clopton, see Dr. Thom and Of Possums and Land Barons and Wonders of the Sea and Minnie’s Boys.

[7] Both men were blind.

[9] Annie Kate Bustin McLeroy, History of Methodism in Putnam County, Privately Printed Pamphlet, Concord United Methodist Church, Putnam County (Eatonton) Georgia.  She is credited with obtaining the bronze historical market in front of the church.  It was the spring of the year and Conference was in session.  Miss Annie Kate rode a bus to Atlanta to attend Conference and while she was there made a trip downtown to the capitol to lay the ground work for the marker to be placed in front of the church.  She wanted to be sure that Concord Church would be remembered as the oldest Methodist Church in Putnam County and to be assured that it would be preserved.  When the anniversary of the church’s one hundred and fiftieth year was approaching Miss Annie Kate set to work to compile a history of Concord.  She dedicated this history to the memory of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Annie McLeroy Lewis, who was a long time member of Concord Church.

[10] Nineteen Ninety Director of Concord United Methodist Church, Eatonton, Georgia. Olan Mills, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 1990. 

[11] Elected in 1857, he would see the state through the American Civil War.

[12] Lucy Jones was the daughter of Lucius Marshall Jones and Mary Brooks (Bearden) Jones.

[13] Annie Kate Bustin McLeroy, History of Methodism in Putnam County, Privately Printed Pamphlet, Concord United Methodist Church, Putnam County (Eatonton) Georgia. 

[14] Wallace Theodore Jones (The Rev.) (April 3, 1899-August 19, 1980), Memoirs of W. Ted Jones, Typescript of Personal Memoirs.

[15] Mary (Bearden) Jones

[16] Wallace Theodore Jones (The Rev.) (April 3, 1899-August 19, 1980), Memoirs of W. Ted Jones, Typescript of Personal Memoirs.

[18] Charlotte White, writing circa 1968, The Eatonton Messenger, Putnam Printing Company, Inc., 111 N. Jefferson Avenue, Putnam County (Eatonton) Georgia 31024.

[19] Annie Kate Bustin McLeroy, History of Methodism in Putnam County, Privately Printed Pamphlet, Concord United Methodist Church, Putnam County (Eatonton) Georgia.

[20] Wallace Theodore Jones (The Rev.) (April 3, 1899-August 19, 1980), Memoirs of W. Ted Jones, Typescript of Personal Memoirs.

[21] A copy of the registry is located Clopton Family Archives.