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THE WEATHERFORDS
Richard Weatherford and ?

Martin Weatherford and his wives Mary ? and Isabella ?
Charles Weatherford and Sehoy III
William Weatherford and his wives Mary Moniac, Sopathe Thlanie, and Mary Stiggins
John "Jake" David Weatherford and Patty Dyer
Rosanna Weatherford and Joseph Shomo
Elizabeth Weatherford and Samuel Takkes-Hadjo Moniac
Alexander McGillivray Weatherford and his wives Martha Pollard, Jane Hadley, and Martha Avery

Mary Levitia Weatherford and Dr.William Forbes Howell
Charles Weatherford and Elizabeth Stiggins
Captain Charles A. Weatherford and Martha Virginia Staples

and
Daniel Weatherford and his wives Sarah (-?) and Mary Webb
(not of this particular family but listed here because of shared surname)

First 2 generations' information from Lynn Hastie Thompson's "William Weatherford"

RICHARD WEATHERFORD and ?

Richard Weatherford

LifeNotes:

Born: ca 1685 James City Co., VA
Married; Died: ca 1755 Lunenburg Co., VA
Parents:

Wife:

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


MARTIN WEATHERFORD and his wives MARY ? and ISABELLA ?

Martin Weatherford

LifeNotes: Martin and Mary moved about 1757 to Augusta, GA. After Martin married Isabella, they went to the Bahamas

Born: ca 1728 VA
Married
Parents: Richard Weatherford

Wife: Mary ?

LifeNotes: She was a mixed blood.

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

Isabella ?

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


CHARLES WEATHERFORD and SEHOY III

Charles Weatherford

LifeNotes: According to Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin, Charles Weatherford "was a man of means and was a government contractor, and constructed and owned the first race courses in Alabama."

Charles Weatherford came to Creek country before 1778 with his friend Samuel Mims. He was also a longtime friend of Lachlan McGillivray.

Born: about 1752 ; Married: about 1780 in Alabama; Died
Parents: Martin Weatherford and Mary ?, a half-blood

LifeNotes: Was a trader. He was a friend of Lachlan McGillivray. He went to the Creek Nation with his friend Samuel Mims.

He lived at his horse track on the Alabama River, about 5 mile upriver from Sehoy; it was customary for Indian couples to live separately and Charles kept the custom with Sehoy. The Weatherford house was near what is now North Motgomery at Pickett Springs. There were conic mounds on the property -- 5 of which are still visible from what is now Coosada Ferry Road.

James Albert Pickett tells this story in The History of Alabama: In 1792, Creeks frequently attack homes on the Cumberland. They captured a young girl named Elizabeth Baker and brought her back to Coosawda, after murdering her family before her eyes. Across the river, Charles Weatherford heard of the girl and ransomed her back, putting her in the care of Sehoy (III), his wife.

Sehoy III

LifeNotes: Of the Wind Clan. See her page.

Born: about 1759 in Little Tulsa, Elmore, AL; 1st-union in 1774, Alabama; Married 2nd-about 1778 in Alabama; Married 3rd-about 1780; Died 1811-2 , buried in Baldwin County, Alabama; her son William Weatherford lies buried next to her.
Parents: Sehoy II and a Tuckabatchee chief

Her first husband was Colonel John Tate, a British officer with rank of colonel and the last British commander at Ft. Toulouse. The children of Sehoy II and her first husband John Tate were: David Tate, born 1778. See his family page. (m.1st-Mary Randon who died with her 2 of her daughters in the Massacre of Ft. Mims; m. 2nd- Margaret Dyer; d. 1829), John Tate II.

Their children are:

Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin, her nephew, said, "I well recollect Aunt Rosannah and Capt. Shomo, having often been at their house. She was woman of great force of of character. She was born in the upper part of Baldwin county, Ala., near where rests the remains of her warrior brother, William the 'Red Eagle".

to Some Creek Families & Friends


WILLIAM WEATHERFORD and his wives MARY MONIAC,
SOPATHE THLANIE, and MARY STIGGINS

William Weatherford
War name: Hopnicafutsahia -- Straight Talker or Truth Teller
Best known as Lamochattee or Red Eagle

Born: about 1781 in AL; Married 1st-about 1797 in AL; Married 2nd -about 1804 in AL; Married 3rd-about 1817 in AL; Died 3/24/1824, following a bear hunt and is buried next to his mother Sehoy III in a grave in Baldwin Co., AL
Parents: Sehoy III and Charles Weatherford

LifeNotes: Leader of the Creeks. Deemed "the architect of the Massacre at Fort Mims". See the letter his grandson Charles Weatherford, Jr. wrote about William. Nephew of Alexander McGillivray and by marriage, nephew of LeClerc Milfort; received their wisdom, according to tribal custom-- the role of the uncle was considered far more importart than that of the father.

Read about Red Eagle and the Massacre at Fort Mims!

Red Eagle goes on to full participation in the Creek War. More to come on that war. Another massacre --the Kimbell-James Massacre, the Canoe Fight with Sam Dale and his forces against the Red Sticks, the Battle of Holy Ground with Red Eagle mounted on Arrow, his black steed, the Battle of Talladega, to the climactic Battle of Horseshoe Bend where all come together -- General Andrew Jackson's forces, including Davy Crockett and Sam Houston joining with Choctaws and other tribes against the Red Sticks. This ends the war.

After the terrible defeat at Horseshoe Bend in 1814, Red Eagle goes to Ft. Jackson (formerly Ft. Toulouse), and surrendered to General Andrew Jackson. Jackson, filled with sympathy and admiration for the noble chief, takes Red Eagle home to Nashville, TN. According to Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin, William's half brother, David Tate, (Tarvin's grandfather) was the only man in AL who knew where Weatherford was during his stay at the Hermitage.

See his speech given to General Jackson at the official surrender at Fort Jackson.

William lived out his days as a well-to-do and well-respected planter in Monroe Co., AL.

See the story of an event that happened in his later years -- the story as told by Charles Weatherford, a grandson.

1st-Wife: Mary "Polly" Moniac

Born: about 1783 in AL;. Married: about 1797 in AL; Died in 1804, Point Tholy, in Lowndes Co., AL
Parents: William Dixon Moniac and Polly Colbert

LifeNotes: sister of Sam Moniac and half-sister to Hannah Moniac, daughter of William Dixon Moniac and Sehoy III (thus Hannah was William Weatherford's half-sister too)

Their children were:

2nd-Wife: Sopoth Thlanie
Born: about 1783 in AL; Married: ca 1813; Died in 1824 or immediately after birth of their son on 12/25/1813 in AL, buried Coosawda, unmarked grave
Parents: John Moniac and Mary Tyner

LifeNotes: From J. D. Driesback: she was " said to be the most beautiful forest maiden of the tribe, noted for her musical voice, and powers of song; and could charm the stern red warrior, and make him forget for the moment the war-path and the chase, by the cadence of her voice, whilst the wild bird stopped in its flight to drink in the sweet refrain."

See the dream of the Red Eagle when he saw his own end.

Their child:

Note: there is a notice in sources that William married Lilla Beasley, daughter of Col. Beasley of Fort Mims. The union is purported to have happened shortly after the Massacre. Am putting mention of it here because I do not want to let any item go unnoticed. Lilla's mother was the daughter of a Creek chief.

3rd-Wife: Mary Stiggins
Born: about 1783 in AL. Married in 1817 "under white law"; Died in 1832, Mount Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL, buried with other Stiggins at the Baptist Church, Little River; her wooden marker was destroyed in a brush fire.
Parents: Joseph Stiggins, an Englishman, and Nancy Grey, a Natchez, niece of Chinnabbee.

LifeNotes: sister of George Stiggins. The great Indian fighter Sam Dale was best man at the wedding of Mary Stiggins to William Weatherford.

Woodrow Wallace shares the story of the Red Eagle's demise from Dreisback: The Red Eagle goes on a hunting trip and seeing the white deer among all the brown ones and reads therein his own death, going home from the hunt and dying three days later dreaming of departing hand in hand with Sopoth Thlanie.

to Some Creek Families & Friends


JOHN "JAKE" DAVID WEATHERFORD and PATTY DYER

John "Jake" David Weatherford

LifeNotes: John Weatherford operated the Claiborne ferry. He was able to assist General Andrew Jackson during the Creek War by helping Jackson transport the Army across the Alabama River. John was given a land grant by James Monroe for his service; the grant included a large portion of Monroe County and the adjoining counties. John and his family lived in Monroe Co., AL. and he appears on the 1854 tax list.

Born: about 1783 in AL; Married:a bout 1802 in AL; Died:
Parents: Charles Weatherford and Sehoy III

Patty Dyer

LifeNotes: She was sister of Margaret Dyer who was one of the wives of David Tate.

Born: about 1785; Married: ; Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


ROSANNA WEATHERFORD and JOSEPH SHOMO

Rosanna Weatherford

LifeNotes: When young, Rosanna attended local schools. When she turned 16, her uncle David Tate took her to Raleigh, NC, to attend school; where she stayed there 2 years.

Rosanna and Joseph and their children lived in Monroe Co., AL.

Dr. Marion Elisha Tarvin, her nephew, said, "I well recollect Aunt Rosannah and Capt. Shomo, having often been at their house. She was woman of great force of of character. She was born in the upper part of Baldwin county, Ala., near where rests the remains of her warrior brother, William the 'Red Eagle".

Born: about 1789 in Baldwin Co., AL Married: 12/25/1821; Died: buried in the family cemetery near the home of her son William A. Shomo.
Parents: Charles Weatherford and Sehoy III

Captain Joseph Shomo

LifeNotes: He was an officer in the US Army. Resigned on 12/31/1820. Bought a farm in Clarke County, AL. They lived, however, in Monroe County, AL, at Mt. Pleasant. He was an Odd Fellow, a Democrat and a Methodist. His last residence is shown as Penscaola, FL.

Born: Married: 12/25/1821; Died: buried at Fort Barrancas.
Parents:

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


ELIZABETH WEATHERFORD and SAMUEL TAKKES-HADJO MONIAC

Elizabeth Weatherford

LifeNotes:

Born: about 1785 in AL; Married: about 1802 in Baldwin County, AL; Died:
Parents: Charles Weatherford and Sehoy III

Samuel Takkes-Hadjo Moniac

LifeNotes: See his Moniac page

Born: about 1781 in AL; Married: about 1802 in Baldwin County, AL; Died:
Parents: William Dixon Moniac, see his Moniac page, and Polly Colbert

Their children were:

From Dr. Marion Elisah Tarvin: "under the treaty at New York, was graduated at West Point. He was made a major and commanded 600 Creeks and Choctaws against the Seminoles in the Florida war of 1836. He was killed, 13 bullets piercing his body. A braver man never lived.").

Another account from J. D. Driesback: "... of whom Gen. Jessup said, that he was as brave and gallant a man as ever drew a sword or faced an enemy. ... His wife was a cousin of Osceola, the Florida chief, who commanded the Florida Indians when Maj. Moniac was killed. Moniac had resigned his commission in the U. S. A. many years before the Florida war of 1836, and entered the army as a private in the company from Claiborne, Ala., but soon rose to the rank of Major by Brevet, and was in command of 600 Creeks and Choctaws when he was killed." (Alabama Historical Reporter, Vol. 2, No. 4, March 1884) See this piece in its entirety.

to Some Creek Families & Friends


ALEXANDER McGILLIVRAY WEATHERFORD and his wives MARTHA POLLARD, JANE HADLEY, and MARTHA "MATTIE" AVERY

Information with many thanks to descendant Jim Guest

Alexander McGillivray Weatherford

LifeNotes:

Frances Eldorado Holland, second wife of Alexander's son "Oscie" Weatherford, in a letter dated 1 April 1975 to her grandson James Guest, stated, "Selestine Oscie Weatherford was born June 1, 1866 in Mobile, Alabama. His parents were Alexander McGillivray Weatherford and Mattie Avery. He came to Texas in 1874."

Alexander (Alex) took his family to Austin County Texas in 1874, and some years later went back to Alabama (to sell some land, according to family stories) and died there.

Alexander is shown in the 1880 census of Austin County Texas as being 61 years old. His child Maude is shown to be 3 years old and born in Alabama, and his son John shows to be 4 months old and born in Texas. This means that Alex's wife Martha "Mattie" (and probably the whole family) would have been in Alabama in about 1876, but in Texas by 1880.

Alexander's granddaughter, Ina Weatherford Toups said that her grandfather, "Alex" Weatherford, came to Texas with his family from around Mobile, Alabama in the 1870's, and that he had "owned slaves". (The 1880 U.S. Census of Austin County Texas shows a black family living in the same "dwelling" with Alexander and his family. The father in the black family is listed as a "servant".)

Ina said that she was told that Alexander went back to Alabama after some years, evidently to sell some land he had there. She said that she didn't think he came back to Texas because the family story was that, "the old man died in Alabama", and that, the land was never sold".

The 1860 US Census of Baldwin County Alabama shows Alexander's age as 40. (From the 1860 U.S. Census of Baldwin County, Alabama. Dwelling 335, Line 5.)

The 1870 U.S. Census of Escambia Co., AL shows Alleck's age as 55. He is listed as an "Indian", born in Alabama, and his occupation is listed as "rail road laborer". His wife Martha's age is listed as 29, as "white", and as a housewife, also born in Alabama. They have four boys, but evidently declined to answer any more questions because the census taker made a notation stating that Alexander had " 4 boys whom he refused to give names....ages". Another notation in different hand writing states "Weatherford refused to answer any questions regarding his children". (from the 1870 U.S. Census of Escambia County, Alabama. 4 July 1870, Jack's Spring Beat, Pg 188, Family #27.)

The 1880 US Census of Austin County Texas shows Alexander's age as 61, his occupation as a farmer, and states that he and his parents were born in Alabama. His wife Martha, 35, is also listed, and seven children, Willie 18, Walter 16, Oceola 13, Agustus 11, Leslie 6, Maud 3, and John 4 months. (from the 1880 U.S. Census of Austin County, Texas. 8 June 1880, ED 166, Pg 4, lines 29. and 30)

The book on William Weatherford by Lynn Hastie Thompson, gives something about Alexander's life before he brought his family to Texas. She says that he "served as Justice of the Peace in and for Baldwin Co. Alabama in September of 1856". Also that during the Civil War of 1861 to 1865 that, "Alexander served in Capt. T.C. English's company of Confederate mounted infantry."

The book also states about Alexander that, "In his later years he lived in Austin, Texas, but his last years he lived with Mary Sizemore, his daughter, in South Monroe County, Alabama."

Born: abt 1820, Alabama; Married 1st-; Married 2nd- : Married 3rd: 14 Mar 1860, Baldwin Co., AL; Died: about 1897 at age 77, while visiting in AL.
Parents: William Weatherford The Red Eagle and Mary Stiggins

1st-Wife: Martha Pollard

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

2nd-Wife: Jane Hadley

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Their child:

Wife: Martha "Mattie" Avery

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: 14 Mar 1860 at age 40, Baldwin Co., AL; Died:
Parents:

Their son:

Jim Guest also lists sources: "Red Eagle and the Wars with the Creek Indians of Alabama" (George Cary Eggleston 1839-1911, Dodd, Mead & Co., New York, published reprint of 1878 edition and also on LDS microfiche #6088297), "William Weatherford, His Country and His People" Lynn Hastie Thompson, Lavender Publishing, Company, P.O. Box 884, Bay Minette, AL36507, published 1991), "Early Alabama Marriages" (published by Family Adventures, PO Box 290354, San Antonio, TX. 78280-1754. Pg 12)

to Some Creek Families & Friends


MARY LEVITIA WEATHERFORD AND DR. WILLIAM FORBES HOWELL

George Windes is a descendant of Mary Levitia and William Howell and would like to hear from you if you share lines or if you have information on the Howells. George offers us the information below.

Mary Levitia or Levelita Weatherford

LifeNotes: She was very young when her father died. She was the only daughter of William Weatherford to grow to adulthood.

Mary Levitia and her Dr. Howell would stay in Alabama till 1850, when her mother's estate was settled, and then moved with several children and numerous slaves to Louisiana where the family had holdings in Natchitoches, DeSoto and Sabine Parishes. Sadly, there was much sickness along the bayou's, and Levitia died at age 36 in 1859.

Born: 1823, Little River, AL. Shown as age 24 in the 1850 census.
Married: 4/11/1842, Monroe Co., AL, C. C. Sellers, surety, T. Burpo, Ordained Minister (source: "Monroe and Conecuh County, Alabama Marriages 1833-1880", Dr. Lucy Wiggins Colson, P. D. and Dr. Robert Ellis Colson, Southern Historical Press, 1983)
Died: in 1859; is buried in a lonely, unkept forest place (Campground Cemetery) near Pleasant Hill, Louisiana. Two of her children are beside her, Bonaparte, age 5, and Natalie, age 14. The widower put up a nine foot apex style monument, which has fallen at least once.
Parents: William Weatherford "Red Eagle" and Mary Stiggins

Dr. William Forbes Howell

LifeNotes: Was from Wilcox Co., AL. He married 2nd- Louisa Elizabeth Smith Durr, widow, about 1860. They had a daughter Emily Hall Howell, born 1862, after Dr. Howell died.

Born: AL; Married: 4/11/1842, Monroe Co., AL, C. C. Sellers, surety, T. Burpo, Ordained Minister -- William is shown as William Harwell (source: "Monroe and Conecuh County, Alabama Marriages 1833-1880", Dr. Lucy Wiggins Colson, P. D. and Dr. Robert Ellis Colson, Southern Historical Press, 1983); Died:
Parents: William H. Howell and Lucy Williamson. William H. Howell was a successful Alabama planter.

Their children were: 

to Some Creek Families & Friends


CHARLES WEATHERFORD and ELIZABETH "BETSY" ANN STIGGINS

Charles Weatherford

LifeNotes: He and Elizabeth lived at the old homeplace of his father.

Born: 1795 in what is now Montgomery Co., AL; Married: Died: 6/13/1894 Monroe Co., AL
Parents: William Weatherford and Mary Moniac

Elizabeth Stiggins

LifeNotes:

Born: ca 1806; Married: ; Died:
Parents: George Stiggins and Elizabeth Adcock

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


CAPTAIN CHARLES A. WEATHERFORD and MARTHA VIRGINIA STAPLES

Captain Charles A. Weatherford

LifeNotes: See the letter Charles wrote

Born: 6/4/1834 Monroe Co., AL
Married: on 2/28/1861, at Mt. Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL with McDuff Mann as security and R. Y. Reaves as Pastor.
Died: 9/13/1909 or 6/13/1896, Monroe Co., AL, buried in Weatherford Cemetery, Monroe Co., AL.
Parents: Charles Weatherford and Elizabeth "Betsy" Ann Stiggins

Martha Virginia Staples

LifeNotes:

Born: ca 1837
Married: on 2/28/1861, at Mt. Pleasant, Monroe Co., AL with McDuff Mann as security and R. Y. Reaves as Pastor.
Died: ca 1913, Baldwin Co., AL
Parents: Jason Staples and Margaret Powell

Their children were:


DANIEL T. WEATHERFORD and his wives

Daniel Weatherford

Born 10/12/1812 SC

1st-wife: Sarah (?).

LifeNotes: They were in Walton Co., FL in 1850 for the census; Daniel is shown there as age 37 and Sarah is shown age 36 and born in AL. Later Daniel is shown in Neshoba Co., MS in the 1860 census as age 45. and in the 1870 census there as age 60. He is shown in the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 67. He dies 9/29/1895. Suzanne Sowell asks your help for more information on Daniel and his family. Daniel is not shown in any way connected to the Creek Weatherford. If you know anything, please email Suzanne Sowell.

Their known children are:

In 1860, Daniel is in Neshoba Co., MS with no wife but with these children from the above list: William, Elizabeth, George, Caroline E., and Charles M.

Mary Webb

Born, Married by 1870, Died
Parents:

Mary is shown in the 1879 census in Neshoba Co., MS as age 25 and born supposedly in MS; she is shown in the Angelina Co., TX 1880 census as age 37.

Their children are:

to Some Creek Families & Friends