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Prisca (?)1

d. 311
     Prisca (?) married Diocles.1,2 Prisca (?) was was built a home in Nicomedeia by her husband Galerius.1 She was a witness where imperator Licinius Valerius Licinianus Licinius executed, Prisca, the widow of Galerius. Prisca (?) was forced, although she was a Christian or favorably disposed to Christianity, to sacrifice to the gods during the Great Persecution in 303.1 She died in 311. Arrested and beheaded by the Emperor Licinius.1

Family

Diocles b. 22 December 245, d. 3 December 316
Child

Citations

  1. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  2. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 197.

Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus1

b. circa 250, d. after 30 April 311
Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus|b. c 250\nd. a 30 Apr 311|p286.htm#i12435|N. N. of Illyricum|b. c 225|p169.htm#i18918|N. N. (?)|b. c 230|p169.htm#i18919|||||||||||||
FatherN. N. of Illyricum2 b. circa 225
MotherN. N. (?) b. circa 230
      Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus married N. N. (?); His 1st.2 Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was born circa 250 at Dacia Ripensis near Sardica, Illyricum, (Bulgaria).2,3 He was the son of N. N. of Illyricum and N. N. (?).2 Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was a shepherd as a youth and acquired the nickname Armentarius.2 He and N. N. (?) were divorced circa March 293; Abandoned.2 Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was appointed Caesar of the East by Emperor Diocletian, as one of the first of the Tetrarchy, on 1 March 293.2 He married Valeria, daughter of Diocles and Prisca (?), after 1 March 293; His 2nd.2 Caesar at Eastern Roman Empire between 1 March 293 and 1 May 305.2 Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus campaigned, as Caesar, in 294 at Egypt.2 He took to the field against Narses of Persia, and was defeated near Ctesiphon in 295.2 He was a witness where imperator Licinius Valerius Licinianus Licinius a close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, whom he accompanied on his Persian expedition in 297.2 Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus made inroads into Armenia, and obtained a treaty from the Persians favorable to the Romans in 298.2 He overcame the Sarmatians and the Carpi along the Danube between 299 and 305.2 He was a witness where Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus succeeded to the rank of Augustus in the west, along with Galerius, who took control of the east on 1 May 305.2 Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus appointed Severus as Caesar in the West, and Maximinus Daia as Caesar in the East on 1 May 305.2 He was appointed as Augustus, with Constantius, to rule over the Eastern Portion, but with both Caesars in his control, he had primacy on 1 May 305.2 He was a witness where Imperator Severus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus appointed caesar (junior emperor) to the emperor Constantius I Chlorus and given control of Pannonia, Italy, and Africa on 1 May 305 at Roman Empire.2,4 Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was a witness where imperator Maximinus Daia Caius Valerius Galerius Maximinus was appointed Eastern Caesar by his uncle, Galerius upon the divesture of Diocletian and Galerius' assumption of the purple on 1 May 305.2 Emperor at Eastern Roman Empire between 1 May 305 and May 311.2,3 Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus died after 30 April 311 at Sardica.2,3

Family 1

N. N. (?)
Child

Family 2

Valeria

Citations

  1. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 206.
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Galerius (Roman emp.) .
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Severus, Flavius Valerius (Roman emp.) .

usurper Augustus Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius1

b. circa 278, d. 28 October 312
usurper Augustus Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius|b. c 278\nd. 28 Oct 312|p286.htm#i12433|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|||||||||||||
FatherMaximianus1 b. 21 July 250, d. July 310
MotherEutropia the Syrian1 b. circa 250, d. after 325
     Usurper Augustus Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius was born circa 278.1 He was the son of Maximianus and Eutropia the Syrian.1 Usurper Augustus Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius married nobilissima femina Valeria Maximilla, daughter of Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus and N. N. (?), after 1 March 293.1 Usurper Augustus Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius was passed over in favour of Flavius Valerius Severus, who was made a caesar in 305.2 He was proclaimed augustus following discontent with the policies of Severus on 28 October 306 at Rome, Roman Empire.2 Emperor at Roman Empire between 28 October 306 and 28 October 312.2 He was a witness where Consul Valerius Romulus Consul with his father in 308.1 Usurper Augustus Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius was a witness where Consul Valerius Romulus Consul with his father in 309.1 (an unknown value) on 28 October 312 at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge, north of Rome.1 Usurper Augustus Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius died on 28 October 312 at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge. Maxentius' rule collapsed when he died in an engagement he had with the Emperor Constantine at the Milvian Bridge after the latter had invaded his realm.1,2

Family

nobilissima femina Valeria Maximilla b. circa 273
Child

Citations

  1. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Maxentius, Marcus Aurelius Valerius (Roman emp.) .

imperator Maximinus Daia Caius Valerius Galerius Maximinus

b. 20 November 270, d. between July 313 and August 313
imperator Maximinus Daia Caius Valerius Galerius Maximinus|b. 20 Nov 270\nd. bt Jul 313 - Aug 313|p286.htm#i18922||||N. N. of Illyricum||p169.htm#i18923|||||||N. N. of Illyricum|b. c 225|p169.htm#i18918|N. N. (?)|b. c 230|p169.htm#i18919|
MotherN. N. of Illyricum1
     Also called Daia of Illyricum. Imperator Maximinus Daia Caius Valerius Galerius Maximinus was born on 20 November 270 at Illyricum. He was of peasant origin. He was the son of N. N. of Illyricum.1 Imperator Maximinus Daia Caius Valerius Galerius Maximinus was a witness where Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus appointed Severus as Caesar in the West, and Maximinus Daia as Caesar in the East on 1 May 305.1 Imperator Maximinus Daia Caius Valerius Galerius Maximinus was appointed Eastern Caesar by his uncle, Galerius upon the divesture of Diocletian and Galerius' assumption of the purple on 1 May 305.1 He died between July 313 and August 313 at Tarsus. Failing to defend against Licinius' attack, he fled to Tarsus, where he died.1

Smbat I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids1

b. circa 265, d. after 314
     The Bagratids considered themselves descendants of the Biblical king David of Israel.2 Sources: 1. Toumanoff, C. 'The Orontids of Armenia' in 'Studies in Christian Caucasian History' (1963) pp.337-342. ; 2. Toumanoff, C. 'The Early Bagratids' in La Museon, (1949), pp.21-54. Also called Ambat I. Smbat I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids was born circa 265. Prince of the Bagratids in 314. He died after 314.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S197] Toby Dills, "Descendant of Antiquity," gedcom to Robert Stewart, 5 Feb 1999.
  2. [S132] Robert Bedrosian, "China to Armenians".

Diocles1

b. 22 December 245, d. 3 December 316
     Diocles was of very humble birth.2 Also called Imperator Caesar Gaïus Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus.1 He married Prisca (?).2,1 Diocles was born on 22 December 245 at Salona, the Dalmatian Coast, Illyria.2,1 Emperor at Eastern Roman Empire between 284 and 305.3 He was co-ruler with Maximianus; Emperor.4 Diocles was a witness where Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was appointed Caesar of the East by Emperor Diocletian, as one of the first of the Tetrarchy, on 1 March 293.2 Diocles contraced an almost fatal illness in 304.2 He was a witness where Maximianus urged by the emperor Diocletian, who appointed him, to divest himself of the purple on 1 March 305 at Mediolanum, Roman Empire.2 Diocles divested himself, and urged his co-emperor Maximianus to do the same, of the purple on 1 March 305 at Nicomedeia, Bithynia, Roman Empire.2 He died on 3 December 316 at Split, the Croation Coast, at age 70 years, 11 months and 11 days. He died in a possible suicide.2,1

Family

Prisca (?) d. 311
Child

Citations

  1. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 197.
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Diocletian.
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Maximian (Roman emp.) .

Fiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann

d. 322
Fiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 322|p286.htm#i13880|Cairpre Lifechar, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 284|p285.htm#i13883|Aine ingen Finn Uí Éremóin||p117.htm#i13884|Cormac m. A., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 266|p285.htm#i13886|Eithne T. i. C. M. Uí Éremóin||p115.htm#i13754|Finn m. C. Uí Éremóin||p120.htm#i14135||||
FatherCairpre Lifechar, Ard-rí na h'Éireann1,2,3 d. 284
MotherAine ingen Finn Uí Éremóin4
     Fiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the son of Cairpre Lifechar, Ard-rí na h'Éireann and Aine ingen Finn Uí Éremóin.1,2,3,4 Also called Fiacha Srabhteine.5 Fiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann and Eochu Doimlén killed Aenghus Gaibuaibhtheach in 276.1 Fiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann witnessed the death of Áengus Gáebuaibthich mac Éogain Bricc Uí Éremóin in 276; Killed by the sons of Cairbre Liffechair, namely, Fiacha Sraibhtine and Eochaidh Doimhlen.1 Fiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann ruled his first year over Ireland in 286.6 120th Monarch of Ireland between 286 and 322.6 He fought several battles | "The battle of Duibhlinn was fought by Fiacha against the Leinstermen; three battles at Sliabh Toadh; the battle of Smear; and also the battle of Ciarmhagh, by Fiacha Sraibhtine." In 291.7 He celebrated his sixth year of rule in 291.8 He died in 322 at the Battle of Dubhchomar, Crioch Rois, Breagh, Ireland. After having been thirty seven years as king over Ireland, was slain by his nephews, the so-called Collas.9,10 Annals of the Four Masters 322: "Fiacha Sraibhtine, after having been thirty seven years as king over Ireland, was slain by the Collas, in the battle of Dubhchomar, in Crioch Rois, in Breagh. / Iar m-beith seacht m-bliadhna ar triochat 'na righ ós Erinn d'Fiachaidh Sraibhtine do-cear lasna Collaib h-i c-cath Dubhchomair h-i c-Crich Rois i m-Breaghaib." ( (an unknown value)).10

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M276.2.
  2. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, ¶954].
  3. [S1445] Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings, pg. 280.
  4. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Baíscne mac Nuadat, 90.
  5. [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #57, pg. 785.
  6. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M286.1.
  7. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M291.2.
  8. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M291.1.
  9. [S291] Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm
  10. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M322.1.
  11. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Domnall mac Fiachach, 97.

imperator Licinius Valerius Licinianus Licinius1

b. circa 265, d. 325
     Imperator Licinius Valerius Licinianus Licinius was of peasant origin.1 He executed, Prisca, the widow of Galerius. He was born circa 265 at Dacia.1 He was a close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, whom he accompanied on his Persian expedition in 297.1 He was a witness where Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus made inroads into Armenia, and obtained a treaty from the Persians favorable to the Romans in 298.1 The Tetrarchy of Rome is stabilized from anarchy. Between October 308 and November 308 at the Conference of Carnuntum. Imperator Licinius Valerius Licinianus Licinius was Emperor, in Thrace, Illyricum, and Pannonia between October 308 and November 308 at Roman Empire.1 He witnessed the death of Prisca (?) in 311; Arrested and beheaded by the Emperor Licinius.1 Imperator Licinius Valerius Licinianus Licinius died in 325 at Spring, Thessalonica. He was put to death by Constantine I.1

Eutropia the Syrian1

b. circa 250, d. after 325
     Eutropia the Syrian was born circa 250. She married Maximianus before 274; Her 2nd.1,2 Eutropia the Syrian died after 325. Surviving all her children save Fausta.1

Family

Maximianus b. 21 July 250, d. July 310
Children

Citations

  1. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  2. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 199.

Flavia Maxima Fausta1

b. circa 288, d. 326
Flavia Maxima Fausta|b. c 288\nd. 326|p286.htm#i11582|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|||||||||||||
FatherMaximianus2 b. 21 July 250, d. July 310
MotherEutropia the Syrian2 b. circa 250, d. after 325
     Flavia Maxima Fausta was born circa 288 at Rome. She was fifteen+ years junior to her husband Constantine.2 She was the daughter of Maximianus and Eutropia the Syrian.2 Flavia Maxima Fausta married Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus, son of Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus and Helena Augusta Flavia Iulia Helene of Bithynia, in 307 at Trier.1,2,3 Flavia Maxima Fausta revealed the plot of her father against Constantine, thus contributing to her own father's end in 310.2 She died in 326. Put to death by her husband, Constantine the Great.3

Family

Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus b. 27 February 272, d. 22 May 337
Children

Citations

  1. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1, the House of Constantine..

Caesar Flavius Iulius Crispus Constantius1,2

b. circa 305, d. 326
Caesar Flavius Iulius Crispus Constantius|b. c 305\nd. 326|p286.htm#i12334|Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus|b. 27 Feb 272\nd. 22 May 337|p286.htm#i10582|Minervina (?)||p102.htm#i12428|Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|Helena Augusta Flavia I. H. of Bithynia|b. 248\nd. 328|p286.htm#i10580|||||||
FatherImperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus1 b. 27 February 272, d. 22 May 337
MotherMinervina (?)2
      Caesar Flavius Iulius Crispus Constantius was born circa 305 at the East.3 He was the son of Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus and Minervina (?).1,2 Caesar Flavius Iulius Crispus Constantius was appointed Caesar by his father on 1 March 317 at Serdica (modern Sofia).2 Caesar between 1 March 317 and 322.2 Consul, for the 1st time in 318.2 He successfully undertook military operations against the Franks and Alamanni between 320 and 323.2 Consul, for the 2nd time in 321.2 He married Helena (?) before January 322.2 Consul, for the 3rd time in 324.2 Caesar Flavius Iulius Crispus Constantius died in 326 at Pola, Istria. Put to death by his father, Constantine the Great, for unclear reasons.1,2

Family

Helena (?) b. circa 305
Child

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm, "Some modern authorities, on good grounds, think that it was in 305.".

Helena Augusta Flavia Iulia Helene of Bithynia

b. 248, d. 328
      Also called St. Helene.1 Helena Augusta Flavia Iulia Helene of Bithynia was born in 248 at Drepanum, Bithynia. Eutropius (Brev. 10.2) mentions that she was born ex obscuriore matrimonio.1 She married Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus, son of Eutropious of the Gordiani and Claudia, circa 270; His 1st.1 Helena Augusta Flavia Iulia Helene of Bithynia and Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus were divorced on 1 March 293.1 Helena Augusta Flavia Iulia Helene of Bithynia made a tour of the eastern provinces of the empire, culminating in Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem) in 326.2 She died in 328 at age 80 years.1

Family

Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus b. 31 March 250, d. 25 July 306
Child

Citations

  1. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  2. [S911] Hadrian to Islam, online http://users.iafrica.com/l/ll/lloyd/1-TimeLine/…..
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  4. [S705] ., Bios Ancient, pg. 226.

King of al-Hirah Imru'u al-Qays I bar 'Amr al-Lakhmi al-Hirahi1,2

d. 7 December 328
King of al-Hirah Imru'u al-Qays I bar 'Amr al-Lakhmi al-Hirahi|d. 7 Dec 328|p286.htm#i10859|King of al-Hirah 'Amr I al-Lakhmi bar Adi al-Hirahi|b. c 235|p85.htm#i10860||||Adi bar Rabi'a al-Lakhmi|b. c 195|p85.htm#i10864|Raquash b. J. al-Hirahi|b. c 200|p85.htm#i10865|||||||
FatherKing of al-Hirah 'Amr I al-Lakhmi bar Adi al-Hirahi3 b. circa 235
     King of al-Hirah Imru'u al-Qays I bar 'Amr al-Lakhmi al-Hirahi was the son of King of al-Hirah 'Amr I al-Lakhmi bar Adi al-Hirahi.3 King of al-Hirah Imru'u al-Qays I bar 'Amr al-Lakhmi al-Hirahi was the son of 'Amr bar Adi.4 He claimed to have campaigned successfully over the entire north and centre of the peninsula, as far as the border of Najran.5 "What was most striking about this inscription for Dussaud and his fellow epigraphers was not only that it pushed back the history of Mudari Arabic back almost 200 years earlier than the previous oldest inscription, which had been dated to 512 C.E.,9 but that the language was so close to the Arabic of the Qur’an. Apart from a few words, like "bar" for "ibn" (son), which are clearly Aramaic, and some dialectical forms, like "ti" for "dhi" (this) and "dh‚" for "alladhi" (which), the vocabulary and syntax does not differ noticeably from the "classical" Arabic of the sixth century C.E."2 He was the second king of the Lakhmid dynasty, an important family in northern Arabia that at that time had been allied with the Byzantines and would later move to the east (to the area around modern-day Basra) and become clients of the Sassanian Persians.2 He was the successor of King of al-Hirah 'Amr I al-Lakhmi bar Adi al-Hirahi; King of al-Hirah.4 King of al-Hirah at Mesopotamia (Iraq), Persian Empire, between 278 and 328.6 Governor of the Bedouin at Northeast Arabia between 309 and 328.5 King of al-Hirah Imru'u al-Qays I bar 'Amr al-Lakhmi al-Hirahi was given, per Muslim sources, a "governorship" by the Sasanian king Shapur II over the Bedouin of northeast Arabia, being charged with the task of restraining their incursions into Sasanian territory. Between 309 and 328.5 King of the Arabs before 328.2 Master of Asad and Madhhij before 328.7 He was the predecessor of King of al-Hirah 'Amr II ibn Imru'u al-Qays al-Hirahi; King of al-Hirah.8 King of al-Hirah Imru'u al-Qays I bar 'Amr al-Lakhmi al-Hirahi died on 7 December 328. Per the "Namara inscription." The Namara inscription was carved on a large block of basalt which had originally served as the lintel for the entrance to the tomb. It identifies the occupant of the tomb as Imru’ al-Qays, son of ‘Amr (the first Lakhmid king), calls him "king of the Arabs," and gives some information about his notable exploits during his reign. Then it gives what is perhaps the most important single piece of information on the inscription: the date of the king’s death, 7 Kaslul (December) of the year 223 in the Nabataean era of Bostra (=328 C.E.). Presumably the tomb was constructed not long after Imru’ al-Qays’s death, so this means we have a firm time frame in which to place the inscription. "This is the funerary monument of Imru’u al-Qays, son of ‘Amr, king of the Arabs; and[?] his title of honor was Master of Asad and Madhhij. And he subdued the Asad¬s, and they were overwhelmed together with their kings, and he put to flight Ma(dh)hij thereafter, and came Driving them into the gates of Najran, the city of Shammar, and he subdued Ma‘add, and he dealt gently with the nobles Of the tribes, and appointed them viceroys, and they became phylarchs for the Romans. And no king has equalled his achievements. Thereafter he died in the year 223 on the 7th day of Kaslul. Oh the good fortune of those who were his friends!"1,2 King of al-Hirah Imru'u al-Qays I bar 'Amr al-Lakhmi al-Hirahi was buried in Namara, about 60 miles southeast of Damascus and almost due east of the Sea of Galilee, southern Syria.2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 430-53.
  2. [S952] Arabic Studies Project, online http://www.arabicstudies.edu/arabiclangrev.html
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 430-54.
  4. [S954] Esq., Bengal Civil Service William Muir Muir on Mahomet, Vol. 1, Chap. 3, Sect. 2.
  5. [S953] Pre-Islamic Arabia, online http://members.nbci.com/_XMCM/lordexarkun/Islam/…
  6. [S954] Esq., Bengal Civil Service William Muir Muir on Mahomet, Vol. 1, Chap. 3, Sect. 2, in 1857 his reign was 288-338, but modern scholarship has fixed the data his death in 328, so I'm going with the same reign length, but adjusted by accurate end date.
  7. [S952] Arabic Studies Project, online http://www.arabicstudies.edu/arabiclangrev.html, his title of honor.
  8. [S203] R. F. Tapsell, Royalty of the World, 184.1 (_), pg. 376.

Iamblichus of Chalcis1

b. circa 250, d. circa 330
Iamblichus of Chalcis|b. c 250\nd. c 330|p286.htm#i30248|||||||||||||||||||
     Iamblichus of Chalcis was a pupil of Porphyry, he was deeply impressed by the doctrines of Plotinus.2 He combined in his own teachings Plato’s ideas with many of those of Pythagoras and much that was mystical and even magical, derived from Asia.2 He was born circa 250 at Chalcis, Coele Syria (now Lebanon). He was observed circa 325.1 He died circa 330.2

Citations

  1. [S1642] Ford Mommaerts-Browne < and e-mail address>, [GEN-ANCIENT] A Speculation in "[GEN-ANCIENT] A Speculation," newsgroup message Mon, 8 Mar 2004 00:14:15 -0600.
  2. [S670] . Columbia Encyclopedia, Iamblichus.

Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia1

b. circa 284?, d. 330
Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia|b. c 284?\nd. 330|p286.htm#i5979|Khosrow II "the Valiant", King of West Armenia|b. c 236\nd. 287|p285.htm#i5981||||Trdat I., King of Greater Armenia|b. c 204?\nd. 255|p285.htm#i5983||||||||||
FatherKhosrow II "the Valiant", King of West Armenia2 b. circa 236, d. 287
     Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia was educated in the Roman Empire.3,4 Called Trdat III by Armenian sources. He was actually Trdat IV. Trdat III, the regicide, murderer of his brother Khosrov II, was his uncle.5 Also called Tiran Helios.6 He was born circa 284?. He was the son of Khosrow II "the Valiant", King of West Armenia.2 Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia escaped as an infant to Roman territory when his uncle murdered his father and acquired the Armenian throne in 287.5 He was the successor of Trdat III "the Regicide", King of West Armenia; King of West Armenia.7 Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia was a witness where Narseh I, Shah of Iran severely defeated by the Caesar Galerius in 297 at Armenia.7 Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia married, as a gesture of lengthy and close friendship and alliance with the Alans, a people closely related to the Scythians, the daughter of Alani King Ashkhadar, princess Ashkhen in 298.8 He married Ashkhen of the Alans, daughter of Kundajiq Askhkadar of the Alans, in 298.3,9,2,8,10 King of Greater Armenia between 298 and 330.11,12,4,13 Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia was converted by St. Gregory the Illuminator, and became the first monarch in history to impose Christianity on his people (doing so 20 years before Constantine I) in 300.14 He was a witness where Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia converted the Armenians to Christianity (who thereby regard themselves as the "first Christian Nation") in 300.15 Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia persecuted Christians in Armenia, in one instance killing a group of thirty seven Christian virgins who fled to Armenia to escape Roman persecution, and after one of the virgins, Hripsime, refused to marry him, in 301. He went insane following his killing of the virgins, and on his sister's advice to free Gregory, he did, and Gregory restored his health, and baptized him and his family. He declared Christianity the national religion and Armenia, making it the first Christian state. He died in 330 at Daranaghyats. Assassinated. The Persian Sassanids, once again unable to subdue Armenia by the means of arms put forth their old, infamous and treacherous act of assassination. In 330 AD the first King of the Holy Cross, as he became known, was poisoned during a feast on one of his visits of the countryside, in the province of Daranaghyats. "And he himself [Trdat] liked the solitary life as had saint Gregory. Thenceforth from time to time he did not appear among his forces, instead fasting and praying for forty days at a time. Going to him, his forces beseeched him to occupy the throne. But he did not agree to this, calling them traitors, superficially practising their piety. They swore vows and sealed decrees to practise Christianity with sanctity and to serve the king) without prevarication. And Trdat acceded to their wishes, occupied his throne, and became an example of all kinds of virtues. But becoming weary of his piety, they planned to kill him treacherously.Taking him to the hunt, they attacked him with bow and arrow, as if by accident. Seeing that he did not die from that, they gave him poison. And thus they murdered him. They snuffed out the life of this man, an individual whose enemies had been unable to hurt him due to his titan-like bravery, because he[ triumphed in every battle. What was considered impossible to accomplish by force--since the reputation of [Trdat's] bravery had spread throughout the entire world--they accomplished with treachery and so extinguished the glowing torch of their own lives. The pious and God-loving Trdatios thus died, having reigned for 56 years."3,4,8,16 He was the predecessor of Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia; King of Armenia.17,18,19 . Trdat the Great's body, in a silver casket, was buried in the Royal Arshakouni burial ground of Tordan.8

Family

Ashkhen of the Alans b. circa 280
Children

Citations

  1. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, xxxvii.
  2. [S1037] DFA (Bagrat), online http://www.ut.ee/~votan/articles/bagrat.htm
    , Part 2, V.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-58.
  4. [S1036] ., Descents From Antiquity, Q-43.
  5. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, xxxvi-xxxvii.
  6. [S912] Holdt Family Roots, online http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/tree/…+Lalou.htm.
  7. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, xxxvi.
  8. [S1091] Armenian Highland, online http://www.armenianhighland.com/main.html
  9. [S1036] ., Descents From Antiquity, Q-43, Q-42.
  10. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, §800.
  11. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia", 303-330.
  12. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C).
  13. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, §48.
  14. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, "Gregory the Illuminator, Saint".
  15. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, "Armenian rite".
  16. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 12.
  17. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-57.
  18. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  19. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 3.
  20. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 83.

Galla (?)1

b. circa 295, d. before 331
     Galla (?) was the sister of the praetorian prefect Vulcacius Rufus and Neratius Cerealis.2 She was born circa 295. She married Consul Julius Constantius, son of Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus and nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius, circa 320; His 1st.1 Galla (?) died before 331.2

Family

Consul Julius Constantius b. circa 295, d. 337
Children

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm

Basilina Camenia1

b. circa 300, d. 331
Basilina Camenia|b. c 300\nd. 331|p286.htm#i12341|Caeionius Iulianus Camenius|b. c 270|p102.htm#i12437||||||||||||||||
FatherCaeionius Iulianus Camenius2 b. circa 270
     Basilina Camenia was born circa 300.1 She was the daughter of Caeionius Iulianus Camenius.2 Basilina Camenia married Consul Julius Constantius, son of Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus and nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius, before 331; His 2nd (widower).1,2 Basilina Camenia died in 331. She died giving birth to Julian.2

Family

Consul Julius Constantius b. circa 295, d. 337
Child

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm

Colla Mend a quo Mugdorna1

d. 331
Colla Mend a quo Mugdorna|d. 331|p286.htm#i14761|Eochu Doimlén||p117.htm#i13885|Aechia of Alba||p127.htm#i14758|Cairpre L., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 284|p285.htm#i13883|Aine i. F. Uí Éremóin||p117.htm#i13884|Updar of Alba||p127.htm#i14759||||
FatherEochu Doimlén1
MotherAechia of Alba2
     Colla Mend a quo Mugdorna was the son of Eochu Doimlén and Aechia of Alba.1,2 From Colla Meann descended the Mughdorna and Dál Mennat.3 Colla Mend a quo Mugdorna also went by the name of Colla "the Famous" Meadhan = the Famous. Also called Aodh His original name. He witnessed the death of Fiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann in 322 at the Battle of Dubhchomar, Crioch Rois, Breagh, Ireland; After having been thirty seven years as king over Ireland, was slain by his nephews, the so-called Collas.4,5 Colla Mend a quo Mugdorna was exiled to Alba (Scotland) in 326.2 He fought against the Ulstermen, in which fell Fearghus Fogha, son of Fraechar Foirtriun, the last king of Ulster, who resided at Eamhain, in 331 at the Battle of Achadh Leithdheirg, Fearnmhagh, Ireland.6 He died in 331 at the Battle of Achadh Leithdheirg, Fearnmhagh (Farney), Ireland. Fell in battle against the Ulsterman, which the Colla brothers otherwise won.6

Citations

  1. [S1445] Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings, pg. 280.
  2. [S299] Genealogy of Family O'Neill, online http://www.cgocable.net/~aoneill/
  3. [S636] Ireland: History in Maps, online http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/kilkenny/2/iremaps.htm
  4. [S291] Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm
  5. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M322.1.
  6. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M331.2.

Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia1

b. 239, d. 332
Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia|b. 239\nd. 332|p286.htm#i6346|Anak Pahlav||p280.htm#i15246||||||||||||||||
FatherAnak Pahlav2
     The Apostle of Armenia. Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia was born in the family of Anak of noble blood and Parthian descent.3 Also called St. Gregory of Armenia. Sources: 1. Toumanoff, C. 'In the Formative Centuries' in 'Studies in Christian Caucasian History' (1963) pp.207-208, note 236. Also called Catholicos of Armenia St. Gregory "the Illuminator" the Parthian.3 He married Mariam (?), daughter of David (?).4 Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia was born in 239 at Vagarshapat [now Ejmiadzin], Armenia.5,3 He was the son of Anak Pahlav.2 A Feast Day commemorates his birth. On 5 August.6 Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia was described in semilegendary 5th-century Armenian chronicles as a Parthian prince who fled the Persian invasion and was educated as a Christian in the Greek culture of Caesarea, Cappadocia (modern Kayseri, Turkey).7 A Feast Day commemorates his sufferings. On 4 February.6 He returned to Armenia in the midst of a Christian persecution pressed by King Tiridates III (who was a zealot for the regional idols) and was imprisoned in a burial pit.7 A Feast Day commemorates his going into the pit. On 28 February.6 A Feast Day commemorates his coming out of the pit. On 19 October.6 He was a witness where Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia converted by St. Gregory the Illuminator, and became the first monarch in history to impose Christianity on his people (doing so 20 years before Constantine I) in 300.7 Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia converted the Armenians to Christianity (who thereby regard themselves as the "first Christian Nation") in 300.8 Catholicos of Armenia between 301 and 325.3,9 He was the predecessor of Aristakes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia; Catholicos of Armenia.3,9 Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia died in 332 at T'ordan, the Daranaghik' district, Armenia, at age 93 years.7,6,10 A Feast Day commemorates the deposit of his relics at Thorton. On 30 September.6 Pope Gregory XVI, in September, 1837, admitted his namesake to the Roman Calendar; and appointed 1 October as his feast (among the festa pro aliquibus locis). On 1 October.6

Family

Mariam (?)
Children

Citations

  1. [S590] Hye Etch, online http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/armenians/history_p1.html
  2. [S328] Robert Bedrosian, "Dayeakut'iwn".
  3. [S1091] Armenian Highland, online http://www.armenianhighland.com/main.html
  4. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, xxxi.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, "Gregory the Illuminator, Saint" - says 240.
  6. [S585] Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter The Catholic Encyclopedia, VIII-Gregory the Illuminator.
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, "Gregory the Illuminator, Saint".
  8. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, "Armenian rite".
  9. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html
  10. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 34.

Hannibalianus Constantius1

b. circa 297, d. before 337
Hannibalianus Constantius|b. c 297\nd. b 337|p286.htm#i18845|Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|Eutropious of the Gordiani|b. c 220|p82.htm#i10583|Claudia|b. c 225|p82.htm#i10584|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|
FatherImperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus1 b. 31 March 250, d. 25 July 306
Mothernobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius1 b. circa 276
     Hannibalianus Constantius was born circa 297. He was the son of Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus and nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius.1 Hannibalianus Constantius died before 337. He died before the imperial purges that occurred in 337 because he is not listed among its victims.1

Consul Julius Constantius1

b. circa 295, d. 337
Consul Julius Constantius|b. c 295\nd. 337|p286.htm#i12338|Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|Eutropious of the Gordiani|b. c 220|p82.htm#i10583|Claudia|b. c 225|p82.htm#i10584|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|
FatherImperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus1,2 b. 31 March 250, d. 25 July 306
Mothernobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius1,2 b. circa 276
      Consul Julius Constantius was born circa 295.1 He was the son of Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus and nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius.1,2 Consul Julius Constantius married Galla (?) circa 320; His 1st.1 Consul Julius Constantius married Basilina Camenia, daughter of Caeionius Iulianus Camenius, before 331; His 2nd (widower).1,2 Consul Julius Constantius was Consul, with Ceionius Rufius Albinus in 335.2 He died in 337. Killed in the imperial purges following the death of his half-brother, Constantine I.1,2

Family 1

Galla (?) b. circa 295, d. before 331
Children

Family 2

Basilina Camenia b. circa 300, d. 331
Child

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm

Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus1

b. 27 February 272, d. 22 May 337
Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus|b. 27 Feb 272\nd. 22 May 337|p286.htm#i10582|Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|Helena Augusta Flavia Iulia Helene of Bithynia|b. 248\nd. 328|p286.htm#i10580|Eutropious of the Gordiani|b. c 220|p82.htm#i10583|Claudia|b. c 225|p82.htm#i10584|||||||
FatherImperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus2,3,4 b. 31 March 250, d. 25 July 306
MotherHelena Augusta Flavia Iulia Helene of Bithynia2,3,4 b. 248, d. 328
     Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus also went by the name of Constantine 'the Great". He was born on 27 February 272 at Naissus, Moesia Superior.5 He was the son of Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus and Helena Augusta Flavia Iulia Helene of Bithynia.2,3,4 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus associated with Minervina (?) before 301; This relationship was probably illegitimate.2 Emperor at Roman Empire between 306 and 337. Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus married Flavia Maxima Fausta, daughter of Maximianus and Eutropia the Syrian, in 307 at Trier.6,2,7 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was the predecessor of Maximianus; Emperor, restored. (an unknown value) on 28 October 312 at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge, north of Rome.2 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was a witness where Caesar Flavius Iulius Crispus Constantius appointed Caesar by his father on 1 March 317 at Serdica (modern Sofia).2 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus became emperor, making possible the building of the famous Christian shrines in Aelia (Jerusalem), beginning one of Jerusalem's most splendid and prosperous periods in 324.8 Emperor of Byzantium between 324 and 337.9 He authorized Bishop Makarios of Aelia (Jerusalem) to demolish the temple of Aphrodite in order to uncover the "tomb of Christ" in 325 at Jerusalem, Palestine.8 He witnessed the death of Flavia Maxima Fausta in 326; Put to death by her husband, Constantine the Great.7 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus witnessed the death of Caesar Flavius Iulius Crispus Constantius in 326 at Pola, Istria; Put to death by his father, Constantine the Great, for unclear reasons.3,2 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus witnessed the marriage of Rex Regum Flavius Hannibalianus Constantius and Augusta Constantina in 335; Her 1st. 1st cousins.2 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was a witness where Caesar Flavius Dalmatius Constantius raised to the purple with the rank of Caesar by his uncle the Emperor Constantine I on 19 September 335.2 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was a witness where Rex Regum Flavius Hannibalianus Constantius named Rex Regum et Ponticarum Gentium by his uncle, Constantine I, probably to replace the King of Persia if his planned campaign against that nation was successful in 337.2 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus traveled to Drepanum, now named Helenopolis in honor of his mother, where he prayed at the tomb of his mother's favorite saint, the martyr Lucian. From there he proceeded to the suburbs of Nicomedia, and there he was baptized, as both Eusebius and Jerome report; but only Jerome adds another significant fact: the baptism was performed by the Arian bishop Eusebius of Nicomedia, on 3 April 337.2 He died on 22 May 337 at Ankyrona, near Nicomedia, at age 65 years, 2 months and 25 days. He died of illness on his way east to fight the Persians, and still wearing the white robes of a Christian neophyte.2,4,10 Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostles, Constantinople. His sarcophagus was placed as he himself had directed; surrounded by the memorial steles of the Twelve Apostles, making him symbolically the thirteenth Apostle.2 Constantius II defeats the usurper Magnentius before 10 August 353 at the Battle of Mons Seleuci, France.

Family 1

Minervina (?)
Child

Family 2

Flavia Maxima Fausta b. circa 288, d. 326
Children

Citations

  1. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 213.
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  4. [S705] ., Bios Ancient, pg. 226.
  5. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 214, 27 Feb 272 or 273.
  6. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  7. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1, the House of Constantine..
  8. [S911] Hadrian to Islam, online http://users.iafrica.com/l/ll/lloyd/1-TimeLine/…..
  9. [S25] J. M. Hussey, Cambridge Medieval History, Vol 4, Part 1, pg. 776.
  10. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 214.

Consul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor

b. circa 296, d. after 22 May 337
Consul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor|b. c 296\nd. a 22 May 337|p286.htm#i18841|Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|Eutropious of the Gordiani|b. c 220|p82.htm#i10583|Claudia|b. c 225|p82.htm#i10584|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|
FatherImperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus b. 31 March 250, d. 25 July 306
Mothernobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius b. circa 276
      Consul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor was born circa 296. He was the son of Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus and nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius. Consul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor was named a consul and censor in 333.1 He died after 22 May 337. He died in the imperial purges following the death of his half-brother, Constantine I.

Family

Children

Caesar Flavius Dalmatius Constantius1

b. circa 314, d. after 22 May 337
Caesar Flavius Dalmatius Constantius|b. c 314\nd. a 22 May 337|p286.htm#i18842|Consul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor|b. c 296\nd. a 22 May 337|p286.htm#i18841||||Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|||||||
FatherConsul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor1 b. circa 296, d. after 22 May 337
      Caesar Flavius Dalmatius Constantius was born circa 314. He was the son of Consul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor.1 Caesar, of Thrace, Achaea, and Macedon on 19 September 335.1 Caesar Flavius Dalmatius Constantius was raised to the purple with the rank of Caesar by his uncle the Emperor Constantine I on 19 September 335.1 He was educated where the family lived, by the rhetor Exsuperius, at Tolosa (Toulouse).1 He died after 22 May 337 at Summer. He was murdered by the soldiery, perhaps as part of the purge of the imperial family that followed the death of his uncle, Constantine I.1

Rex Regum Flavius Hannibalianus Constantius1

b. circa 315, d. after 22 May 337
Rex Regum Flavius Hannibalianus Constantius|b. c 315\nd. a 22 May 337|p286.htm#i18843|Consul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor|b. c 296\nd. a 22 May 337|p286.htm#i18841||||Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|||||||
FatherConsul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor1 b. circa 296, d. after 22 May 337
      Rex Regum Flavius Hannibalianus Constantius was born circa 315. He was the son of Consul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor.1 Rex Regum Flavius Hannibalianus Constantius was educated where the family lived, by the rhetor Exsuperius, at Tolosa (Toulouse).1 He married Augusta Constantina, daughter of Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus and Flavia Maxima Fausta, in 335; Her 1st. 1st cousins.1 Rex Regum Flavius Hannibalianus Constantius was named Rex Regum et Ponticarum Gentium by his uncle, Constantine I, probably to replace the King of Persia if his planned campaign against that nation was successful in 337.1 He died after 22 May 337. He perished in the purge of the imperial family which occurred following the death of his uncle, Constantine I.1

Family

Augusta Constantina b. circa 320, d. 354

N. N. Constantius1

b. circa 322, d. after 22 May 337
N. N. Constantius|b. c 322\nd. a 22 May 337|p286.htm#i18847|Consul Julius Constantius|b. c 295\nd. 337|p286.htm#i12338|Galla (?)|b. c 295\nd. b 331|p286.htm#i12339|Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|||||||
FatherConsul Julius Constantius1 b. circa 295, d. 337
MotherGalla (?)1 b. circa 295, d. before 331
     N. N. Constantius was born circa 322. He was the son of Consul Julius Constantius and Galla (?).1 N. N. Constantius died after 22 May 337. He died in the imperial purges following the death of his uncle, Constantine I.1

sparapet Vach'e Mamikonean1

b. circa 300?, d. before 338
sparapet Vach'e Mamikonean|b. c 300?\nd. b 338|p286.htm#i25559|Artawazd Mamikonean||p222.htm#i25558||||||||||||||||
FatherArtawazd Mamikonean1
     Sparapet Vach'e Mamikonean was the general of all of Greater Armenia.1 He was had a son who was a very little boy (at the time of his father's death), named after his grandfather Artawazd.2 He was son of Artawazd, of the Mamikonean tohm.1 He was born circa 300?. He was the son of Artawazd Mamikonean.1 Sparapet Vach'e Mamikonean destroyed the army of Sanesan, king of the Mazk'ut'k', who had invaded Armenia in the reign of Xosrov III after 331.1 He freed Armenia with these comrades-in-arms: Bagrat Bagratuni,
Mehundak and Garegin Erheshtunik'
Vahan, nahapet of the Amatunik' tohm,
and Varaz Kaminakan.3 Sparapet of Armenia before 338. He died before 338. He fell in battle against the Iranians. "[T]here was incredible mourning throughout the entire land for many times the Lord had saved the Armenians through him. Archbishop Vrt'anes assembled and consoled everyone, including king Xosrov himself and all the troops who were taken with heart-rending sorrow, tearful laments, burdensome care, great sobbings and unbelievable mourning."4

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 16.
  2. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 32.
  3. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 17.
  4. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 30.

Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia1

b. circa 300?, d. 338
Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia|b. c 300?\nd. 338|p286.htm#i5977|Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia|b. c 284?\nd. 330|p286.htm#i5979|Ashkhen of the Alans|b. c 280|p51.htm#i5980|Khosrow II "the Valiant", King of West Armenia|b. c 236\nd. 287|p285.htm#i5981||||Kundajiq Askhkadar of the Alans|b. c 250|p131.htm#i15247||||
FatherTrdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia2 b. circa 284?, d. 330
MotherAshkhen of the Alans2 b. circa 280
     Also called Xosrov Kotak.3 Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia also went by the name of Khosrow "the Short".4 He was grandson of Xosrov, and son of the brave and virtuous king Trdat III, the Great.3 He was the successor of Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia; King of Greater Armenia.5,6,7,8 Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia was born circa 300?. He was the son of Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia and Ashkhen of the Alans.2 Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia was a witness where Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia went to the emperor Constantine to have Xosrov, son of the brave and virtuous Trdat made king of Armenia.9 King of Armenia between 330 and 338.1,10,3 Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia transferred [the capital] from the city of Artashat to Dwin and planted oak forests for a place of recreation.11 He died in 338. "Having reigned for nine years, he died in piety."1,11 Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia was buried in Ani of Daranaghik', the district of Ekegheac'. He was buried by his ancestors.12 He was the predecessor of Tiran, King of Armenia; King of Armenia.13 Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia was a witness where King of al-Hirah al-Mundhir III ibn al-Nu'man al-Hirahi restored by Nushirvan after 531.14

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-57.
  2. [S1037] DFA (Bagrat), online http://www.ut.ee/~votan/articles/bagrat.htm
    , Part 2, V.
  3. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 3.
  4. [S590] Hye Etch, online http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/armenians/history_p1.html
  5. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia", 303-330.
  6. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C).
  7. [S1036] ., Descents From Antiquity, Q-43.
  8. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, §48.
  9. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 13.
  10. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  11. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 14.
  12. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 33.
  13. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 5.
  14. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, Chapter XLII: State Of The Barbaric World. Part III. footnote 59..

Wisimar of the Heruli

b. circa 267, d. 340
Wisimar of the Heruli|b. c 267\nd. 340|p286.htm#i10663|Alberic I of the Heruli|b. b 237\nd. 292|p285.htm#i10664||||Teneric the Herul|b. b 201\nd. 237|p285.htm#i10665|Biogonna the Thuringian|b. c 212|p83.htm#i10666|||||||
FatherAlberic I of the Heruli b. before 237, d. 292
     Wisimar of the Heruli was born circa 267. He was the son of Alberic I of the Heruli. Wisimar of the Heruli died in 340.

Family

Child

imperator Constantine II Flavius Claudius Constantinus1

b. 316, d. 340
imperator Constantine II Flavius Claudius Constantinus|b. 316\nd. 340|p286.htm#i12335|Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus|b. 27 Feb 272\nd. 22 May 337|p286.htm#i10582|Flavia Maxima Fausta|b. c 288\nd. 326|p286.htm#i11582|Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|Helena Augusta Flavia I. H. of Bithynia|b. 248\nd. 328|p286.htm#i10580|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|
FatherImperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus1,2 b. 27 February 272, d. 22 May 337
MotherFlavia Maxima Fausta3,2 b. circa 288, d. 326
      Imperator Constantine II Flavius Claudius Constantinus was born in 316 at Summer, Arles, France.2 He was the son of Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus and Flavia Maxima Fausta.1,2,3 Caesar between 1 March 317 and 9 September 337.2 Imperator Constantine II Flavius Claudius Constantinus agreed to take Britain, Gaul, and Spain in the split of his late father's empire between his brothers in September 337 at Pannonia.2 Co-Emperor, of Britain, Gaul, and Spain between 9 September 337 and 340.2 He was a witness where imperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans beat back an attempt by his brother Constantine II to seize some of his realm in 340.2 Imperator Constantine II Flavius Claudius Constantinus died in 340 at age 24 years. Died in an attempt to seize some of his brother Constans' realm in a battle fought near Aquileia.2

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1, the House of Constantine..

Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia1

b. circa 269?, d. 341
Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia|b. c 269?\nd. 341|p286.htm#i6344|Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia|b. 239\nd. 332|p286.htm#i6346|Mariam (?)||p243.htm#i27487|Anak Pahlav||p280.htm#i15246||||David (?)||p243.htm#i27488||||
FatherGrigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia b. 239, d. 332
MotherMariam (?)2
     Also called St. Vrtanes of Armenia.3 "Pahlav" means "Parthian." Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia had been married, was childless, and for a long time he beseeched God not to deprive him of the blessing of a son a fruit of his own which he would place in the Lord's service and in his old age the Lord heard his prayers, his wife became pregnant and bore twin sons.4 Also called Vrt'anes of Armenia.4 Also called Bardanes Greek. Also called Catholicos of Armenia St. Vrtanes I the Parthian.5 He was born circa 269?. He was the son of Grigor Lusavoritch Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia and Mariam (?).2 Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia was the successor of Aristakes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia; Catholicos of Armenia.5,3 Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia went to the emperor Constantine to have Xosrov, son of the brave and virtuous Trdat made king of Armenia.6 Catholicos of Armenia between 333 and 341.5,3 He died in 341. "Vrt'anes spent his life doing good deeds. Although the naxarars wanted to kill him many times, God did not allow this to occur. Instead, Vrt'anes died peacefully and passed to Christ, the hope of all."7 He was the predecessor of Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia; Catholicos of Armenia.8,5 Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia was buried in T'ordan, the Daranaghik' district. "Then the entire land of Armenia assembled and with great service, with psalms and spiritual songs, with lamps, candles, fragrant incenses, and royal wagons [ark'unakan karhok'], those who were left orphaned of their natural lord and their spiritual vardapet accompanied [Vrt'anes' body] with sorrowful weeping to the village of T'ordan in Daranaghik' district. It was there, by the [tomb of the] great patriarch Gregory that they laid his holy bones to rest."9

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S197] Toby Dills, "Descendant of Antiquity," gedcom to Robert Stewart, 5 Feb 1999.
  2. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, xxxi.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html
  4. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 5.
  5. [S1091] Armenian Highland, online http://www.armenianhighland.com/main.html
  6. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 13.
  7. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 14.
  8. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-56.
  9. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 33-34.

Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia1

b. circa 319?, d. 347
Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia|b. c 319?\nd. 347|p286.htm#i5973|Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia|b. c 269?\nd. 341|p286.htm#i6344||||Grigor L. Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia|b. 239\nd. 332|p286.htm#i6346|Mariam (?)||p243.htm#i27487|||||||
FatherVhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia b. circa 269?, d. 341
     Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia scorned every mundane thing regarding as good, not the transitory, but the sublime.2 He knew his wife only once, on their first night at the age of fifteen, and from the union twin sons were born, destinted to bring christianity to the land, for which Yusik, troubled by his deed, gave thanks to the Lord.2 Also called St. Husik of Armenia.3 He was given the daughter of his patron, Tiran, King of Armenia, in marriage.2 Also called Catholicos of Armenia St. Housik I the Parthian.4 He married N. N. Aršakuni, daughter of Tiran, King of Armenia. Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia was born circa 319?. He was the son of Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia. Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia was the successor of Vhartanes Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia; Catholicos of Armenia.4,3 Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia was a witness where Tiran, King of Armenia did not rule the kingdom according to the rules of God, but with evil deeds which the blessed Yusik vigorously reprimanded.5 Yusik I Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia was ordained to the kat'oghikosate at Caesarea, Cappadocia.6 He was raised by Tiran, son of King Xosrov of Armenia.2,5 Catholicos of Armenia between 341 and 347.1,4 He was robust and tall, and was extremely handsome and attractive, to the point that he had no equal throughout the country.7 He died in 347. "With words of priestly authority [Yusik] threatened and reproached them for impiety, adultery, homosexuality, the shedding of blood, dispossession, ravishment, hatred of the poor and numerous other sins such as these [vasn anorenut'ean porhnku'teann ew aruagitut'ean ew arenheghut'eann, zrkut'ean, yap'shtakut'ean, aghk'atatec'ut'ean ew ayloc' bazum meghac']. He himself, out of awe of the severe commandments of the Lord regarded as enemies those who perpetually transgressed the orders of Christ and broke the holy word of God. Throughout the entire course of his life he waged a war of reproach against everyone. On one of the annual feast days [Or ibrew or mi yawurc' tarekanac'], king Tiran and others of the nobility came to enter Church. But [Yusik] cried out, saying: "You are unworthy. Why have you come? Do not come inside"! Therefore they dragged him into the church, and clubbed and crushed God's chief priest, the blessed venerable lad Yusik. After beating him, they left him there, half-dead. Officiants of the court church took him from the royal Bnabegh fortress in the district of Greater Cop'k' to the village of T'ordan in Daranaghik' district. There, not many days later, he died and was placed near Gregory and his fathers."

Kirakos tells a different tale of his end. "Tiran despised Yusik and later murdered him for the following reason. After the death of the son of the great Constantine, emperor Constantius, Julian the Apostate ruled over the Romans [361-63]. He sent a tablet on which was painted the picture of satan and next to him that of Julian, in order that it be placed in the Armenian church. Tiran, out of fear of Julian, did as he was ordered. However, the blessed Yusik was opposed to this and did not allow the painting to enter the church. Instead he grabbed it from [Tiran's] hands, threw it on the ground and trampelled it with his feet, shattering it to bits. The angered Tiran ordered Yusik to be beaten to death with clubs. [Yusik] occupied the episcopal throne for six years."8,9

Family

N. N. Aršakuni
Children

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-56.
  2. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 5.
  3. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html
  4. [S1091] Armenian Highland, online http://www.armenianhighland.com/main.html
  5. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 14.
  6. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 35.
  7. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 36.
  8. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 12.
  9. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 14-15.

Tiran, King of Armenia1

d. 350?
Tiran, King of Armenia|d. 350?|p286.htm#i5975|Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia|b. c 300?\nd. 338|p286.htm#i5977||||Trdat IV "the Great", King of Armenia|b. c 284?\nd. 330|p286.htm#i5979|Ashkhen of the Alans|b. c 280|p51.htm#i5980|||||||
FatherKhosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia1 b. circa 300?, d. 338
     Tiran, King of Armenia was the son of Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia.1 Also called Tiridates.2 Tiran, King of Armenia was the successor of Khosrow III Kotak, King of Armenia; King of Armenia.3,4,5 Tiran, King of Armenia ruled in his father's stead circa 339.6 King of Armenia between 339 and 350.1 He did not rule the kingdom according to the rules of God, but with evil deeds which the blessed Yusik vigorously reprimanded.6 He selected several mighty princes, among them the great general of Armenia, named Vasak from the Mamikonean tohm, Andovk Siwnik', and Arshawir Kamsarakan, great and principal nahapets, to accompany P'arhen to his ordination as kat'oghikosate of Greater Armenia in 348.7 He was a witness where Vasak Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia selected by King Tiran to accompany the newly appointed Catholicos, P'arhen, to the capital city of Cappadocia, Caesarea in 348.8 Tiran, King of Armenia was a witness where Arshawir Kamsarakan, nahapet of Arsharunik' selected by King Tiran to accompany the newly appointed Catholicos, P'arhen, to P'arhen's ordination in 348 at Caesarea, Cappadocia.8,9 Tiran, King of Armenia was a witness where Andovk Siwni, nahapet of Siwnik' selected by King Tigranes to accompany P'arhen to P'arhen's ordination in 348 at Caesarea, Cappadocia.9 Tiran, King of Armenia died in 350?. "The king of Iran, Shapuh, perfidiously called Tiran before him, and on the way had his eyes blinded with coals. This was revenge granted by God for Tiran's unjust murder of Yusik and Daniel. Later his own son Arshak strangled him. [Tiran] ruled for thirty years."10 He was the predecessor of Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia; King of Armenia.11,12

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 5.
  2. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-56.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-57.
  4. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  5. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 3.
  6. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 14.
  7. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 55-56.
  8. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 16.
  9. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 55.
  10. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 14-15.
  11. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 131.
  12. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 16.
  13. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 227.

imperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans1,2

b. between 320 and 323, d. circa February 350
imperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans|b. bt 320 - 323\nd. c Feb 350|p286.htm#i11584|Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus|b. 27 Feb 272\nd. 22 May 337|p286.htm#i10582|Flavia Maxima Fausta|b. c 288\nd. 326|p286.htm#i11582|Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|Helena Augusta Flavia I. H. of Bithynia|b. 248\nd. 328|p286.htm#i10580|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|
FatherImperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus1,3 b. 27 February 272, d. 22 May 337
MotherFlavia Maxima Fausta1,4 b. circa 288, d. 326
      Imperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans was said to rule moderately at the start, he grew to become overbearing, and sources also condemned him for his homosexual tendencies.2 He was born between 320 and 323. The 3rd and youngest son.2 He was the son of Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus and Flavia Maxima Fausta.1,3,4 Caesar between 25 December 333 and 337.2 Caesar between 25 December 333 and 9 September 337.2 Imperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans succeeding his father, Constantine the Great, and co-ruling with his brothers, as Emperor of the Romans, his area of control included Italy, Africa, Illyricum, Macedonia, and Achaea on 9 September 337.2 Co-Emperor, of Italy, Africa, Illyricum, Macedonia, and Achaea between 9 September 337 and 350.2 He beat back an attempt by his brother Constantine II to seize some of his realm in 340.2 He witnessed the death of imperator Constantine II Flavius Claudius Constantinus in 340; Died in an attempt to seize some of his brother Constans' realm in a battle fought near Aquileia.2 Imperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans issued (or perhaps re-issued) a ban against pagan sacrifice in 341.2 He conducted a successful campaign against the Franci between 341 and 342.2 He visited Britain, probably on a military campaign, in 343.2 He died circa February 350 at Helena, a town in the Pyrenees. Put to death by Gaeso and a band of Magnentius' assassins, who dragged their victim from a temple in which he had sought refuge.2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  4. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1, the House of Constantine..

imperator Nepotian Julius Nepotian1

d. 30 June 350
imperator Nepotian Julius Nepotian|d. 30 Jun 350|p286.htm#i18850|Consul Virius Nepotian||p169.htm#i18849|Eutropia Constantius|b. c 298\nd. a 30 Jun 350|p286.htm#i18848|||||||Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|
FatherConsul Virius Nepotian1
MotherEutropia Constantius1 b. circa 298, d. after 30 June 350
     Imperator Nepotian Julius Nepotian was the son of Consul Virius Nepotian and Eutropia Constantius.1 Imperator Nepotian Julius Nepotian declared himself emperor and with band of gladiators he attacked Rome on 3 June 350.1 Emperor between 3 June 350 and 30 June 350.1 He died on 30 June 350 at Rome. He was killed by Magnentius' generals twenty-eight days after the beginning of the revolt. His head was put on a spear and carried around Rome.1

Eutropia Constantius1

b. circa 298, d. after 30 June 350
Eutropia Constantius|b. c 298\nd. a 30 Jun 350|p286.htm#i18848|Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|Eutropious of the Gordiani|b. c 220|p82.htm#i10583|Claudia|b. c 225|p82.htm#i10584|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|
FatherImperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus1 b. 31 March 250, d. 25 July 306
Mothernobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius1 b. circa 276
     Eutropia Constantius married Consul Virius Nepotian.1 Eutropia Constantius was born circa 298. She was the daughter of Imperator Caesar Gaïus Flavius Valerius Constantius Augustus and nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius.1 Eutropia Constantius died after 30 June 350. She was put to death by Magnentius following her sons revolt.1

Family

Consul Virius Nepotian
Child

imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius1

b. circa 290, d. 10 August 353
imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius|b. c 290\nd. 10 Aug 353|p286.htm#i10644|N. N. of the Britons|b. c 260|p83.htm#i10645|N. N. des Francs|b. c 265|p83.htm#i10646|||||||||||||
FatherN. N. of the Britons b. circa 260
MotherN. N. des Francs b. circa 265
      Though of German stock, was born at Samarobriva of a British father and a Frankish mother.1 Imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius was born circa 290 at Samarobriva.1 He was the son of N. N. of the Britons and N. N. des Francs. Imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius married Justina, daughter of N. N. Justis, circa 341; Her 1st.1 Emperor at Roman Empire between 350 and 353. Imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius was was declared emperor at Augustodunum at a banquet one night, following his decision to revolt because he heard about the military setbacks Constantius was suffering in the east on 18 January 350 at Augustodunum.1 Emperor between 18 January 350 and 10 August 353.1 He witnessed the death of imperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans circa February 350 at Helena, a town in the Pyrenees; Put to death by Gaeso and a band of Magnentius' assassins, who dragged their victim from a temple in which he had sought refuge.1 Imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius was controlled Gaul, Africa, and Spain after 15 February 350.1 He witnessed the death of imperator Nepotian Julius Nepotian on 30 June 350 at Rome; He was killed by Magnentius' generals twenty-eight days after the beginning of the revolt. His head was put on a spear and carried around Rome.1 Imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius witnessed the death of Eutropia Constantius after 30 June 350; She was put to death by Magnentius following her sons revolt.1 Constantius II defeats the usurper Magnentius before 10 August 353 at the Battle of Mons Seleuci, France. Imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius was defeated by Constantius II and forced to flee before 10 August 353 at the Battle of Mons Seleuci, France.1 He was a witness where imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius defeated the forces of the usurper Magnentius' near the Cottian Alps, in the area of Mons Seleuci before 10 August 353 at the Battle of Mons Seleuci, France.1 Imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius died on 10 August 353 at Lugdunum, France. His soldiers discovered that they were supporting a lost cause and decided to surrender Magnentius to the emperor. When Magnentius realized that there was no escape, he murdered, or at least attempted to murder, his own mother and all the relatives who were with him . On 10 or 11 August 353 Magnentius committed suicide.1

Family

Justina b. circa 321

Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus1

b. 325, d. 354
Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus|b. 325\nd. 354|p286.htm#i12340|Consul Julius Constantius|b. c 295\nd. 337|p286.htm#i12338|Galla (?)|b. c 295\nd. b 331|p286.htm#i12339|Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|||||||
FatherConsul Julius Constantius1 b. circa 295, d. 337
MotherGalla (?)1 b. circa 295, d. before 331
      Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus was so described: handsome, with blonde hair, but "differing from the temperate character of his brother Julian."2 He was born in 325 at Massa Veternensis, Etruria (Tuscany). The youngest of 3 children.3 He was the son of Consul Julius Constantius and Galla (?).1 Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus married Augusta Constantina, daughter of Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus and Flavia Maxima Fausta, circa 350; Her 2nd (widow). 1st cousins.3 Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus was elevated to the rank of Caesar by Constantius II who was forced to launch a campaign in the west against Flavius Magnus Magnentius in Gaul in 350.3 Caesar between 350 and 354. He was Consul, for the 1st time with Constantius II in 352.3 He was Consul, for the 2nd time with Constantius II in 353.3 He was Consul, for the 3rd time with Constantius II in 354.3 He died in 354 at age 29 years. The Caesar's hands were bound, and he was summarily beheaded. Allegedly, Gallus was allowed no defense, and his face and head were mutilated.3

Family

Augusta Constantina b. circa 320, d. 354

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm, per Ammianus.
  3. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm

Augusta Constantina1

b. circa 320, d. 354
Augusta Constantina|b. c 320\nd. 354|p286.htm#i18844|Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus|b. 27 Feb 272\nd. 22 May 337|p286.htm#i10582|Flavia Maxima Fausta|b. c 288\nd. 326|p286.htm#i11582|Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|Helena Augusta Flavia I. H. of Bithynia|b. 248\nd. 328|p286.htm#i10580|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|
FatherImperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus1 b. 27 February 272, d. 22 May 337
MotherFlavia Maxima Fausta1 b. circa 288, d. 326
     Augusta Constantina was born circa 320.1 She was the daughter of Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus and Flavia Maxima Fausta.1 Augusta Constantina married Rex Regum Flavius Hannibalianus Constantius, son of Consul and Censor Flavius Dalmatius Constantius the Censor, in 335; Her 1st. 1st cousins.1 Augusta Constantina married Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus, son of Consul Julius Constantius and Galla (?), circa 350; Her 2nd (widow). 1st cousins.1 Augusta Constantina died in 354 at Caeni Gallicani, Bithynia.1

Family 1

Rex Regum Flavius Hannibalianus Constantius b. circa 315, d. after 22 May 337

Family 2

Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus b. 325, d. 354

Muiredach Tírech, Ard-rí na h'Éireann

d. 356
Muiredach Tírech, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 356|p286.htm#i13879|Fiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 322|p286.htm#i13880||||Cairpre L., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 284|p285.htm#i13883|Aine i. F. Uí Éremóin||p117.htm#i13884|||||||
FatherFiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann1,2 d. 322
     Muiredach Tírech, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the son of Fiachu Sraibtine, Ard-rí na h'Éireann.1,2 Also called Muireadach Tireach.3 Muiredach Tírech, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was fought and defeated Colla Uais after four years' reign and banished him and his two brothers into Scotland, and became the 123rd Monarch of Ireland to rule for 30 years, in 326.4 He was a witness where Colla Uais a quo Uí Macc Uais, Ard-rí na h'Éireann exiled to Alba (Scotland) along with his brothers, and 300 others as well, in 326.4,5 Annals of the Four Masters 326: "The fourth year of Colla Uais, in the sovereignty of Ireland, when Muireadhach Tireach expelled him and his brothers into Alba Scotland with three hundred along with them. / An cethramadh bliadhain do Colla Uais h-i righe n-Ereann go ros-ionarbh Muiredhach Tireach eisiomh cona bhraithribh i n-Albain go t-tríbh cédaibh maraon riu." ( (an unknown value)).5 Muiredach Tírech, Ard-rí na h'Éireann succeeded his 1st cousin, Colla Uais, and ruled his first year over Ireland in 327.6 122nd Monarch of Ireland between 327 and 356.7 Annals of the Four Masters 327: "The first year of Muireadhach Tireach in the sovereignty of Ireland. / An céd-bhliadhain do Muiredhach Tirech h-i righe n-Ereann." ( (an unknown value)).6 Annals of the Four Masters 331: "The fifth year of Muireadhach. / An cúicceadh bliadhain do Muireadhach." ( (an unknown value)).8 He died in 356 at the Battle of Dubhall, Portrigh, over Dabhall, Ireland. Slain by Caelbhadh, son of Crunn, King of Uladh.9,10 He was the predecessor of Ard-rí na h'Éireann Cáelbad mac Cruind Ba Druí Dál n-Araidhe; 123rd Monarch of Ireland.11 Annals of the Four Masters 356: "After Muireadhach Tireach had been thirty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Caelbhadh, son of Crunn, King of Uladh, at Portrigh, over Dabhall. / Iar m-beith triocha bliadhain h-í righe n-Ereann do Muireadhach Tíreach do-cear la Caolbhadh mac Cruinn, ri n-Uladh, oc Port Righ uas Dabhall." ( (an unknown value)).10 Chronicon Scotorum 364: "Muiredhach Tirech slain by Caelbadh, son of Crund, King of Uladh, at Port Riogh, over the Dabhall."12

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, ¶954].
  2. [S1445] Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings, pg. 280.
  3. [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #59, pg. 785.
  4. [S299] Genealogy of Family O'Neill, online http://www.cgocable.net/~aoneill/
  5. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M326.1.
  6. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M327.1.
  7. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M327.1, M356.1.
  8. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M331.1.
  9. [S291] Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm
  10. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M356.1.
  11. [S636] Ireland: History in Maps, online http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/kilkenny/2/iremaps.htm
  12. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. v. A.D.364.
  13. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M365.1.

Ard-rí na h'Éireann Cáelbad mac Cruind Ba Druí Dál n-Araidhe

d. 357
Ard-rí na h'Éireann Cáelbad mac Cruind Ba Druí Dál n-Araidhe|d. 357|p286.htm#i18311|rí Uladh Crond Ba Druí mac Echach Dál n-Araidhe||p119.htm#i14104|Indécht ingen Lugdach Dál Fiatach||p119.htm#i14103|rí Uladh Eochaid m. L. Dál n-Araidhe||p164.htm#i18366||||rí Uladh Lugaid L. m. Á. Dál Fiatach||p119.htm#i14102||||
Fatherrí Uladh Crond Ba Druí mac Echach Dál n-Araidhe
MotherIndécht ingen Lugdach Dál Fiatach
     Ard-rí na h'Éireann Cáelbad mac Cruind Ba Druí Dál n-Araidhe was the son of rí Uladh Crond Ba Druí mac Echach Dál n-Araidhe and Indécht ingen Lugdach Dál Fiatach. Ard-rí na h'Éireann Cáelbad mac Cruind Ba Druí Dál n-Araidhe married Céindi ingen Cendfindain, daughter of Cendfindan mac Maith. 123rd Monarch of Ireland between 356 and 357.1 Ard-rí na h'Éireann Cáelbad mac Cruind Ba Druí Dál n-Araidhe died in 357. He was slain by Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin.2 Annals of the Four Masters 357: "After Caelbhadh, son of Crunn Badhrai, had been one year in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin. / Iar m-beith aon-bhliadhain i righe n-Ereann do Caolbhadh, mac Cruinn Ba Dhrai, do-cear la h-Eochaidh Muighmeadhoin." ( (an unknown value)).2 Chronicon Scotorum 364: "Muiredhach Tirech slain by Caelbadh, son of Crund, King of Uladh, at Port Riogh, over the Dabhall."3

Family

Céindi ingen Cendfindain
Child

Citations

  1. [S636] Ireland: History in Maps, online http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/kilkenny/2/iremaps.htm
  2. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M357.1.
  3. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. v. A.D.364.

imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius1

b. 7 August 317, d. 3 November 361
imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius|b. 7 Aug 317\nd. 3 Nov 361|p286.htm#i12336|Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus|b. 27 Feb 272\nd. 22 May 337|p286.htm#i10582|Flavia Maxima Fausta|b. c 288\nd. 326|p286.htm#i11582|Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|Helena Augusta Flavia I. H. of Bithynia|b. 248\nd. 328|p286.htm#i10580|Maximianus|b. 21 Jul 250\nd. Jul 310|p285.htm#i12431|Eutropia the Syrian|b. c 250\nd. a 325|p286.htm#i12432|
FatherImperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus2 b. 27 February 272, d. 22 May 337
MotherFlavia Maxima Fausta3 b. circa 288, d. 326
      Imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius was born on 7 August 317 at Illyricum. The 2nd son.1 He was the son of Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus and Flavia Maxima Fausta.2,3 Imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius was made Caesar on 13 November 324 at Nicomedeia.1 Caesar between 13 November 324 and 9 September 337.1 He was sent to Gaul when his brother Constantine II fought on the Danube in 332.1 He succeeded Constantine I, his father, to the Byzantine Emperorship in 337.4 He was a witness where Šahpur II, Shah of Iran defeated, in a long war, the Romans under Emperor Constantinus II between 337 and 363.5 Co-Emperor, of the east except for Thrace, Achaea, and Macedon between 9 September 337 and 3 November 361.4,1 Imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius married N. N., daughter of Consul Julius Constantius and Galla (?), circa 340; 1st cousins.1 Imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius was a witness where Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus elevated to the rank of Caesar by Constantius II who was forced to launch a campaign in the west against Flavius Magnus Magnentius in Gaul in 350.1 Imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius was a witness where Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus Consul, for the 1st time with Constantius II in 352.1 Imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius forbids Christians to convert to Judaism and describes Jews in his official statute as "savage," "abominable," and "blasphemous" in 353.6 He was a witness where Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus Consul, for the 2nd time with Constantius II in 353.1 Imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius was a witness where imperator Magnentius Flavius Magnus Magnentius defeated by Constantius II and forced to flee before 10 August 353 at the Battle of Mons Seleuci, France.1 Imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius defeated the forces of the usurper Magnentius' near the Cottian Alps, in the area of Mons Seleuci before 10 August 353 at the Battle of Mons Seleuci, France.1 He was a witness where Caesar Flavius Claudius Constantius Gallus Consul, for the 3rd time with Constantius II in 354.1 Imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius died on 3 November 361 at Mopsucrenae, Cilicia, at age 44 years, 2 months and 27 days. Killed in battle against the Persians.1

Family

N. N. b. circa 323

Citations

  1. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  2. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1, the House of Constantine..
  4. [S25] J. M. Hussey, Cambridge Medieval History, Vol 4, Part 1, pg. 776.
  5. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-56.
  6. [S911] Hadrian to Islam, online http://users.iafrica.com/l/ll/lloyd/1-TimeLine/…..

imperator Julian "the Apostate" Constantius1

b. circa 331, d. 363
imperator Julian "the Apostate" Constantius|b. c 331\nd. 363|p286.htm#i12342|Consul Julius Constantius|b. c 295\nd. 337|p286.htm#i12338|Basilina Camenia|b. c 300\nd. 331|p286.htm#i12341|Imperator Caesar Gaïus F. V. Constantius Augustus|b. 31 Mar 250\nd. 25 Jul 306|p285.htm#i10581|nobilissima femina Theodora Aurelius Valerius|b. c 276|p101.htm#i12337|Caeionius I. Camenius|b. c 270|p102.htm#i12437||||
FatherConsul Julius Constantius1 b. circa 295, d. 337
MotherBasilina Camenia1 b. circa 300, d. 331
      Imperator Julian "the Apostate" Constantius was born circa 331.2 He was the son of Consul Julius Constantius and Basilina Camenia.1 Imperator Julian "the Apostate" Constantius succeeded Constantine II, his 1st cousin, to the Byzantine Emperorship in 361. Emperor of Byzantium between 361 and 363.3 He met with Jewish leaders in Antioch and wrote to Patriarch Hillel II promising to make Jerusalem a Jewish city again, ordering the Jewish Temple's reconstruction on 19 July 362.4 He died in 363. Killed in battle, defending the Romans from Shapur II of the Persians.1 He was a witness where Šahpur II, Shah of Iran attacked the Romans, this time under the leadership of Julian who was killed, in 363.5

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S25] J. M. Hussey, Cambridge Medieval History, Vol 4, Part 1, pg. 776.
  4. [S911] Hadrian to Islam, online http://users.iafrica.com/l/ll/lloyd/1-TimeLine/…..
  5. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-56.

Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann

d. 365
Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 365|p286.htm#i13872|Muiredach Tírech, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 356|p286.htm#i13879||||Fiachu S., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 322|p286.htm#i13880||||||||||
FatherMuiredach Tírech, Ard-rí na h'Éireann1,2,3,4 d. 356
     Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the son of Muiredach Tírech, Ard-rí na h'Éireann.1,2,3,4 Also called Eochaidh Muigh Meadhoin.5 Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was called Muigh Meadhoin or the "Slaves Lord" and earned the nickname by making slave raids on Roman Britain.6 Also called Eachach Muighmedoin Irish.7 Also called Eochu Mugmedón Translated to english.7 He married Mong Finn ingen Fiodhaig Éoganachta, daughter of Fidhach mac Dáire Éoganachta; His 1st. Mother of his first three sons, and his 5th and last son.8 Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann married Cairenn Chasdubh of Britain, daughter of King Scal Moen of Britain; Concubine. Captured and carried off in one of his raids into Roman Britain.6 Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the ancestor of Áed mac Echach, rí Connacht; son of Eochu Tirmcharna alias Timrim, son of Fergus son of Muiredach Mael son of Eógan Sreb son of Daui Galach son of Brion son of Eochu Muigmedón.9 Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the successor of Ard-rí na h'Éireann Cáelbad mac Cruind Ba Druí Dál n-Araidhe; 123rd Monarch of Ireland.10 Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann slew Caelbhadh, son of Crunn Badhrai, after he had been one year in the sovereignty of Ireland in 357.11 He slew his Irian predecessor in 357.12 He witnessed the death of Ard-rí na h'Éireann Cáelbad mac Cruind Ba Druí Dál n-Araidhe in 357; He was slain by Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin.11 Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was King of Connacht, Eochu Mugmedón mac Muiredeach mac Fiachadh, and king of Ireland, in 358.13 He ruled his first year over Ireland in 358.14 124th Monarch of Ireland between 358 and 365.1 Annals of the Four Masters 358: "The first year of Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin in sovereignty over Ireland. / An céid-bhliadhain d'Eochaidh Muighmeadhon h-i righe ós Erinn." ( (an unknown value)).14 Chronicon Scotorum 364: "Eochaidh Muighmedhoin, son of Muiredhach Tirech, reigned eight years."2 He died in 365 at Teamhair, Ireland. An accidental death in his eighth year of rule.12,1 Annals of the Four Masters 365: "The eighth year of Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin, son of Muireadhach Tireach, over Ireland, when he died at Teamhair. / An t-ochtmadh bliadhain d'Eochaidh Muighmhedhoin mac Muiredhaigh Tirigh ós Erinn go n-erbailt i t-Teamhraigh." ( (an unknown value)).1 Chronicon Scotorum 371: "Eochaidh Muighmedhoin died."15

Family 1

Cairenn Chasdubh of Britain
Child

Family 2

Mong Finn ingen Fiodhaig Éoganachta d. 365
Children

Citations

  1. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M365.1.
  2. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. v. A.D.364.
  3. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, ¶954].
  4. [S1445] Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings, pg. 280.
  5. [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #60, pg. 785.
  6. [S299] Genealogy of Family O'Neill, online http://www.cgocable.net/~aoneill/
  7. [S897] [unknown], AU, U445.1.
  8. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Dáire Cerbba mac Ailella, 92.
  9. [S897] [unknown], AU, U577.4.
  10. [S636] Ireland: History in Maps, online http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/kilkenny/2/iremaps.htm
  11. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M357.1.
  12. [S291] Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm
  13. [S294] Various, Irish Annals.
  14. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M358.1.
  15. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. A.D.371.
  16. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M379.1.
  17. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Heremon, 98.
  18. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachra Foltsnaithech, 99.
  19. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M449.2.

Mong Finn ingen Fiodhaig Éoganachta1

d. 365
Mong Finn ingen Fiodhaig Éoganachta|d. 365|p286.htm#i13873|Fidhach mac Dáire Éoganachta||p120.htm#i14155||||Dáre C. m. A. Éoganachta||p120.htm#i14154||||||||||
FatherFidhach mac Dáire Éoganachta1,2
     Mong Finn ingen Fiodhaig Éoganachta was the daughter of Fidhach mac Dáire Éoganachta.1,2 Mong Finn ingen Fiodhaig Éoganachta married Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann, son of Muiredach Tírech, Ard-rí na h'Éireann; His 1st. Mother of his first three sons, and his 5th and last son.1 Mong Finn ingen Fiodhaig Éoganachta witnessed the death of Cairenn Chasdubh of Britain; As Eochaid's concubine, she was hated by his wife, Monghfinn, and forced to do menial work while in pregnancy, and it was while doing work that she gave birth to Niall, unfortunately dying in the process.3 Mong Finn ingen Fiodhaig Éoganachta died in 365 at Inish Donglais, County Mayo, Ireland. Died when she drank from the poisoned cup she had given her brother, Criomthann. Though she herself had filled the cup with poison, she too drank from it to avoid suspicion. Whether it was from the horror that she killed her own brother, or some other reason unknown, her children were set aside from the Irish throne in favor of their half-brother, Niall.1,4,2 She witnessed the death of Ard-rí na h'Éireann Crimthann Mór mac Fiodhaig Éoganachta in 378 at Cratloe Hill, County Clare, Ireland; Poisoned by his sister - for she tasted the drink in order to induce him to drink from it. Crimthann having drunk it came to Sliabh Uidhe on Riogh "The Mountain of the King's Death" (now Cratloe Hill, Co. Clare) and there expired.2,5

Family

Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann d. 365
Children

Citations

  1. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Dáire Cerbba mac Ailella, 92.
  2. [S303] Eoghanacht Genealogies, ., 1703 unknown repository.
  3. [S595] History of Scots, Picts, Britons, online http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/DavidDale1\index.html.
  4. [S291] Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm
  5. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M378.1.
  6. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Heremon, 98.
  7. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Brión mac Echach, 99.
  8. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachra Foltsnaithech, 99.

Vardan Mamikonean I, nahapet of the Mamikonean tohm1

b. circa 300, d. before 367
Vardan Mamikonean I, nahapet of the Mamikonean tohm|b. c 300\nd. b 367|p286.htm#i5969|N. N. Mamikonean||p243.htm#i27494||||||||||||||||
FatherN. N. Mamikonean1
     Prince of the Mamikonids. Vardan Mamikonean I, nahapet of the Mamikonean tohm was eldest brother of Vasak, sparapet of Armenia, and one other.1 He was born circa 300. He was the son of N. N. Mamikonean.1 Vardan Mamikonean I, nahapet of the Mamikonean tohm and Vasak Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia the dayeaks and nourishers of king Arshak in 350.2 Vardan Mamikonean I, nahapet of the Mamikonean tohm was established by King Arshak in the nahapetut'iwn of his azg (i.e. as Prince of the Mamikonean House) circa 351.1 He died before 367 at the fortress Eraxani, Tao. He was betrayed by his brother Vasak, who wrongly convinced King Arshak of treachery. Vasak's troops went to Vardan's fortress and were admitted. "They reasoned that since it was the force of [Vardan's] brother, he had come in peace. So [Vasak's troops] came and descended to the door of the tent, since [Vardan] had pitched his tent in the valley, at the foot of the fortress. Vasak's troops were all secretly armed, wearing their [regular] clothing on top. While [Vardan], naked was washing his head, many men with swords reached him, and stabbed him as he was bent over to pour water over himself. He did not even have time to arise, since they struck and killed him from the side."3 He was a witness where Vasak Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia treacherously betrayed his brother Vardan to King Arshak, and sent troops to slay him before 367.3

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 78.
  2. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 101.
  3. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 137.

King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain1

b. circa 305, d. circa 367
King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain|b. c 305\nd. c 367|p286.htm#i11494|Gereint ab Einudd of Britain||p91.htm#i11498||||King of the Silures Einudd a. G. of Britain||p91.htm#i11499||||||||||
FatherGereint ab Einudd of Britain1
     Succeeding his father-in-law, Donant (Dynod) as king. Dumnonia is a region in the southwest corner of England, covering Cornwall and Devon. The region was not successfully conquered by the English until the very end of the Saxon period. King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain had some twenty children by his second wife, Dareca, sister of St. Patrick, all of whom became saints or Bishops, mostly in Ireland: St.Echea, St.Lalloca, St.Mel-Noch, St.Rioch, St.Munis, Cruman, Midgma, St.Loman, St.Loarn, Cieran, Carantog, Magalle, Columb, Brychan, Brychad, Brendan, Fine, Melchu, St. Bolcan & their eldest son, Gradlon Mawr
.1 He was born circa 305.1 He was the son of Gereint ab Einudd of Britain.1 King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain married St. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia, daughter of Brenin Dumnonia Dynod ap Caradoc o Dumnonia, before 325 at Rome; Probably married by Pope Cyriacus.1,2 King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain married Darerca verch Calpurnius, daughter of Calpurnius of Britain and N. N. of Wales, before 330; His 2nd.1 1st King of Vannetais at Brittany between 340 and 387.3 King of Dumnonia at Britain between 340 and 387.3 King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain died circa 367.1 He was acceded by King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia in 367. King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain was the predecessor of King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia; King of Dumnonia.3 King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain was the predecessor of King of Brittany Erbin ap Cynan Meriadoc of Britain; King of Vannetais.3 King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain died in 421?.3

Family 1

St. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia b. circa 305, d. circa 410
Child

Family 2

Darerca verch Calpurnius
Children

Citations

  1. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  2. [S750] Robert B. Stewart, "My Theories", Except Siricius was not Pope until 384-399..
  3. [S640] History Files, online http://homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33/history.htm
  4. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M447.2.

P'arhanjem Siwni1,2

b. circa 320?, d. circa 368?
P'arhanjem Siwni|b. c 320?\nd. c 368?|p286.htm#i25552|Andovk Siwni, nahapet of Siwnik'|b. c 300?|p243.htm#i27493||||||||||||||||
FatherAndovk Siwni, nahapet of Siwnik'2 b. circa 300?
     P'arhanjem Siwni was granddaughter of Antiokhos (Andovk) Siwni.2 She was the brave though impious wife of Arsace.3 She bore the king a son they named Pap.4 She was the daughter of a certain Andovk, one of the naxarars of the nahapet of Siwnik.1' Also called Pharandsem.3 She was extremely well known for her beauty and modesty.1 She was born circa 320?. She was the daughter of Andovk Siwni, nahapet of Siwnik'.2 P'arhanjem Siwni married Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia, son of Tiran, King of Armenia; Consort.1,3,2 P'arhanjem Siwni refused the orders of her captive husband to surrender herself to Sapor, threw herself into Artogerassa (St. Martin, iii. 293, 302) where she defended herself for fourteen months, till famine and disease had left few survivors out of 11,000 soldiers and 6000 women who had taken refuge in the fortress.5 She died circa 368?. She then threw open the gates with her own hand. M. St. Martin adds, what even the horrors of Oriental warfare will scarcely permit us to credit, that she was exposed by Sapor on a public scaffold to the brutal lusts of his soldiery, and afterwards empaled.3

Family

Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia b. circa 325?, d. 371
Child

Citations

  1. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 119.
  2. [S1272] Robert H. Hewsen, Armenia atlas, pg. 121.
  3. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, Chapter XXV: Reigns Of Jovian And Valentinian, Division Of The Empire. Part VI. Para IV. footnote..
  4. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 129.
  5. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, Chapter XXV: Reigns Of Jovian And Valentinian, Division Of The Empire. Part VI. Para IV. footnote. "Pharandsem, not Olympias, refusing the orders of her captive husband to surrender herself to Sapor, threw herself into Artogerassa".

Ermanaric, king of the Getae1,2

b. circa 303, d. between 370 and 376
Ermanaric, king of the Getae|b. c 303\nd. bt 370 - 376|p286.htm#i9814|Achiulf|b. c 273|p75.htm#i9811||||Athal, the Noble One|b. c 243|p75.htm#i9815||||||||||
FatherAchiulf3 b. circa 273
     Ermanaric, king of the Getae was the only king named in the upper reaches of Gothis genealogy whose existence finds outside confirmation.4 Also called Hermanaric of the Goths. He was born circa 303. He was the son of Achiulf.3 Ermanaric, king of the Getae succeeded Geberich as king of the Goths.5 King of the Getae between 335 and 375.6,7 He subdued many warlike peoples of the north and made them obey his laws, "and some of our ancestors have justly compared him to Alexander the Great".5 He was the ruler of a vast empire in Ukraine, and although the exact limits of his territory are obscure, it evidently stretched south of the Pripet Marshes between the Don and Dniester rivers.8 According to the 6th-century historian Jordanes, the king put to death a woman named Sunilda by tying her to two wild horses and driving them apart, because her husband had treacherously deserted him. Thereupon her two brothers, Sarus and Ammius, severely wounded Ermanaric. Variations of this legend had a profound effect on medieval Germanic literature, including that of England and Scandinavia. The form of Ermanaric's name differs among authors and dialects: it occurs as Ermenrichus in Ammianus Marcellinus (whose book 31 is the chief source for the king's career), as Hermanaricus in Jordanes, as Jörmunrekr in the Norse writers, and as Eormenric in the Anglo-Saxon. He died between 370 and 376. "He committed suicide because he despaired of successfully resisting the Huns, who invaded his territories in the 370s. His kingdom was thereupon destroyed and his people became subject to the Huns for about 75 years.8 " He died in 375.1

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S713] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1997, pg. 25, figure 2.
  2. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica, XXIII.
  3. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica, XIV-79.
  4. [S253] Peter Heather, Heather, P., pg. 115.
  5. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica, XIV-116.
  6. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica, XIV-118.
  7. [S1629] M.D. Alexander M. Rackus, Guthones, Part II.
  8. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  9. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica, XIV-81.

Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia1

b. circa 325?, d. 371
Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia|b. c 325?\nd. 371|p286.htm#i25551|Tiran, King of Armenia|d. 350?|p286.htm#i5975||||Khosrow I. K., King of Armenia|b. c 300?\nd. 338|p286.htm#i5977||||||||||
FatherTiran, King of Armenia2,3 d. 350?
     Also called Aršak.4 Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia was born circa 325?. He was the son of Tiran, King of Armenia.2,3 Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia was the successor of Tiran, King of Armenia; King of Armenia.5 Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia married P'arhanjem Siwni, daughter of Andovk Siwni, nahapet of Siwnik'; Consort.6,7,4 Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia was described as "hairy, and his color dark" by his wife, P'aranjem who detested him.8 He strangled his father circa 350.9 He occupied the throne of his kingdom by the order of Shapuh.3 King of Armenia between 350 and 367.1,3 He was a witness where Arshawir Kamsarakan, nahapet of Arsharunik' and Andovk Siwni, nahapet of Siwnik' selected by the unanimous consent of the bishops, the king and the ashxarhax, to be a delagate in a group of nobles to accompany the newly appointed Catholicos, Nerses to his ordination in 353 at Caesarea, Cappadocia.10 Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia witnessed the death of Vasak Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia; Then king Shapuh of Iran ordered that chains be brought and cast around the neck of Arshak, and irons about his hands and feet, and that they should take him to Andmesh, which is called Anush fortress, and keep him bound there until he died. The next day king Shapuh ordered that Vasak Mamikonean, the general sparapet of Greater Armenia, should be brought before him, and he began to threaten hirn. Now Vasak was personally small, and Shapuh, king of Iran said to hirn: "Hey, fox, it was you who obstructed things and so fatigued us. You are the one who destroyed the Aryans for so many years. Why? I will kill you with a fox's death". Vasak replied, saying: "Now that you see me as personally short, you are not [acurately] measuring, my size. For until now I was a lion to you, but now, I am a fox. While I was Vasak, I was a giant with one foot on one mountain and the other foot on another mountain. When I leaned on my right foot the mountain [under my] right would be brought to the ground. When I leaned on my left foot, the left mountain would be brought to the ground". King Shapuh of Iran then asked: "Pray tell me what were those two rnountains that you brought to the ground"? And Vasak replied: "Of the two mountains, one was you and the other was the Byzantine emperor. While God allowed, I brought you and the Byzantine emperor to the ground, since the blessing of our father Nerses was upon us, and God had not forsaken us. While we acted according to his word, and accepted his xrat, be aware, we could have given you xrat. But with our eyes open, we fell into the abyss. So, do what you want". Then the king of Iran ordered that the general of Armenia, Vasak, be flayed, that the skin be removed and filled with hay, and taken to that very Andmesh fortress (which they call Anyush) wherein king Arshak was being held.11 Then king Shapuh of Iran ordered that chains be brought and cast around the neck of Arshak, and irons about his hands and feet, and that they should take him to Andmesh, which is called Anush fortress, and keep him bound there until he died. The next day king Shapuh ordered that Vasak Mamikonean, the general sparapet of Greater Armenia, should be brought before him, and he began to threaten hirn. Now Vasak was personally small, and Shapuh, king of Iran said to hirn: "Hey, fox, it was you who obstructed things and so fatigued us. You are the one who destroyed the Aryans for so many years. Why? I will kill you with a fox's death". Vasak replied, saying: "Now that you see me as personally short, you are not [acurately] measuring, my size. For until now I was a lion to you, but now, I am a fox. While I was Vasak, I was a giant with one foot on one mountain and the other foot on another mountain. When I leaned on my right foot the mountain [under my] right would be brought to the ground. When I leaned on my left foot, the left mountain would be brought to the ground". King Shapuh of Iran then asked: "Pray tell me what were those two rnountains that you brought to the ground"? And Vasak replied: "Of the two mountains, one was you and the other was the Byzantine emperor. While God allowed, I brought you and the Byzantine emperor to the ground, since the blessing of our father Nerses was upon us, and God had not forsaken us. While we acted according to his word, and accepted his xrat, be aware, we could have given you xrat. But with our eyes open, we fell into the abyss. So, do what you want". Then the king of Iran ordered that the general of Armenia, Vasak, be flayed, that the skin be removed and filled with hay, and taken to that very Andmesh fortress (which they call Anyush) wherein king Arshak was being held. In 367.11 Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia was the predecessor of Pap, King of Armenia; King of Armenia.12 Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia died in 371. It was not till many years after (A.D. 371) that he stabbed himself, according to the romantic story, (St. M. iii. 387, 389) in a paroxysm of excitement at his restoration to royal honors.7

Family

P'arhanjem Siwni b. circa 320?, d. circa 368?
Child

Citations

  1. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 131.
  2. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 227.
  3. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 16.
  4. [S1272] Robert H. Hewsen, Armenia atlas, pg. 121.
  5. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 5.
  6. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 119.
  7. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, Chapter XXV: Reigns Of Jovian And Valentinian, Division Of The Empire. Part VI. Para IV. footnote..
  8. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 129.
  9. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 15-16.
  10. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 16.
  11. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 187-188.
  12. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 202.