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Burgomaster Willem Selijns1

b. circa 1500
      Arms: Couped, on gules three pals argent; on sable six crosslets (3,2,1) or.2 Burgomaster Willem Selijns was born circa 1500.3 He married Stijntje Willems before 1526.4,3 Burgomaster Willem Selijns was had eight children.4,5 He was a burgomaster of the town, and where the Selijns' coat-of-arms was found to adorn his home at Sint-Truiden, Brabant, Belgium.4,3 He died at Sint-Truiden, Brabant, Belgium. He was murdered coming from the City Hall.3

Family

Stijntje Willems b. circa 1506
Child

Citations

  1. [S207] ., ".", Vol 104 Issue 3, Jul 1973, pg. 163.
  2. [S1357] LL.B., A.M. Louis P. De Boer, "Selyns-Kock-Webber", pg. 369.
  3. [S207] ., ".", Vol 63 #2 Apr 1932, pg. 115.
  4. [S358] F.A.S.G. George Olin Zabrisjie, "Anneke Jans", pg 162, Anneke Jans; Wallis & Selyns Families.
  5. [S359] ., "Rev. Henricus Selyns", pg 115.

Bartelmeus Webber

b. 10 November 1602
Bartelmeus Webber|b. 10 Nov 1602|p278.htm#i5155|Wolfert Webber Sr.|b. c 1565|p38.htm#i4125|Annetgen Kock|b. Dec 1579|p38.htm#i4126|||||||Henrick H. Kock|b. 1548\nd. 28 May 1610|p441.htm#i4127|Agnietgen J. Selyns|b. 25 Aug 1551\nd. 4 Nov 1617|p441.htm#i4128|
FatherWolfert Webber Sr.1 b. circa 1565
MotherAnnetgen Kock1 b. December 1579
     Bartelmeus Webber was baptized on 10 November 1602 at the Reformed Oude Kerk, Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands; "Parents: Wolfert Webber, Annetgen Coppen; witness, Hendrick De beyer."1 He was the son of Wolfert Webber Sr. and Annetgen Kock.1 Bartelmeus Webber died. Died young.1

Citations

  1. [S358] F.A.S.G. George Olin Zabrisjie, "Anneke Jans", pg 159, Anneke Jans; Webber Family.

Bartelomeus Webber

b. 20 November 1605
Bartelomeus Webber|b. 20 Nov 1605|p278.htm#i5156|Wolfert Webber Sr.|b. c 1565|p38.htm#i4125|Annetgen Kock|b. Dec 1579|p38.htm#i4126|||||||Henrick H. Kock|b. 1548\nd. 28 May 1610|p441.htm#i4127|Agnietgen J. Selyns|b. 25 Aug 1551\nd. 4 Nov 1617|p441.htm#i4128|
FatherWolfert Webber Sr. b. circa 1565
MotherAnnetgen Kock b. December 1579
     Bartelomeus Webber was baptized on 20 November 1605 at the Reformed Oude Kerk, Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands; "Parents, Wolfert Webber, Anneken Webbers; witnesses, Wouter van Dueren, Jan kock, Lijsbet Willems."1 He was the son of Wolfert Webber Sr. and Annetgen Kock. Bartelomeus Webber died. Died young.1

Citations

  1. [S358] F.A.S.G. George Olin Zabrisjie, "Anneke Jans", pg 159, Anneke Jans; Webber Family.

Agniestgen Kock

b. 7 November 1574
Agniestgen Kock|b. 7 Nov 1574|p278.htm#i5466|Henrick Henricksz Kock|b. 1548\nd. 28 May 1610|p441.htm#i4127|Agnietgen Jans Selyns|b. 25 Aug 1551\nd. 4 Nov 1617|p441.htm#i4128|Henrick Kock|b. c 1518|p134.htm#i15562||||Jan W. Selyns|b. 20 May 1526\nd. 1561|p438.htm#i4537|Niesje van Rijckels|b. c 1532\nd. 7 Sep 1572|p439.htm#i4538|
FatherHenrick Henricksz Kock b. 1548, d. 28 May 1610
MotherAgnietgen Jans Selyns b. 25 August 1551, d. 4 November 1617
     Agniestgen Kock was baptized on 7 November 1574 at the Reformed Oude Kerk, Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands; "Agnies(tgen), parents, Heij'drik Cock, Nies Jans; witnesses, Lambert Louris, Stij' Jan's."1 She was the daughter of Henrick Henricksz Kock and Agnietgen Jans Selyns. Agniestgen Kock died. Died young.1

Citations

  1. [S358] F.A.S.G. George Olin Zabrisjie, "Anneke Jans", pg 161, Anneke Jans; Cocks Family.

Heijndrick Kock

b. 17 November 1581
Heijndrick Kock|b. 17 Nov 1581|p278.htm#i5469|Henrick Henricksz Kock|b. 1548\nd. 28 May 1610|p441.htm#i4127|Agnietgen Jans Selyns|b. 25 Aug 1551\nd. 4 Nov 1617|p441.htm#i4128|Henrick Kock|b. c 1518|p134.htm#i15562||||Jan W. Selyns|b. 20 May 1526\nd. 1561|p438.htm#i4537|Niesje van Rijckels|b. c 1532\nd. 7 Sep 1572|p439.htm#i4538|
FatherHenrick Henricksz Kock b. 1548, d. 28 May 1610
MotherAgnietgen Jans Selyns b. 25 August 1551, d. 4 November 1617
     Heijndrick Kock was baptized on 17 November 1581 at the Reformed Oude Kerk, Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands; "Parents, Hijndrick Cock, schorteldockwerver [a cloth weaver, type uncertain], Nies Jans; witnesses, none."1 He was the son of Henrick Henricksz Kock and Agnietgen Jans Selyns. Heijndrick Kock died. Died young.1

Citations

  1. [S358] F.A.S.G. George Olin Zabrisjie, "Anneke Jans", pg 161, Anneke Jans; Cocks Family.

Warin FitzGerold1

Warin FitzGerold||p278.htm#i24941|Henry FitzGerold|d. c 1231|p390.htm#i24921|Ermentrude Talbot|b. c 1200?|p49.htm#i24922|Chamberlain Henry fitz Gerold|d. bt 1174 - 1175|p374.htm#i24923|Maud de Chesney|d. b 1198|p381.htm#i24924|Gilbert Talbot of Linton|b. c 1156?\nd. b 13 Feb 1230/31|p390.htm#i19760||||
FatherHenry FitzGerold1 d. circa 1231
MotherErmentrude Talbot2 b. circa 1200?
     Warin FitzGerold was the son of Henry FitzGerold and Ermentrude Talbot.1,2 Warin FitzGerold died. D.s.p.1 He married Agnes (?) before 1234.1

Family

Agnes (?)

Citations

  1. [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VII, Chart between 48-49.
  2. [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VIII, Chart between 48-49.

Queen of the Hittites Pudukhepa of Lawazantiya1

Queen of the Hittites Pudukhepa of Lawazantiya||p278.htm#i5890|priest of Ishtar Pentipsharri of Lawazantiya||p54.htm#i6421||||||||||||||||
Fatherpriest of Ishtar Pentipsharri of Lawazantiya2
     Queen of the Hittites Pudukhepa of Lawazantiya was the daughter of priest of Ishtar Pentipsharri of Lawazantiya.2 Queen of the Hittites Pudukhepa of Lawazantiya died. It is not known when either she or her husband died, despite all the other documentary details available. Nor has their tomb been discovered among the wealth of architectural structures at Hattusha.2 Letter from Egyptian King Ramses II to Hittite Queen Puduhepa: "The king of Egypt, the Great King, the son of the Sun, beloved of the God Amon, the First Great king, the king of the land of Egypt, will speak thus to the Great Queen Puduhepa of the Hatti land, my sister: Look! Ramses, beloved of the God Amon, the Great King of the land of Egypt, is well. His houses, his sons, his armies, his horses, his chariots and the things in his country are (also) very well. May you, Great Queen of the Hatti land, my sister, also be well!! May your houses, sons, horses, chariots and the things in your country (also) be well!! Here, Ramses II addressing Queen Puduhepa as ‘Great Queen’ and ‘my sister’, says that her decision to give her daughter is also approved by the gods, and he entreats the gods thus:...” And you (gods) give her to the house of the king! And she will be the ruling (queen) of the Egyptians..."(KBo XXVIII 23). Letter from Egyptian King Ramses II to Hittite Queen Puduhepa: "The Great King, the king of Egypt, son of the Sun, Ramses beloved of Amon, speaks thus: Speak to the queen of the Hatti land, the great Queen Puduhepa: See then, I, your brother, am well. My houses, my sons, my armies, my horses, my chariots and the things in my lands, are very well (in comfort). May you, my sister,(also) be well! May your houses, your sons, your armies, your horses, your chariots, your nobles, and the things in your lands be very very well! Speak thus to my sister: Look now! My messengers have come to me together with my sister’s messengers and have brought me news that my brother, the king of the Hatti land, the Great King, is in good health... Speak thus to my sister: The great King, the king of the Hatti land, has written to me thus: ‘Let the people come to pour sweet-smelling oil on my daughter’s head and let them take her to the house of the Great King, the king of Egypt, my brother. ‘Look now! My brother wrote thus to me. This decision written to me by brother is wonderful. The Sun God has approved of him. The Weather God has approved of him. And the Egyptian gods and the Hatti gods have approved of him for making this fine decision in order to join two great lands into one forever..."EDEL 1953.262-273 (KUB lll 63). She and Great King Khattushili III of the Hittites had prayers composed which open with an invocation to the Sun Goddess of Arinna, the chief goddess of the pantheon, and go on to thank her for her favour. The prayer begins as follows:


O Sun Goddess of the city of Arinna,
my lady, mistress of our lands.
Queen of Heaven and earth,
mistress of the kings and queens of the land of Hatti.


Queen of the Hittites Pudukhepa of Lawazantiya was not the only wife of Khattushili III, for in a letter Puduhepa writes: ..."The daughters of the king whom I discovered when I came to the palace gave birth with my assistance, and I raised their children. I also raised the children who had already been born and I made them commanders in the army.".2 She married Great King Khattushili III of the Hittites, son of Great King Murshili II of the Hittites, 1275/4 BCE at circa.3,2 Queen of the Hittites Pudukhepa of Lawazantiya was a "handmaiden of Ishtar" in the city of Lavazantiya at Kumanni, Anatolia.2 Sources: 1. Edwards, I.E.S., Gadd, C.J., Hammond, N.G.L. and Sollberger, E. (eds.) 'The Cambridge Ancient History' 3rd Ed., Vol.II, #2, pp.129, 260. She was the mother, according to written sources, of both of the daughters sent as brides to Ramses II of Egypt, and of Hattusili’s successor Tuthaliya IV.2 She was the daughter of a powerful high priest from the Hurrian country of Kizzuwatna.4 She adopted Arinnitti, the Hittite sun goddess and principal deity and patron of the Hittite empire and monarchy, as her protectress; the queen's seal showed her in the goddess' embrace.5

Family

Great King Khattushili III of the Hittites b. 1326 B.C., d. 1245 B.C.
Child

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Puduhepa (Hittite q.) .
  2. [S1355] Muhibbe Darga, Darga.
  3. [S30] Jack M. Sasson, Ancient Near East, Vol II, Khattushili III, King of the Hittites.
  4. [S30] Jack M. Sasson, Ancient Near East, 1:565.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Arinnitti (Hittite goddess).

Athenagenes Souren-Pahlav1

Athenagenes Souren-Pahlav||p278.htm#i5971|Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia|b. c 319?\nd. 347|p286.htm#i5973|N. N. Aršakuni||p51.htm#i5974|Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia|b. c 269?\nd. 341|p286.htm#i6344||||Tiran, King of Armenia|d. 350?|p286.htm#i5975||||
FatherYusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia2 b. circa 319?, d. 347
MotherN. N. Aršakuni2
     Athenagenes Souren-Pahlav was the son of Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia and N. N. Aršakuni.2 Athenagenes Souren-Pahlav led his life, like his brother Pap, in impiety, lewdness and God-hating.3 He died at the church in the awan at Ashtishat, Taron. "While ... in great merriment, reclining in the episcopate eating and drinking, suddenly the angel of the Lord appeared in the form of a bolt of lightning," and struck he and his brother dead where they sat. The other people who were with them in the temple making merry and sitting with them, up and fled, one and all, out of the temple. Out of terror not one of them turned back, nor did anyone else dare think of going inside or even of approaching the door which had remained open when they fled. On the following days, no one dared to cross the threshold. Thus did the two brothers, Pap and At'anagenes, perish, felled inside the episcopate in the spot where they reclined. The doors of the temple remained open, and no one dared to approach. Finally their bodies rotten, spoiled, and decomposed, and their bones came apart and scattered.3 Either he married his own great-aunt (Bambish) or the genealogies are confused as to who her parents are. Also called At'anagines.2 He was younger of twin sons of Yusik and the daughter of Tiran, son of King Xosrov Kotak.2 He and Pap Souren-Pahlav led their lives in impiety, lewdness and God-hating, every day of their lives passed in great audacity, without the fear of God before their eyes, and conducted themselves in a licentious way, in adultery, and ridiculed and scorned the order of God.4 Athenagenes Souren-Pahlav married Bambishu, Princess of Armenia, daughter of Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia, before 335.1,5,6

Family

Bambishu, Princess of Armenia b. 315
Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-56.
  2. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 5.
  3. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 19.
  4. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 60.
  5. [S1037] DFA (Bagrat), online http://www.ut.ee/~votan/articles/bagrat.htm
    , Part 2, V.
  6. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 15.

konungr á Hringaríki Sigurdr Hjörtr Helgasson1

konungr á Hringaríki Sigurdr Hjörtr Helgasson||p278.htm#i8320|Helgi "inn hvassi" of Ringerike||p111.htm#i13335|Aslaug Sigurdsdóttir||p111.htm#i13336|||||||Sigurdr o., King of the Danes||p111.htm#i13337||||
FatherHelgi "inn hvassi" of Ringerike2
MotherAslaug Sigurdsdóttir2
     Konungr á Hringaríki Sigurdr Hjörtr Helgasson was the son of Helgi "inn hvassi" of Ringerike and Aslaug Sigurdsdóttir.2 King at Ringerike.2 Konungr á Hringaríki Sigurdr Hjörtr Helgasson was only twelve years old he killed in single combat the berserk Hildebrand, and eleven others of his comrades.2 He died. Killed on a solitary ride by the berserk, Hake (not Hake Gandulfsson), who came against him with thirty men, and they fought. Sigurd Hjort fell there, after killing twelve of Hake's men; and Hake himself lost one hand, and had three other wounds.2 Konungr á Hringaríki Sigurdr Hjörtr Helgasson also went by the name of Sigurd "Stag" of Ringerike or Hart. He was stouter and stronger than any other man, and his equal could not be seen for a handsome appearance.2 He married Thórný Klakk-Haraldsdóttir, daughter of Klakk-Harald av Jylland.

Family

Thórný Klakk-Haraldsdóttir
Child

Citations

  1. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Skjöld, King of Danes, 80.
  2. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, Halfdan the Black Saga.

Ragnhild Haraldsdóttir

Ragnhild Haraldsdóttir||p278.htm#i8323|Haraldr Gullskeggr, konungr í Sogni||p278.htm#i8324||||||||||||||||
FatherHaraldr Gullskeggr, konungr í Sogni
     Ragnhild Haraldsdóttir was the daughter of Haraldr Gullskeggr, konungr í Sogni. Ragnhild Haraldsdóttir married Hálfdan Svarti Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold, son of Gudrødr Veidikonung Hálfdanarson, King of Vestfold and Ása Haraldsdóttir; His 1st.1 Ragnhild Haraldsdóttir died. She died the same winter her father did.1

Family

Hálfdan Svarti Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold b. circa 820, d. circa 860
Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, Halfdan the Black Saga.

Haraldr Gullskeggr, konungr í Sogni1

     Haraldr Gullskeggr, konungr í Sogni died. Died in the winter after giving his grandson the kingdom.2 King at Sogn.2 Haraldr Gullskeggr, konungr í Sogni also went by the name of Harald "Goldbeard".2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway.
  2. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, Halfdan the Black Saga.

Haraldr Granraudi, King of Agdir

     King at Agder.1 Haraldr Granraudi, King of Agdir declined the proposal of Gudrod Halfdansson to marry his daughter, and the ambassadors returned to the king, and told him the result of their errand.1 Haraldr Granraudi, King of Agdir also went by the name of Harald "Redbeard" of Agder. He died. Killed in battle against Gudrod Halfdansson (the Hunting King) who attacked Agder when his offer of marriage to Haralds daughter was refused.1

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.

King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson

King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson||p278.htm#i8328|King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson||p278.htm#i9461|Sólveig Hálfdansdóttir of Solør||p72.htm#i9465|Ingjaldr I. Ö., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9462|Gauthildar A.||p72.htm#i9463|Hálfdan G. S. of Solør||p72.htm#i9466||||
FatherKing of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson1
MotherSólveig Hálfdansdóttir of Solør1
     King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson was the son of King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson and Sólveig Hálfdansdóttir of Solør.1 King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson was brought up in Soleyar, in the house of his mother's brother Solve.1 King at Raumerike.1 He subdued Soleyar (his foster father's homeland), and then proceeded with his army into Raumarike, plundered there, and laid that district also in subjection by force of arms.1 He subdued a great part of Hedemark, Toten, Hadeland, and much of Westfold.1 He took possession of Värmland after his brothers death, raised scatt (tax) from it, and placed earls over it as long as he lived.1 He was captured by the Swedes who'd killed his Uncle, and made their Chief (in deference to his Yngling blood?).1 King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson also went by the name of Halfdan "White Leg". He was founded a pagan temple at Skaereid, Skiringsale. He married Ása Eysteinsdóttir, daughter of Eysteinn Hardrádi of Uppland and Sólveig Hálfdanardóttir (?).1 King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson was a witness where Sölvi Hálfdansson of Solør took in his nephew, Halfdan Huitbein, to raise in Soleyar.1 King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson witnessed the death of Sölvi Hálfdansson of Solør; Those of the Swedes who had more understanding found that the dear times proceeded from there being a greater number of people on the land than it could support, and that the king could not be blamed for this. They took the resolution, therefore, to cross the Eida forest with all their men, and came quite unexpectedly into Soleyar, where they put to death King Solve.1 King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson died. He lived to be an old man, and died in his bed at Toten.1 He was the successor of King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson; King of Vestfold.2 King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson was buried in Skaereid, Skiringsale, Vëstfold. After he had died, his body was transported to Westfold, and was buried under a mound at a place called Skaereid, at Skiringsale.

So says Thjodolf: --

"Halfdan, esteemed by friends and foes,
Receives at last life's deep repose:
The aged man at last, though late,
Yielded in Toten to stern fate.
At Skiringsale hangs o'er his grave
A rock, that seems to mourn the brave Halfdan,
to chiefs and people dear,
Received from all a silent tear."1
King of Vestfold at Norway between 710 and 750.3 He was the predecessor of King of Raumerike and Vestfold Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdanarson; King.1,4

Family

Ása Eysteinsdóttir b. circa 718
Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandinavian, Vestfold, ? -c. 710.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandinavian, Vestfold, c. 710-c. 750.
  4. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandinavian, Vestfold.

John Hamilton Philp

b. 12 April 1810
John Hamilton Philp|b. 12 Apr 1810|p278.htm#i6469|Thomas Philp|b. 26 Sep 1779|p58.htm#i7064|Janet Hamilton|b. 9 Apr 1778|p58.htm#i7065|William Philp|b. 8 Nov 1752|p135.htm#i15695|Janet Millar|b. c 1754|p135.htm#i15696|John Hamilton|b. 27 Oct 1751|p135.htm#i15693|Elizabeth Ireland|b. 2 Jan 1757|p135.htm#i15694|
FatherThomas Philp1 b. 26 September 1779
MotherJanet Hamilton b. 9 April 1778
     As 2nd son, named after his mother's father, per Scottish tradition. John Hamilton Philp was born on 12 April 1810 at Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.2,3,4 He was the son of Thomas Philp and Janet Hamilton.1 John Hamilton Philp was christened on 19 April 1810 at Church Parish, Edinburgh, County of Midlothian, Scotland.5,3,4 He was of Erie County at Pennsylvania. He owned a rocky farm, "leased it for a long term of years." Someone else made a fortune on oil on the place.6 He married Harriet Huddleston, daughter of William? Huddleston, before 1835. John Hamilton Philp died at Canada.6

Family

Harriet Huddleston b. 1813?
Child

Citations

  1. [S22] Scots Origins (published), Given under seal from the General Register Office, New Register House, 24 Mar 1999, # 9577.
  2. [S22] Scots Origins (published), B M 12 APR 1810 PHILP JOHN PHILP THOMAS HAMILTON JANET EDINBURGH MIDLOTHIAN THOMAS PHILP/JANET HAMILTON FR358 685 1 41 .
  3. [S254] 1880 census, internet, batch #'s 56313-3, 56314-1.
  4. [S415] ., OPR Baptism Record: Philp, John, 24 Mar 1999, Scots Origins.
  5. [S229] International Genealogical Index (IGI), batch # 7508621 source call # 0935378 (Patron Sheets, 1960-1991), sheet: 95, type: film.
  6. [S1611] Letter, Mary E. Philp to family.

Mary Rudderow

b. 1681
Mary Rudderow|b. 1681|p278.htm#i6477|John Rudderow Jr.|b. c 1640\nd. 12 May 1733|p458.htm#i4461|Lucy Stiles|b. c 1660|p42.htm#i4462|John Rudderow Sr.|b. c 1614|p61.htm#i7765|Anne Jones|b. c 1618|p61.htm#i7766|N. N. Stiles|b. c 1636|p54.htm#i6479||||
FatherJohn Rudderow Jr.1 b. circa 1640, d. 12 May 1733
MotherLucy Stiles1 b. circa 1660
     Mary Rudderow was born in 1681.1 She was the daughter of John Rudderow Jr. and Lucy Stiles.1 Mary Rudderow married Nicholas Caulau circa 1700.1 Mary Rudderow died. She died shortly after marrying, leaving no issue.1

Family

Nicholas Caulau b. circa 1675

Citations

  1. [S574] Henry Reed Stiles, The Stiles Family, pg. 632.

Philip de Braose, 2nd Baron Bramber

b. circa 1070
Philip de Braose, 2nd Baron Bramber|b. c 1070|p278.htm#i7154|William de Braose, 1st Baron Bramber|b. c 1036\nd. bt 1093 - 1096|p353.htm#i18089|Eve, dame de Boessey-le-Chatel|b. c 1050|p166.htm#i18625||||Gunnor d' Ivry|b. c 1015|p166.htm#i18622|||||||
FatherWilliam de Braose, 1st Baron Bramber1 b. circa 1036, d. between 1093 and 1096
MotherEve, dame de Boessey-le-Chatel2 b. circa 1050
      Philip de Braose, 2nd Baron Bramber was the only son of William de Braose.3 He was born circa 1070 at Bramber, West Sussex, England.4 He was the son of William de Braose, 1st Baron Bramber and Eve, dame de Boessey-le-Chatel.1,2 2nd Lord of Bramber at West Sussex, England, after 1093.4 Philip de Braose, 2nd Baron Bramber confirmed his father's gifts to the abbey of St. Florent in 1096 at Saumur, Maine-et-Loire, France.4 He married Aenor de Toteneis, daughter of Judhael de Toteneis, before 1100. Arms: Azure a lion rampant Or (the cross crosslets having been added in the fashion of the time to state that he had taken the cross).5 Philip de Braose, 2nd Baron Bramber was the first Braose Lord of Builth and Radnor, their initial holding in the Welsh Marches before 1103 at Wales.4 Lord of Builth and Radnor at Powys, Wales, before 1103.4 He returned from the 1st Crusade in 1103.4 He was represented, in a record, by "his brother Robert, the son of Anketill" in 1103.6 He built the Norman church of St Nicolas at Old Shoreham and founded the port of New Shoreham after 1103 at West Sussex, England.4 He saw his lands confiscated by Henry I, due to his traitrous support of William, son of Robert Curthose, in 1110.4 He supported William Clito's claims against Henry I (as did Louis VI of France) in 1110.4 He was restored to the Braose lands previously confiscated in 1112.4 He travelled, it is suggested, to Jerusalem at the time when the Templars were first conceived in 1120.7 He was a witness where évêque de Salisbury Philippe de Harcourt and seigneur de Renneville Richard de Harcourt chevalier du temple refer in charters to Philip de Braose as "patruus" - paternal uncle circa 1121.4 Philip de Braose, 2nd Baron Bramber confirmed the gifts of his nephew, Philip de Harcourt, to the newly established Knights Templar, which included the manor and church of Shipley between 1125 and 1130 at West Sussex, England.4 He died at Palestine. He possibly went on the 2nd Crusade and died in Palestine. "Philip's death appears to be recorded by a contemporary writer, Gerald of Wales. Some time before 1135, Philip and his dogs spent a night in the church of Saint Afan, or Llanafan in Welsh. They had been hunting near Builth. At first light Philip awoke to find that all his dogs had gone mad and he himself was blind. After years of helplessness, Philip grasped an opportunity to redeem his offence against the church. He armed himself and travelled to Jerusalem on a strong and faithful war horse, led by a group of friends. They took him to the front line of battle, where he gallantly charged forward. Philip was immediately struck down and met an honourable death."4

Family

Aenor de Toteneis b. circa 1079
Children

Citations

  1. [S603] C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, B:xP, pg. 72.
  2. [S642] Braose Family Web, online http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/, Probably..
  3. [S1032] K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, pg. 471.
  4. [S642] Braose Family Web, online http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/
  5. [S1503] The Baronage Press Vol. VIII, No. 2, online http://www.baronage.co.uk/index.html
  6. [S642] Braose Family Web, online http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/, (Pipe Roll Soc. Vol 71 no 544).
  7. [S642] Braose Family Web, online http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/, Crusading Spirit.

Bodegeisel II, duc d' Aquitaine1,2

b. circa 555
Bodegeisel II, duc d' Aquitaine|b. c 555|p278.htm#i7665|Gondolfus, Bishop of Tongres|b. c 530\nd. c 607|p295.htm#i7667|N. N. d'Angoulême|b. c 533|p64.htm#i8178|Mundéric, Pretender of Austrasia|b. c 500\nd. c 533|p291.htm#i7668|Arthemia de Genève|b. c 515?|p64.htm#i8179|Maurilion d'Angoulême|b. c 510|p64.htm#i8180|N. N. the Thuringian|b. c 510|p80.htm#i10440|
FatherGondolfus, Bishop of Tongres b. circa 530, d. circa 607
MotherN. N. d'Angoulême b. circa 533
     Bodegeisel II, duc d' Aquitaine was the son of Mummolen who came from Soissons.3 He was born circa 555. He was the son of Gondolfus, Bishop of Tongres and N. N. d'Angoulême. Bodegeisel II, duc d' Aquitaine married Chrodoare, abbesse d'Amay before 582. Bodegeisel II, duc d' Aquitaine was Frankish Ambassador to Byzantium in 589.4 He died at Carthage, Africa. As an envoy of King Childebert to the Emperor Maurice, he was murdered while enroute to Constantinople.3

Family

Chrodoare, abbesse d'Amay b. circa 560, d. circa 634
Child

Citations

  1. [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., 190-7.
  2. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 171-47.
  3. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, pg. 548.
  4. [S1132] DFA (4000 yr), online, App. A:2.

Peter Worden Sr.

b. between 1570 and 1580
Peter Worden Sr.|b. bt 1570 - 1580|p278.htm#i7767|Robert Werden|b. 1534\nd. 11 Sep 1580|p439.htm#i7769|Isabel Worthington|b. c 1547|p61.htm#i7770|||||||Peter Worthington|b. 1514\nd. 1578|p439.htm#i7771|Isabel Anderton|b. 1518|p61.htm#i7772|
FatherRobert Werden b. 1534, d. 11 September 1580
MotherIsabel Worthington b. circa 1547
     Peter Worden Sr. was a hatter by trade.1 He had lands at Yarmouthport at Barnstable County, Massachusetts.2 He probably from Clayton at Lancashire, England.1 He was among the early settlers of the section of Cape Cod just north of Nantucket.1 He was born between 1570 and 1580 at Clayton, Lancashire, England.3 He was the son of Robert Werden and Isabel Worthington. Peter Worden Sr. left a will on 9 February 1638/39 at Plymouth, Massachusetts.2 He died at Yarmouth, Massachusetts. His estate was probated on 9 March 1639.1

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S803] William Richard Cutter NEFGM, III:1310.
  2. [S803] William Richard Cutter NEFGM, III:1310-1311.
  3. [S803] William Richard Cutter NEFGM, Vol III, pg. 1310.
  4. [S733] Charles Edward Banks, English Ancestry of the Pilgrims, pg. 153 - this father-daughter relationship is given with necessary reservations.
  5. [S803] William Richard Cutter NEFGM, Vol III, pg. 1311.

Princess Scota of Egypt1

b. 0620 B.C.
Princess Scota of Egypt|b. 0620 B.C.|p278.htm#i14646|Necho II, Pharaoh of Egypt|b. 0660 B.C.\nd. 0595 B.C.|p272.htm#i6113|Chedebnitjerbone ?||p52.htm#i6114|Psamtik I. W., Pharaoh of Egypt|b. 0690 B.C.\nd. 0610 B.C.|p272.htm#i6115|Mehetenweskhet of Heliopolis|b. 0682 B.C.|p52.htm#i6116|||||||
FatherNecho II, Pharaoh of Egypt2 b. 0660 B.C., d. 0595 B.C.
MotherChedebnitjerbone ?2
     Princess Scota of Egypt was born 0620 B.C.. She was the daughter of Necho II, Pharaoh of Egypt and Chedebnitjerbone ?.2 Princess Scota of Egypt died at A.M. 3500. "In this battle fell Scota, the daughter of Pharaoh, wife of Milidh."3 Also called N. N. the Saite.2 She married Míl Espáne mac Bile, son of King of Galicia Bile mac Nemain.2

Family

Míl Espáne mac Bile
Child

Citations

  1. [S232] David Starr Jordan & Sarah Louise Kimball, Your Family Tree, pg. 26.
  2. [S298] HRH Prince Michael of Albany, Albany, pg. 69.
  3. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M.

Hugues VIII "le Brun", sire de Lusignan1

b. 1110
Hugues VIII "le Brun", sire de Lusignan|b. 1110|p278.htm#i8106|Hugues VII "le Brun", sire de Lusignan|b. 1065\nd. 1151|p368.htm#i13142|Sarazine (?)|b. 1067\nd. 1144|p366.htm#i13143|Hugues VI "le Diable", sire de Lusignan|b. c 1033\nd. 1110|p358.htm#i12213|Ildegarde de Thouars|b. c 1043|p101.htm#i12214|||||||
FatherHugues VII "le Brun", sire de Lusignan2 b. 1065, d. 1151
MotherSarazine (?)2 b. 1067, d. 1144
     Hugues VIII "le Brun", sire de Lusignan was born in 1110.3 He was the son of Hugues VII "le Brun", sire de Lusignan and Sarazine (?).2 Hugues VIII "le Brun", sire de Lusignan married Bourgogne de Rançon, dame de Fontenay, daughter of Geoffroy de Rançon, seigneur de Taillebourg and Fosseffie (?).4 Hugues VIII "le Brun", sire de Lusignan departed for Palestine in 1163.5 He was captured at the battle of harim in 1164.5 He died at Outremer.5

Family

Bourgogne de Rançon, dame de Fontenay b. circa 1115
Children

Citations

  1. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé), Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., III:77.
  2. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé), Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., III:76.
  3. [S467] GdRdF, online http://jeanjacques.villemag.free.fr/
  4. [S1350] Thierry Stasser < and e-mail address>, Re: Raoul and Hugh de Lusignan connection in "Re: Raoul and Hugh de Lusignan connection," newsgroup message Sun, 04 May 2003 08:58:22 +0200, (Chartes de l'abbaye de Nouaillé de 578 à 1200, in Archives Historiques du Poitou, vol 49, p 333-334).
  5. [S1350] Thierry Stasser < and e-mail address>, Re: Raoul and Hugh de Lusignan connection in "Re: Raoul and Hugh de Lusignan connection," newsgroup message Sun, 04 May 2003 08:58:22 +0200, (Letter of Amauri, patriarch of Antioch, to King Louis VII of France, in Recueil des Historiens des Gaules et de la France, vol XVI, 61-62).
  6. [S1350] Thierry Stasser < and e-mail address>, Re: Raoul and Hugh de Lusignan connection in "Re: Raoul and Hugh de Lusignan connection," newsgroup message Sun, 04 May 2003 08:58:22 +0200.

King of Raumerike and Vestfold Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdanarson

King of Raumerike and Vestfold Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdanarson||p278.htm#i9085|King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson||p278.htm#i8328|Ása Eysteinsdóttir|b. c 718|p52.htm#i8329|King of the Swedes Óláfr T. Ingjaldsson||p278.htm#i9461|Sólveig H. of Solør||p72.htm#i9465|Eysteinn H. of Uppland|b. c 688|p72.htm#i9459|Sólveig H. (?)|b. c 693|p72.htm#i9460|
FatherKing of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson1
MotherÁsa Eysteinsdóttir1 b. circa 718
     King of Raumerike and Vestfold Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdanarson was the son of King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson and Ása Eysteinsdóttir.1 King at Raumerike.1 King of Raumerike and Vestfold Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdanarson was given Vestfold to rule over after his father took possession of Eystein's deceased father-in-law's territory.1 He married Hild Eiríksdóttir, daughter of King of Vestfold Eiríkr Agnarsson.1 King of Raumerike and Vestfold Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdanarson was the successor of King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson; King of Vestfold.2 King of Raumerike and Vestfold Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdanarson went with some ships of war to Varna, the land of King Skjold, and plundered there, and carried away all he could find of clothes or other valuables, and of peasants' stock, and killed cattle on the strand for provision, and then began his return home.1 He died at died. King Skjold of Varna came to the strand with his army, just as Eystein was at such a distance over the fjord that King Skjold could only see his sails. Then he took his cloak, waved it, and blew into it. King Eystein was sitting at the helm as they sailed in past Jarls, and another ship was sailing at the side of his, when there came a stroke of a wave, by which the boom of the other ship struck the king and threw him overboard, which proved his death.1 King of Raumerike and Vestfold Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdanarson was buried in Borre, Raden, near Vodle, Vestfold, Norway. His men fished up his body, and it was carried into Borre, where a mound was thrown up over it, out towards the sea at Raden, near Vodle.

So says Thjodolf: --

"King Eystein sat upon the poop
Of his good ship: with sudden swoop
The swinging boom dashed him to hell,
And fathoms deep the hero fell
Beneath the brine. The fury whirl
Of Loke, Tempest's brother's girl,
Grim Hel, clutched his soul away;
And now where Vodle's ocean bay
Receives the ice-cold stream, the grave
Of Eystein stands -- the good, the brave!"1
King at Vestfold, Norway, between 750 and 780.1,3

Family 1

Hild Eiríksdóttir
Child

Family 2

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandinavian, Vestfold, c. 710-c. 750.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandinavian, Vestfold.

Hálfdan Snälle Haraldsson, King of Roeskilde1,2,3

Hálfdan Snälle Haraldsson, King of Roeskilde||p278.htm#i9379|Haraldr Valdarsson, King of Roeskilde||p78.htm#i10098||||Valdar H., King of Roeskilde||p78.htm#i10099|Hildis|b. b 530\nd. c 572|p293.htm#i10100|||||||
FatherHaraldr Valdarsson, King of Roeskilde4
     Hálfdan Snälle Haraldsson, King of Roeskilde died. Killed by his brother, Gudrod, who did it at the urging of his wife, Aasa, daughter of Ingjald "the Evil-Advisor."5 He was born at Jutland, Denmark. He was the son of Haraldr Valdarsson, King of Roeskilde.4 Hálfdan Snälle Haraldsson, King of Roeskilde married Maolda (?) before 612.

Family

Maolda (?) b. circa 590
Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 143-41 - This generation is added by RFC in order to fulfill the fact that Rörik, Skioldung Prince of Lethra, is the great-grandfather of Rörik 143-39. See also 240-45..
  2. [S220] Rupert Alen and Anna Marie Dahlquist, Royal Familes of Scandanavia, Flanders, and Kiev, Pg. 170. This source names him..
  3. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Skjöld, King of Danes, 72.
  4. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 240-46.
  5. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.

Rögnvaldr Heidum Hæri Óláfsson, King of Vestfold1,2

Rögnvaldr Heidum Hæri Óláfsson, King of Vestfold||p278.htm#i9457|Óláfr Geirstad-Alf Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold||p278.htm#i9458||||Gudrødr V. H., King of Vestfold|d. c 821|p307.htm#i8325|Álfhild A.||p65.htm#i8493|||||||
FatherÓláfr Geirstad-Alf Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold3
     Rögnvaldr Heidum Hæri Óláfsson, King of Vestfold was the son of Óláfr Geirstad-Alf Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold.3 King at Vestfold, Norway.3 Rögnvaldr Heidum Hæri Óláfsson, King of Vestfold succeeded his father to the kingdom of Vestfold.3 Rögnvaldr Heidum Hæri Óláfsson, King of Vestfold also went by the name of Ragnvald "Mountain-High" of Vestfold. He married Thóra Sigurdsdóttir, daughter of Sigurdr orms-í-auga, King of the Danes; 10th cousins.4 Rögnvaldr Heidum Hæri Óláfsson, King of Vestfold died. Thjodolf of Hvina composed for him the "Ynglinga-tal", in which he says: --

"Under the heaven's blue dome, a name
I never knew more true to fame
Than Rognvald bore; whose skilful hand
Could tame the scorners of the land, --
Rognvald, who knew so well to guide
The wild sea-horses through the tide:
The "Mountain-high" was the proud name
By which the king was known to fame."3

Family

Thóra Sigurdsdóttir
Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 166-38.
  2. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Eystein Adilsson, 81.
  3. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  4. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Skjöld, King of Danes, 78.

Óláfr Geirstad-Alf Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold1,2

Óláfr Geirstad-Alf Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold||p278.htm#i9458|Gudrødr Veidikonung Hálfdanarson, King of Vestfold|d. c 821|p307.htm#i8325|Álfhild Alfarinsdóttir||p65.htm#i8493|King of Vestfold Hálfdan M. Eysteinsson||p276.htm#i8266|Hlíf Dagsdóttir||p76.htm#i14510|Alfarinn, King of Álfheim, Ruler of Vingulmark||p65.htm#i8494||||
FatherGudrødr Veidikonung Hálfdanarson, King of Vestfold3 d. circa 821
MotherÁlfhild Alfarinsdóttir3
     Óláfr Geirstad-Alf Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold was the son of Gudrødr Veidikonung Hálfdanarson, King of Vestfold and Álfhild Alfarinsdóttir.3 Óláfr Geirstad-Alf Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold was a great warrior, and an able man; and was besides remarkably handsome, very strong and large of growth.3 He was about twenty years old when his father, Gudrod, died.3 He lost Värmland, and it's scatt (tax revenue), to the Swedish king.3 He came to the kingdom after his father, but only to Vestfold, for King Alfgeir took all Vingulmark to himself, and placed his son Gandalf over it.3 Also called King Olaf Geirstad-Alf of Vestfold. He was a witness where Anti-King of Norway Óláfr Geirstadaalf Haraldsson named for his granduncle, Olaf Geirstad-Alf Gudrodsson? King at Eastern Vestfold.3 King at Vestfold, Norway, between 824 and 840.3,4 Óláfr Geirstad-Alf Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold died at Geirstad. He died, in his main residence, of a disease in his foot (gout).3 He divided the kingdom of his father's, now that his brother Halfdan was eighteen and had the kingdom with him, and Olaf got the eastern and Halfdan the southern part. Óláfr Geirstad-Alf Gudrødsson, King of Vestfold was buried in Geirstad. He was laid under a mound at Geirstad.

So sings Thjodolf: --

"Long while this branch of Odin's stem
Was the stout prop of Norway's realm;
Long while King Olaf with just pride
Ruled over Westfold far and wide.
At length by cruel gout oppressed,
The good King Olaf sank to rest:
His body now lies under ground,
Buried at Geirstad, in the mound."3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 166-39.
  2. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Eystein Adilsson, 80.
  3. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  4. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandinavian, Vestfold.

King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson

King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson||p278.htm#i9461|Ingjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9462|Gauthildar Algautsdóttir||p72.htm#i9463|Braut-Önundr Y., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9467||||Algaut G.||p72.htm#i9464|Álöf Óláfsdóttir||p151.htm#i17075|
FatherIngjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes1
MotherGauthildar Algautsdóttir1
     King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson was the son of Ingjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes and Gauthildar Algautsdóttir.1 King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson was forced to leave Nerike, when the Swedes heard he was there, and he went on westwards, through the forest, to a river which comes from the north and falls into the Venner lake, and is called Klar river. There they sat themselves down, turned to and cleared the woods, burnt, and then settled there, and soon there were great districts, and altogether they were called Vermeland.1 He was raised in the care of his foster-father Bove, in West Gotland, where he was brought up along with Saxe, Bove's son, who had the surname of Flette.1 He was given the name "Tree Feller" by the Swedes who laughed at his proceedings, that he was clearing forests instead of ruling.1 He attracted a great many of his countrymen, who were fleeing Sweden on account of Ivar, and they settled in the bountiful Varmeland, but in so great a number that the land could no longer support them, and they blamed him.1 He was went with the men who chose to follow him, when heard of his father's end, to Nerike; for all the Swedish community rose with one accord to drive out Ingjald's family and all his friends.1 King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson also went by the name of Olaf "Tree Feller".1 He was is said to have sacrificed his own people in time of famine. He married Sólveig Hálfdansdóttir of Solør, daughter of Hálfdan Guldtand Solvarsson of Solør.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden, between 620 and 630.2 King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson was the predecessor of Ivarr Vídfadmi Hálfdanarson, King of the Danes and Swedes; King of the Swedes.2 King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson died. Then there came dear times and famine, which they ascribed to their king; as the Swedes used always to reckon good or bad crops for or against their kings. The Swedes took it amiss that Olaf was sparing in his sacrifices, and believed the dear times must proceed from this cause. The Swedes therefore gathered together troops, made an expedition against King Olaf, surrounded his house and burnt him in it, giving him to Odin as a sacrifice for good crops. This happened at the Venner lake.

Thus tells Thjodolf of it: --

"The temple wolf, by the lake shores,
The corpse of Olaf now devours.
The clearer of the forests died
At Odin's shrine by the lake side.
The glowing flames stripped to the skin
The royal robes from the Swedes' king.
Thus Olaf, famed in days of yore,
Vanished from earth at Venner's shore."1
King of Vestfold at Norway before 710.3 He was the predecessor of King of Raumerike Hálfdan Hvítbeinn Óláfsson; King of Vestfold.4

Family

Sólveig Hálfdansdóttir of Solør
Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandinavian, Vestfold, ? -c. 710.
  4. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandinavian, Vestfold, c. 710-c. 750.

Ingjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes

Ingjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9462|Braut-Önundr Yngvarsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9467||||Yngvarr E., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9468||||||||||
FatherBraut-Önundr Yngvarsson, King of the Swedes1
     Ingjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Braut-Önundr Yngvarsson, King of the Swedes.1 Ingjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes was was made infamous for his treachery against his own nobles following the death of his father. "When a king died, his successor was supposed to attend the funeral feast and there sit at the foot of the throne. A huge beaker was brought in. The heir had to pledge to do some might deed of valor, and then drain the beaker to the bottom. After this ceremony, he was led to the throne and proclaimed king. When Igjald planned the funeral of his father Anund the Cultivator, he invited all the petty kings and jarls of the neighboring areas to attend the feast. There he stood up, made a vow to increase his kingdom by half on every side, and drained the beaker. He then allowed his guests to become drunk. At this point he left the hall, surrounded it with his men, and set it on fire, thus killing all his potential rivals. For his treachery he became known as Ingjald Illräde."2 He was attending a mid-winter festival with his father, and King Yngvar had also come there with his sons. Alf, King Yngvar's son, and Ingjald, King Onund's son, were there -- both about six years old. They amused themselves with child's play, in which each should be leading on his army. In their play Ingjald found himself not so strong as Alf, and was so vexed that he almost cried. His foster-brother Gautvid came up, led him to his foster-father Svipdag the Blind, and told him how ill it appeared that he was weaker and less manly than Alf, King Yngvar's son. Svipdag replied that it was a great shame. The day after Svipdag took the heart of a wolf, roasted it on the tongs, and gave it to the king's son Ingjald to eat, and from that time he became a most ferocious person, and of the worst disposition.1 It was a common saying that King Ingjald had killed twelve kings, and deceived them all under pretence of peace; therefore he was called Ingjald the Evil-adviser.1 He was is said to have been the last fey-born pagan sacrol "peace king" associated with human sacrifice in his own family. Ingjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes also went by the name of Ingjald "Ill Ruler". He married Gauthildar Algautsdóttir, daughter of Algaut Gautreksson and Álöf Óláfsdóttir.1 Ingjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes ordered a great feast to be prepared in Upsal, when Ingjald took the dominions and the kingdom of his father, and intended at that feast to enter on his heritage after King Onund his father. He had a large hall made ready for the occasion -- one not less, nor less sumptuous, than that of Upsal; and this hall was called the Seven Kings Hall, and in it were seven high seats for kings. Then King Ingjald sent men all through Sweden, and invited to his feast kings, earls, and other men of consequence. To this heirship-feast came King Algaut, his father-in-law; Yngvar king of Fjadryndaland, with his two sons, Alf and Agnar; King Sporsnjall of Nerike; King Sighvat of Aattundaland: but Granmar king of Sodermanland did not come. ... Now when the guests had become drunk towards evening King Ingjald told Svipdag's sons, Gautvid and Hylvid, to arm themselves and their men, as had before been settled; and accordingly they went out, and came up to the new hall, and set fire to it. The hall was soon in a blaze, and the six kings, with all their people, were burned in it. Those who tried to come out were killed. Then King Ingjald laid all the dominions these kings had possessed under himself, and took scatt from them.1 He died at Lake Mälaren, Uppsala, Sweden. King Ingjald was at a feast in Raening, when he heard that King Ivar's army was in the neighbourhood. Ingjald thought he had not strength to go into battle against Ivar, and he saw well that if he betook himself to flight his enemies would swarm around him from all corners. He and Aasa took a resolution which has become celebrated. They drank until all their people were dead drunk, and then put fire to the hall; and it was consumed, with all who were in it, including themselves, King Ingjald, and Aasa.

Thus says Thjodolf: --

"With fiery feet devouring flame
Has hunted down a royal game
At Raening, where King Ingjald gave
To all his men one glowing grave.
On his own hearth the fire he raised,
A deed his foemen even praised;
By his own hand he perished so,
And life for freedom did forego."1
King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden, between 565 and 620.1,3 He was the predecessor of King of the Swedes Óláfr Trételgju Ingjaldsson; King of the Swedes.3 Ingjaldr Illráda Önundsson, King of the Swedes was a witness where Ivarr Vídfadmi Hálfdanarson, King of the Danes and Swedes began to bring his army against the wicked king of Skåne, Ingjald Illråd and surrounded Ingjald's great hall on Lake Mälen in which Ingjald perished when he burned down his own palace around him and his daughter circa 623 at Lake Mälaren, Uppsala, Sweden.1 After Ingjald the Evil-adviser the Upsal dominion fell from the Yngling race notwithstanding the length of time they could reckon up the series of their forefathers.1

Family

Gauthildar Algautsdóttir
Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S220] Rupert Alen and Anna Marie Dahlquist, Royal Familes of Scandanavia, Flanders, and Kiev, pg. 4.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.

Braut-Önundr Yngvarsson, King of the Swedes

Braut-Önundr Yngvarsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9467|Yngvarr Eysteinsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9468||||Eysteinn A., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9469||||||||||
FatherYngvarr Eysteinsson, King of the Swedes1
     Braut-Önundr Yngvarsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Yngvarr Eysteinsson, King of the Swedes.1 Braut-Önundr Yngvarsson, King of the Swedes succeeded his father to the kingdom at Uppsala.1 He bestowed great diligence and expense on opening the woods and cultivating the cleared land. He made roads through the desert forests; and thus cleared land is found all through the forest country, and great districts are settled. In this way extensive tracts of land were brought into cultivation, for there were country people enough to cultivate the land. Onund had roads made through all Sweden, both through forests and morasses, and also over mountains; and he was therefore called Onund Roadmaker.1 He went with his army to Estland to avenge his father, and landed and ravaged the country round far and wide, and returned with a great booty in autumn to Sweden.1 Braut-Önundr Yngvarsson, King of the Swedes also went by the name of Anund "the Cultivator". He applied for his son, Ingjald, to King Algaut, of Gotland, for his daughter Gauthild.1 He died. King Onund one autumn, travelling between his mansion-houses, came over a road called Himmenheath, where there are some narrow mountain valleys, with high mountains on both sides. There was heavy rain at the time, and before there had been snow on the mountains. A landslip of clay and stones came down upon King Onund and his people, and there he met his death, and many with him.

So says Thjodolf, namely: --

"We all have heard how Jonkur's sons,
Whom weapons could not touch, with stones
Were stoned to death in open day,
King Onund died in the same way.
Or else perhaps the wood-grown land,
Which long had felt his conquering hand,
Uprose at length in deadly strife,
And pressed out Onund's hated life."1
King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden, between 545 and 565.1,2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.

Yngvarr Eysteinsson, King of the Swedes

Yngvarr Eysteinsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9468|Eysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9469||||Adils Ó., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9470|Yrsa of Saxland|b. c 565|p72.htm#i9471|||||||
FatherEysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes1
     Yngvarr Eysteinsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Eysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes.1 Yngvarr Eysteinsson, King of the Swedes was a great warrior, and often lay out with his warships; for the Swedish dominions were much ravaged then by Danes and East-country men.1 He made a peace with the Danes; but betook himself to ravaging the East country in return.1 He succeeded his father to the kingdom of Uppsala.1 He died at Stein, Estland. One summer he went with his forces to Estland, and plundered at a place called Stein. The men of Estland came down from the interior with a great army, and there was a battle; but the army of the country was so brave that the Swedes could not withstand them, and King Yngvar fell, and his people fled.1 He was the successor of Eysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.1,2 . He was buried close to the seashore under a mound in Estland; and after this defeat the Swedes returned home.

Thjodolf sings of it thus: --

"Certain it is the Estland foe
The fair-haired Swedish king laid low.
On Estland's strand, o'er Swedish graves,
The East Sea sings her song of waves;
King Yngvar's dirge is ocean's roar
Resounding on the rock-ribbed shore."1
King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden, between 531 and 545.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.

Eysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes

Eysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9469|Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9470|Yrsa of Saxland|b. c 565|p72.htm#i9471|Óttarr V. E., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9472||||Helgi H., King of the Danes|b. c 528|p278.htm#i9503|Álöf h. R. of Saxland||p151.htm#i17067|
FatherAdils Óttarson, King of the Swedes1
MotherYrsa of Saxland b. circa 565
     Eysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes and Yrsa of Saxland.1 Eysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes succeeded his father to the kingdom of Uppsala.1 He was the successor of Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.1,2 Eysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes died. There was a sea-king called Solve, a son of Hogne of Njardo, who at that time plundered in the Baltic, but had his dominion in Jutland. He came with his forces to Sweden, just as King Eystein was at a feast in a district called Lofond. Solve came unexpectedly in the night on Eystein, surrounded the house in which the king was, and burned him and all his court.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala between 505 and 531.1,2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.

Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes

Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9470|Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9472||||Egill A., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9473||||||||||
FatherÓttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes1
     Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes was the son of Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes.1 Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes went, one expedition, to Saxland with his troops. There a king was reigning called Geirthjof, and his wife was called Alof the Great; but nothing is told of their children. The king was not at home, and Adils and his men ran up to the king's house and plundered it, while others drove a herd of cattle down to the strand. The herd was attended by slave-people, churls, and girls, and they took all of them together. Among them was a remarkably beautiful girl called Yrsa, whom he took back with him to Sweden, but not as a slave, for it was soon observed that she was intelligent, spoke well, and in all respects well behaved.1 He had many disputes with a king called Ole of the Uplands (his Uncle, Ali, of Uppland in Sweden); and these kings had a battle on the ice of the Venner lake, in which King Ole fell, and King Adils won the battle (There is a long account of this battle in the "Skjoldunga Saga") at Värmland, Sweden.1,2 He was long time king, became very rich, and went also for several summers on viking expeditions.1 He was attacked by King Halfdan's son Helge, who ruled at that time over Leidre, who came to Sweden with so great an army, that King Adils saw no other way than to flee at once.1 He succeeded his father to kingdom.1 He married Yrsa of Saxland, daughter of Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes and Álöf hin Ríka of Saxland; Her 1st.1,3 Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes was the successor of Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.1,4 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden, between 460 and 505.1,4 Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes died at Uppsala, Sweden. King Adils was a great lover of good horses, and had the best horses of these times. One of his horses was called Slongve, and another Raven. This horse he had taken from Ole on his death, and bred from him a horse, also called Raven, which the king sent in a present to King Godgest in Halogaland. When Godgest mounted the horse he was not able to manage him, and fell off and was killed. This accident happened at Omd in Halogaland. King Adils was at a Disa sacrifice; and as he rode around the Disa hall his horse' Raven stumbled and fell, and the king was thrown forward upon his head, and his skull was split, and his brains dashed out against a stone. Adils died at Upsal, and was buried there in a mound. The Swedes called him a great king.

Thjodolf speaks thus of him: --

"Witch-demons, I have heard men say,
Have taken Adils' life away.
The son of kings of Frey's great race,
First in the fray, the fight, the chase,
Fell from his steed -- his clotted brains
Lie mixed with mire on Upsal's plains.
Such death (grim Fate has willed it so)
Has struck down Ole's deadly foe."1
He was the predecessor of Eysteinn Adilsson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.1,4

Family

Yrsa of Saxland b. circa 565
Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S481] Gwyn Jones, The Vikings, pg. 38.
  3. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga, Chapter 32.
  4. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.

Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes

Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9472|Egill Aunsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9473||||Aunn G. J., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9474||||||||||
FatherEgill Aunsson, King of the Swedes1
     Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Egill Aunsson, King of the Swedes.1 Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes succeeded to the domains and kingdom after his father.1 He launched a raid against the homeland of King Frode, when he learned the latter was away, he sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeded westward to the Sound, and sailed north about to Jutland; landed at Lymfjord; plundered the Vend district; burned, and laid waste, and made desolate the country he went over with his army.1 Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes also went by the name of Ottar "Vendel-crow". He continued to refuse the Danes under King Frode his due taxes, and this caused them to come to blows.1 He was the successor of Egill Aunsson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.2 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden, between 456 and 460.1,2 Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes was the predecessor of Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.1,2 Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes died. When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste, they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception, and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places, and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people.1 Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes was buried in Vendil, Jutland. The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces. Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow.

Thjodolf tells so of it: --

"By Danish arms the hero bold,
Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold.
To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne;
By eagles' claws the corpse is torn,
Spattered by ravens' bloody feet,
The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat.
The Swedes have vowed revenge to take
On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake;
Like dogs to kill them in their land,
In their own homes, by Swedish hand."1
He was named for the wrong Vendel, it seems, not for Vendil in Jutland, as the Yngling Saga describes, but Vendel in Uppland, where the chief burial mound is known as "Ottars Hög" or the mound of Ottar Vendel-crow, and some further speculate (one Ari Thorgilsson, which derived from a history of Norway from 1170) that it was not Ottar who was Vendelkraka, but his father, Egil.3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.
  3. [S481] Gwyn Jones, The Vikings, pg. 38.

Egill Aunsson, King of the Swedes1

Egill Aunsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9473|Aunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9474||||Jörundr Y., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9475||||||||||
FatherAunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes2
     Egill Aunsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Aunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes.2 Egill Aunsson, King of the Swedes was rebelled against by a slave of his late father's named Tunne, who'd taken Aunn's treasure and buried it, and when Egil withheld the respect he felt he'd deserved, he unearthed the treasure and used it to gather about him men to pillage and maraud King Egil's lands, and Tunne won every battle they fought and eventually forced Egil to flee to Denmark.2 He was assisted against the usurper Tunne by King Frode the Bold of Denmark, who provided men, in exchange for the promise of a tax from Egil, and Egil therewith recovered Uppsala.2 He did not fulfill his promise of paying tax to Frode, but managed to remain friends with the king anyway.2 He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home.2 He succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death.2 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden, between 448 and 456.3 He was the predecessor of Óttarr Vendilkráku Egilsson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.2,3 Egill Aunsson, King of the Swedes died. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest, separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull, and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound. The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up, and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull. The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal.

Thjodolf sings of it thus: --

"The fair-haired son of Odin's race,
Who fled before fierce Tunne's face,
Has perished by the demon-beast
Who roams the forests of the East.
The hero's breast met the full brunt
Of the wild bull's shaggy front;
The hero's heart's asunder torn
By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn."2

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden, Egil Tunadogil.
  2. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.
  4. [S481] Gwyn Jones, The Vikings, pg. 38.

Aunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes

Aunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9474|Jörundr Yngvesson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9475||||Yngve A., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9476||||||||||
FatherJörundr Yngvesson, King of the Swedes1
     Aunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Jörundr Yngvesson, King of the Swedes.1 King at Wester Gotland.1 Aunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes was deposed from Uppsala by Halfdan, son of Frode the Peaceful, son of Dan Mikellati, following twentyfive years of ruling Uppsala, and fled to Wester Gotland where he ruled another twentyfive years.1 He again fled to West Goterland while Olaf the Bold ruled in Uppsala for twentyfive years, until he was killed by Starkad "the Old".1 He returned to Uppsala, when he was sixty years of age, on Halfdan's death.1 He died. The answer from Odin on the sacrifice of his second son was that he should live as long as he gave him one of his sons every tenth year, and also that he should name one of the districts of his country after the number of sons he should offer to Odin. When he had sacrificed the seventh of his sons he continued to live; but so that he could not walk, but was carried on a chair. Then he sacrificed his eighth son, and lived thereafter ten years, lying in his bed. Now he sacrificed his ninth son, and lived ten years more; but so that he drank out of a horn like a weaned infant. He had now only one son remaining, whom he also wanted to sacrifice, and to give Odin Upsal and the domains thereunto belonging, under the name of the Ten Lands, but the Swedes would not allow it; so there was no sacrifice, and King On died, and was buried in a mound at Upsal. Since that time it is called On's sickness when a man dies, without pain, of extreme old age.

Thjodolf tell of this: --

"In Upsal's town the cruel king
Slaughtered his sons at Odin's shrine --
Slaughtered his sons with cruel knife,
To get from Odin length of life.
He lived until he had to turn
His toothless mouth to the deer's horn;
And he who shed his children's blood
Sucked through the ox's horn his food.
At length fell Death has tracked him down,
Slowly, but sure, in Upsal's town."1
He returned again to Uppsala following the death of Olaf the Bold, and again sacrificed to Odin, and offered yet another son for another twentyfive years of rule.1 He made a great sacrifice, and in it offered up his son to Odin. He got an answer from Odin, that he should live sixty years longer; and he was afterwards king in Upsal for twenty-five years.1 He was a wise man, who made great sacrifices to the gods; but being no warrior, he lived quietly at home.1 He became king of the Swedes after his father.1 Aunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes also went by the name of Aunn "the Old". He was attacked by Olaf the Bold, son of Friedlief, and nephew of Halfdan, who deposed him.1 He was the successor of Jörundr Yngvesson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.1,2 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden, between 313 and 448.1,3 Aunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes was a witness where Hálfdan Frodisson, King of the Danes attacked Aunn of Uppsala, and following twenty-five years of Aunn's rule (ruled 313-448 (sic)) there, usurped him to become King in Uppsala circa 338.1 Hálfdan Frodisson, King of the Danes ruled in place of Aunn Gamli Jörundsson, King of the Swedes; King of Uppsala. King of the Swedes, restored at Uppsala.1 He was the predecessor of Egill Aunsson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden, 313-448 (sic).

Jörundr Yngvesson, King of the Swedes

Jörundr Yngvesson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9475|Yngve Alreksson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9476||||Alrekr A., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9477|Dageiðr Dagsdóttir|b. c 445|p72.htm#i9478|||||||
FatherYngve Alreksson, King of the Swedes1
     Jörundr Yngvesson, King of the Swedes was the son of Yngve Alreksson, King of the Swedes.1 Jörundr Yngvesson, King of the Swedes recovered the lands of his father from Hake, the usurper.1 He and his brother proceeded up the Maelare lake, and advanced towards Upsal against King Hake, who came out against them on the Fyrisvoid with far fewer people. There was a great battle, in which King Hake went forward so bravely that he killed all who were nearest to him, and at last killed King Eric, and cut down the banner of the two brothers. King Jorund with all his men fled to their ships. King Hake had been so grievously wounded that he saw his days could not be long; so he ordered a warship which he had to be loaded with his dead men and their weapons, and to be taken out to the sea; the tiller to be shipped, and the sails hoisted. Then he set fire to some tar-wood, and ordered a pile to be made over it in the ship. Hake was almost if not quite dead, when he was laid upon this pile of his. The wind was blowing off the land -- the ship flew, burning in clear flame, out between the islets, and into the ocean. Great was the fame of this deed in after times.1 He died. Though ruler of a country; he was often in the summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, came up with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund to it, and had him hanged there. So ended his life.

Thjodolf talks of this event thus: --

"Jorund has travelled far and wide,
But the same horse he must bestride
On which he made brave Gudlog ride.
He too must for a necklace wear
Hagbert's fell noose in middle air.
The army leader thus must ride
On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side."1
He was a great warrior, like his brother Eric, and they bided their time in their warships during the reign of the usurper, Hake, who'd killed their cousin Hugleik.1 He and his brother marauded in Denmark one summer, where they met a King Gudlog from Halogaland, and had a battle with him, which ended in their clearing Gudlog's ship and taking him prisoner. They carried him to the land at Stromones, and hanged him there, and afterwards his men raised a mound over him.

So says Eyvind Skaldaspiller:

"By the fierce East-kings' cruel pride,
Gudlog must on the wild horse ride --
The wildest horse you e'er did see:
'Tis Sigur's steed -- the gallows tree.
At Stromones the tree did grow,
Where Gudlog's corpse waves on the bough.
A high stone stands on Stromo's heath,
To tell the gallant hero's death."1
He became more celebrated by this deed, he and his brother, this killing of King Gudlog from Halogaland, and they appeared to be much greater men than before, and they steered for home, Sweden, and gathered together a strong force, for as soon as the Swedes heard that the Yngling brothers were come to them, they flocked to them in multitudes.1 He was a witness where Hugleikr Álfsson, King of the Swedes succeeded the two brothers, Yngve and Alf, in the kingdom of the Swedes, the sons of Yngve being still children.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden, between 302 and 313.1,2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.

Yngve Alreksson, King of the Swedes1

Yngve Alreksson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9476|Alrekr Agnason, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9477|Dageiðr Dagsdóttir|b. c 445|p72.htm#i9478|Agni D., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9479|N. N. (?)||p151.htm#i17059|King Dagr "the Great" (?)||p151.htm#i17062||||
FatherAlrekr Agnason, King of the Swedes2
MotherDageiðr Dagsdóttir b. circa 445
     Yngve Alreksson, King of the Swedes was the son of Alrekr Agnason, King of the Swedes and Dageiðr Dagsdóttir.2 King of the Swedes at Uppsala.2 Yngve Alreksson, King of the Swedes was a great warrior, always victorious; handsome, expert in all exercises, strong and very sharp in battle, generous and full of mirth; so that he was both renowned and beloved.2 He succeeded his father, with his brother Alf, to the kingly power in Sweden.2 He witnessed the death of Álfr Alreksson, King of the Swedes; Killed in a fight by his brother over his wife, Queen Bera.2 Yngve Alreksson, King of the Swedes died. He often sat long in the evening at the drinking-table; but Alf, his brother, a dour man, went willingly to bed very early. Queen Bera, Alf's wife, sat often till late in the evening, and she and Yngve conversed together for their amusement; but Alf soon told her that she should not sit up so late in the evening, but should go first to bed, so as not to waken him. She replied, that happy would be the woman who had Yngve instead of Alf for her husband; and as she often repeated the same, he became very angry. One evening Alf went into the hall, where Yngve and Bera sat on the high seat speaking to each other. Yngve had a short sword upon his knees, and the guests were so drunk that they did not observe the king coming in. King Alf went straight to the high seat, drew a sword from under his cloak, and pierced his brother Yngve through and through. Yngve leaped up, drew his short sword, and gave Alf his death-wound; so that both fell dead on the floor.2 . Yngve, and his brother Alf, were buried under mounds in Fyrisvold.

Thus tells Thjodolf of it: --

"I tell you of a horrid thing,
A deed of dreadful note I sing --
How by false Bera, wicked queen,
The murderous brother-hands were seen
Each raised against a brother's life;
How wretched Alf with bloody knife
Gored Yngve's heart, and Yngve's blade
Alf on the bloody threshold laid.
Can men resist Fate's iron laws?
They slew each other without cause."2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 166-52.
  2. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.

Alrekr Agnason, King of the Swedes

Alrekr Agnason, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9477|Agni Dagsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9479|N. N. (?)||p151.htm#i17059|Dagr S. D., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9481||||||||||
FatherAgni Dagsson, King of the Swedes1
MotherN. N. (?)1
     Alrekr Agnason, King of the Swedes was the son of Agni Dagsson, King of the Swedes and N. N. (?).1 Alrekr Agnason, King of the Swedes succeeded his father, and was king together with his brother, Eric.1 He was a powerful man, a great warrior, and expert at all feats of arms.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala.1 He married Dageiðr Dagsdóttir, daughter of King Dagr "the Great" (?). Alrekr Agnason, King of the Swedes died. It was the custom of he and his brother Eric to ride and break in horses both to walk and to gallop, which nobody understood so well as they; and they vied with each other who could ride best, and keep the best horses. It happened one day that both the brothers rode out together alone, and at a distance from their followers, with their best horses, and rode on to a field; but never came back. The people at last went out to look after them, and they were both found dead with their heads crushed. As they had no weapons, except it might be their horses' bridles, people believed that they had killed each other with these.

So says Thjodolf: --

"Alric fell, by Eric slain,
Eric's life-blood dyed the plain,
Brother fell by brother's hand;
And they tell it in the land,
That they worked the wicked deed
With the sharp bits that guide the steed.
Shall it be said of Frey's brave sons,
The kingly race, the noble ones,
That they have fought in deadly battle
With the head-gear of their cattle?"1

Family

Dageiðr Dagsdóttir b. circa 445
Children

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.

Agni Dagsson, King of the Swedes

Agni Dagsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9479|Dagr Spaka Dygvason, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9481||||Dyggvi D., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9482||||||||||
FatherDagr Spaka Dygvason, King of the Swedes1
     Agni Dagsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Dagr Spaka Dygvason, King of the Swedes.1 Agni Dagsson, King of the Swedes succeeded his father, a powerful and celebrated man, expert, and exercised in all feats.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden.1 He married Skjálf Frostasdóttir, daughter of Frosti of Finland; Captured in marauding expedition.2 Agni Dagsson, King of the Swedes married N. N. (?).1 Agni Dagsson, King of the Swedes married the Finnish princess, Skjalf, whom he'd taken from the hall of her father, Froste, and at his wedding party he took the gold ornament of his ancestor, Visbur, and put it around his neck.1 He died. Now when King Agne had got drank, Skjalv bade him take care of his gold ornament which he had about his neck; therefore he took hold of the ornament, and bound it fast about his neck before he went to sleep. The land-tent stood at the wood side, and a high tree over the tent protected it against the heat of the sun. Now when King Agne was asleep, Skjalv took a noose, and fastened it under the ornament. Thereupon her men threw down the tent-poles, cast the loop of the noose up in the branches of the tree, and hauled upon it, so that the king was hanged close under the branches and died; and Skjalv with her men ran down to their ships, and rowed away.1
. King Agne was buried upon the spot, which was afterwards called Agnefet; and it lies on the east side of the Tauren, and west of Stoksund.

Thjodolf speaks of it thus: --

"How do ye like the high-souled maid,
Who, with the grim Fate-goddess' aid,
Avenged her sire? -- made Swithiod's king
Through air in golden halter swing?
How do ye like her, Agne's men?
Think ye that any chief again
Will court the fate your chief befell,
To ride on wooden horse to hell?"1

Family 1

N. N. (?)
Child

Family 2

Skjálf Frostasdóttir

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga, Chapter 22.

Dagr Spaka Dygvason, King of the Swedes

Dagr Spaka Dygvason, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9481|Dyggvi Dómarsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9482||||Dómarr D., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9484|Drótt Ó.||p72.htm#i17054|||||||
FatherDyggvi Dómarsson, King of the Swedes1
     Dagr Spaka Dygvason, King of the Swedes was the son of Dyggvi Dómarsson, King of the Swedes.1 Dagr Spaka Dygvason, King of the Swedes succeeded his father, and was so wise a man that he understood the language of birds.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden.1 Also called Dag "the Wise".2 He was the successor of Dyggvi Dómarsson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.3 Dagr Spaka Dygvason, King of the Swedes had a sparrow which told him much news, and flew to different countries. Once the sparrow flew to Reidgotaland, to a farm called Varva, where he flew into the peasant's corn-field and took his grain. The peasant came up, took a stone, and killed the sparrow.1 He ill-pleased that his sparrow did not come home; and as he, in a sacrifice of expiation, inquired after the sparrow, he got the answer that it was killed at Varva. Thereupon he ordered a great army, and went to Gotland; and when he came to Varva he landed with his men and plundered, and the people fled away before him. King Dag returned in the evening to his ships, after having killed many people and taken many prisoners.1 He died. As they were going across a river at a place called Skjotan's [the Weapon's] Ford, a labouring thrall came running to the river-side, and threw a hayfork into their troop. It struck the king on the head, so that he fell instantly from his horse and died. In those times the chief who ravaged a country was called Gram, and the men-at-arms under him Gramer.

Thjodolf sings of it thus: --

"What news is this that the king's men,
Flying eastward through the glen,
Report? That Dag the Brave, whose name
Is sounded far and wide by Fame --
That Dag, who knew so well to wield
The battle-axe in bloody field,
Where brave men meet, no more will head
The brave -- that mighty Dag is dead!

"Varva was wasted with the sword,
And vengeance taken for the bird --
The little bird that used to bring
News to the ear of the great king.
Varva was ravaged, and the strife
Was ended, when the monarch's life
Was ended too -- the great Dag fell
By the hay-fork of a base thrall!"4,1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga, Chapter 21.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.
  4. [S220] Rupert Alen and Anna Marie Dahlquist, Royal Familes of Scandanavia, Flanders, and Kiev, pg. 3.

Dyggvi Dómarsson, King of the Swedes

Dyggvi Dómarsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9482|Dómarr Dómaldasson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9484|Drótt Óláfsdóttir||p72.htm#i17054|Dómaldi V., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9486||||Óláfr V., King of the Danes||p111.htm#i13324|Dampi (?)||p143.htm#i16315|
FatherDómarr Dómaldasson, King of the Swedes1
MotherDrótt Óláfsdóttir1
     Dyggvi Dómarsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Dómarr Dómaldasson, King of the Swedes and Drótt Óláfsdóttir.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden.2 Dyggvi Dómarsson, King of the Swedes succeeded his father in ruling the land.1 He died. About him nothing is said but that he died in his bed.

Thjodolf tells of it thus: --

"Dygve the Brave, the mighty king,
It is no hidden secret thing,
Has gone to meet a royal mate,
Riding upon the horse of Fate.
For Loke's daughter in her house
Of Yngve's race would have a spouse;
Therefore the fell-one snatched away
Brave Dygve from the light of day."1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.

Dómarr Dómaldasson, King of the Swedes

Dómarr Dómaldasson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9484|Dómaldi Vísbursson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9486||||Vísburr V., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9487|N. N. (?)||p151.htm#i17053|||||||
FatherDómaldi Vísbursson, King of the Swedes
     Dómarr Dómaldasson, King of the Swedes was the son of Dómaldi Vísbursson, King of the Swedes. Dómarr Dómaldasson, King of the Swedes was the predecessor of Dyggvi Dómarsson, King of the Swedes; King of the Swedes.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden.2 Dómarr Dómaldasson, King of the Swedes next ruled over the land. He reigned long, and in his days were good seasons and peace.2 He married Drótt Óláfsdóttir, daughter of Óláfr Vermundarson, King of the Danes and Dampi (?).2 Dómarr Dómaldasson, King of the Swedes died at Uppsala, Sweden. Nothing is told of him but that he died in his bed in Upsal, and was transported to the Fyrisvold, where his body was burned on the river bank, and where his standing stone still remains.

So says Thjodolf: --

"I have asked wise men to tell
Where Domar rests, and they knew well.
Domar, on Fyrie's wide-spread ground,
Was burned, and laid on Yngve's mound."2

Family

Drótt Óláfsdóttir
Child

Citations

  1. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Sweden.
  2. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.

Dómaldi Vísbursson, King of the Swedes

Dómaldi Vísbursson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9486|Vísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9487|N. N. (?)||p151.htm#i17053|Vanlandi S., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9490|Drífa S. of Finland||p72.htm#i9491|||||||
FatherVísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes
MotherN. N. (?)1
     Dómaldi Vísbursson, King of the Swedes was the son of Vísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes and N. N. (?).1 Dómaldi Vísbursson, King of the Swedes took the heritage after his father Visbur, and ruled over the land.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden.1 He was given bad luck by the witchcraft used against him by his step-mother.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala. He witnessed his people, for in his time there was great famine and distress, as they, the Swedes, made great offerings of sacrifice at Upsal. The first autumn they sacrificed oxen, but the succeeding season was not improved thereby.1 He again watched his people make sacrifices, for in the following autumn they sacrificed men, but the succeeding year was rather worse.1 He died. The third autumn, when the offer of sacrifices should begin, a great multitude of Swedes came to Upsal; and now the chiefs held consultations with each other, and all agreed that the times of scarcity were on account of their king Domald, and they resolved to offer him for good seasons, and to assault and kill him, and sprinkle the stalle of the gods with his blood. And they did so.

Thjodolf tells of this: --

"It has happened oft ere now,
That foeman's weapon has laid low
The crowned head, where battle plain,
Was miry red with the blood-rain.
But Domald dies by bloody arms,
Raised not by foes in war's alarms --
Raised by his Swedish liegemen's hand,
To bring good seasons to the land."2,1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S220] Rupert Alen and Anna Marie Dahlquist, Royal Familes of Scandanavia, Flanders, and Kiev, pg. 3.

Vísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes

Vísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9487|Vanlandi Svegdirsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9490|Drífa Snjásdóttir of Finland||p72.htm#i9491|Svegdir F., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9493|Vana of Vanheim||p72.htm#i9494|Snjá "the Old" of Finland||p72.htm#i9492||||
FatherVanlandi Svegdirsson, King of the Swedes1
MotherDrífa Snjásdóttir of Finland1
     Vísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes was the son of Vanlandi Svegdirsson, King of the Swedes and Drífa Snjásdóttir of Finland.1 Vísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes married the daughter of Aude the Rich, and gave her as her bride-gift three large farms, and a gold ornament. King of the Swedes at Uppsala.1 He was confronted in Uppsala by his first two sons, when the one was twelve and the other thirteen years of age, and they desired to have their mother's dower; but he would not deliver it to them. Then they said that the gold ornament should be the death of the best man in all his race, and they returned home.1 He and Auðsdóttir the Scandinavian were divorced; He left her and took another wife.1 Vísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes married Auðsdóttir the Scandinavian, daughter of Auðr the Scandinavian.1 Vísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes married N. N. (?); His 2nd.1 Vísburr Vanlandason, King of the Swedes died. After his son's had left him, they began again with enchantments and witchcraft, to try if they could destroy their father. The sorceress Huld said that by witchcraft she could bring it about by this means, that a murderer of his own kin should never be wanting in the Yngling race; and they agreed to have it so. Thereafter they collected men, came unexpectedly in the night on Visbur, and burned him in his house.

So sings Thjodolf: --

"Have the fire-dogs' fierce tongues yelling
Lapt Visbur's blood on his own hearth?
Have the flames consumed the dwelling
Of the here's soul on earth?
Madly ye acted, who set free
The forest foe, red fire, night thief,
Fell brother of the raging sea,
Against your father and your chief."2,1

Family 1

Auðsdóttir the Scandinavian b. circa 320

Family 2

N. N. (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S220] Rupert Alen and Anna Marie Dahlquist, Royal Familes of Scandanavia, Flanders, and Kiev, pg. 3.

Vanlandi Svegdirsson, King of the Swedes

Vanlandi Svegdirsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9490|Svegdir Fjölnirsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9493|Vana of Vanheim||p72.htm#i9494|Fjölnir Y., King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9495||||||||||
FatherSvegdir Fjölnirsson, King of the Swedes
MotherVana of Vanheim
     Vanlandi Svegdirsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Svegdir Fjölnirsson, King of the Swedes and Vana of Vanheim. Vanlandi Svegdirsson, King of the Swedes was a great warrior, and went far around in different lands. He took up his winter abode in Finland with Snae the Old, and got his daughter Driva in marriage.1 He left Driva behind in the spring, and did not return after three years as he'd promised.1 He succeeded his father, and ruled over the Upsal domain.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden.1 He married Drífa Snjásdóttir of Finland, daughter of Snjá "the Old" of Finland.1 Vanlandi Svegdirsson, King of the Swedes died at Uppsala, Sweden. He was initially bewitched and wished to return to Finnland. His advisors, noting the witchcraft of the Finns, advised him against it. "He then became very drowsy, and laid himself down to sleep; but when he had slept but a little while he cried out, saying that the Mara was treading upon him. His men hastened to him to help him; but when they took hold of his head she trod on his legs, and when they laid hold of his legs she pressed upon his head; and it was his death."

Thus says Thjodolf: --

"And Vanlande, in a fatal hour,
Was dragg'd by Grimhild's daughter's power,
The witch-wife's, to the dwelling-place
Where men meet Odin face to face.
Trampled to death, to Skytaa's shore
The corpse his faithful followers bore;
And there they burnt, with heavy hearts,
The good chief killed by witchcraft's arts."2,1
. The Swedes took his body and burnt it at a river called Skytaa, where a standing stone was raised over him.1

Family

Drífa Snjásdóttir of Finland
Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S220] Rupert Alen and Anna Marie Dahlquist, Royal Familes of Scandanavia, Flanders, and Kiev, pg. 3.

Svegdir Fjölnirsson, King of the Swedes

Svegdir Fjölnirsson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9493|Fjölnir Yngvifreysson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9495||||Yngvi-Frey, the ruler of Peace and Fertility, Rain, and Sunshine||p278.htm#i9496|Gerðr, the Giantess||p72.htm#i9497|||||||
FatherFjölnir Yngvifreysson, King of the Swedes1
     Svegdir Fjölnirsson, King of the Swedes was the son of Fjölnir Yngvifreysson, King of the Swedes.1 King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden.1 Svegdir Fjölnirsson, King of the Swedes took the kingdom after his father, and he made a solemn vow to seek Godheim and Odin.1 He married Vana of Vanheim. Svegdir Fjölnirsson, King of the Swedes went with twelve men through the world, and came to Turkland, and the Great Svithiod, where he found many of his connections.. He was five years on this journey.1 He set out again, following the birth of his son, to search for Godheim. After heading out, he and his men came to a mansion on the east side of Swithiod (Mannheim, or Sweden) called Stein, where there was a stone as big as a large house. In the evening after sunset, as Swegde was going from the drinking-table to his sleeping-room, he cast his eye upon the stone, and saw that a dwarf was sitting under it.1 He died. Drunk, he was lured into the rock by the dwarf, who promised to show him Odin inside it. He ran to the stone, entered it, and it closed behind him, and he never came back.

Thiodolf of Kvine tells of this: --

"By Diurnir's elfin race,
Who haunt the cliffs and shun day's face,
The valiant Swegde was deceived,
The elf's false words the king believed.
The dauntless hero rushing on,
Passed through the yawning mouth of stone:
It yawned -- it shut -- the hero fell,
In Saekmime's hall, where giants dwell."2,1

Family

Vana of Vanheim
Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S220] Rupert Alen and Anna Marie Dahlquist, Royal Familes of Scandanavia, Flanders, and Kiev, pg. 3.

Fjölnir Yngvifreysson, King of the Swedes

Fjölnir Yngvifreysson, King of the Swedes||p278.htm#i9495|Yngvi-Frey, the ruler of Peace and Fertility, Rain, and Sunshine||p278.htm#i9496|Gerðr, the Giantess||p72.htm#i9497|Njörð, the Sea God||p278.htm#i9500|Eorthe of Esageard||p72.htm#i9501|Gymer (of Norse Myth)||p72.htm#i9498|Orsoda (of Norse Myth)||p72.htm#i9499|
FatherYngvi-Frey, the ruler of Peace and Fertility, Rain, and Sunshine1
MotherGerðr, the Giantess1
     Fjölnir Yngvifreysson, King of the Swedes was the son of Yngvi-Frey, the ruler of Peace and Fertility, Rain, and Sunshine and Gerðr, the Giantess.1 Fjölnir Yngvifreysson, King of the Swedes was powerful, and lucky in seasons and in holding the peace. King of the Swedes at Uppsala, Sweden. He died at "In Frode's Hall", Hleithra, Sealand, Denmark. He was attending a great feast hosted by his friend, Frode of Leidre, at the latter's hall in Sealand. In this large house there was a vessel many ells high. This vessel stood in a lower room, and from above it, in a hole in the floor of the loft, one poured the mead, exceedingly strong. "In the evening Fjolne, with his attendants, was taken into the adjoining loft to sleep. In the night he went out to the gallery to seek a certain place, and he was very sleepy and exceedingly drunk. As he came back to his room he went along the gallery to the door of another left, went into it, and his foot slipping, he fell into the vessel of mead and was drowned."

So says Thjodolf of Kvine:

"In Frode's hall the fearful word,
The death-foreboding sound was heard:
The cry of fey denouncing doom,
Was heard at night in Frode's home.
And when brave Frode came, he found
Swithiod's dark chief, Fjolne, drowned.
In Frode's mansion drowned was he,
Drowned in a waveless, windless sea."2,1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S220] Rupert Alen and Anna Marie Dahlquist, Royal Familes of Scandanavia, Flanders, and Kiev, pg. 3.

Yngvi-Frey, the ruler of Peace and Fertility, Rain, and Sunshine1,2,3

Yngvi-Frey, the ruler of Peace and Fertility, Rain, and Sunshine||p278.htm#i9496|Njörð, the Sea God||p278.htm#i9500|Eorthe of Esageard||p72.htm#i9501|Erce of Esageard||p151.htm#i17046||||Erce of Esageard||p151.htm#i17046||||
FatherNjörð, the Sea God2,4
MotherEorthe of Esageard2
     Yngvi-Frey, the ruler of Peace and Fertility, Rain, and Sunshine was the son of Njörð, the Sea God and Eorthe of Esageard.2,4 If he is the ancestor of the Ynglings, and the son of Njord, and Njord was of Vanaland, and offered as a hostage to the Asalander, Odin, then, per Snorri, the Ynglingers are not descendants of Odin, but of Njord, a native son.2 Yngvi-Frey, the ruler of Peace and Fertility, Rain, and Sunshine was called by another name, Yngve; and this name Yngve was considered long after in his race as a name of honour, so that his descendants have since been called Ynglinger. He built a great temple at Upsal, made it his chief seat, and gave it all his taxes, his land, and goods.2 King of the Swedes. He was said to be ancestor of the Ynglingar, the Swedish royal family.5 He was once said to be king of the Swedes, his reign one of peace and plenty.5 He was originally one of the Vanir tribe, he was included with the Aesir.3 He died. After his death, he was worshiped as a god. The day Friday was named in his honor.6,7 He was given Upsal as a domain by Odin.2 Also called Frey.2 He was , like his father, fortunate in friends and in good seasons.2 He was a priest of the sacrifices, like his father, and became Diar of the Asaland people.2 He married Gerðr, the Giantess, daughter of Gymer (of Norse Myth) and Orsoda (of Norse Myth).2 Yngvi-Frey, the ruler of Peace and Fertility, Rain, and Sunshine was buried in the tomb of the Kings, Uppsala, Sweden. "Frey fell into a sickness; and as his illness took the upper hand, his men took the plan of letting few approach him. In the meantime they raised a great mound, in which they placed a door with three holes in it. Now when Frey died they bore him secretly into the mound, but told the Swedes he was alive; and they kept watch over him for three years. They brought all the taxes into the mound, and through the one hole they put in the gold, through the other the silver, and through the third the copper money that was paid. Peace and good seasons continued."6,2

Family

Gerðr, the Giantess
Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 166-63.
  2. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Freyr (Norse myth.).
  4. [S1143] Brockhaus 2002, "Freyr".
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, from Germanic religion and mythology, Freyr.
  6. [S220] Rupert Alen and Anna Marie Dahlquist, Royal Familes of Scandanavia, Flanders, and Kiev, pg. 2.
  7. [S277] Gene Gurney, Kingdoms of Europe, Sweden, pg. 480.

Njörð, the Sea God1,2

Njörð, the Sea God||p278.htm#i9500|Erce of Esageard||p151.htm#i17046||||||||||||||||
FatherErce of Esageard
     Njörð, the Sea God was the son of Erce of Esageard. King of the Swedes.1 . The Swedes burned him, and all wept over his grave-mound. He died. Njord died on a bed of sickness, and before he died made himself be marked for Odin with the spear-point.1 He "had taken his own sister in marriage, for that was allowed by their law;".1 Of the Vanir, a race of gods responsible for wealth, fertility, and commerce and subordinate to the warlike Aesir. As reparation for the torture of their goddess Gullveig, the Vanir demanded from the Aesir monetary satisfaction or equal status. Declaring war instead, the Aesir suffered numerous defeats before granting equality. The Vanir sent their gods Njörd and Freyr to live with the Aesir and received Hoenir and Mimir in exchange.3 Held in several traditions as a divine ruler of the Swedes.2 He was the father of Freyr and Freyja by his own sister.2 He was there when all the diar or gods died, these diar being the temple priests that had journeyed from Asaland with Odin, and blood-sacrifices were made for them.1 He was given Noatun as a domain by Odin.1 He was a priest of the sacrifices, and became Diar of the Asaland people.1 He succeeded Odin as the sole sovereign of the Swedes.1 He was the best man of the Vanaland people, whom Odin attacked but could not subdue, and so Njord was offered as hostage in exchange for peace between those of Vanaland and those of Asaland.1 He was a good ruler, and in his days were peace and plenty, and such good years, in all respects, that the Swedes believed Njord ruled over the growth of seasons and the prosperity of the people.1 He married Eorthe of Esageard, daughter of Erce of Esageard; Siblings.1 Njörð, the Sea God married Skaði (of Norse Myth), daughter of Thiazi, the Giant; Her 1st. "But she would not live with him."4

Family 1

Eorthe of Esageard
Children

Family 2

Skaði (of Norse Myth)

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Njord (Norse myth.).
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Vanir (Norse myth.).
  4. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga, Chapter 9.
  5. [S1143] Brockhaus 2002, "Freyr".
  6. [S1143] Brockhaus 2002, "Freyja".

Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes

b. circa 528
Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes|b. c 528|p278.htm#i9503|Hálfdan II Frodasson, King of the Danes|d. 580|p294.htm#i10105|Sigris (?)|b. c 506|p78.htm#i10106|Frode I. F., King of the Danes||p111.htm#i13320||||||||||
FatherHálfdan II Frodasson, King of the Danes1 d. 580
MotherSigris (?)2 b. circa 506
     Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes was a witness where Adils Óttarson, King of the Swedes attacked by King Halfdan's son Helge, who ruled at that time over Leidre, who came to Sweden with so great an army, that King Adils saw no other way than to flee at once.1 Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes died. Killed in a war expedition.1 He associated with Álöf hin Ríka of Saxland.1 Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes was the successor of King of the Danes Frode V Skjölding; King of the Danes.3 King of the Danes at Leidre, Denmark, between 460 and 494.3 Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes was born circa 528.4,2 He was the son of Hálfdan II Frodasson, King of the Danes and Sigris (?).1,2 Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes associated with Yrsa of Saxland, daughter of Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes and Álöf hin Ríka of Saxland, circa 594 at Leidre; Her 2nd.1

Family 1

Yrsa of Saxland b. circa 565
Child

Family 2

Álöf hin Ríka of Saxland
Child

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 324-49.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Denmark.
  4. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Eystein Adilsson, 69.

Hrólfr Kráka, King of the Danes

Hrólfr Kráka, King of the Danes||p278.htm#i9504|Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes|b. c 528|p278.htm#i9503|Yrsa of Saxland|b. c 565|p72.htm#i9471|Hálfdan I. F., King of the Danes|d. 580|p294.htm#i10105|Sigris (?)|b. c 506|p78.htm#i10106|Helgi H., King of the Danes|b. c 528|p278.htm#i9503|Álöf h. R. of Saxland||p151.htm#i17067|
FatherHelgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes1 b. circa 528
MotherYrsa of Saxland1 b. circa 565
     Hrólfr Kráka, King of the Danes was the son of Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes and Yrsa of Saxland.1 Hrólfr Kráka, King of the Danes succeeded his father, after his death in battle, at age eight.1 He was the successor of Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes; King of the Danes.2 King of the Danes at Leidre between 510 and 522.1,2 Hrólfr Kráka, King of the Danes died. He died in the lifetime of Eystein of Sweden (ruled 505-531), King Adils' son.1

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, The Ynglinga Saga.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Denmark.

Sigtryggr Eysteinsson of Hedemark

Sigtryggr Eysteinsson of Hedemark||p278.htm#i9934|||||||||||||||||||
     Sigtryggr Eysteinsson of Hedemark had subdued Raumarike before, and having heard that Halfdan the Black was attacking, came out with his army against him, and there was great battle, in which King Halfdan was victorious.1 He had his residence in Hedemark.1 He died. Just as he was about to flee the battlefield where he had been defeated by Halfdan the Black, an arrow struck him under the left arm, and he fell dead.1

Citations

  1. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, Halfdan the Black Saga.