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THE BAILEYS
Richard Bailey and Mary ?

Dixon Bailey and ?
Margaret "Peggy" Bailey and Richard Robinson
Mary "Polly" Bailey and Wiliam Arthur Sizemore

RICHARD BAILEY and MARY ?

Richard Bailey

LifeNotes: Native of England. He was an Indian Trader among the Creeks. Lived for 33 years among the Creeks. Was at Auttossee. In 1797, he was recognized by Benjamin Hawkins as a trader living at Autossee. Hawkins noted that "Mr.
Bailey is a good farmer, has many conveniences about, with his lands fenced, stable, garden, lots for his stock, some thriving trees, and a small nursery. The Creek agent also noted that Bailey had 200 head of cattle, 120 horses, 150 hogs, 20 beehives, and 7 slaves.

The family was twice forced to flee the Creek country, once during a feud brought on by the destruction of Bailey's stock by Indians, and again in 1789, when he and a dozen other traders were banished by the Creek council.

Born: about 1747, shown as age 40 in the 1787 Spanish census for the Tensaw District; Married: Died: in 1798-9 from a fall from a horse
Parents:

Mary

LifeNotes: See the description of Auttossee settlement in the late 18th century, as told by Benjamin Hawkins, and quoted in Swanton's "Early History of the Creek Indians and their Neighbors" (1922), and where there is mention of and praise of Mrs. Bailey, as "neat, cleanly, provident, and economical", as well as "agreeable and jocose in conversation, kind to everybody, yet firm" and "careful of the interest of her family and resolute in support of it".

Born: Married: Died:
Parents: granddaughter of Chief Wind of the Otallackim / Otalla of the Creek Indians, village of Autosse or Atasi

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


DIXON BAILEY and ?

Dixon Bailey

LifeNotes: From Autossee. Educated in Philadelphia under the Treaty of New York.

He was said to be "of fine personal appearance, unimpeachable integrity, and a strong mind. His courage and energy were not surpassed by those of any other man."(James Albert Pickett, "History of Alabama").

Bitter enemy of William Weatherford. Led the troops under Col. James Caller, in the Battle of Burnt Corn.

He was at Fort Mims during the horrible attack and managed to help others escape; he made his way outside the fort and into the woods where he died of his wounds. See his estate's claims for losses suffered at the hands of hostiles.

Born: in Autossee
Married:
Died: 8/30/1813, Massacre of Ft. Mims, Clarke Co., AL
Parents:

Wife

LifeNotes: Some say she was a daughter of Sophia Durant. Some say she was from SC, others say she was one of the daughters of Sophia McGillivray and Benjamin Durant.

Born: Married: Died: 8/30/1813, Massacre of Ft. Mims, Clarke Co., AL
Parents:

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


MARGARET "PEGGY" BAILEY and RICHARD ROBINSON

Margaret "Peggy" Bailey

LifeNotes: According to her grandson's application to Eastern Creek application (his name was Dixon Bailey Reed): " that at the massacre at Fort Mims took place in 1813. My uncle, Dixon Bailey, commanded the white forces againse the band of Creeks commanded by Billy Weatherford. My grandmother Peggy Bailey, was out of the fort at the time, picking blackberries, and learning that the Indians were coming, she found 30 or 40 women across the River from the fort without protection. She swam the River, got a flat boat and took it across, and the women got upon it, and floated down to Mobile. For this act of heroism, she was given a large tract of land on the Alabama River in Monroe Co., called Bailey's Bluff. See the document regarding a claim to the land that Peggy Bailey received. See also her claim for losses suffered at the hands of the hostiles.

Born:
Married:
Died:
Parents:

Richard Robinson

LifeNotes:

Born:
Married:
Died:
Parents:

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


MARY "POLLY" BAILEY and WILLIAM ARTHUR SIZEMORE

Information on Mary's family from Eastern Creek Applications, National Archives, Washington, D. C. Alabama Census Reports, 1810-1910.

Mary "Polly" Bailey

LifeNotes: She was said to be an expert swimmer, and she sometimes acted as ferryman. They lived on the west side of the river and did not take refuge at Fort Mims, thereby survivinf the terrible massacre.

Born: between 1759-70, AL
Married:
Died: 1/23/1862, Baldwin Co., AL, buried there. See her will.
Parents: Richard Bailey and Mary

William Arthur Sizemore

LifeNotes: William Arthur Sizemore kept a ferry at Gainestown.

Listed as a Half Creek Indian applying for his Creek Indian Land Reservation in the Treaty of Fort Jackson 1814 Special Acts. Also he is listed in the American State Papers under Volume 9 page 860 making a Creek Indian Land Claim according to an Act of Congress passed March the 3rd 1817 between the United States and the Creek Nation, to certain Chiefs and warriors of that Nation and for other purposes. This was provided by the First Article of The Treaty of Fort Jackson, August 9 1814. According to the evidence of these papers, Arthur Sizemore was a Member of the Creek Nation of Indians before the Removal of the 1830s. to Oklahoma. He was a friendly Creek during the Creek Civil War of 1813-1814. He is not known to have joined the Red Sticks; this is why his family suffered much loss to the Hostile Indians during the Creek War with the American Government.

Born:
Married:
Died: about 1858, Monroe Co., AL. See the administration of his estate.
Parents:

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


THE EHLERTS / ELLIOTS
Michael Ehlert / Elliot and Peggy ?

Elizabeth Ehlert / Elliot and Dixon Moniac

MICHAEL EHLERT or ELLIOT and PEGGY ?

Husband: Michael Ehlert / Elliot

LifeNotes: According to Benjamin Hawkins, Michael Ehlert was a Dutchman. He was the trader for Mooklausa, an Upper Creek town, in 1797.

On 4/7/1798, by Act of Congress, certain portions of land then known as Georgia lands became Mississppi Territory; these lands are the present states of Alabama and Mississppi.

On the personal tax roll, Mississippi Territory, 1803, Michael Ehlert is listed as paying taxes on the following: 7 black slves, 7 horses / mares / mules, and 80 cattle. He was shown as living on Lauris?? Creek (document difficult to read).

Michael Ehlert paid tax on 7 slaves, 1807 Washington Co., Mississippi Territory.

Shown in 1809 as inhabitant of Washington Co., Mississippi Territory and signing petition to Congress asking for right of settlers on public lands to have right to purchase said lands before anyone else (that right had been limited since 3/1807). Also asked for free navigation of Mobile.

Shown 10/9/1811, among the inhabitants of Wayne Co., Missisppi Territory, asking for right of preemption.

Shown on 1812 Mississippi Territory tax rolls for Green Co., paying tax on 4 slaves. Probably also paid tax on 100 acres of land located at Chickasawhay which he had purchased.

A river pilot on the Alabama River and as an express with various detachments of the United States Troops. He was present at the Battle of the Holy Ground. He said that he had commenced an improvement on the land described in his claim and built a house on it in the year 1812. This land consisted of 640 acres more or less.

Michael Ehlert made a sworn statement in 1814 that he was a resident of the Creek Nation for many years amd subject to their laws; that he was a white man, and Indian country man with an Indian family; that he had a family of 5 children.; that he had occupied the land described as the SW quarter of Sec 20, Township 6, Range 6, NE quarter of Sec 30, NW quarter of Sec 29, SE quarter of Sec 19, all in township 6, Range 6, for one year prior to the war; that he was in service to the United States with the late Col. Benjamin Hawkins and that being inservice and in running the line under the Treaty of Fort Jackson, he had personally not re-occupied land but had irt occupied by his son Charles ever since; that he was actively friendly to the United States during the Creek War, serving as a pilot on the Alabama River and as an express with various detachments of the United States Troops and that he was present the Battle of Holy Ground -- these statements were made to justify his claim to certain land ceded by the Creek Indians by the Treaty of Fort Jackson.

Under the treaty of 8/9/1814 between the Creek Nation and the United States, all of the lands owned by the Creeks were ceded to the United States with certain allocations given to individuals. the land so given would remain with each friendly Indian and his descendants so long as they occupied it. Should they leave the land, it would revert back to the United States. This law was amended 3/3/1817 by Congress, stating that the lands given under the treaty of 8/9/1814 would belong to such chief or warrior as long as he occupied the land and cultivated it; further, if he continued to occupy the land at the time of his death, the land would descend to his heirs in fee simple, reserving to the widow use or occupation of one third part during her natural life.

Born: about 1770; Married: Died: 1827
Parents:

Wife: Peggy ?, Creek woman from the village of Muklasa

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died: 1812, Monroe Co., AL
Parents:

Their children were:

On 10/15/1821, a judgment against Charles Elliot and John E. Myles in behalf of Samuel Hale and William Chase for $100. 12 1/2. On 8/7/1817, Jesse C. Farrar, sheriff of Monroe County, AL, was authorized to seize and take the lands of Charles Elliot and John E. Myles to satusfy said damages. The land (all of Charles Elliot's holdings in part of a section of land originally garnted by an Act of Congress to Michael Ehlert now deceased of whom the said Charles Elliot is an heir and entitled to an equal share of the said section of land with his other brothers and sistersm viz the southeast quarter of section 19, the southwest quarter of Section 20, the northwest quarter of Section 29 and the northeast quarter of Section 30, Township 6, Range 6m with its appurtances, and all estate, right, title and interest which the said Charles Elliot had in the said tract of land or piece or parcel of land on the 15th day of October in the year of our Lord 1821) were sold at public auction for the sum of $150 and a deed was issued by Jesse C. Farrar to William Moon.

By 1832, Charles was shown living in Au-lauga Town in the census of Creek Indians -- this may be an Indian town that was in Autauga Co., AL.

Charles claimed land in what is today Macon County, but in 1837 he sold this land to Leonard Abercrombie and moved to Covington County, Alabama.

to Some Creek Families & Friends


ELIZABETH EHLERT or ELLIOT and DIXON MONIAC

Elizabeth "Betsy" Ehlert or Elliot

LifeNotes: They were part of the founding ancestors of the Poarch Band Creeks, in addition to the McGhee / Semoice family. Elizabeth was living as of 1846.

Elizabeth sold land she had inherited from her father on 2/24/1830, to Peter Doty; deed is recorded in Monroe Co., AL Courthouse in Monroeville.

Born: between 1795-1800
Married: ca 1812
Died:
Parents:

Dixon Moniac

LifeNotes: See his Moniac page.

Born:
Married:
Died: 1835
Parents: Samuel Takkes-Hadjo Moniac and Elizabeth Weatherford

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends