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MAD DOG'S LINE
Mad Dog and his wives

Mad Far off Warrior and Hannah Hale

MAD DOG aka EFUA HAUJO and his wives

Thanks to Chris Clark. Please contact Chris if you have information on the Mad Dog lines.

Mad Dog aka Fahiko aka Efua Haujo

LifeNotes: After Alexander McGillivray died in 1793, the mantle leadership of the Creek Nation mainly went to Mad Dog ("Fahiko") of Tuckabatche, who while friendly to the Americans, hated the Chickasaw Indians and waged a two year war against them in the early 19th century.

Louis Milfort, a French trader who had unsuccessfully sought the mantle of leadership won by Mad Dog, once called the chief "a thorough-going rascal". Mad Dog remained chief of the Upper Creeks until 1802, when because of his advanced age, gave up his role.

Born: about 1710, probably Coosada
Married:
Died: 1812, Tuckabatchee Village, AL
Parents:

One of his wives was Autucky aka Tuskenua later married Big Warrior aka George Cornells.

LifeNotes:

Born:
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to Some Creek Families & Friends


LITTLE PRINCE MAD- FAR- OFF-WARRIOR aka BIRD TAIL KING
and
HANNAH HALE

Little Prince Mad Far-Off-Warrior aka Bird Tail King

LifeNotes: See Chris Clark's piece on Far Off Warrior

Here is an excerpt form Chris's piece on Far Off Warrior:
In 1777, Hopoie Haujo, the Far Off Warrior of the Fish Ponds, and his father, Mad Dog of Tuckabatchee, led an attack on Fort Roger's which was on the Ogeechee River in present-day Taliaferro County, Georgia. This was apparently the vengeance taken for the death of the head warrior of the Tiger clan and nephew of Ishenpoaphe. In the ensuing attack on the fort, the indians captured a young girl named Hannah Hale, who was about 11 or 12 years old. She was taken to the Far Off Warrior's village known by trader's as the "Fish Ponds" and located on the Coosa River situated in present-day Coosa County, Alabama. Hannah Hale would later marry the Far Off Warrior, Hopoie Haujo, and by him have five children.

Born: about 1731, probably Okchai in AL
Married:
Died:
Parents:

Hannah Hale

LifeNotes: See her page. In the year 1777, when Hannah was 11 or 12 years old, she was abducted by the Creek Indians at a place called Roger's Fort on the Ogeechee River in present-day Taliaferro County, Georgia.

Chris Clark shares this with us:
In his book "Sketch of the Creek Country", Benjamin Hawkins writes this concerning Hannah Hale and the village Laloakalka, commonly called the Fish Ponds, where she lived: "Hannah Hale resides here. She was taken a prisoner from Georgia, when about eleven or twelve years old, and married the head man of this town, by whom she has five children. This woman spins and weaves, and has taught two of her daughters to spin; she has labored under many difficulties; yet by her industry has acquired some property. She has one negro boy, a horse or two, sixty cattle, and some hogs; she received the friendly attention of the agent for Indian affairs, as soon as he came in the nation. He furnished her with a wheel, loom, and cards; she has an orchard of peach and apple trees. Having made her election at the national council, in 1799, to reside in the nation, the agent appointed Hopoithle Haujo to look out for a suitable place for her, to help her to remove to it with her stock, and take care that she receives no insults from the Indians."

See the entire text of Chris Clark's piece, "Hannah Hale of Thlotlogalgua, or Laloakalka -- The FishPonds"

Born: 1765, in or near Taliaferro Co., GA.
Married: about 1777, Fish Pond village, Coosa Co., AL.
Died: about 1818, Autauga Town, Monroe Co., AL
Parents:

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


THE FRANCISES
David Francis and Choctaw Daughter of Sehoy I

Josiah Francis aka Hillis Hadja and Hannah Moniac

DAVID FRANCIS and DAUGHTER of SEHOY I

David Francis

LifeNotes: He was a white trader and silevrsmith who lived at Autauga Town, making silver ornaments for the Creeks. David signed the 1790 Treaty of New York as "Mumageechee of the Oaksoys".

Born: Married: Died:
Parents:

Choctaw woman

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents: Sehoy I and Red Shoes, Choctaw Chief

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


JOSIAH FRANCIS and HANNAH MONIAC

Josiah Francis the Prophet or Hillis Hadjo

LifeNotes: Mixed blood. Half-brother of Sam Moniac. Cousin of Tecumseh, the Shawnee chief. Was part of Fort Mims raiding party. Was a Redstick leader during the uprisings of 1812-1814. Josiah was known to the Americans as the Creek "Prophet", a title apparently plaglarized form the Shawnee prophet, Seekaboo, brother of Tecumseh.

Josiah joined Peter McQueen and other Redstick leaders in fleeing from the Creek country following the defeat at Horseshoe Bend, and in 1816 visited England, where he was commissioned a brigadier

His family was among the two hundred Seminoles who surrendered to Jackson at Fort Gadsden in August, 1818. Miles Weekly Register, reporting on the surrender of the Seminoles in its December 12,1818, issue, noted that "the wife and family of the Prophet are among the prisoners; two of his daughters are very interesting young ladies ... the youngest and most beautiful is caressed by all the officers for having saved the life of a Georgia militia man" (see below).

Born: about 1770
Married:
Died: April 1818, hung by General Andrew Jackson for his friendship to the Spanish of Florida and for allegedly being an instigator of the so-called Seminole War
Parents: David Francis

Hannah Moniac

LifeNotes:

Born: Married: Died:
Parents: Sehoy III of the Wind Clan and William Dixon Moniac

Their children were:

to Some Creek Families & Friends


JIM BOY aka TUSTENUGGEE EMATHLA aka HIGH HEAD JIM and ??

Note: Some believe that Ward Coochman is also JimBoy. For now, I am giving the Coochmans separate pages.

Jim Boy

Was full-blood Creek.

See the bio in "Indian Chiefs" on this site.

Saved the lives of Vicey Cornells McGirth, wife of Zachariah McGirth, a settler, and 6 of her 7 children at the Fort Mims massacre.

Led Creek detachment with General Thomas Jesup against the Seminoles in 1836, he was described as "a fine looking savage, and has a certain air of importance and bearing that marks him as a `great chief' "

Jim Boy removed west in 1837 with his two wives (one thought to be a daughter of Alexander McGillivray) and his twelve children; four of the children died enroute in a steamboat accident.

JimBoy is shown at left as painted by Charles Bird King in 1826 in Washington.

Born: about 1793
Married:
Died: about 1851 Wetumpka, IT
Parents:

Nihethoye

LifeNotes:

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Wife:

LifeNotes:

Born:
Married:
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to Some Creek Families & Friends