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Arsaces II, King of K'art'li1

d. 0001 CE
Arsaces II, King of K'art'li|d. 0001 CE|p266.htm#i24683||||Princess of Armenia|b. 0090 B.C.|p51.htm#i6016|||||||Tigranes I. M., King of Armenia|b. 0140 B.C., circa\nd. 0055 B.C., circa|p267.htm#i6017|Cleopatra Arshâmid|b. 0110 B.C.|p51.htm#i6018|
MotherPrincess of Armenia1 b. 0090 B.C.
     Arsaces II, King of K'art'li died 0001 CE. He was struck the breast with an arrow which killed him, by his mother's son.1 9th King of Kartli at Transcaucasia 0020 BCE - 0001 AD.1 He was the son of Princess of Armenia.1 Also called Arsaces.1 Arsaces II, King of K'art'li was an Arsacid on his mother's side, and on his father's side a descendant of Nebrot' and P'arnavaz.2 Also called Arbak.1 Also called King Arsaces II of Kartli.1 Also called Arshak II.1 Also called Artaxias.1

Citations

  1. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Ch. 4.
  2. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 47.

Lucius Agrippa1

b. 0017 B.C., d. 0002 AD
Lucius Agrippa|b. 0017 B.C.\nd. 0002 AD|p266.htm#i17830|Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa|b. 0065 B.C.\nd. 0012 B.C.|p266.htm#i10388|Julia Major|b. 0039 B.C.\nd. 768|p303.htm#i10389|||||||Gaïus Octavius|b. 0063 B.C., September 23\nd. 0014 AD, August 19|p266.htm#i10335|Scribonia||p80.htm#i10376|
FatherConsul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa1,2 b. 0065 B.C., d. 0012 B.C.
MotherJulia Major1,2 b. 0039 B.C., d. 768
     Lucius Agrippa died 0002 AD at Massilia. He died of an illness.1,3 He was adopted 0017 B.C; He was adopted by his grandfather, the Emperor Augustus, to be one of his heirs.3,2 He was born 0017 B.C..1,2 He was the son of Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia Major.1,2 As of 0017 B.C., also called Lucius Caesar Aggripanus.

Citations

  1. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  2. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 25.
  3. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm

Phraates IV, King of Parthia1

b. 0072 B.C., d. 0002 B.C.
Phraates IV, King of Parthia|b. 0072 B.C.\nd. 0002 B.C.|p266.htm#i6246|Orodes II, King of Parthia|b. 0096 B.C.\nd. 0038 B.C.|p267.htm#i6256|Princess of Commagene||p53.htm#i6257|Phraates I., King of Parthia|b. 0120 B.C.\nd. 0057 BCE, circa|p267.htm#i6254||||Antiochus I. T. D. E. P. P., King of Commagene|b. 0100? BCE\nd. 0031 B.C.|p266.htm#i6258|Isias P., Princess of Commagene|b. 0100 B.C.|p53.htm#i6259|
FatherOrodes II, King of Parthia b. 0096 B.C., d. 0038 B.C.
MotherPrincess of Commagene
     Phraates IV, King of Parthia died 0002 B.C.. He was poisoned by Musa, his Italian concubine, who then ruled jointly with their son Phraates V.2 He was a witness where Phraataces, King of Parthia murdered his father to take the Parthian throne 0002 B.C.3 Phraates IV, King of Parthia sent his sons and grandson to Rome, a gesture that must be understood as one of confidence in a "friendly" power but also as a guarantee that his throne would pass to his son by Musa, an Italian slave girl given him by Augustus 0009 B.C..3 He was given Musa, and Italian, as a wife by Octavious Augustus of Rome 0018 B.C.. He concluded a peace with the Romans under Octavious Augustus which included the release of roman prisoners and the return of the captured insignia 0020 B.C..3 Great King of Parthia 0025-0002 B.C..4,5 He was troubled by a roman supported pretender to the Parthian throne, Tiridates II, 0028-0027 B.C..3 He was driven into exile among the Scythians by Tiridates II 0032 B.C..5 He was again defeated Marc Antony who now abandoned his plans for the Parthians 0034 B.C..3 He was able to defeat Marc Antony's push into Parthia from Media with his cavalry 0036 B.C..3 He assassinated his father, Orodes II, and killed off his brothers, and his own eldest son as well, to secure the Parthian throne 0038 B.C..3 He witnessed the death of Orodes II, King of Parthia 0038 B.C; He was assassinated by his son, Phraates IV.3,6 Great King of Parthia 0038-0032 B.C..5,7 Phraates IV, King of Parthia was born 0072 B.C.. He was the son of Orodes II, King of Parthia and Princess of Commagene.

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Children

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 417-69.
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Phraates IV.
  3. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  4. [S285] Parthia.com, online http://www.fivepointstech.com/parthia/
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Tiridates II (k. of Parthia) .
  6. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Iran, History of.
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Phraates IV (k. of Parthia) .
  8. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews-Book XVIII, Chap. 2, para. 4.
  9. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-68.
  10. [S1371] Lost Langages, online http://www.lostlanguages.com/, parthian.htm.

Gaïus Agrippa

b. 0020 B.C., d. 0004 AD
Gaïus Agrippa|b. 0020 B.C.\nd. 0004 AD|p266.htm#i17829|Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa|b. 0065 B.C.\nd. 0012 B.C.|p266.htm#i10388|Julia Major|b. 0039 B.C.\nd. 768|p303.htm#i10389|||||||Gaïus Octavius|b. 0063 B.C., September 23\nd. 0014 AD, August 19|p266.htm#i10335|Scribonia||p80.htm#i10376|
FatherConsul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa1 b. 0065 B.C., d. 0012 B.C.
MotherJulia Major1 b. 0039 B.C., d. 768
     Gaïus Agrippa was granted proconsular powers for a mission to Armenia, which had been invaded by the Parthians 0001 B.C..2 He was established a pro-Roman king on the Armenian throne but was seriously wounded while attempting to suppress an uprising in the area 0002 AD.2 He died 0004 AD at February 21, Lycia. He eventually died of his wounds on his way back to Italy.2 He was adopted 0017 B.C; He was adopted by his grandfather, the Emperor Augustus, as a possible heir.3,2 As of 0017 B.C., also called Gaïus Caesar Aggripanus. He was the son of Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia Major.1 Gaïus Agrippa was born 0020 B.C..2,1 He was grandson of the Roman emperor Augustus, and would probably, had he survived Augustus, have succeeded to the imperial throne.2 He was the eldest son of Augustus' closest associate, Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, and Julia, the emperor's daughter.2

Citations

  1. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 25.
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Caesar, Gaius.
  3. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm

Antipater III of Judaea1

b. 0045 B.C., d. 0004 B.C.
Antipater III of Judaea|b. 0045 B.C.\nd. 0004 B.C.|p266.htm#i21297|Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea|b. 0073 B.C.\nd. 0004 B.C., March/April|p266.htm#i21276||||Antipater I., procurator of Judaea|d. 0043 B.C.|p267.htm#i21278|Cypros of Petra||p191.htm#i21279|||||||
FatherHerod I "the Great", King of Judaea1 b. 0073 B.C., d. 0004 B.C., March/April
     Antipater III of Judaea died 0004 B.C.. He was executed by his father who by now was quite mad.1,2,3 He was a witness where Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea killed his firstborn son, Antipater III, in his last years 0006-0004 B.C.3 Antipater III of Judaea married a daughter of Antigonus II 0020 B.C. At circa.2 He was the son of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea.1 Antipater III of Judaea was born 0045 B.C. At circa. He was the oldest son of Herod the Great, born to Doris.3

Citations

  1. [S909] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  2. [S914] Unknown author, WW - Bible, chart, pg. 145.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.

Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea

b. 0073 B.C., d. 0004 B.C., March/April
Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea|b. 0073 B.C.\nd. 0004 B.C., March/April|p266.htm#i21276|Antipater II, procurator of Judaea|d. 0043 B.C.|p267.htm#i21278|Cypros of Petra||p191.htm#i21279|Antipas of Idumaea||p191.htm#i21325||||||||||
FatherAntipater II, procurator of Judaea1 d. 0043 B.C.
MotherCypros of Petra1
     Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was the predecessor of ethnarchês of Judaea Herod Archelaus of Judaea; ethnarchês of Judaea.2 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was the predecessor of Herod Philp I, tetrarchês of the northern territories; tetrarchês of the northern territories.3 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was the predecessor of Herod Antipas, tetrarchês of Galilee and Peraea; tetrarchês of Galilee and Peraea.4,3,5 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea died 0004 B.C., March/April at Jericho, Palestine. After a troubled reign of thirty-seven years, he died at Jericho amid great agonies both of body and mind, B.C. 4, i.e., according to the common chronology, in the year in which Jesus was born.6,4,1,7 He left a will 0004 B.C; After his death his kingdom was divided among three of his sons. He'd altered his will three times, and killed his firstborn son.4,6 He was a witness where Herod Philp I, tetrarchês of the northern territories had the land east of Jordan, between Caesarea Philippi and Bethabara, in the division of his father's realm following his death 0004 B.C. At Palestine.4 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was a witness where Herod Antipas, tetrarchês of Galilee and Peraea had Galilee and Peraea in the division of his father's realm following his death 0004 B.C. At Palestine.4 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea witnessed the death of Antipater III of Judaea 0004 B.C; He was executed by his father who by now was quite mad.8,9,6 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea killed his firstborn son, Antipater III, in his last years 0006-0004 B.C..6 He witnessed the death of Alexander of Judaea 0007 B.C; He was executed by his father.10,8,11 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea executed the two sons he had by the Hasmonean Princess, Mariamne, 0007 B.C..10,6 He witnessed the death of Aristobulus IV of Judaea 0007 B.C; He was executed by his father.8,10 Suffered from arteriosclerosis in his last years, and was in great pain and in mental and physical disorder 0007-0004 B.C.6 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea started the restoration of the ruined temple of Jerusalem 0020 B.C. At Palestine.4 He witnessed the death of Alexandra the Hasmonean 0028 B.C; She was executed by her son-in-law, Herod.8,6 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea witnessed the death of Mariamne the Hasmonean 0029 B.C; She was put to death for adultery at the instigation of Herod's sister Salome, and Mariamne's mother, Alexandra.9,10 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea witnessed the death of John Hyrcanus II, High Priest of Judaea 0030 B.C. At Jerusalem, Judaea; He was executed by Herod the Great, the husband of his granddaughter, Mariamne.6,8,12 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea saw executed, through the instigation of his sister, Salome, and his mother-in-law, Alexandra, his wife Mariamne's grandfather, Alexandra's father and the Hasmonean High Priest, Alexandra's own daughter Mariamne, and then Alexandra herself 0030-0028 B.C..6 He witnessed the death of Aristobulus the Hasmonean 0035 BCE; He was murdered by his brother-in-law, Herod the Great.13 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was nominated as King of Judaea by the Roman senate and equipped with an army to make good his claim 0037 B.C..6 He married Mariamne the Hasmonean, daughter of Alexander II the Hasmonean and Alexandra the Hasmonean, 0037 B.C; His 2nd.10,6,13 King of Judaea at Palestine 0037-0004 B.C..14,1,6 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was given Judaea by Mark Antony 0038 B.C..15 He divorced his first wife, Doris, sent her and his son away from court 0038 B.C. At circa.6 Basileus of Palestine 0038-0004 B.C..16 He was a witness where triumvir Marcus Antonius appointed Herod the Great as tetrarch of Judaea 0040 B.C. At Palestine.6 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea fled to Rome after the Parthians invaded Palestine and civil war broke out 0040 B.C..6 He was appointed tetrarch of Judaea by Mark Antony, and also king of Judaea by the Roman senate. 0041 B.C..4,6 A contract for the marriage of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea and Mariamne the Hasmonean was signed 0042 B.C.. Betrothal.13 Tetrachês of Galilee & Perea at Palestine 0043-0040 B.C..3 Stratêgos of Coele-Syria 0046-0043 B.C..17 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was made tetrach of Galilee when his father was given Judea to rule 0047 B.C. At Palestine.4 Governor of Galilee at Palestine 0047 B.C..8 He was the successor of Antipater II, procurator of Judaea; King of Judaea.1,4 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea met Mark Antony and became a lifelong friend 0056 B.C..6 He was the son of Antipater II, procurator of Judaea and Cypros of Petra.1 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was born 0073 B.C. At southern Palestine.6,7 He was the father of Alexander of Judaea; the son of Herod the king.11 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was the grandfather of Tigranes V, basileus of Greater Armenia; the oldest of two sons of Herod's second Hasmonean son Alexander.7,18 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea married Mariamne, a Hasmonean princess, and although the union was directed at ending his feud with the Hasmoneans, a priestly family of Jewish leaders, he was deeply in love with Mariamne.6 He was the son of Antipater, an Idumaean, and Cypros, an Arabian of noble descent.4,9 Also called King Herod of Judaea. He had Sextus, Mark Antony, and then Augustus & Livia as patrons.7 He was described as having a stern and cruel disposition, "... brutish and a stranger to all humanity".4 He rebuilt the city of Caesarea (q.v.) on the coast, and also the city of Samaria (q.v.), which he called Sebaste, in honour of Augustus at Palestine.4 He was fond of splendour, and lavished great sums in rebuilding and adorning the cities of his empire at Palestine.4 He was a practicing Jew, but of Arab origin on both sides.6 He was related to ethnarchês of Judaea Herod Archelaus of Judaea; the son and principal heir of Herod I the Great.19 Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was the father of Antipater III of Judaea; the oldest son of Herod the Great, born to Doris.6

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Children

Family 3

Mariamne the Hasmonean b. 0057 B.C., d. 0029 B.C.
Children

Family 4

Child

Citations

  1. [S912] Holdt Family Roots, online http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/tree/…+Lalou.htm.
  2. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, Ethnarchês: literally "a ruler of a people," it was a term for a ruler with less status and power than a client-king.
  3. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, Tetrachês: a regional ruler with less power and status than a client-king or ethnarch .
  4. [S904] Matthew George Easton (1823-1894), Easton's.
  5. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, AJ:XVIII:5:4.
  6. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.
  7. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html
  8. [S909] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  9. [S914] Unknown author, WW - Bible, chart, pg. 145.
  10. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Mariamne.
  11. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Book II, Chapter 7.
  12. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, John Hyrcanus II (k. of Judaea) .
  13. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Extracts with Commentary.
  14. [S275] ., KJV, Matt. 2:1-22; Luke 1:5; Acts 23:35.
  15. [S917] Antony and Cleopatra, online http://www.rhul.ac.uk/scolar/cl2361/lectures/1.html
  16. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, Basileus: a client-king.
  17. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, Stratêgos: originally it referred to a general, but came to be used for a governor.
  18. [S916] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  19. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod Archelaus.
  20. [S904] Matthew George Easton (1823-1894), Easton's, #23290.
  21. [S1296] Anne Elizabeth Redgate, TPoE: Armenians, fig 4.1.
  22. [S585] Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VII, under Herod.

Pharorus, tetrarchês of Perea1,2

d. 0005 B.C.
Pharorus, tetrarchês of Perea|d. 0005 B.C.|p266.htm#i21293|Antipater II, procurator of Judaea|d. 0043 B.C.|p267.htm#i21278|Cypros of Petra||p191.htm#i21279|Antipas of Idumaea||p191.htm#i21325||||||||||
FatherAntipater II, procurator of Judaea1 d. 0043 B.C.
MotherCypros of Petra1
     Pharorus, tetrarchês of Perea died 0005 B.C.. He was poisoned.1,3,4 Tetrarchês of Perea at Palestine 0020-0005 B.C..5 He was the son of Antipater II, procurator of Judaea and Cypros of Petra.1 Pharorus, tetrarchês of Perea had his brother Herod and Augustus as patrons.2 He was son of Antipater.3

Citations

  1. [S909] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  2. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html
  3. [S914] Unknown author, WW - Bible, chart, pg. 145.
  4. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, says "illness".
  5. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, Tetrachês: a regional ruler with less power and status than a client-king or ethnarch .

Cleopatra Selene1

b. 0040 B.C., d. 0005 B.C., circa
Cleopatra Selene|b. 0040 B.C.\nd. 0005 B.C., circa|p266.htm#i21364|triumvir Marcus Antonius|b. 0082-0081 B.C.\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i10336|Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt|b. 0070-0069 B.C.\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i10380|praetor Marcus Antonius Creticus||p279.htm#i10347|Julia||p80.htm#i10349|Ptolemy X. N. D., King of Egypt|b. 0117 B.C., late\nd. 0051 B.C., February/March|p267.htm#i10397|Cleopatra V. T., Queen of Egypt|d. 0057 B.C.|p267.htm#i10398|
Fathertriumvir Marcus Antonius1 b. 0082-0081 B.C., d. 0030 B.C.
MotherCleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt1 b. 0070-0069 B.C., d. 0030 B.C.
     Cleopatra Selene died 0005 B.C., circa.2 She married Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania, son of Juba I, King of Numidia, 0020 B.C; His 1st.3,4,2 Cleopatra Selene was placed under the guardianship of Octavia, sister of Augustus, after the annexation of Egypt 0030 B.C..2 She was declared queen of Cyrene at the Donations of Alexandria 0034 B.C., Autumn at Alexandria, Egypt.2 She was the daughter of triumvir Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt.1 Cleopatra Selene was born 0040 B.C. At Alexandria, Egypt.1 She was the daughter of Mark Antony and Cleopatra.4

Family

Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania b. 0050 B.C., d. 0024 AD
Child

Citations

  1. [S917] Antony and Cleopatra, online http://www.rhul.ac.uk/scolar/cl2361/lectures/1.html
  2. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Juba II.
  4. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, North Africa, History of.

Ariobarzanes, King of Armenia1

d. 0006 AD
Ariobarzanes, King of Armenia|d. 0006 AD|p266.htm#i22979|Artavasdes I, King of Media Atropatene|b. 0075? BCE\nd. 0020 BCE|p266.htm#i6248|Princess of Commagene|b. 0074 B.C.|p53.htm#i6249|Ariobarzanes I. P., King of Media Atropatene|b. 0095? BCE\nd. 0065/0056 BCE|p267.htm#i6250|Princess o. C.|b. 0099? BCE|p219.htm#i24759|Antiochus I. T. D. E. P. P., King of Commagene|b. 0100? BCE\nd. 0031 B.C.|p266.htm#i6258|Isias P., Princess of Commagene|b. 0100 B.C.|p53.htm#i6259|
FatherArtavasdes I, King of Media Atropatene1 b. 0075? BCE, d. 0020 BCE
MotherPrincess of Commagene1 b. 0074 B.C.
     King of Armenia 0002-0004 AD.1 Ariobarzanes, King of Armenia died 0006 AD. He was murdered.1 He was the son of Artavasdes I, King of Media Atropatene and Princess of Commagene.1

Citations

  1. [S1038] e-mail address Ian, Re: Armenian kings
    in "Re: Armenian kings," newsgroup message 22 Feb 2001.

Alexander of Judaea1

b. 0030 B.C., d. 0007 B.C.
Alexander of Judaea|b. 0030 B.C.\nd. 0007 B.C.|p266.htm#i21274|Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea|b. 0073 B.C.\nd. 0004 B.C., March/April|p266.htm#i21276|Mariamne the Hasmonean|b. 0057 B.C.\nd. 0029 B.C.|p266.htm#i21277|Antipater I., procurator of Judaea|d. 0043 B.C.|p267.htm#i21278|Cypros of Petra||p191.htm#i21279|Alexander I. the Hasmonean|d. 0049 B.C.|p267.htm#i21329|Alexandra the Hasmonean|b. 0101 B.C.\nd. 0028 B.C.|p266.htm#i21330|
FatherHerod I "the Great", King of Judaea2,3 b. 0073 B.C., d. 0004 B.C., March/April
MotherMariamne the Hasmonean2 b. 0057 B.C., d. 0029 B.C.
     Alexander of Judaea died 0007 B.C.. He was executed by his father.4,5,6 He was a witness where Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea executed the two sons he had by the Hasmonean Princess, Mariamne, 0007 B.C.4,7 Alexander of Judaea was the son of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea and Mariamne the Hasmonean.2,3 Alexander of Judaea was born 0030 B.C..5 He had two sons by Glaphyra.8 He was the son of Herod the king.6 He married the daughter of the king of Cappadocia and had two children; his grandson and great-grandson became kings of other lands.9 He had two sons, Alexander and Tigranes, by the daughter of Archelaus, king of Cappadocia.10 He was the father of Tigranes V, basileus of Greater Armenia; the oldest of two sons of Herod's second Hasmonean son Alexander.11,12 Alexander of Judaea married Glaphyra Archelaid, daughter of Archelaus IV Sisines, King of Cappadocia and Unknown an Armenian?; Her 1st.2

Family

Glaphyra Archelaid
Child

Citations

  1. [S912] Holdt Family Roots, online http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/tree/…+Lalou.htm.
  2. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, AJ:XVIII:5:4.
  3. [S1296] Anne Elizabeth Redgate, TPoE: Armenians, fig 4.1.
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Mariamne.
  5. [S909] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  6. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Book II, Chapter 7.
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.
  8. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews-Book XVII, Chapter 1, 2.
  9. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Extracts with Commentary.
  10. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews-Book XVIII, Chapter 5, 4.
  11. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html
  12. [S916] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html

Aristobulus IV of Judaea1

b. 0031 B.C., d. 0007 B.C.
Aristobulus IV of Judaea|b. 0031 B.C.\nd. 0007 B.C.|p266.htm#i21285|Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea|b. 0073 B.C.\nd. 0004 B.C., March/April|p266.htm#i21276|Mariamne the Hasmonean|b. 0057 B.C.\nd. 0029 B.C.|p266.htm#i21277|Antipater I., procurator of Judaea|d. 0043 B.C.|p267.htm#i21278|Cypros of Petra||p191.htm#i21279|Alexander I. the Hasmonean|d. 0049 B.C.|p267.htm#i21329|Alexandra the Hasmonean|b. 0101 B.C.\nd. 0028 B.C.|p266.htm#i21330|
FatherHerod I "the Great", King of Judaea1,2,3 b. 0073 B.C., d. 0004 B.C., March/April
MotherMariamne the Hasmonean1,3 b. 0057 B.C., d. 0029 B.C.
     Aristobulus IV of Judaea was a witness where Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea executed the two sons he had by the Hasmonean Princess, Mariamne, 0007 B.C.4,5 Aristobulus IV of Judaea died 0007 B.C.. He was executed by his father.1,4 He was born 0031 B.C..1 He was the son of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea and Mariamne the Hasmonean.1,2,3 Aristobulus IV of Judaea married a cousin, Bernice, the daughter of Herod’s sister Salome, and had five children and at least three grandchildren.6 He had three sons by Bernice, Salome’s daughter, and two daughters.7 He was a Roman mentioned in Paul's Epistle to the Romans (16:10), whose "household" is saluated.8 Also called Aristobulus the Roman.8

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S909] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  2. [S1296] Anne Elizabeth Redgate, TPoE: Armenians, fig 4.1.
  3. [S585] Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VII, under Herod.
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Mariamne.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.
  6. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Extracts with Commentary.
  7. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews-Book XVII, Chapter 1, 2.
  8. [S904] Matthew George Easton (1823-1894), Easton's.
  9. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, AJ:XVIII:5:4.

Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conchobar Abratruad mac Find Filed Uí Éremóin1

d. 0008 B.C.
Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conchobar Abratruad mac Find Filed Uí Éremóin|d. 0008 B.C.|p266.htm#i13760|King of Leinster Find mac mac Rosa Rúaid Uí Éremóin||p115.htm#i13761||||Ros R. m. F. F. Uí Éremóin||p115.htm#i13762||||||||||
FatherKing of Leinster Find mac mac Rosa Rúaid Uí Éremóin2,3
     Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conchobar Abratruad mac Find Filed Uí Éremóin ruled a single year over Ireland 0008 B.C..2 99th Monarch of Ireland 0008 B.C..2 He died 0008 B.C.. Killed by his successor, Crimhthann, son of Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg.2 He was the son of King of Leinster Find mac mac Rosa Rúaid Uí Éremóin.2,3 Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conchobar Abratruad mac Find Filed Uí Éremóin was the son of Feargus Fairge per O'Hart.4 He was the son of Finn File, son of Rossa Ruadh, son of Fearghus Fairrghe, per the Annals of Munster.2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Láegaire Lorc, 88.
  2. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M5192.1.
  3. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, 21.
  4. [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #42, pg. 785.

Marcus Antonius Polemo I Philopator, roi en Cilicie1

d. 0008 B.C.
Marcus Antonius Polemo I Philopator, roi en Cilicie|d. 0008 B.C.|p266.htm#i21357|Polemon I Eusebes Soter, King of Cilicia Trachae|b. 0060 B.C.\nd. 0009-0008 B.C.|p266.htm#i30294||||Zenon of Laodikeia|b. 0090 B.C.\nd. 0040-0036 B.C.|p267.htm#i30295||||||||||
FatherPolemon I Eusebes Soter, King of Cilicia Trachae1 b. 0060 B.C., d. 0009-0008 B.C.
     Marcus Antonius Polemo I Philopator, roi en Cilicie died 0008 B.C..2 He was given Pontus by Mark Antony 0038 B.C..3 King of Pontus 0038-0008 B.C..2 He was the son of Polemon I Eusebes Soter, King of Cilicia Trachae.1 Also called Polemo I, King of Pontus.4

Citations

  1. [S1650] Christian Settipani, Settipani-Continuite Addenda, I, pg. 55.
  2. [S918] Pontus Proconsularis, online http://pages.ancientsites.com/~QuintusCinna_Cocceius/Rome/…..
  3. [S917] Antony and Cleopatra, online http://www.rhul.ac.uk/scolar/cl2361/lectures/1.html
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Archelaus.

Dynamis, Queen of the Cimmerian Bosporus1

b. 0062 BCE, d. 0008 CE
Dynamis, Queen of the Cimmerian Bosporus|b. 0062 BCE\nd. 0008 CE|p266.htm#i25473|||||||||||||||||||
     Queen of the Bosporanian Realm 0013 B.C. -0008 A.D..1 Dynamis, Queen of the Cimmerian Bosporus married Asander, King of Bosporus; Her 1st. Dynamis, Queen of the Cimmerian Bosporus was born 0062 BCE.1 She died 0008 CE.1 She was a grandchild of King Mithridatis of Persia, she inherited the country from her father.1

Family

Asander, King of Bosporus d. 0016 B.C.

Crimthann Nia Náire mac Lugaid, Ard-rí na h'Éireann1,2

d. 0009 AD
Crimthann Nia Náire mac Lugaid, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 0009 AD|p266.htm#i11654|Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg mac Breas, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 0009 B.C.|p266.htm#i11655|Clothra ingen Echach Uí Éremóin||p117.htm#i13905|Bress-Nar-Lothar m. E. Uí Éremóin||p279.htm#i11656|Clothra i. E. Uí Éremóin||p117.htm#i13905|Eochaid F. m. F., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 0130 B.C.|p269.htm#i11657||||
FatherLughaidh Sriabh nDearg mac Breas, Ard-rí na h'Éireann3,4 d. 0009 B.C.
MotherClothra ingen Echach Uí Éremóin5
     Crimthann Nia Náire mac Lugaid, Ard-rí na h'Éireann ruled his eigth year over Ireland during the first year of the age of Christ 0001 AD at age of the world 5200.6 He ruled his first year over Ireland 0007 B.C..3 100th Monarch of Ireland 0007 B.C..3 He witnessed the death of Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conchobar Abratruad mac Find Filed Uí Éremóin 0008 B.C; Killed by his successor, Crimhthann, son of Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg.7 Crimthann Nia Náire mac Lugaid, Ard-rí na h'Éireann died 0009 AD at Dun Crimhthainn, Edair, Ireland. In his sixteenth year in the sovereignty of Ireland, he died after returning from the famous expedition upon which he had gone.8 He was the son of Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg mac Breas, Ard-rí na h'Éireann and Clothra ingen Echach Uí Éremóin.3,4,5 Crimthann Nia Náire mac Lugaid, Ard-rí na h'Éireann undertook an expedition from which he returned with him the wonderful jewels, among which were a golden chariot, and a golden chess board, inlaid with a hundred transparent gems, and the Cedach Crimhthainn, which was a beautiful cloak, embroidered with gold. He brought a conquering sword, with many serpents of refined messy gold inlaid in it; a shield, with bosses of bright silver; a spear, from the wound inflicted by which no one recovered; a sling, from which no erring shot was discharged; and two greyhounds, with a silver chain between them, which chain was worth three hundred cumhals; with many other precious articles.8 "Nicknamed Niadh-Nar, as being ashamed of his incestuous birth, which the word Niah-Nar signifies to verify the truth of those unnatural births." Also called Crimthann Niadh-Nar.9 Also called Crimthann Niadh Nar.10 He was Crimhthann Niadhnair, son of Lughaidh.3 He married Naira of the Picts, daughter of Loich of the Picts.11

Family

Naira of the Picts
Child

Citations

  1. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Heremon, 87.
  2. [S291] Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm
  3. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M5193.1.
  4. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, ¶954].
  5. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Heremon, 84.
  6. [S636] Ireland: History in Maps, online http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/kilkenny/2/iremaps.htm
  7. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M5192.1.
  8. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M9.1.
  9. [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #43, pg. 785.
  10. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  11. [S299] Genealogy of Family O'Neill, online http://www.cgocable.net/~aoneill/

Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus

b. 0038 B.C., Fall, d. 0009 B.C.
Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus|b. 0038 B.C., Fall\nd. 0009 B.C.|p266.htm#i10328|Tiberius Claudius Nero||p80.htm#i10361|Livia Drusilla|b. 0058 B.C., January 30\nd. 0029 AD|p266.htm#i10362|Appius Claudius Nero||p80.htm#i10386||||Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus||p80.htm#i10400|Alfidia||p80.htm#i10404|
FatherTiberius Claudius Nero1
MotherLivia Drusilla1 b. 0058 B.C., January 30, d. 0029 AD
     Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus died 0009 B.C. At Germany. Killed in a fall from a horse.2,3 He died 0009 B.C.. Died of an illness.4 He married Antonia Minor, daughter of triumvir Marcus Antonius and Octavia Minor, 0016 B.C.5,1,6 Quaestor, 0018 B.C..3 Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus was permitted to stand for magistracies five years before the legal ages 0019 B.C..3 He was brought up by Octavian after his father's death 0033 B.C..3 He was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla.1 Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus was born 0038 B.C., Fall.7 He was the father of Emperor Claudius I of the Romans; the son of Nero Claudius Drusus, a popular and successful Roman general, and the younger Antonia, he was the nephew of the emperor Tiberius and a grandson of Livia Drusilla, the wife of the emperor Augustus.8 Also called Drusus "the Elder".1 Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus was the son of Livia.5

Family

Antonia Minor b. 0036 B.C.
Children

Citations

  1. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 26.
  2. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  3. [S680] Simon Hornblower and Tony Spawforth, Who's Who (Classical World), pg. 134.
  4. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  5. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.
  6. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Livia Drusilla.
  8. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Claudius.

Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg mac Breas, Ard-rí na h'Éireann1

d. 0009 B.C.
Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg mac Breas, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 0009 B.C.|p266.htm#i11655|Bress-Nar-Lothar mac Echach Uí Éremóin||p279.htm#i11656|Clothra ingen Echach Uí Éremóin||p117.htm#i13905|Eochaid F. m. F., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 0130 B.C.|p269.htm#i11657||||Eochaid F. m. F., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 0130 B.C.|p269.htm#i11657||||
FatherBress-Nar-Lothar mac Echach Uí Éremóin2,1
MotherClothra ingen Echach Uí Éremóin2
     Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg mac Breas, Ard-rí na h'Éireann died 0009 B.C.. After having been twenty six years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he died of grief. Some say he killed himself by falling upon his own sword.3,4 98th Monarch of Ireland 0034 B.C..5 He ruled his first year over Ireland 0034 B.C..5 He was born. "His (Eochaid's) other daughter was named Clotherne, who was debauched by her own brothers, who in a drunken fit lay with her, all three, the product of which union was a son named Lugaidh, who had (a strange thing to be told) a red circle about his neck and another about his middle. To distinguish each brother's proportion of him, the head and face resembling Bress; the middle part between the two circles, Nar; and thence downward resembling the third brother, Lothar. For which he has the nickname of Sriabh ndearg, i.e., red circled."3 He was the son of Bress-Nar-Lothar mac Echach Uí Éremóin and Clothra ingen Echach Uí Éremóin.2,1 Also called Lewy "of the Red Circles". Also called Lugaid Reóderg mac Bres Nar Lothar.6 Also called Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg.7 Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg mac Breas, Ard-rí na h'Éireann associated with Clothra ingen Echach Uí Éremóin, daughter of Eochaid Feidlech mac Finn, Ard-rí na h'Éireann; Mother-son.8,6

Family

Clothra ingen Echach Uí Éremóin
Child

Citations

  1. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  2. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Heremon, 85.
  3. [S291] Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm
  4. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M5191.1.
  5. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M5166.1.
  6. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Heremon, 86.
  7. [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #41, pg. 785.
  8. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Heremon, 84.
  9. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M5193.1.
  10. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, ¶954].

Polemon I Eusebes Soter, King of Cilicia Trachae1

b. 0060 B.C., d. 0009-0008 B.C.
Polemon I Eusebes Soter, King of Cilicia Trachae|b. 0060 B.C.\nd. 0009-0008 B.C.|p266.htm#i30294|Zenon of Laodikeia|b. 0090 B.C.\nd. 0040-0036 B.C.|p267.htm#i30295||||||||||||||||
FatherZenon of Laodikeia2,1 b. 0090 B.C., d. 0040-0036 B.C.
     Polemon I Eusebes Soter, King of Cilicia Trachae died 0009-0008 B.C..2 King of Cilicia Trachae 0025-0020 B.C..1 He was born 0060 B.C..2 He was the son of Zenon of Laodikeia.2,1 Also called Marcus Antonius Polemo I Eusébès, roi de Pont.2 King of Pontus.2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1656] Ian Mladjov's Resources, online http://sitemaker.umich.edu/mladjov, CILICIA (KILIKIA).
  2. [S1650] Christian Settipani, Settipani-Continuite Addenda, I, pg. 55.

Salome, despoina of Jamnia, Azotus, & Phasaelis1,2

b. 0068 B.C., d. 0010 CE
Salome, despoina of Jamnia, Azotus, & Phasaelis|b. 0068 B.C.\nd. 0010 CE|p266.htm#i21294|Antipater II, procurator of Judaea|d. 0043 B.C.|p267.htm#i21278|Cypros of Petra||p191.htm#i21279|Antipas of Idumaea||p191.htm#i21325||||||||||
FatherAntipater II, procurator of Judaea3 d. 0043 B.C.
MotherCypros of Petra1
     Despoina of Jamnia, Azotus, & Phasaelis 0004-0010 CE.4 Salome, despoina of Jamnia, Azotus, & Phasaelis died 0010 CE. She died, age 78, of old age.1,5,2 She witnessed the death of Mariamne the Hasmonean 0029 B.C; She was put to death for adultery at the instigation of Herod's sister Salome, and Mariamne's mother, Alexandra.5,6 Salome, despoina of Jamnia, Azotus, & Phasaelis was the daughter of Antipater II, procurator of Judaea and Cypros of Petra.3,1 Salome, despoina of Jamnia, Azotus, & Phasaelis was born 0068 B.C. At circa.2 She had Augustus & Livia as patrons.2 She was daughter of Antipater.5

Citations

  1. [S909] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  2. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html
  3. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, AJ:XVIII:5:4.
  4. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, Despoina: the feminine form of despotês "ruler".
  5. [S914] Unknown author, WW - Bible, chart, pg. 145.
  6. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Mariamne.

Octavia Minor1

b. 0069 B.C., d. 0011 B.C.
Octavia Minor|b. 0069 B.C.\nd. 0011 B.C.|p266.htm#i10337|praetor Gaïus Octavius|b. 0099 B.C.\nd. 0059 B.C.|p267.htm#i10339|Atia|b. 0085 B.C.|p80.htm#i10340|Gaïus Octavius the Citizen||p80.htm#i10382||||Marcus Atius Balbus||p80.htm#i10341|Julia|b. 0105 B.C.|p80.htm#i10342|
Fatherpraetor Gaïus Octavius2 b. 0099 B.C., d. 0059 B.C.
MotherAtia2 b. 0085 B.C.
     Octavia Minor died 0011 B.C..3 She withdrew from public life after the death of her son Marcellus 0023 B.C..3 She was thrown out of her former house (that of Mark Antony) on his orders, and she left it "accompanied by all his children, except the eldest by Fulvia, who was then with his father, weeping and grieving that she must be looked upon as one of the causes of the war. But the Romans pitied, not so much her, as Antony himself, and more particularly those who had seen Cleopatra, whom they could report to have no way the advantage of Octavia either in youth or in beauty.".4 She and triumvir Marcus Antonius were divorced 0032 B.C; He divorced her.3 Octavia Minor brought troops and money to Mark Antony, but since he was now with Cleopatra, he refused to see her 0035 B.C..3 She brought about peace between her brother Octavian and her husband, Mark Antony, which resulted in the Treaty of Tarentum 0037 B.C..3 She and triumvir Marcus Antonius celebrated the Panathenaic games in Athens 0038 B.C. At Greece.5 Octavia Minor married triumvir Marcus Antonius, son of praetor Marcus Antonius Creticus and Julia, 0040 B.C; His 3rd. Her 2nd (widow).5 Octavia Minor married Gaïus Claudius Marcellus 0054 B.C. At before; Her 1st.3,4 Octavia Minor was the daughter of praetor Gaïus Octavius and Atia.2 Octavia Minor was born 0069 B.C. At circa.3 She was the mother of Antonia Minor; the daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia Minor.4 Octavia Minor took in all six surving children of Mark Antony's, those by all three wives, and brought them up with her own.4 She was an elder half-sister of Octavian and great niece of Julius Caesar.4,6 She was the daughter of Gaius Octavius and his second wife, Atia (but Plutarch says Atia was Octavian's mother, and Octavia Minor, his half-sister by his father's other wife Ancharia).3 She was a faithful wife and mother who raised Antony's children by Cleopatra along with her own children.3 She was the daughter of Ancharia.4

Family 1

triumvir Marcus Antonius b. 0082-0081 B.C., d. 0030 B.C.
Child

Family 2

Gaïus Claudius Marcellus d. 0040 B.C.
Child

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Octavia (w. of Mark Antony) - Minor, though I've seen Major elsewhere..
  2. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 26.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Octavia (w. of Mark Antony).
  4. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.
  5. [S917] Antony and Cleopatra, online http://www.rhul.ac.uk/scolar/cl2361/lectures/1.html
  6. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm

Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa

b. 0065 B.C., d. 0012 B.C.
     Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa died 0012 B.C..1,2,3 Co-Emperor at Roman Empire 0013-0012 B.C..1 He married Julia Major, daughter of Gaïus Octavius and Scribonia, 0021 B.C; His 2nd. Her 2nd (widow).2,4,3 Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was associated with Gaïus Octavius Consul VII 0027 B.C.5 Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was Consul with Imperator Caesar Augustus 0027 B.C.. He was associated with Gaïus Octavius Consul VI 0028 B.C.5 Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was Consul with Imperator Caesar Augustus 0028 B.C.. He was saw his most famous victory won at the Battle of Actium, where he defeated the combined forces of Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Marc Antony 0031 B.C. At 2 September. He was Consul with Lucius Caninius Gallus 0037 B.C.. He was born 0065 B.C..6 He defeated and destroyed the fleet of Sextus Pompey in a battle off Naulochus. He was the father of Gaïus Agrippa; the eldest son of Augustus' closest associate, Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, and Julia, the emperor's daughter.7

Family

Julia Major b. 0039 B.C., d. 768
Children

Citations

  1. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 25.
  4. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.
  5. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 17.
  6. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 25, He was 25 years older than Julia..
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Caesar, Gaius.

Gaïus Octavius1

b. 0063 B.C., September 23, d. 0014 AD, August 19
Gaïus Octavius|b. 0063 B.C., September 23\nd. 0014 AD, August 19|p266.htm#i10335|praetor Gaïus Octavius|b. 0099 B.C.\nd. 0059 B.C.|p267.htm#i10339|Atia|b. 0085 B.C.|p80.htm#i10340|Gaïus Octavius the Citizen||p80.htm#i10382||||Marcus Atius Balbus||p80.htm#i10341|Julia|b. 0105 B.C.|p80.htm#i10342|
Fatherpraetor Gaïus Octavius b. 0099 B.C., d. 0059 B.C.
MotherAtia b. 0085 B.C.
     Gaïus Octavius given the honorary title "Pater Patriae" (Father of his Country) by the senate 0002 B.C., February 5.1 He was Consul XIII 0002 B.C..1 He adopted the 44-year old son of Livia's first husband, along with his last surving grandson, the 15-year old Agrippa Postumus (the younger brother of Gaius and Lucius) 0004 AD, June 26.2 He witnessed the adoption of Tiberius Claudius Nero 0004 AD, June 26; He was adopted as heir to the Emperor Augustus which at last secured for him the succession as Emperor, but he was also forced to himself adopt his nephew, Germanicus (and keep Augustus's line on the throne), who would succeed in favor of his own natural son.3,2 Gaïus Octavius was Consul XII 0005 B.C..1 He was a witness where Tiberius Claudius Nero granted tribunician power (tribunicia potestas) for five years by Emperor Augustus, and an extensive commission in the East 0006 B.C.3,4 Gaïus Octavius took the title "Pontifex Maximus" (chief priest) on the death of the last priest Lepidus 0012 B.C., March 6.1 He was co-ruler with Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa; co-Emperor.5 Gaïus Octavius held at his death the name and titles: "Imperator Caesar Divi filius Augustus, Pontifex Maximus, Consul XIII, Imperator XXI, Tribuniciae potestatis XXXVII, Pater Patriae".1 He died 0014 AD, August 19 at Nola, near Naples, Campania, Italia, Roman Empire. "While traveling in Campania, Augustus died peacefully." He may also have died of an illness.3,6,1 He was the predecessor of Tiberius Claudius Nero; Emperor.3 Gaïus Octavius was buried in the Mausoleum of Augustus in the Campia Martius, Rome. His ashes were deposited in the burial chamber at the center of the Mausoleum.1 He witnessed the adoption of Lucius Agrippa 0017 B.C; He was adopted by his grandfather, the Emperor Augustus, to be one of his heirs.3,4 Gaïus Octavius witnessed the adoption of Gaïus Agrippa 0017 B.C; He was adopted by his grandfather, the Emperor Augustus, as a possible heir.3,7 Gaïus Octavius was a witness where Phraates IV, King of Parthia given Musa, and Italian, as a wife by Octavious Augustus of Rome 0018 B.C. Gaïus Octavius was a witness where Phraates IV, King of Parthia concluded a peace with the Romans under Octavious Augustus which included the release of roman prisoners and the return of the captured insignia 0020 B.C.5 Gaïus Octavius was Consul XI 0023 B.C..1 He was first given Tribunician power (thereafter renewed annually on 26 June), under the second constitutional settlement, 0023 B.C..1 He was Consul X 0024 B.C..1 He was Consul IX 0025 B.C..1 He was a witness where Gaïus Claudius Marcellus chosen by Augustus as his probable successor 0025 B.C.3 Gaïus Octavius was Consul VIII 0026 B.C..1 He was called Imperator Caesar Divi filius Augustus after the senate conferred on him on his accession the new title "Augustus" 0027 B.C., January 16.1 He was Consul VII 0027 B.C..1 He was associated with Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa Consul with Imperator Caesar Augustus 0027 B.C. Gaïus Octavius was Consul VI 0028 B.C..1 He was associated with Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa Consul with Imperator Caesar Augustus 0028 B.C. Gaïus Octavius was Consul V 0029 B.C..1 He was Consul IV 0030 B.C..1 He was a witness where Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania befriended by Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) as a young man at Italy.8 Gaïus Octavius was Consul III 0031 B.C..1 Emperor at Roman Empire 0031-0014 A.D..3 He was Consul II 0033 B.C..1 He married Livia Drusilla, daughter of Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus and Alfidia, 0038 B.C; Her 2nd. His 3rd. s.p.9,1 Gaïus Octavius was called "Imperator Caesar Divi filius" after he dropped the name Julius and his own forename Gaius, and switched the title "imperator" from the end to the beginning 0040 B.C..1 He married Scribonia 0040 B.C; His 2nd.1 Gaïus Octavius was a witness where Julia deified by her grandson Claudius 0042 AD.9 Gaïus Octavius was called "Gaius Julius Caesar Divi filius Imperator" on the deification of Julius Caesar 0042 B.C., January.1 He was Consul for the first time 0043 B.C..1 He was acclaimed "Imperator" (the title given by troops to a victorious general) 21 times, for the first time in 43 BC.1 He married Claudia 0043 B.C; His 1st.10,1 Gaïus Octavius was adopted 0044 B.C., May 8; He was adopted by the famous General, Julius Caesar, in his will. He was called "Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus" after his adoption by Julius Caesar 0044 B.C., May 8.1 He witnessed the will of dictator Gaïus Julius Caesar 0044 B.C., May 8; Julius Ceasar stipulated in his will that he adopted Gaius Ocatvius as his heir.1 Gaïus Octavius was a witness where dictator Gaïus Julius Caesar fought an outbreak of resistance 0045 B.C. At March 17, Munda, Province of Farther Spain.5 Gaïus Octavius was present at Julius Caesar's triumphs where he took part in the procession and was accorded military honors 0046 B.C. At September.3,6 He was elected to the Patrician Order 0046 B.C.. He was elected to the pontifical college 0048 B.C..3 He was was said to have been taken in by Julius Caesar who began training him as successor 0048 B.C.. He made his debut, at age twelve, by delivering the funeral speech for his grandmother Julia 0051 B.C..6 An unknown place ; Octavius, her grandson, delivered the eulogy at her funeral, which was his first public appearance as Emperor.3 Gaïus Octavius was called "Gaius Octavius," at his birth, after his father.1 He was the son of praetor Gaïus Octavius and Atia. Gaïus Octavius was born 0063 B.C., September 23 at at the Ox-Heads in the Palatine quarter, Rome, Italia, Roman Republic.3,6,1,11 He adopted his grandchildren, Gaius and Lucius, as his heirs.4 He was described as having "clear, bright eyes, in which he liked to have it thought there was a kind of divine power....His teeth were wide apart, small, and ill-kept; his hair was slightly curling and inclining to golden; his eyebrows met".12 He was the son of Attia.10

Family 1

Livia Drusilla b. 0058 B.C., January 30, d. 0029 AD

Family 2

Scribonia
Child

Family 3

Claudia b. 0066 B.C.

Citations

  1. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 17.
  2. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 43.
  3. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  4. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 25.
  5. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  6. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Augustus, Caesar.
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Caesar, Gaius.
  8. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Juba II.
  9. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Livia Drusilla.
  10. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.
  11. [S1393] Suetonius, Suetonius: Lives of the Caesars, De Vita Caesarum--Divus Augustus.
  12. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 16, per Suetonius Augustus.

Asander, King of Bosporus

d. 0016 B.C.
     Asander, King of Bosporus died 0016 B.C.. He married Dynamis, Queen of the Cimmerian Bosporus; Her 1st. Asander, King of Bosporus was a pretender who slew her father and married her, and in spite of Roman nominees ruled as archon, and later as king.

Family

Dynamis, Queen of the Cimmerian Bosporus b. 0062 BCE, d. 0008 CE

Archelaus IV Sisines, King of Cappadocia1

b. 0056 B.C. ?, d. 0017 AD
Archelaus IV Sisines, King of Cappadocia|b. 0056 B.C. ?\nd. 0017 AD|p266.htm#i21347|Archelaus III, High Priest of Bellona|b. 0078 B.C. ?|p206.htm#i23196|Glaphyra (?)||p206.htm#i23197|Archelaus I., High Priest of Bellona|b. 0100 B.C. ?\nd. 0055 B.C., January/February|p267.htm#i21366|Unknown (?)||p206.htm#i23206|||||||
FatherArchelaus III, High Priest of Bellona2 b. 0078 B.C. ?
MotherGlaphyra (?)2
     Archelaus IV Sisines, King of Cappadocia was summoned to Rome when Tiberius succeeded Augustus, accused in the Senate, and soon deprived of his throne 0014 AD.3 He died 0017 AD.3 He added Cilicia Trachea, eastern Lycaonia, and Armenia Minor to his domain 0020 B.C..4 He retained his crown by making peace with Octavian (later Augustus) after Antony's defeat at the Battle of Actium 0031 B.C..4 King of Cappadocia at Asia Minor 0036 B.C to 0017 CE.4,5 He was granted the kingdom by Mark Antony 0036 B.C..4 He was the son of Archelaus III, High Priest of Bellona and Glaphyra (?).2 Archelaus IV Sisines, King of Cappadocia was born 0056 B.C. ?.6 He married Unknown an Armenian?; His 1st.2 Archelaus IV Sisines, King of Cappadocia was related to Glaphyra Archelaid; the daughter of Archelaus, king of Cappadocia.1 Archelaus IV Sisines, King of Cappadocia was the last king of Cappadocia as a Roman client during the late republic and the early empire.4 He married King Polemo's widow, giving him indirect control of most of Pontus.4

Family

Unknown an Armenian?
Child

Citations

  1. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Book II, Chapter 7.
  2. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Archelaus (k. of Cappadocia) .
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Archelaus.
  5. [S1296] Anne Elizabeth Redgate, TPoE: Armenians, fig 4.1.
  6. [S750] Robert B. Stewart, "My Theories", for year 0056 B.C..
  7. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, AJ:XVIII:5:4.

ethnarchês of Judaea Herod Archelaus of Judaea1,2

b. 0022 B.C., d. 0018 CE
ethnarchês of Judaea Herod Archelaus of Judaea|b. 0022 B.C.\nd. 0018 CE|p266.htm#i21282|Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea|b. 0073 B.C.\nd. 0004 B.C., March/April|p266.htm#i21276||||Antipater I., procurator of Judaea|d. 0043 B.C.|p267.htm#i21278|Cypros of Petra||p191.htm#i21279|||||||
FatherHerod I "the Great", King of Judaea3 b. 0073 B.C., d. 0004 B.C., March/April
     Ethnarchês of Judaea at Palestine 0004 B.C. to 0006 CE.4 Ethnarchês of Judaea Herod Archelaus of Judaea witnessed the will of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea 0004 B.C; After his death his kingdom was divided among three of his sons. He'd altered his will three times, and killed his firstborn son.1,5 King of Idumea, Judea, and Samaria at Palestine 0004 B.C..5,3 Ethnarchês of Judaea Herod Archelaus of Judaea used, when took possession of his ethnarchy, not the Jews only, but the Samaritans also, barbarously; and this out of his resentment of their old quarrels with him 0004 B.C..6 He went before the emperor Augustus to defend his title against the claims of his brothers Philip and Antipas 0004 B.C. At Rome, Italy.2 He was confirmed by Augustus as in possession of the largest portion of his father's old territory but did not recognize him as king, giving him instead the lesser title of ethnarch to emphasize his dependence on Rome 0004 B.C..2 He had Judea, Samaria, and Edom (Idumea) (i.e., central and southern Palestine) in the division of his father's realm following his death 0004 B.C. At Palestine.7,3 He was considered an alien oppressor by his Jewish subjects, and their repeated complaints against him caused Augustus to order him to Rome again 0006 B.C..2 He was banished, in the ninth year of his government, to Vienna, a city of Gaul, and his effects were put into Caesar's treasury 0006 CE.6,8 He died 0018 CE at circa, Gaul.9,2 He was the son of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea.3,10 Ethnarchês of Judaea Herod Archelaus of Judaea was born 0022 B.C..2 He was the successor of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea; King of Judaea.11,12,5 Ethnarchês of Judaea Herod Archelaus of Judaea married Glaphyra Archelaid, daughter of Archelaus IV Sisines, King of Cappadocia and Unknown an Armenian?; His 2nd (divorcé). Her 3rd (widow).6 Ethnarchês of Judaea Herod Archelaus of Judaea had Augustus as a patron.9 He was half Idumaean and half Samaritan.2 In the account of the Gospel According to Matthew (2:22), it was fear of Archelaus' tyranny that led Jesus' family to settle outside his domain at Nazareth in Galilee.2 He was the son and principal heir of Herod I the Great.13

Family

Glaphyra Archelaid

Citations

  1. [S904] Matthew George Easton (1823-1894), Easton's.
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod Archelaus (k. of Judaea).
  3. [S904] Matthew George Easton (1823-1894), Easton's, #23290.
  4. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, Ethnarchês: literally "a ruler of a people," it was a term for a ruler with less status and power than a client-king.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.
  6. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Book II, Chapter 7.
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Palestine, history of.
  8. [S914] Unknown author, WW - Bible, chart, pg. 145.
  9. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html
  10. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, AJ:XVII:1:3.
  11. [S275] ., KJV, Matt. 2:1-22; Luke 1:5; Acts 23:35.
  12. [S912] Holdt Family Roots, online http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/tree/…+Lalou.htm.
  13. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod Archelaus.

Germanicus Caesar1

b. 0015 B.C., d. 0019 AD
Germanicus Caesar|b. 0015 B.C.\nd. 0019 AD|p266.htm#i10357|Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus|b. 0038 B.C., Fall\nd. 0009 B.C.|p266.htm#i10328|Antonia Minor|b. 0036 B.C.|p79.htm#i10329|Tiberius Claudius Nero||p80.htm#i10361|Livia Drusilla|b. 0058 B.C., January 30\nd. 0029 AD|p266.htm#i10362|triumvir Marcus Antonius|b. 0082-0081 B.C.\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i10336|Octavia Minor|b. 0069 B.C.\nd. 0011 B.C.|p266.htm#i10337|
FatherNero Drusus Claudius Germanicus2 b. 0038 B.C., Fall, d. 0009 B.C.
MotherAntonia Minor2 b. 0036 B.C.
     Germanicus Caesar was adopted 0004 AD, June 26; He was adopted by Tiberius, the heir of Emperor Augustus, to insure the the Emperorship would return to the family of Augustus, in favor over Tiberius' own son.3 He witnessed the adoption of Tiberius Claudius Nero 0004 AD, June 26; He was adopted as heir to the Emperor Augustus which at last secured for him the succession as Emperor, but he was also forced to himself adopt his nephew, Germanicus (and keep Augustus's line on the throne), who would succeed in favor of his own natural son.4,3 On 0004 AD his name was legally changed to Germanicus Julius Caesar Claudianus. Germanicus Caesar was the son of Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus and Antonia Minor.2 Germanicus Caesar was born 0015 B.C..4 He died 0019 AD at October 10, Antioch. Historians have been debating ever since whether it was due to natural causes or murder. In any case, Agrippina was firmly convinced that Tiberius, who had become emperor in was jealous of Germanicus' popularity and had had him poisoned.4,1 He was the nephew and adoptive son of Tiberius.1 He was the father of Emperor Caligula of the Romans; the son of Germanicus Caesar, nephew and adoptive son of Tiberius, and Agrippina the Elder.1 Germanicus Caesar married Agrippina the Elder, daughter of Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia Major, in 749 at a.u.c..

Family

Agrippina the Elder b. 0015 B.C., d. 0033 AD
Children

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Caligula (emp. of Rome).
  2. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm
  3. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 43.
  4. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  5. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 44.

Vonones I "Ahamen", King of Armenia1,2,3

b. 0040 B.C., d. 0019 AD
Vonones I "Ahamen", King of Armenia|b. 0040 B.C.\nd. 0019 AD|p266.htm#i15269|Phraates IV, King of Parthia|b. 0072 B.C.\nd. 0002 B.C.|p266.htm#i6246||||Orodes I., King of Parthia|b. 0096 B.C.\nd. 0038 B.C.|p267.htm#i6256|Princess o. C.||p53.htm#i6257|||||||
FatherPhraates IV, King of Parthia1,2,3 b. 0072 B.C., d. 0002 B.C.
     King of Parthia 0008-0012 AD.2,1 Vonones I "Ahamen", King of Armenia was a witness where Artabanus III, King of Parthia elected to replace Vonones I, whose Roman lifestyle displeased the Parthians, 0010 AD.1 Vonones I "Ahamen", King of Armenia was defeated by Artabanus III on which he fled to Armenia where he secured the throne there 0012 AD.1 King of Armenia 0012-0016 AD.4 He was raised and educated in Rome, which caused him problems later in Parthia, 0015 B.C..2 He was deposed from the Armenian throne by Artabanus II and fled first to Syria, where the Romans kept him in kingly style, then removed to Cilicia at Artabanus's request 0018 AD.1 He died 0019 AD at Antioch, Syria. Vonones went to Antioch in Syria, where the Roman governor kept him in custody until he was killed in an attempt to escape.5 He was the son of Phraates IV, King of Parthia.1,2,3 Vonones I "Ahamen", King of Armenia was born 0040 B.C.. "The life of the father Vonones had a sad ending: According to Tacitus, he was sent by his father Phraates to Augustus 'to cement friendship, not so much from dread of us as from distrust of the loyalty of his countrymen.' After the death of Phraates and the ensuing civil wars, the Parthian nobles had asked Augustus to give them Vonones for the throne of Parthia. Thus, loaded with wealth from Augustus, Vonones returned home to become king. However, his apparent sympathy for the Romans and his foreign manners and training caused a national uprising headed by Artabanus III (r. A.D. 12-38) also an Arsakid (on the mother's side) "who had grown to manhood among the Dahae." Vonones went to Armenia where soon he was asked to be king of the land. However, Romans not willing to go to war against Artabanus, sent him to Pompeiopolis, a city on the coast of Cilicia, where he was killed by a Roman officer when trying 'to escape to his kinsman, the king of Scythia' (Annals II.1-4, 58, 68)."3 Ahmn < Tr. Ahamen/Aga-men ("lord I am") or Akaman ("true lord"), most likely Vonones I (whwnm?); with aga/aka "lord, master; elder brother" (UYG; REDH).3 Vonon.es I (whwnm?) Parthian king (A.D. 7-12) [whwnm < Tr. Ahamen/Agamen "lord I am"].6 He was the eldest son of Phraates IV.5

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S285] Parthia.com, online http://www.fivepointstech.com/parthia/
  2. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  3. [S1371] Lost Langages, online http://www.lostlanguages.com/, parthian.htm.
  4. [S1038] e-mail address Ian, Re: Armenian kings
    in "Re: Armenian kings," newsgroup message 22 Feb 2001.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Vonones I.
  6. [S1371] Lost Langages, online http://www.lostlanguages.com/, parthian.htm, name of the Parthian king, with the correct Turkish reading and it's meaning.
  7. [S1371] Lost Langages, online http://www.lostlanguages.com/, parthian.htm, Tutuk-tari, same as Tthtr, apparently the personal name of Vonones II (son of Vonones I "Ahamen") whose inscription of Case 2 tells how he made a statue for his father.

Artavasdes I, King of Media Atropatene1

b. 0075? BCE, d. 0020 BCE
Artavasdes I, King of Media Atropatene|b. 0075? BCE\nd. 0020 BCE|p266.htm#i6248|Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, King of Media Atropatene|b. 0095? BCE\nd. 0065/0056 BCE|p267.htm#i6250|Princess of Commagene|b. 0099? BCE|p219.htm#i24759|Mithradates I., King of Parthia and Media Atropatene|b. 0097 B.C.\nd. 0054 B.C.|p267.htm#i6252|Princess o. A.|b. 0100 B.C.|p53.htm#i6253|Mithradates I. K., King of Commagene|b. 0120 B.C.\nd. 0063 B.C.|p267.htm#i6260|Laodice T.|b. 0119 B.C.|p53.htm#i6261|
FatherAriobarzanes I Philoromaios, King of Media Atropatene1 b. 0095? BCE, d. 0065/0056 BCE
MotherPrincess of Commagene2 b. 0099? BCE
     Artavasdes I, King of Media Atropatene died 0020 BCE.2 He married Princess of Commagene, daughter of Antiochus I Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philoromaios Philhellen, King of Commagene and Isias Philostorgos, Princess of Commagene, 0054 B.C.1,3,4 Artavasdes I, King of Media Atropatene was the son of Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, King of Media Atropatene and Princess of Commagene.1,2 Artavasdes I, King of Media Atropatene was born 0075? BCE.2 Artavasd.es ()rtwzd) Parthian king (A.D. 226-227?) (FryHP 319) [since, Parthian w is similar to b, Art-bzd > Arta-basd < Tr. Ortu-basti "he who has overpowered the (enemy's) army," or "he has surprised the capital," with ortu/ordu "capital city, the city of the king; the court; the center; army headquarter, army" (DLT; UYG), and bas- "to raid, to overwhelm, to overpower; to surprise"].5 Sources: 1. Bryan, K. 'Davidic Descents to the House of Plantagenet' Augustan, Vol. XXV, 16-23. King of Media Atropatene.

Family

Princess of Commagene b. 0074 B.C.
Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-69.
  2. [S1132] DFA (4000 yr), online, pg. 22.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 412-69.
  4. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm, "The marriage of a king of Atropatenian Media to a daughter of Antiochus I of Commagene is a hypothesis developed by Settipani, based on the view that Strabo 11.13.1 is strictly referring to marriages made by Median kings, originally listed in chronological order of their occurrence.".
  5. [S1371] Lost Langages, online http://www.lostlanguages.com/, parthian.htm, name of the Parthian king, with the correct Turkish reading and it's meaning.
  6. [S1038] e-mail address Ian, Re: Armenian kings
    in "Re: Armenian kings," newsgroup message 22 Feb 2001.

Heli ha-David

d. 0020-0016 B.C.
Heli ha-David|d. 0020-0016 B.C.|p266.htm#i15187|Matthat "Nasi" ha-David||p218.htm#i24606|Alexandra the Hasmonean|b. 0101 B.C.\nd. 0028 B.C.|p266.htm#i21330|Levi ha-David||p109.htm#i13192||||John H. I., High Priest of Judaea|b. 0100-0102 BCE\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i21331||||
FatherMatthat "Nasi" ha-David1,2
MotherAlexandra the Hasmonean1 b. 0101 B.C., d. 0028 B.C.
     Heli ha-David died 0020-0016 B.C.. Executed.1 He was the son of Matthat "Nasi" ha-David and Alexandra the Hasmonean.1,2 Heli ha-David was a Davidic prince.1

Citations

  1. [S1083] Davidic Dynasty, online http://members.aol.com/rdavidh218/davidicdynasty.html
  2. [S275] ., KJV, Luke 3:24.

Gaïus Claudius Marcellus

b. 0042 B.C., d. 0023 B.C.
Gaïus Claudius Marcellus|b. 0042 B.C.\nd. 0023 B.C.|p266.htm#i10390|Gaïus Claudius Marcellus|d. 0040 B.C.|p267.htm#i10346|Octavia Minor|b. 0069 B.C.\nd. 0011 B.C.|p266.htm#i10337|||||||praetor Gaïus Octavius|b. 0099 B.C.\nd. 0059 B.C.|p267.htm#i10339|Atia|b. 0085 B.C.|p80.htm#i10340|
FatherGaïus Claudius Marcellus d. 0040 B.C.
MotherOctavia Minor b. 0069 B.C., d. 0011 B.C.
     Gaïus Claudius Marcellus died 0023 B.C.. He died at a young age of an illness.1,2 He was chosen by Augustus as his probable successor 0025 B.C..1 He married Julia Major, daughter of Gaïus Octavius and Scribonia, 0025 B.C; Her 1st.1,3,4 Gaïus Claudius Marcellus was born 0042 B.C..1 He was the son of Gaïus Claudius Marcellus and Octavia Minor. Gaïus Claudius Marcellus was adopted by Octavian, and given one of his daughters in marriage.3

Family

Julia Major b. 0039 B.C., d. 768

Citations

  1. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Octavia (w. of Mark Antony).
  3. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.
  4. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 25.

Prince of Judah Jacob "Nasi" ha-David1

d. 0023 B.C.
Prince of Judah Jacob "Nasi" ha-David|d. 0023 B.C.|p266.htm#i13193|Matthan ha-David||p91.htm#i11939||||Eleazar ha-David||p110.htm#i13265||||||||||
FatherMatthan ha-David
     Prince of Judah Jacob "Nasi" ha-David died 0023 B.C.. Removed from office and executed.1 Prince of Judah 0032-0023 B.C..1 He was born. Luke 3:24 "Which was the son of Matthat..."2 He was the son of Matthan ha-David. Prince of Judah Jacob "Nasi" ha-David was born. Matt. 1:15 "... Matthan begat Jacob."3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1083] Davidic Dynasty, online http://members.aol.com/rdavidh218/davidicdynasty.html
  2. [S275] ., KJV, Book of Luke, 3:24.
  3. [S275] ., KJV, Book of Matthew, 1:15.
  4. [S317] The Chevalier Labran de St. Germain Laurence Gardner, Gardner's Bloodline, 405.

Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania1

b. 0050 B.C., d. 0024 AD
Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania|b. 0050 B.C.\nd. 0024 AD|p266.htm#i21367|Juba I, King of Numidia|b. 0085 B.C.\nd. 0046 B.C.|p267.htm#i21348||||||||||||||||
FatherJuba I, King of Numidia1,2 b. 0085 B.C., d. 0046 B.C.
     Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania died 0024 AD.1 He married Cleopatra Selene, daughter of triumvir Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt, 0020 B.C; His 1st.1,3,2 Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania married Cleopatra Selene, daughter of Mark Antony, the Roman Triumvir, and Cleopatra, the Greek Queen of Egypt, and together they ruled over a Hellenistic kingdom consisting of royal tombs, a cult of Isis, capital- roman town planning, and widespread use of slaves (with Greek names). He was the successor of Ptolemy, King of Numidia; King of Numidia. King of Mauretania at North Africa 0025 B.C. to 0024 CE.1,2 King of Numidia at North Africa 0029-0025 B.C..1 Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania was befriended by Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) as a young man at Italy.1 He was paraded at age five, after the death of his father, in Caesar's triumphal procession 0045 B.C. At Rome, Italy.1 He was given a good education 0045-0030 B.C. At Italy.1 He was born 0050 B.C..1 He was the son of Juba I, King of Numidia.1,2 Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania was the successor of Juba I, King of Numidia; King of Numidia.2 Juba II, King of Numidia and Mauretania was the most accomplished of kings.3 He was the son of Berber King Juba I of Numidia (85 B.C. - 46 B.C.). He was the son of Juba I.1 He married Glaphyra Archelaid, daughter of Archelaus IV Sisines, King of Cappadocia and Unknown an Armenian?; Her 2nd (widow).4,2

Family 1

Cleopatra Selene b. 0040 B.C., d. 0005 B.C., circa
Child

Family 2

Glaphyra Archelaid

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Juba II.
  2. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm
  3. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.
  4. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Book II, Chapter 7.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, North Africa, History of.

Joseph ha-David

b. 0029 B.C., d. 0026 AD
Joseph ha-David|b. 0029 B.C.\nd. 0026 AD|p266.htm#i13196|Prince of Judah Jacob "Nasi" ha-David|d. 0023 B.C.|p266.htm#i13193||||Matthan ha-David||p91.htm#i11939||||||||||
FatherPrince of Judah Jacob "Nasi" ha-David1 d. 0023 B.C.
     Joseph ha-David married an unknown person 0007 B.C., March; The Second Marriage. This marriage would have been celebrated when the bride was three months pregnant, per the dynastic rules. However ... young Jesus seems to have been concieved in the wrong month, just shortly after betrothal, and not in the month of December as rules called for. Given that Jesus was the firstborn descendant in the Davidic succession, he was kept, and the marriages authorized anyway. Until the Second Marriage, Mary would have still be referred to as an "almah" or young woman. It is "almah" which get's translated, incorrectly, as "virgin" and hence the myth of the "virgin birth." This did, however, fit in well with the pronouncement of Isaiah in 735 B.C.: Isa 7:14 "Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel." "Immanu-El" means "With us [is] God." Mary and Joseph did not name their son this, but "Jesus," or "Yehoshua" or "Jehovah saves."2 He died 0026 AD.3 He was the son of Prince of Judah Jacob "Nasi" ha-David.4,1 Joseph ha-David was born 0029 B.C.. Matt. 1:16 "And Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary..."5,6 He was recognized as the “royal Davidic heir” despite his foreign mother.4 He was reduced to poverty by the series of King Herod’s persecution of the royal Davidic house, and took up carpentry as a trade.4 He was not a carpenter, as the bible states due to faulty translations, but a "master of his craft,".7 He was the son-in-law of Heli, who was, like himself, a descendant of David.8

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S317] The Chevalier Labran de St. Germain Laurence Gardner, Gardner's Bloodline, 405.
  2. [S317] The Chevalier Labran de St. Germain Laurence Gardner, Gardner's Bloodline, 39.
  3. [S1083] Davidic Dynasty, online http://members.aol.com/rdavidh218/davidicdynasty.html, "AD26".
  4. [S1083] Davidic Dynasty, online http://members.aol.com/rdavidh218/davidicdynasty.html
  5. [S275] ., KJV, Book of Matthew, 1:16.
  6. [S1083] Davidic Dynasty, online http://members.aol.com/rdavidh218/davidicdynasty.html, "29 BC".
  7. [S317] The Chevalier Labran de St. Germain Laurence Gardner, Gardner's Bloodline, 35.
  8. [S906] D. D. Rev. C. I. Scofield, Scofield, Luke 3:23, [1].
  9. [S275] ., KJV, Book of Matthew, 13:55.

Alexandra the Hasmonean1

b. 0101 B.C., d. 0028 B.C.
Alexandra the Hasmonean|b. 0101 B.C.\nd. 0028 B.C.|p266.htm#i21330|John Hyrcanus II, High Priest of Judaea|b. 0100-0102 BCE\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i21331||||Alexander J., High Priest of Judaea|b. 0125 BCE\nd. 0076 B.C.|p268.htm#i21332|Alexandra S., High Priestess of Judaea|b. 0140 BCE\nd. 0067 B.C.|p267.htm#i21336|||||||
FatherJohn Hyrcanus II, High Priest of Judaea1 b. 0100-0102 BCE, d. 0030 B.C.
     Alexandra the Hasmonean died 0028 B.C.. She was executed by her son-in-law, Herod.1,2 She witnessed the death of Mariamne the Hasmonean 0029 B.C; She was put to death for adultery at the instigation of Herod's sister Salome, and Mariamne's mother, Alexandra.3,4 Alexandra the Hasmonean was a witness where Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea saw executed, through the instigation of his sister, Salome, and his mother-in-law, Alexandra, his wife Mariamne's grandfather, Alexandra's father and the Hasmonean High Priest, Alexandra's own daughter Mariamne, and then Alexandra herself 0030-0028 B.C.2 Alexandra the Hasmonean was the daughter of John Hyrcanus II, High Priest of Judaea.1 Alexandra the Hasmonean was born 0101 B.C..5 She was a woman of the vilest stamp who had often aided Salome, the sister of her son-in-law, Herod, in her wicked schemes (including the death of her own daughter Mariamne).2 She married Alexander II the Hasmonean, son of Judah Aristobulus II, King of Judaea.1 Alexandra the Hasmonean married Matthat "Nasi" ha-David, son of Levi ha-David; Her 1st.6

Family 1

Matthat "Nasi" ha-David
Child

Family 2

Alexander II the Hasmonean d. 0049 B.C.
Children

Citations

  1. [S909] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.
  3. [S914] Unknown author, WW - Bible, chart, pg. 145.
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Mariamne.
  5. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Antiquities, Book XIII, she lived to be 73.
  6. [S1083] Davidic Dynasty, online http://members.aol.com/rdavidh218/davidicdynasty.html
  7. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Extracts with Commentary.

Livia Drusilla

b. 0058 B.C., January 30, d. 0029 AD
Livia Drusilla|b. 0058 B.C., January 30\nd. 0029 AD|p266.htm#i10362|Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus||p80.htm#i10400|Alfidia||p80.htm#i10404|Tribune Marcus Livius Drusus||p80.htm#i10401||||||||||
FatherMarcus Livius Drusus Claudianus
MotherAlfidia
     Livia Drusilla assumed the name Julia Augusta after the death of Augustus 0014 AD, 19 August.1 She died 0029 AD. She lived to the grand old age of 86.1,2 She was still pregnant with her second son, Nero Claudius Drusus, when Octavian (later Augustus) compelled her to divorce Nero and marry him 0038 B.C., spring.1 She married Gaïus Octavius, son of praetor Gaïus Octavius and Atia, 0038 B.C; Her 2nd. His 3rd. s.p.1,3 Livia Drusilla and Tiberius Claudius Nero were divorced 0038 B.C.1 Livia Drusilla married Tiberius Claudius Nero, son of Appius Claudius Nero, 0044 B.C. At circa; Her 1st. Cousins.1 Livia Drusilla was the daughter of Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus and Alfidia. Livia Drusilla was born 0058 B.C., January 30.1 She was the mother of Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus; the son of Livia.4 Livia Drusilla was the devoted and influential wife of Caesar Augustus and counselled him on affairs of state and who, in her efforts to secure the imperial succession for her son Tiberius, was reputed to have caused the deaths of many of his rivals.1 She was the daughter of Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus, an adoptive son of the tribune Marcus Livius Drusus.1 She was the mother of Tiberius Claudius Nero; the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla, and the adopted son of Augustus.5

Family

Tiberius Claudius Nero
Children

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Livia Drusilla.
  2. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 21.
  3. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 17.
  4. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Tiberius.
  6. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 26.
  7. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm

Mariamne the Hasmonean1

b. 0057 B.C., d. 0029 B.C.
Mariamne the Hasmonean|b. 0057 B.C.\nd. 0029 B.C.|p266.htm#i21277|Alexander II the Hasmonean|d. 0049 B.C.|p267.htm#i21329|Alexandra the Hasmonean|b. 0101 B.C.\nd. 0028 B.C.|p266.htm#i21330|Judah A. I., King of Judaea|b. 0100-0098 BCE\nd. 0049 B.C.|p267.htm#i21333||||John H. I., High Priest of Judaea|b. 0100-0102 BCE\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i21331||||
FatherAlexander II the Hasmonean2 d. 0049 B.C.
MotherAlexandra the Hasmonean2 b. 0101 B.C., d. 0028 B.C.
     Mariamne the Hasmonean died 0029 B.C.. She was put to death for adultery at the instigation of Herod's sister Salome, and Mariamne's mother, Alexandra.3,4 She was a witness where Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea saw executed, through the instigation of his sister, Salome, and his mother-in-law, Alexandra, his wife Mariamne's grandfather, Alexandra's father and the Hasmonean High Priest, Alexandra's own daughter Mariamne, and then Alexandra herself 0030-0028 B.C.5 Mariamne the Hasmonean married Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea, son of Antipater II, procurator of Judaea and Cypros of Petra, 0037 B.C; His 2nd.4,5,6 A contract for the marriage of Mariamne the Hasmonean and Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea was signed 0042 B.C.. Betrothal.6 Mariamne the Hasmonean was the daughter of Alexander II the Hasmonean and Alexandra the Hasmonean.2 Mariamne the Hasmonean was born 0057 B.C. At circa.4 She was [grand] daughter of Hyrcanus.7 She was famed for her beauty.6 She was a Jewish princess, and a popular heroine in both Jewish and Christian traditions.4 Herod's marriage to her served to unite his family with the deposed Hasmonean royal family (Maccabees) and helped legitimize his position.4

Family

Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea b. 0073 B.C., d. 0004 B.C., March/April
Children

Citations

  1. [S912] Holdt Family Roots, online http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/tree/…+Lalou.htm.
  2. [S909] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  3. [S914] Unknown author, WW - Bible, chart, pg. 145.
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Mariamne.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.
  6. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Extracts with Commentary.
  7. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, AJ:XVIII:5:4.
  8. [S585] Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VII, under Herod.

Bartom, King of K'art'li1

b. 0090 B.C., d. 0030 B.C.
Bartom, King of K'art'li|b. 0090 B.C.\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i6015|Artaces I, King of K'art'li|b. 0110 B.C.\nd. 0063 B.C.|p267.htm#i6037|Princess of K'art'li|b. 0131 B.C.|p51.htm#i6040|Arshak I., King of K'art'li|b. 0135 B.C.\nd. 0078 B.C.|p268.htm#i6039||||Mruan I., King of K'art'li|d. 0109 B.C.|p268.htm#i6043|Princess of K'art'li||p51.htm#i6044|
FatherArtaces I, King of K'art'li2 b. 0110 B.C., d. 0063 B.C.
MotherPrincess of K'art'li b. 0131 B.C.
     Bartom, King of K'art'li died 0030 B.C.. Killed in battle.3 He witnessed the death of K'art'am, King of K'art'li 0033 B.C; Killed in the same battle as his father-in-law, to whom he had been made heir.4 Bartom, King of K'art'li witnessed the marriage of K'art'am, King of K'art'li and N. N. Aršakuni 0040 B.C. At circa; 4th cousins.5 Bartom, King of K'art'li had no son, only one daughter whom he had married to a descendant of K'ujis so that there would be an heir for his kingdom. And he did this to please the Iberians who did not want the reign of a foreign people but only of the Pharnabazids, 0040 B.C. At circa. He married Princess of Armenia, daughter of Tigranes II Megas, King of Armenia and Cleopatra Arshâmid, 0061 B.C.3 7th King of Kartli at Transcaucasia 0063-0030 BCE.6 Bartom, King of K'art'li was the successor of Artaces I, King of K'art'li; 6th King of Kartli.7 Bartom, King of K'art'li was the son of Artaces I, King of K'art'li and Princess of K'art'li.2 Bartom, King of K'art'li was born 0090 B.C.. He was an Arsacid, son of King Artag. Sources: Bryan, K. 'Davidic Descents to the House of Plantagenet' Augustan, Vol. XXV, 16-23. Also called Barton.8 Also called Bartom.8

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Princess of Armenia b. 0090 B.C.
Child

Citations

  1. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 47.
  2. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 44.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 409-70.
  4. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-69.
  5. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Ch. 4.
  6. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 44, 379, 63-30.
  7. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 44, 379, 78-63.
  8. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chapter 4.

triumvir Marcus Antonius

b. 0082-0081 B.C., d. 0030 B.C.
triumvir Marcus Antonius|b. 0082-0081 B.C.\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i10336|praetor Marcus Antonius Creticus||p279.htm#i10347|Julia||p80.htm#i10349|consul Marcus Antonius the Orator|b. 0143 B.C.\nd. 0087 B.C.|p268.htm#i10348||||consul Lucius Julius Caesar||p80.htm#i10350|Fulvia (?)||p206.htm#i23250|
Fatherpraetor Marcus Antonius Creticus
MotherJulia
     Triumvir Marcus Antonius died 0030 B.C. At August 30, Alexandria, Egypt. On his failed succession with Cleopatra against Emperor Augustus, a stunning defeat with massive defection, he and his wife committed suicide.1 He was defeated by Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) in the last of the civil wars that destroyed the Roman Republic.1 He was a witness where Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa saw his most famous victory won at the Battle of Actium, where he defeated the combined forces of Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Marc Antony 0031 B.C. At 2 September. Triumvir Marcus Antonius and Octavia Minor were divorced 0032 B.C; He divorced her.2 Triumvir Marcus Antonius he had a falling out with Octavian 0033 B.C..3 He was a witness where Phraates IV, King of Parthia again defeated Marc Antony who now abandoned his plans for the Parthians 0034 B.C.4 Triumvir Marcus Antonius executed Artavasdes II, King of Armenia, 0034 B.C..5 He was Consul with Lucius Scribonius Libo 0034 B.C.. He summoned Cleopatra to join him in Syria 0035 B.C..3 He was a witness where Octavia Minor brought troops and money to Mark Antony, but since he was now with Cleopatra, he refused to see her 0035 B.C.2 Triumvir Marcus Antonius was a witness where Phraates IV, King of Parthia able to defeat Marc Antony's push into Parthia from Media with his cavalry 0036 B.C.4 Triumvir Marcus Antonius invaded Parthia, but defeated after the treachery of Artavasdes of Armenia, 0036 B.C..3 He was joined by Cleopatra 0037 B.C. At Antioch.3 He married Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt, daughter of Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, King of Egypt and Cleopatra V Tryphaena, Queen of Egypt, 0037 B.C; His 5th? Her 4th.3,6 Triumvir Marcus Antonius was proclaimed Neos Dionusios 0038 B.C. At Ephesus.3 He and Octavia Minor celebrated the Panathenaic games in Athens 0038 B.C. At Greece.3 Triumvir Marcus Antonius was a witness where Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt given several old Ptolemaic possessions in the Levant by Mark Antony 0038 B.C.3 Triumvir Marcus Antonius was a witness where Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea given Judaea by Mark Antony 0038 B.C.3 Triumvir Marcus Antonius was a witness where Marcus Antonius Polemo I Philopator, roi en Cilicie given Pontus by Mark Antony 0038 B.C.3 Triumvir Marcus Antonius appointed Herod the Great as tetrarch of Judaea 0040 B.C. At Palestine.7 He married Octavia Minor, daughter of praetor Gaïus Octavius and Atia, 0040 B.C; His 3rd. Her 2nd (widow).3 Triumvir Marcus Antonius associated with Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt, daughter of Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, King of Egypt and Cleopatra V Tryphaena, Queen of Egypt, 0041 B.C. At Tarsus.3,6 Triumvir Marcus Antonius witnessed the death of Arsinoë IV, Queen of Egypt 0041 B.C. At Ephesus; She was executed by Mark Antony allegedly at the request of his lover, her sister, Cleopatra VII.6 Triumvir Marcus Antonius was a witness where Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea appointed tetrarch of Judaea by Mark Antony, and also king of Judaea by the Roman senate. 0041 B.C.8,7 Triumvir Marcus Antonius wintered in Alexandria 0041-0040 B.C. At Egypt.3 Triumvir 0043-0030 B.C..1 He was Consul with Gaius Julius Caesar 0044 B.C.. He became consul as the dictator's colleague 0044 B.C..1 He was associated with dictator Gaïus Julius Caesar Consul with Mark Antony 0044 B.C. Triumvir Marcus Antonius was removed from the post and without employment because his methods as regent of Italy had displeased Caesar 0046-0044 B.C..1 He was left in charge of Italy, as Master of the Horse (the dictator's assistant) after the decisive battle at Pharsalus (in Thessaly) in which he had commanded Caesar's left wing, 0048-0047 B.C..1 He became tribune of the people (an official with the traditional function of protecting the plebeians from arbitrary actions of the magistrates) when Civil War broke out between Pompey and Caesar, and vigorously supported Caesar in the Senate 0049 B.C..1 He held the minor office of quaestor, an office of financial administration that gave him a place in the Senate, and he was subsequently elected to the politically influential priesthood of the augurs, 0051 B.C..1 He continued to serve Julius Caesar in the aftermath of the conquest of Gaul 0052-0050 B.C..1 An unknown place ; Mark Antony gained notice by burying Archelaus with royal honors.9 Triumvir Marcus Antonius joined the staff of Julius Caesar, to whom he was related on his mother's side, and served with him for much of the concluding phase of Caesar's conquest of central and northern Gaul 0054-0053 B.C..1 He was a witness where Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea met Mark Antony and became a lifelong friend 0056 B.C.7 Triumvir Marcus Antonius served with distinction as a cavalry commander under Aulus Gabinius in Judaea and Egypt 0057-0054 B.C..1 He was the son of praetor Marcus Antonius Creticus and Julia. Triumvir Marcus Antonius was born 0082-0081 B.C..1 He was the father of Antonia Minor; the daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia Minor.10 Triumvir Marcus Antonius was the brother of consul Lucius Antonius; the brother of Mark Antony.10 Triumvir Marcus Antonius left by his three wives seven children, of whom only Antyllus, the eldest, was put to death by Caesar.10 Also called Mark Antony. He was a man of considerable ability and impressive appearance, far more genial than his adversary but not quite equal to Octavian's exceptional efficiency and energy and, in particular, unfit or unwilling to grasp the moment for action.1 He had also a very good and noble appearance; his beard was well grown, his forehead large, and his nose aquiline, giving him altogether a bold, masculine look, that reminded people of the faces of Hercules in paintings and sculptures.10 "It was, moreover, an ancient tradition, that the Antonys were descended from Hercules, by a son of his called Anton; and this opinion he thought to give credit to, by the similarity of his person just mentioned, and also by the fashion of his dress. For, whenever he had to appear before large numbers, he wore his tunic girt low about the hips, a broadsword on his side, and over all a large, coarse mantle."10 He was the son and grandson of men of the same name.1 He was the ancestor of Emperor Nero of the Romans; Mark Antony's descendant in the fifth generation.10 Triumvir Marcus Antonius was the father of Cleopatra Selene; the daughter of Mark Antony and Cleopatra.10 Triumvir Marcus Antonius associated with Glaphyra (?); Mistress.6

Family 1

Octavia Minor b. 0069 B.C., d. 0011 B.C.
Child

Family 2

Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt b. 0070-0069 B.C., d. 0030 B.C.
Child

Family 3

Glaphyra (?)

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Antony, Mark.
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Octavia (w. of Mark Antony).
  3. [S917] Antony and Cleopatra, online http://www.rhul.ac.uk/scolar/cl2361/lectures/1.html
  4. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  5. [S1038] e-mail address Ian, Re: Armenian kings
    in "Re: Armenian kings," newsgroup message 22 Feb 2001.
  6. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.
  8. [S904] Matthew George Easton (1823-1894), Easton's.
  9. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm, Strabo 12.3.34, Plutarch, Antony 3. .
  10. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.
  11. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 26.

Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt

b. 0070-0069 B.C., d. 0030 B.C.
Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt|b. 0070-0069 B.C.\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i10380|Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, King of Egypt|b. 0117 B.C., late\nd. 0051 B.C., February/March|p267.htm#i10397|Cleopatra V Tryphaena, Queen of Egypt|d. 0057 B.C.|p267.htm#i10398|Ptolemy I. P. S. I., King of Egypt|b. 0142 B.C.\nd. 0080 B.C.|p268.htm#i13551||||Ptolemy I. P. S. I., King of Egypt|b. 0142 B.C.\nd. 0080 B.C.|p268.htm#i13551||||
FatherPtolemy XII Neos Dionysos, King of Egypt b. 0117 B.C., late, d. 0051 B.C., February/March
MotherCleopatra V Tryphaena, Queen of Egypt d. 0057 B.C.
     Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt died 0030 B.C. At August 30, Alexandria, Egypt. On their failed succession against Emperor Augustus, a stunning defeat with massive defection, she and Mark Antony committed suicide.1 She was a witness where Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa saw his most famous victory won at the Battle of Actium, where he defeated the combined forces of Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Marc Antony 0031 B.C. At 2 September. Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt was a witness where triumvir Marcus Antonius summoned Cleopatra to join him in Syria 0035 B.C.2 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt was a witness where triumvir Marcus Antonius joined by Cleopatra 0037 B.C. At Antioch.2 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt married triumvir Marcus Antonius, son of praetor Marcus Antonius Creticus and Julia, 0037 B.C; His 5th? Her 4th.2,3 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt was given several old Ptolemaic possessions in the Levant by Mark Antony 0038 B.C..2 She associated with triumvir Marcus Antonius, son of praetor Marcus Antonius Creticus and Julia, 0041 B.C. At Tarsus.2,3 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt supports the triumvirs 0043 B.C..2 She witnessed the death of dictator Gaïus Julius Caesar 0044 B.C., 15 March at the Ides of March, Rome, Italy; He was surrounded by conspirators at a meeting of the senate and cut down with twenty-three stab wounds. He died at the foot of a statue of his great rival, Pompey.4,5 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt witnessed the death of Ptolemy XIV Theos Philopator II, King of Egypt 0044 B.C., 3 September; Allegedly poisoned by his consort and sister, Cleopatra VII.6,7,2,3 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt fled Rome on the death of Julius Caesar 0044 B.C..2 She was in Rome, and a statue (of her?) placed in the temple of Venus Genetrix, 0045 B.C. At Italy.2 She married Ptolemy XIV Theos Philopator II, King of Egypt, son of Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, King of Egypt and Cleopatra V Tryphaena, Queen of Egypt, 0047 B.C., February; Her 3rd. s.p.6,3 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt appears on coins without her brother/husband, Ptolemy XIV, the nominal king 0047 B.C..2 Arsinoë IV, Queen of Egypt ruled in opposition of Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt; Queen of Egypt. She married dictator Gaïus Julius Caesar, son of praetor Gaïus Julius Caesar and Aurelia, 0048 B.C., mid August; Her 1st. A liaison.3 By custom of Egptian royalty, she was supposed to marry her brother Ptolemy XIII. She was instead exiled by her brother. She returned to Egypt where she met the Roman, Julius Caesar and married. 0048 B.C. Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt returns to Alexandria 0048 B.C. At Egypt.2 She was a witness where Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator I, King of Egypt expelled Cleopatra VII from Egypt 0048 B.C., Spring.3 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt married Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator I, King of Egypt, son of Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, King of Egypt and Cleopatra V Tryphaena, Queen of Egypt, 0048 B.C., September; Her 2nd. s.p.3 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt was deposed by her husband/brother Ptolemy XIII 0049 B.C..2 Queen of Egypt 0051-0030 B.C.. She was co-ruler with Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator I, King of Egypt; King of Egypt. Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt was born 0070-0069 B.C. At Alexandria, Egypt.2 She was the daughter of Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, King of Egypt and Cleopatra V Tryphaena, Queen of Egypt. Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt was the second daughter of King Ptolemy XII.1 Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt also went by the name of Cleopatra "Goddess Loving her Father".1 She was the mother of Cleopatra Selene; the daughter of Mark Antony and Cleopatra.8

Family 1

triumvir Marcus Antonius b. 0082-0081 B.C., d. 0030 B.C.
Child

Family 2

dictator Gaïus Julius Caesar b. 0100 B.C., July 12-13, d. 0044 B.C., 15 March
Child

Family 3

Ptolemy XIV Theos Philopator II, King of Egypt b. 0060/59 B.C., d. 0044 B.C., 3 September

Family 4

Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator I, King of Egypt b. 0062/1 B.C., d. 0047 B.C., 14/15 January

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator.
  2. [S917] Antony and Cleopatra, online http://www.rhul.ac.uk/scolar/cl2361/lectures/1.html
  3. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm
  4. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Caesar, Julius.
  6. [S284] E.Ptolemy, online http://www.houseofptolemy.org/housegen.htm
  7. [S680] Simon Hornblower and Tony Spawforth, Who's Who (Classical World), pg. 333.
  8. [S931] A.H. Clough, Plutarch's Lives, ANTONY.

K'art'am Aršakuni

d. 0030 B.C.
K'art'am Aršakuni|d. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i15242|Prince K'ujisuni||p130.htm#i15215|Princess of K'art'li||p130.htm#i15216|K'ujis of Kartli||p130.htm#i15214|N. N. of Kartli||p130.htm#i15213|Sayurmak I., King of K'art'li|d. 0159 B.C.|p269.htm#i6045|Princess of Partaw||p130.htm#i15207|
FatherPrince K'ujisuni
MotherPrincess of K'art'li
     K'art'am Aršakuni died 0030 B.C.. He was killed in the same battle as his father-in-law, King Bartom.1 He was the son of Prince K'ujisuni and Princess of K'art'li. K'art'am Aršakuni was the adopted son, and son-in-law, of King Bartom.1 He was a descendant of P'arnavaz.2 He was from Egrisi.2 He was a grandson of K'uji.2 He married N. N. Aršakuni, daughter of Bartom, King of K'art'li.3

Family

N. N. Aršakuni
Child

Citations

  1. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 46, Georgian text.
  2. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 46.
  3. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 47.

John Hyrcanus II, High Priest of Judaea1,2

b. 0100-0102 BCE, d. 0030 B.C.
John Hyrcanus II, High Priest of Judaea|b. 0100-0102 BCE\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i21331|Alexander Jannaeus, High Priest of Judaea|b. 0125 BCE\nd. 0076 B.C.|p268.htm#i21332|Alexandra Salome, High Priestess of Judaea|b. 0140 BCE\nd. 0067 B.C.|p267.htm#i21336|John H. I., High Priest of Judaea|b. 0175 B.C., circa\nd. 0104 B.C.|p268.htm#i21335|N. N. (?)|d. 0104 B.C.|p268.htm#i21353|||||||
FatherAlexander Jannaeus, High Priest of Judaea1 b. 0125 BCE, d. 0076 B.C.
MotherAlexandra Salome, High Priestess of Judaea2 b. 0140 BCE, d. 0067 B.C.
     John Hyrcanus II, High Priest of Judaea died 0030 B.C. At Jerusalem, Judaea. He was executed by Herod the Great, the husband of his granddaughter, Mariamne.3,1,4 He was a witness where Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea saw executed, through the instigation of his sister, Salome, and his mother-in-law, Alexandra, his wife Mariamne's grandfather, Alexandra's father and the Hasmonean High Priest, Alexandra's own daughter Mariamne, and then Alexandra herself 0030-0028 B.C.3 John Hyrcanus II, High Priest of Judaea was lowered in rank, by the Roman Pompey, to high-priest and ethnarch, but withdrawn from him was his jurisdiction all territory outside of Judea proper.5 High Priest at Judea, Palestine, 0063-0040 B.C..1 He assumed the leadership of Judaea on the death of his mother 0067 B.C..2 He was favoured by the Pharisees.5 He was the successor of Judah Aristobulus II, King of Judaea; King of Judaea.1 John Hyrcanus II, High Priest of Judaea was appointed high priest on his father's death 0076 B.C..2 He was made by his mother the elder high priest, on account of his age, as also, besides that, on account of his inactive temper, no way disposing him to disturb the public 0076 B.C..6 He was born 0100-0102 BCE.7 He was the son of Alexander Jannaeus, High Priest of Judaea and Alexandra Salome, High Priestess of Judaea.1,2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S909] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, John Hyrcanus II.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, John Hyrcanus II (k. of Judaea) .
  5. [S585] Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter The Catholic Encyclopedia, VIII:History of the Jews.
  6. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Book I, Chapter 5.
  7. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Extracts with Commentary - he was at least 70 when he died in 30/31 BCE.

Ptolemy XV Caesarion, King of Egypt

b. 0047 B.C., 23 June, d. 0030 B.C., late August
Ptolemy XV Caesarion, King of Egypt|b. 0047 B.C., 23 June\nd. 0030 B.C., late August|p266.htm#i10381|dictator Gaïus Julius Caesar|b. 0100 B.C., July 12-13\nd. 0044 B.C., 15 March|p267.htm#i10345|Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt|b. 0070-0069 B.C.\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i10380|praetor Gaïus Julius Caesar|d. 0084 B.C.|p268.htm#i10344|Aurelia||p80.htm#i10343|Ptolemy X. N. D., King of Egypt|b. 0117 B.C., late\nd. 0051 B.C., February/March|p267.htm#i10397|Cleopatra V. T., Queen of Egypt|d. 0057 B.C.|p267.htm#i10398|
Fatherdictator Gaïus Julius Caesar b. 0100 B.C., July 12-13, d. 0044 B.C., 15 March
MotherCleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt b. 0070-0069 B.C., d. 0030 B.C.
     Ptolemy XV Caesarion, King of Egypt died 0030 B.C., late August. Executed by Octavian when the Romans took over Egypt. He was the last ruler of Egypt, the action of the Romans eclipsing millennia of culture and self-governance.1,2 King of Egypt 0044-0030 B.C.. He was the son of dictator Gaïus Julius Caesar and Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, Queen of Egypt. Ptolemy XV Caesarion, King of Egypt was born 0047 B.C., 23 June.1,2 He was the successor of Ptolemy XIV Theos Philopator II, King of Egypt; nominal co-ruler of Egypt.3

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Ptolemy XV Caesar.
  2. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm
  3. [S917] Antony and Cleopatra, online http://www.rhul.ac.uk/scolar/cl2361/lectures/1.html

Antiochus I Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philoromaios Philhellen, King of Commagene1,2

b. 0100? BCE, d. 0031 B.C.
Antiochus I Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philoromaios Philhellen, King of Commagene|b. 0100? BCE\nd. 0031 B.C.|p266.htm#i6258|Mithradates I Kallinikos, King of Commagene|b. 0120 B.C.\nd. 0063 B.C.|p267.htm#i6260|Laodice Thea|b. 0119 B.C.|p53.htm#i6261|Samus I. T. D., King of Commagene|b. 0150 B.C.\nd. 0100 B.C.|p268.htm#i6292|Pythodoris Arshâmid|b. 0150 B.C.|p53.htm#i6293|Antiochus V. E. P. G., King of Syria|b. 0142 B.C.\nd. 0096 B.C.|p268.htm#i6041|Tryphaena|b. 0141/140 B.C.|p51.htm#i6042|
FatherMithradates I Kallinikos, King of Commagene3 b. 0120 B.C., d. 0063 B.C.
MotherLaodice Thea3 b. 0119 B.C.
     Antiochus I Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philoromaios Philhellen, King of Commagene died 0031 B.C.. King of Commagene at southeastern Anatolia, ancient Syria, 0069-0031 B.C..4 He married Isias Philostorgos, Princess of Commagene, daughter of Mithradates I Kallinikos, King of Commagene and Laodice Thea, 0076 B.C; Possibly siblings.2 Antiochus I Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philoromaios Philhellen, King of Commagene was born 0100? BCE.5 He was the son of Mithradates I Kallinikos, King of Commagene and Laodice Thea.3 Sources: 1. Stuart, R.W. 'Royalty for Commoners', line 412. ; 2. Bryan, K. 'Davidic Descents to the House of Plantagenet' Augustan, Vol. XXV, 16-23.

Family

Isias Philostorgos, Princess of Commagene b. 0100 B.C.
Children

Citations

  1. [S197] Toby Dills, "Descendant of Antiquity," gedcom to Robert Stewart, 5 Feb 1999.
  2. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 412-70.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 412-71.
  4. [S578] Fatih Cimok, Commagene Nemrut, pg. 57.
  5. [S1132] DFA (4000 yr), online, pg. 22.
  6. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 417-70.
  7. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-69.

Agrippina the Elder

b. 0015 B.C., d. 0033 AD
Agrippina the Elder|b. 0015 B.C.\nd. 0033 AD|p266.htm#i10358|Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa|b. 0065 B.C.\nd. 0012 B.C.|p266.htm#i10388|Julia Major|b. 0039 B.C.\nd. 768|p303.htm#i10389|||||||Gaïus Octavius|b. 0063 B.C., September 23\nd. 0014 AD, August 19|p266.htm#i10335|Scribonia||p80.htm#i10376|
FatherConsul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa b. 0065 B.C., d. 0012 B.C.
MotherJulia Major b. 0039 B.C., d. 768
     Agrippina the Elder was born 0015 B.C. At circa. She was the daughter of Consul Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia Major. Agrippina the Elder died 0033 AD at 18 October, Pandateria. The official story was that she committed suicide, she was probably starved to death on the orders of the aging emperor Tiberius.1,2 She was the mother of Emperor Caligula of the Romans; the son of Germanicus Caesar, nephew and adoptive son of Tiberius, and Agrippina the Elder.2 Agrippina the Elder married Germanicus Caesar, son of Nero Drusus Claudius Germanicus and Antonia Minor, in 749 at a.u.c..

Family

Germanicus Caesar b. 0015 B.C., d. 0019 AD
Children

Citations

  1. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Caligula (emp. of Rome).
  3. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  4. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 44.

K'art'am, King of K'art'li

b. 0065 B.C., d. 0033 B.C.
K'art'am, King of K'art'li|b. 0065 B.C.\nd. 0033 B.C.|p266.htm#i6013|Aderki, King of Armenia|b. 0029 B.C., circa|p131.htm#i15244|N. N. of Armenia||p223.htm#i25675|K'art'am Aršakuni|d. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i15242|N. N. Aršakuni||p223.htm#i25677|King of Armenia||p223.htm#i25676||||
FatherAderki, King of Armenia2 b. 0029 B.C., circa
MotherN. N. of Armenia1
     K'art'am, King of K'art'li was the successor of Aderki, King of Armenia; 10th King of Kartli.1 K'art'am, King of K'art'li died 0033 B.C.. Killed in the same battle as his father-in-law, to whom he had been made heir.3 He married N. N. Aršakuni, daughter of Bartom, King of K'art'li and Princess of Armenia, 0040 B.C. At circa; 4th cousins.4 K'art'am, King of K'art'li was the predecessor of P'arsman I, King of K'art'li; 12th (co-)King of Kartli.5 K'art'am, King of K'art'li was the son of Aderki, King of Armenia and N. N. of Armenia.1,2 K'art'am, King of K'art'li was born 0065 B.C.. He was given the land by Armazi, K'art'li south of the Mtkuari, from Xunan as far as the head of the Mtkuari, and all Klarjet'i.6 He was a descendant of K'ujis.4 He was adopted by his father-in-law..3 Sources: Bryan, K. 'Davidic Descents to the House of Plantagenet' Augustan, Vol. XXV, 16-23.7 11th (co-)King of Kartli at Transcaucasia.5 Prince of Kaudjide.3 He was co-ruler with Bartom, King of K'art'li; 11th (co-)King of Kartli.6

Family

N. N. Aršakuni b. 0060 B.C.
Children

Citations

  1. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 49.
  2. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chap. 4.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-69.
  4. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Ch. 4.
  5. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle.
  6. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 52.
  7. [S197] Toby Dills, "Descendant of Antiquity," gedcom to Robert Stewart, 5 Feb 1999.

Herod Philp I, tetrarchês of the northern territories1

b. 0020 B.C., d. 0034 CE
Herod Philp I, tetrarchês of the northern territories|b. 0020 B.C.\nd. 0034 CE|p266.htm#i21280|Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea|b. 0073 B.C.\nd. 0004 B.C., March/April|p266.htm#i21276||||Antipater I., procurator of Judaea|d. 0043 B.C.|p267.htm#i21278|Cypros of Petra||p191.htm#i21279|||||||
FatherHerod I "the Great", King of Judaea2 b. 0073 B.C., d. 0004 B.C., March/April
     Tetrarchês of the northern territories at Palestine 0004 B.C. to 0034 CE.3 Herod Philp I, tetrarchês of the northern territories witnessed the will of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea 0004 B.C; After his death his kingdom was divided among three of his sons. He'd altered his will three times, and killed his firstborn son.1,4 Herod Philp I, tetrarchês of the northern territories had the land east of Jordan, between Caesarea Philippi and Bethabara, in the division of his father's realm following his death 0004 B.C. At Palestine.1 He was born 0020 B.C..5 He was the son of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea.2 Herod Philp I, tetrarchês of the northern territories died 0034 CE.5 He was the successor of Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea; King of Judaea.6,7,4 Herod Philp I, tetrarchês of the northern territories was less extravagant a ruler than any of his brothers, avoiding prolonged trips to Rome, instead travelling extensively in his territory and devoting his time to his subjects.5 He he had Augustus and Tiberius as patrons.8

Citations

  1. [S904] Matthew George Easton (1823-1894), Easton's.
  2. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, AJ:XVIII:5:4.
  3. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, Tetrachês: a regional ruler with less power and status than a client-king or ethnarch .
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Herod.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Philip (k. of Judaea).
  6. [S275] ., KJV, Matt. 2:1-22; Luke 1:5; Acts 23:35.
  7. [S912] Holdt Family Roots, online http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/tree/…+Lalou.htm.
  8. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html

Aristobulus the Hasmonean1

b. 0052 BCE, d. 0035 BCE
Aristobulus the Hasmonean|b. 0052 BCE\nd. 0035 BCE|p266.htm#i24649|Alexander II the Hasmonean|d. 0049 B.C.|p267.htm#i21329|Alexandra the Hasmonean|b. 0101 B.C.\nd. 0028 B.C.|p266.htm#i21330|Judah A. I., King of Judaea|b. 0100-0098 BCE\nd. 0049 B.C.|p267.htm#i21333||||John H. I., High Priest of Judaea|b. 0100-0102 BCE\nd. 0030 B.C.|p266.htm#i21331||||
FatherAlexander II the Hasmonean1 d. 0049 B.C.
MotherAlexandra the Hasmonean1 b. 0101 B.C., d. 0028 B.C.
     Aristobulus the Hasmonean died 0035 BCE. He was murdered by his brother-in-law, Herod the Great.1 He came to the attention of Marc Antony 0036 BCE.1 He was born 0052 BCE.2 He was the son of Alexander II the Hasmonean and Alexandra the Hasmonean.1 Aristobulus the Hasmonean was extraordinarily handsome.1

Citations

  1. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Extracts with Commentary.
  2. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Extracts with Commentary - he is 16 when he comes to Marc Antony's attention in 36 BCE.

Tigranes V, basileus of Greater Armenia

d. 0036 CE
Tigranes V, basileus of Greater Armenia|d. 0036 CE|p266.htm#i21273|Alexander of Judaea|b. 0030 B.C.\nd. 0007 B.C.|p266.htm#i21274|Glaphyra Archelaid||p282.htm#i21275|Herod I "the Great", King of Judaea|b. 0073 B.C.\nd. 0004 B.C., March/April|p266.htm#i21276|Mariamne the Hasmonean|b. 0057 B.C.\nd. 0029 B.C.|p266.htm#i21277|Archelaus I. S., King of Cappadocia|b. 0056 B.C. ?\nd. 0017 AD|p266.htm#i21347|Unknown an Armenian?||p6.htm#i23190|
FatherAlexander of Judaea1,2 b. 0030 B.C., d. 0007 B.C.
MotherGlaphyra Archelaid1,2
     Basileus of Greater Armenia at Transcaucasia 0006-0010 AD.3 Tigranes V, basileus of Greater Armenia was appointed king of Armenia by the emperor Claudius, but was later recalled to Rome, tried and deposed 0015 CE.4 He died 0036 CE. He was executed. d.s.p.5,6 He was the son of Alexander of Judaea and Glaphyra Archelaid.1,2 Tigranes V, basileus of Greater Armenia was king of Armenia, accused at Rome, and died childless.1 He was betrothed by his grandfather, Herod the Great, to the daughter of Pheroras.7 He had Augustus and Tiberius as patrons.5 He was the oldest of two sons of Herod's second Hasmonean son Alexander.5,4 He was the son of Alexandros son of Herod I of Judaea.8 Also called Dikran.5 He was the son of Glaphyra Archelaid; the ancestress of Kings Tigranes V and VI of Armenia.9

Citations

  1. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews-Book XVIII, Chapter 5, 4.
  2. [S1296] Anne Elizabeth Redgate, TPoE: Armenians, fig 4.1.
  3. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html, Basileus: a client-king.
  4. [S916] Into his Own, online http://religion.rutgers.edu/iho/index.html
  5. [S915] Herodian Politics, online http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kchanson/politics.html
  6. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, AJ:XVIII:5:4.
  7. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews-Book XVII, Chapter 1, 2.
  8. [S1038] e-mail address Ian, Re: Armenian kings
    in "Re: Armenian kings," newsgroup message 22 Feb 2001.
  9. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm

Tiberius Claudius Nero1

b. 0042 B.C., d. 0037 AD, March 16
Tiberius Claudius Nero|b. 0042 B.C.\nd. 0037 AD, March 16|p266.htm#i10363|Tiberius Claudius Nero||p80.htm#i10361|Livia Drusilla|b. 0058 B.C., January 30\nd. 0029 AD|p266.htm#i10362|Appius Claudius Nero||p80.htm#i10386||||Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus||p80.htm#i10400|Alfidia||p80.htm#i10404|
FatherTiberius Claudius Nero2
MotherLivia Drusilla2 b. 0058 B.C., January 30, d. 0029 AD
     Tiberius Claudius Nero lost his powers, which were not immediately renewed, 0001 B.C..2 He had a disconcerting manner; a slow, methodical way of speaking that seemed intended to conceal his meaning rather than make it plain, and he was diligent.3 He was not handsome, and as a teenager he was tall and broad-shouldered, but his complexion was bad, and his nose had a pronounced hook, something though that was typically Roman.3 He was a witness where Gaïus Octavius adopted the 44-year old son of Livia's first husband, along with his last surving grandson, the 15-year old Agrippa Postumus (the younger brother of Gaius and Lucius) 0004 AD, June 26.4 Tiberius Claudius Nero witnessed the adoption of Germanicus Caesar 0004 AD, June 26; He was adopted by Tiberius, the heir of Emperor Augustus, to insure the the Emperorship would return to the family of Augustus, in favor over Tiberius' own son.4 Tiberius Claudius Nero was adopted 0004 AD, June 26; He was adopted as heir to the Emperor Augustus which at last secured for him the succession as Emperor, but he was also forced to himself adopt his nephew, Germanicus (and keep Augustus's line on the throne), who would succeed in favor of his own natural son.2,4 As of 0004 AD, also called Tiberius Iulius Caesar.1 He announced (given the attention Augustus was showing to Juliian successors) his withdrawal from public life and went to live on Rhodes with some personal friends and an astrologer, Thrasyllus 0006 B.C..2 He was granted tribunician power (tribunicia potestas) for five years by Emperor Augustus, and an extensive commission in the East 0006 B.C..2,5 He was Consul, for the 2nd time, 0007 B.C..6 He married Julia Major, daughter of Gaïus Octavius and Scribonia, 0011 B.C., February 12; His 2nd. Her 3rd (widow). s.p.2,5 Tiberius Claudius Nero was obliged by the Emperor Augustus to divorce his first wife, Vispania, to whom he was deeply attached, and marry his daughter, the twice widowed Julia 0012 B.C..5 He received important military commissions in Pannonia and Germany and proved very successful in the field 0012-0006 B.C..2 He was Consul, for the 1st time 0013 B.C..2 As of 0014 AD, August 19, also called Tiberius Caesar Augustus.1 Emperor at Roman Empire 0014-0037 AD.2 He witnessed the death of Germanicus Caesar 0019 AD at October 10, Antioch; Historians have been debating ever since whether it was due to natural causes or murder. In any case, Agrippina was firmly convinced that Tiberius, who had become emperor in was jealous of Germanicus' popularity and had had him poisoned.2,7 Tiberius Claudius Nero was granted praetorian rank after returning from the East 0019-0013 B.C..2 He oversaw one of his stepfather's proudest successes; in which the Parthians, who had captured the eagles of the legions lost in the failed eastern campaigns of M. Crassus (53 B.C.), Decidius Saxa (40 B.C.), and Mark Antony (36 B.C.), formally returned them to the Romans 0020 B.C..2 He became a quaestor and was given the privilege of standing for the praetorship and consulship five years in advance of the age prescribed by law 0024 B.C..2 He assumed (at age 14) the gown of manhood (toga virilis) and Augustus led him into the forum 0027 B.C..2 He took part in Augustus's triumph for the Actium campaign, riding on the left of Augustus in the triumphal chariot 0029 B.C..2 He was the successor of Gaïus Octavius; Emperor.2 Tiberius Claudius Nero witnessed the death of Agrippina the Elder 0033 AD at 18 October, Pandateria; The official story was that she committed suicide, she was probably starved to death on the orders of the aging emperor Tiberius.6,7 Tiberius Claudius Nero became a tyrannical recluse in his last years, inflicting a reign of terror against the major personages of Rome.3 He died 0037 AD, March 16 at Capreae [Capri], near Naples. He was possibly murdered by smothering.3,1 He was the predecessor of Emperor Caligula of the Romans; Emperor.2 Tiberius Claudius Nero was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla.2 Tiberius Claudius Nero was born 0042 B.C. At November 16.2,3 He was related to Germanicus Caesar; the nephew and adoptive son of Tiberius.7 Tiberius Claudius Nero was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla, and the adopted son of Augustus.3

Family

Julia Major b. 0039 B.C., d. 768

Citations

  1. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 29.
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Tiberius.
  4. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 43.
  5. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 25.
  6. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Caligula (emp. of Rome).

Artabanus III, King of Parthia

d. 0038 AD
Artabanus III, King of Parthia|d. 0038 AD|p266.htm#i15272|Viceroy of Hyrcania|b. 0035? BCE|p53.htm#i6244|Princess of Parthia Aršakuni|b. 0031 B.C.|p53.htm#i6245|||||||Phraates I., King of Parthia|b. 0072 B.C.\nd. 0002 B.C.|p266.htm#i6246||||
FatherViceroy of Hyrcania1 b. 0035? BCE
MotherPrincess of Parthia Aršakuni1 b. 0031 B.C.
     Artabanus III, King of Parthia was the successor of Vonones I "Ahamen", King of Armenia; King of Parthia.2,3 Artabanus III, King of Parthia was elected to replace Vonones I, whose Roman lifestyle displeased the Parthians, 0010 AD.3 King of Media Atropatene 0010-0038 AD.3 King of Parthia 0010-0038 AD.3 He was a witness where Vonones I "Ahamen", King of Armenia defeated by Artabanus III on which he fled to Armenia where he secured the throne there 0012 AD.3 Artabanus III, King of Parthia was a violently anti-Roman sovereign, who was eager to drive Rome out of Asia.1 He was a witness where Vonones I "Ahamen", King of Armenia deposed from the Armenian throne by Artabanus II and fled first to Syria, where the Romans kept him in kingly style, then removed to Cilicia at Artabanus's request 0018 AD.3 Artabanus III, King of Parthia witnessed the death of Vonones I "Ahamen", King of Armenia 0019 AD at Antioch, Syria; Vonones went to Antioch in Syria, where the Roman governor kept him in custody until he was killed in an attempt to escape.4 Artabanus III, King of Parthia died 0038 AD.3 He was the son of Viceroy of Hyrcania and Princess of Parthia Aršakuni.1 Artabanus III, King of Parthia was also of the race of Arsaces.5 He was the son of a viceroy of Hyrcania and was only Arsacid on his mother's side.1 He was the ancestor of the later Arsacids of Parthia, 78-222, the Arsacids of Armenia, 63-428, and of players in Medieal Armenia, Byzantium, and Western Europe.6 The descent of Artabanus III and later Parthian and Armenian kings from the kings of Atropatenian Media is the morely likely one of the two major hypotheses accounting for their origin.7

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, from Iran, history of; The "anti-Hellenistic" period (AD 12-162).
  2. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  3. [S285] Parthia.com, online http://www.fivepointstech.com/parthia/
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Vonones I.
  5. [S913] Josephus ben Matthias of Judaea, Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews-Book XVIII, Chap. 2, para. 4.
  6. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm
  7. [S1052] Egyptian Royal Genealogy, online http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Egypt/index.htm, See the discussion in Settipani..