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Nerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia

b. circa 335?, d. 373
Nerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia|b. c 335?\nd. 373|p287.htm#i5967|Athenagenes Souren-Pahlav||p278.htm#i5971|Bambishu, Princess of Armenia|b. 315|p51.htm#i5972|Yusik I. Pahlav, Katholikos of Armenia|b. c 319?\nd. 347|p286.htm#i5973|N. N. Aršakuni||p51.htm#i5974|Khosrow I. K., King of Armenia|b. c 300?\nd. 338|p286.htm#i5977||||
FatherAthenagenes Souren-Pahlav1,2
MotherBambishu, Princess of Armenia1,2 b. 315
     Nerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia was the ancestor of Sahakanoyš Souren-Pahlav; a member of the Gregorid family (confirmed by contemporary evidence of high quality), and the line can then be traced back without difficulty to the Gregorid Armenian patriarch Nerses the Great.3 Nerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia was of, well founded, Arsacid descent through his mother and/or grandmother, and from there, virtually certain of a descent from king Phriapites of Parthia in the early second century BC.3 He was a soldier of king Arshak who raised his steel sword in service to the king and considered himself unworthy of the honor of being chosen as patriarch.4 He was worthy of the epithet by which he was called, "the marvelous," for he was a rightous and blessed man.5 He was a tall man, of pleasing size and captivating beauty, so much so that his equal in good looks could not be found in the world. Everyone looking at him found him desirable, amazing and venerable, and he displayed enviable courage in military training.6 He was son of At'anagines, son of Yusik, by Bambish, sister of King Tiran of Armenia.7 Prince of the Gregorid Domain.8 Also called St. Nersch I "the Great". Also called Nerses.2 Also called Catholicos of Armenia Nersess I the Parthian.9 He was born circa 335?. He was nourished and educated at Caesarea, Cappadocia.7 He was the son of Athenagenes Souren-Pahlav and Bambishu, Princess of Armenia.1,2 Nerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia married Samdukht Mamikonean of Taraun, daughter of Vardan Mamikonean I, nahapet of the Mamikonean tohm, before 352.8,1 Catholicos of Armenia between 353 and 373.8,9,10 Nerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia died in 373. He was murdered on orders of King Pap who once more appointed Aghbianids to the Catholicosate.8,1,11 He was a witness where Pap, King of Armenia ordered the death of the Catholicos, Nerses the Great, in 373.12

Family

Samdukht Mamikonean of Taraun b. circa 330
Child

Citations

  1. [S1037] DFA (Bagrat), online http://www.ut.ee/~votan/articles/bagrat.htm
    , Part 2, V.
  2. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), Ch. 15.
  3. [S1037] DFA (Bagrat), online http://www.ut.ee/~votan/articles/bagrat.htm
    , Part III.
  4. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): Chap. 1.
  5. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 16-17.
  6. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 82.
  7. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 81.
  8. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-55.
  9. [S1091] Armenian Highland, online http://www.armenianhighland.com/main.html
  10. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html
  11. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  12. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 246.
  13. [S664] Pas on Xerxes, online ..
  14. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 21.

Pap, King of Armenia1

d. 374
Pap, King of Armenia|d. 374|p287.htm#i25554|Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia|b. c 325?\nd. 371|p286.htm#i25551|P'arhanjem Siwni|b. c 320?\nd. c 368?|p286.htm#i25552|Tiran, King of Armenia|d. 350?|p286.htm#i5975||||Andovk Siwni, nahapet of Siwnik'|b. c 300?|p243.htm#i27493||||
FatherArsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia1 b. circa 325?, d. 371
MotherP'arhanjem Siwni1 b. circa 320?, d. circa 368?
     Pap, King of Armenia was the son of Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia and P'arhanjem Siwni.1 Pap, King of Armenia grew up, and commited sins: adultery, the abomination of homosexuality, sodomy, and disgusting lewdness, but especially homosexuality; furthermore he made others effeminate; thus did he sully himself.2 He married Zarmanduxt (?).3 Pap, King of Armenia was the successor of Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia; King of Armenia.4,5 Pap, King of Armenia was in Byzantium (as a royal hostage) at the time of his father's arrest in 367.6 He was acknowledged, as the son of Tiranus, as the lawful sovereign of Armenia, and his title to the throne was deeply rooted in the hereditary succession of five hundred years.7 He was a witness where Mušegh Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia assembled the surviving azatagund people and went with them to the Byzantine emperor where he presented the entreaties of the land of Armenia and all the calamitous events which had happened to [the Armenians], and he requested from the Byzantine emperor that Pap, Arshak's son, [be made] king of the land of Armenia in 367.8 King of Armenia between 367 and 374.8 Pap, King of Armenia witnessed the death of Nerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia in 373; He was murdered on orders of King Pap who once more appointed Aghbianids to the Catholicosate.9,10,11 Pap, King of Armenia ordered the death of the Catholicos, Nerses the Great, in 373.12 He died in 374. He was killed on orders of the Byzantine general Terent who probably acted on the instigation of Musheg Mamikonean, Pap's finest general who rebelled when Pap killed the holy Nerses. "Suddenly two of the legionnaires who stood behind [Pap] bearing shields with gold bosses, raised their battle-axes and struck king Pap. One cut his neck while the other battle-axe sliced off the right hand which was on the handle of his sabre. The hand fell off. King Pap fell on his face then and there. The wine from the goblet, the blood from his neck and [Pap's] body fell together onto the table as king Pap perished immediately." Gibbons recounts "A robust and desperate Barbarian instantly rushed on the king of Armenia; and though he bravely defended his life with the first weapon that chance offered to his hand, the table of the Imperial general was stained with the royal blood of a guest, and an ally. Such were the weak and wicked maxims of the Roman administration, that, to attain a doubtful object of political interest the laws of nations, and the sacred rights of hospitality were inhumanly violated in the face of the world."13,7

Family

Zarmanduxt (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 129.
  2. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 169.
  3. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 267.
  4. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 131.
  5. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 16.
  6. [S328] Robert Bedrosian, "Dayeakut'iwn", II. P'awstos Buzand.
  7. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, Chapter XXV: Reigns Of Jovian And Valentinian, Division Of The Empire. Part VI. Para IV..
  8. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 202.
  9. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-55.
  10. [S1037] DFA (Bagrat), online http://www.ut.ee/~votan/articles/bagrat.htm
    , Part 2, V.
  11. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  12. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 246.
  13. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 253-254.

Smbat II, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids1

b. circa 315, d. after 374
Smbat II, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 315\nd. a 374|p287.htm#i6394|Bagrat I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 290|p54.htm#i6396||||Smbat I., Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 265\nd. a 314|p286.htm#i6398||||||||||
FatherBagrat I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids b. circa 290
     Sources: 1. Toumanoff, C. 'The Orontids of Armenia' in 'Studies in Christian Caucasian History' (1963) pp.337-342. ; 2. Toumanoff, C. 'The Early Bagratids' in La Museon, (1949), pp.21-54. Smbat II, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids was was Presiding Prince of the Bagratids.. He was born circa 315. He was the son of Bagrat I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids. Smbat II, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids died after 374.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S197] Toby Dills, "Descendant of Antiquity," gedcom to Robert Stewart, 5 Feb 1999.

Mušegh Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia1

d. between 374 and 375
Mušegh Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia|d. bt 374 - 375|p287.htm#i25555|Vasak Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia|b. c 315?|p282.htm#i25546||||N. N. Mamikonean||p243.htm#i27494||||||||||
FatherVasak Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia1 b. circa 315?
     Mušegh Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia was the son of Vasak Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia.1 Mušegh Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia ordered that all Mzdeists they seized should be roasted over the flames; killed wickedly many fortress-keepers as well as many respected lords, who were honored in the presence of the king of Iran: he had them arrested and had then flayed, stuffed with hay, and hanged on the walls, and he did this in many places to avenge his father, Vasak.2 He did not allow anyone to dishonor the women of king Shapuh of Iran, rather he had palanquins prepared for all of them and then sent them all after their man, king Shapuh.3 He was the successor of Vasak Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia; High Constable of Armenia.1,4 Mušegh Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia assembled the surviving azatagund people and went with them to the Byzantine emperor where he presented the entreaties of the land of Armenia and all the calamitous events which had happened to [the Armenians], and he requested from the Byzantine emperor that Pap, Arshak's son, [be made] king of the land of Armenia in 367.1 Sparapet of Armenia in 367.1 He died between 374 and 375. He was killed at a dinner with King Varazdat, the successor of Pap to Armenia.5 . "When they had taken the body of sparapet to his tun, to his family, his family did not believe his death, despite the fact that they could see his head separated from his body. They said: "He has been in countless battles and never received a wound. No arrow has ever struck him, nor has anyone's weapon pierced him". Half of them expected him to resurrect, so they sewed the head back onto the torso and placed it on the roof of a tower, saying: "Because he was a brave man, the arhlezk' will descend and cause him to arise". They guarded [Mushegh] expecting his resurrection, until his body putrified. Then they brought him down from the tower, and wept over and buried him, as was the proper way."6

Citations

  1. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 202.
  2. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 206.
  3. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 208.
  4. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, Chapter XXV: Reigns Of Jovian And Valentinian, Division Of The Empire. Part VI. Para IV. footnote..
  5. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 258.
  6. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 259.

imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder

b. 321, d. 17 November 375
imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder|b. 321\nd. 17 Nov 375|p287.htm#i10640|Gratianus Valentinianus the Elder|b. c 291|p83.htm#i10641||||||||||||||||
FatherGratianus Valentinianus the Elder1 b. circa 291
      Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder was born in 321 at Cibalis (modern Vinkovci), Pannonia. He was the son of Gratianus Valentinianus the Elder.1 Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder married Marina Severa circa 345; His 1st.1 Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder married Justina, daughter of N. N. Justis, before 350; His 2nd. Her 2nd.1,2 Emperor between 364 and 15 November 375. Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder set up residence, from which he directed operations against the invading Alemanni, in October 365 at Paris, France.3 Romans, under Valentinian, defeat invading army of the Alemanni, under Vadomair. In July 366 at Châlons-sur-Marne, Gaul.4 He moved, to be in closer communication with his general Theodosius (father of the later Emperor Theodosius I) then defending Britain, and set up residence in 367 at Ambiani (modern Amiens), (France).3 He proclaimed his nine-year-old son, Gratian, as co-emperor on 24 August 367.3 He took up residence, where he remained for seven years devoting his attention to the construction of an elaborate system of fortifications on the Rhine, in October 367 at Trier, (Germany).3 He was the predecessor of imperator Gratian Valentinianus; Emperor. Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder died on 17 November 375 at Bregetio, Pannonia Inferior, at age 54 years. Defending against an invasion of Pannonia by the Quadi, he went to Sirmium, where he fell sick and died.3

Family 1

Marina Severa b. circa 325
Child

Family 2

Justina b. circa 321
Children

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 52, genealogy table 2..
  2. [S451] Leslie Mahler, later roman empire in "later roman empire," listserve message 05/02/1998.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Valentinian I (Roman emp.).
  4. [S429] John Sweetman, Dictionary of European Battles, pg. 47.
  5. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 227.
  6. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm

Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis

b. circa 316, d. 376
     Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis was born circa 316 at Spain.1 He married Thermantia the elder before 346. Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator participated in his father's campaigns against the Picts and Scots between 368 and 369 at Britain.2,3 Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis was magister equitum praesentalis between 368 and 375.2 He was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator campaigned with his father against the Alemanni in 370 at Gaul.3 Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator campaigned with his father against the Sarmatians between 372 and 373 at the Balkans.3 Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis died in 376 at Carthage, Africa. He was was sentenced to death and executed as a result of political intrigues by enemies at court.3

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Thermantia the elder b. circa 321
Child

Citations

  1. [S451] Leslie Mahler, later roman empire in "later roman empire," listserve message 05/02/1998.
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.
  4. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..

Ard-rí na h'Éireann Crimthann Mór mac Fiodhaig Éoganachta1

d. 378
Ard-rí na h'Éireann Crimthann Mór mac Fiodhaig Éoganachta|d. 378|p287.htm#i14816|Fidhach mac Dáire Éoganachta||p120.htm#i14155||||Dáre C. m. A. Éoganachta||p120.htm#i14154||||||||||
FatherFidhach mac Dáire Éoganachta1,2
     Ard-rí na h'Éireann Crimthann Mór mac Fiodhaig Éoganachta was the son of Fidhach mac Dáire Éoganachta.1,2 Ard-rí na h'Éireann Crimthann Mór mac Fiodhaig Éoganachta took the fortress of Doire Da Broc from the sons of Eochaid Mugmeadhon (of the kings of Tara).1 He was Crimhthann, son of Fidhach, son of Daire Cearb. Of Crimthann Már. He was the eponymous ancestor of the Crimthann Már.1,3 He ruled his first year over Ireland in 366.4 125th Monarch of Ireland between 366 and 378.5,4 Annals of the Four Masters 366: "The first year of Crimhthann, son of Fidhach, son of Daire Cearb, over Ireland. / An ced-bhliadhain do Criomhthann, mac Fiodhaidh, mic Daire Cerb, os Erinn." ( (an unknown value)).4 Chronicon Scotorum 371: "Criomthand, son of Fiodhach, reigned five years in Hibernia."2 Chronicon Scotorum 376: "Criomthand, son of Fiodhach, died."6 He died in 378 at Cratloe Hill, County Clare, Ireland. Poisoned by his sister - for she tasted the drink in order to induce him to drink from it. Crimthann having drunk it came to Sliabh Uidhe on Riogh "The Mountain of the King's Death" (now Cratloe Hill, Co. Clare) and there expired.1,5 Annals of the Four Masters 378: "After Crimhthann, son of Fidhach, had been thirteen years as king over Ireland, he died of a poisonous drink which his own sister gave him. / Iar m-beith tri bliadhna décc 'na righ ós Erinn do Criomhthann, mac Fiodhaigh, at-bail do digh neimhe tucc Moingfhionn a h-siuir feisin dó." ( (an unknown value)).5

Citations

  1. [S303] Eoghanacht Genealogies, ., 1703 unknown repository.
  2. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. A.D.371.
  3. [S636] Ireland: History in Maps, online http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/kilkenny/2/iremaps.htm
  4. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M366.1.
  5. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M378.1.
  6. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. vi. A.D.376.

King of Cernyw Owain Finddu ap Macsen o Cernyw1

b. circa 358, d. after 378
King of Cernyw Owain Finddu ap Macsen o Cernyw|b. c 358\nd. a 378|p287.htm#i11913|Western Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine|b. c 340\nd. 388|p287.htm#i11580|Ceindrech verch Rheiden|b. c 340|p97.htm#i11888|imperator Constans I Flavius J. Constans|b. bt 320 - 323\nd. c Feb 350|p286.htm#i11584||||Rheiden ab Eledi||p97.htm#i11889||||
FatherWestern Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine1 b. circa 340, d. 388
MotherCeindrech verch Rheiden1 b. circa 340
     Also called Eugenius filius Maximus Latin. Also called Owen "Black Lips" English, Finduu = Black Lips. King of Cernyw Owain Finddu ap Macsen o Cernyw was born circa 358.1 He was the son of Western Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine and Ceindrech verch Rheiden.1 King of Cernyw Owain Finddu ap Macsen o Cernyw died after 378 at Dinas Emrys, Gwynedd, Wales. There is an old story told about how Owain died. He is said to have been visiting his brother, Constantine, in North Wales, when he encountered an evil giant at Dinas Emrys. The two took part in a fierce battle in which they pelted each other with either arrows or huge steel balls. Eventually Owain killed the giant, but was so badly wounded himself that he shot an arrow into the air and asked to be buried where it fell. He died immediately afterward and was buried at what became Bedd Owain.1 King of Cernyw Owain Finddu ap Macsen o Cernyw was buried in Bedd Owain, Gwynedd, Wales.1

Family

Child

imperator Valens Flavius Valens1

b. circa 330, d. 9 August 378
imperator Valens Flavius Valens|b. c 330\nd. 9 Aug 378|p287.htm#i12345|Gratianus Valentinianus the Elder|b. c 291|p83.htm#i10641||||||||||||||||
FatherGratianus Valentinianus the Elder1 b. circa 291
      Imperator Valens Flavius Valens was born circa 330.1 He was the son of Gratianus Valentinianus the Elder.1 Imperator Valens Flavius Valens succeeded Jovian (363-364) to the Byzantine Emperorship in 364. Emperor of the Romans, Valens between 364 and 378.2 He died on 9 August 378 at near Adrianople. He perished at the hands of the Visigoths and other barbarians at the catastrophic defeat inflicted on the Empire.3

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 52, genealogy table 2..
  2. [S25] J. M. Hussey, Cambridge Medieval History, Vol 4, Part 1, pg. 776.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.

Šahpur II, Shah of Iran

b. circa 305?, d. 379
Šahpur II, Shah of Iran|b. c 305?\nd. 379|p287.htm#i13536|Hormazd II, Shah of Iran|d. 309|p285.htm#i13537|Princess of Kabul|b. c 283?|p113.htm#i13538|Narseh I., Shah of Iran|d. 303|p285.htm#i13540||||King of Kabul|b. c 253?|p113.htm#i13539||||
FatherHormazd II, Shah of Iran1 d. 309
MotherPrincess of Kabul1 b. circa 283?
     Šahpur II, Shah of Iran was son of Hormazd II.2 He was the successor of Hormazd II, Shah of Iran; Shah of Iran.2 Šahpur II, Shah of Iran was born circa 305?. He was the son of Hormazd II, Shah of Iran and Princess of Kabul.1 Šahpur II, Shah of Iran was a witness where King of al-Hirah Imru'u al-Qays I bar 'Amr al-Lakhmi al-Hirahi given, per Muslim sources, a "governorship" by the Sasanian king Shapur II over the Bedouin of northeast Arabia, being charged with the task of restraining their incursions into Sasanian territory. Between 309 and 328.3 Shahanshah of Iran at southwestern Asia between 309 and 379.4,2 Šahpur II, Shah of Iran defeated, in a long war, the Romans under Emperor Constantinus II between 337 and 363.5 He witnessed the death of imperator Constantius II Flavius Julius Constantius on 3 November 361 at Mopsucrenae, Cilicia; Killed in battle against the Persians.6 Šahpur II, Shah of Iran witnessed the death of imperator Julian "the Apostate" Constantius in 363; Killed in battle, defending the Romans from Shapur II of the Persians.7 Šahpur II, Shah of Iran attacked the Romans, this time under the leadership of Julian who was killed, in 363.5 He made peace with the Romans, something the Romans found disgraceful, after 363.5 "King Shapuh of Iran ordered that all mature males be trampled by elephants, and that all the women and children should be put under the blades of threshers. They killed thousands upon thousands, myriads upon myriads, there was no counting the slain. [Shapuh] ordered that the women of the fugitive azats and naxarars should be taken to the horse-arena in the city of Zarehawan. He ordered that all the azat women should be stripped and seated here and there in the arena. Then king Shapuh himself, mounted on a horse quickly rode around the women. Those who caught his eye he took with him, one by one, to rape. For he had pitched a tent near the arena and he would go there to commit impiety. Thus he spent many days with the women. They killed all the mature males of the azg of the Siwnik' tohm, killed all the women, and [Shapuh] ordered that all the young boys should be made eunuchs and sent to the country of Iran. He did all of this to get vengeance on Andovk, [as a result of whom] there was war with Nerseh, king of Iran."8 He witnessed the death of Vasak Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia; Then king Shapuh of Iran ordered that chains be brought and cast around the neck of Arshak, and irons about his hands and feet, and that they should take him to Andmesh, which is called Anush fortress, and keep him bound there until he died. The next day king Shapuh ordered that Vasak Mamikonean, the general sparapet of Greater Armenia, should be brought before him, and he began to threaten hirn. Now Vasak was personally small, and Shapuh, king of Iran said to hirn: "Hey, fox, it was you who obstructed things and so fatigued us. You are the one who destroyed the Aryans for so many years. Why? I will kill you with a fox's death". Vasak replied, saying: "Now that you see me as personally short, you are not [acurately] measuring, my size. For until now I was a lion to you, but now, I am a fox. While I was Vasak, I was a giant with one foot on one mountain and the other foot on another mountain. When I leaned on my right foot the mountain [under my] right would be brought to the ground. When I leaned on my left foot, the left mountain would be brought to the ground". King Shapuh of Iran then asked: "Pray tell me what were those two rnountains that you brought to the ground"? And Vasak replied: "Of the two mountains, one was you and the other was the Byzantine emperor. While God allowed, I brought you and the Byzantine emperor to the ground, since the blessing of our father Nerses was upon us, and God had not forsaken us. While we acted according to his word, and accepted his xrat, be aware, we could have given you xrat. But with our eyes open, we fell into the abyss. So, do what you want". Then the king of Iran ordered that the general of Armenia, Vasak, be flayed, that the skin be removed and filled with hay, and taken to that very Andmesh fortress (which they call Anyush) wherein king Arshak was being held.9 Šahpur II, Shah of Iran conquered Armenia.5 He tried, during the Iranian invasions of Armenia in the late 360s, to exterminate the House of Siwnik': "They killed all the mature males of the azg of the Siwnik' tohm, and killed all the women; and [Shahpuhr] ordered that all the young boys should be made eunuchs and be sent to the country of Iran".10 He witnessed the death of Arsaces III Tiranus, King of Armenia in 371; It was not till many years after (A.D. 371) that he stabbed himself, according to the romantic story, (St. M. iii. 387, 389) in a paroxysm of excitement at his restoration to royal honors.11 Šahpur II, Shah of Iran died in 379.5

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-57.
  2. [S1228] Coins and history, online www.grifterrec.com.
  3. [S953] Pre-Islamic Arabia, online http://members.nbci.com/_XMCM/lordexarkun/Islam/…
  4. [S262] MS Encarta 99, "Persia," Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved..
  5. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-56.
  6. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  7. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 47, genealogy table 1..
  8. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 199.
  9. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 187-188.
  10. [S328] Robert Bedrosian, "Dayeakut'iwn", II. P'awstos Buzand, footnote 22.
  11. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, Chapter XXV: Reigns Of Jovian And Valentinian, Division Of The Empire. Part VI. Para IV. footnote..
  12. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 176.

rí Mumhan Conall Corc mac Lugaid Éoganachta1

d. 379
rí Mumhan Conall Corc mac Lugaid Éoganachta|d. 379|p287.htm#i14169|Lugaid mac Ailella Éoganachta||p120.htm#i14171|Doilg Ireithneach (?)||p127.htm#i14818|rí Mumhan Ailill F. B. m. F. Éoganachta||p120.htm#i14156||||||||||
FatherLugaid mac Ailella Éoganachta3,2
MotherDoilg Ireithneach (?)2
     Why was he named "Corc?" "The persons who fostered Conall were Maghlar Dearg of the Corca Oiche tribe (Abbeyfeale district) and Torna Eigeas the poet of the Ciaraigh Luachra (of Kerry) - they reared him in the house of Crimthann Mor now of Fiodhach. There were Sorceresses in Munster at that time, destroying youths and every newborn child they choose to destroy. Some of these Sorceresses led by Feidhlim daughter of Mothair came to the house when the infant Corc was. The nurses who were in the house hid the youth under an upturned cauldron which was in the house. Said one of the Sorceresses: Whom shall we destroy of the people of this house. Another said: None but whoever is hid beneath the cauldron. After that a spark shot out of the fire and pitched in the youth's ear so that it became purple (Corcra); hence he was called Corc."2 Rí Mumhan Conall Corc mac Lugaid Éoganachta was the ancestor of the Eóghanachta, Uí Echach Mumhan and Uí Cairpri Luachra.4 He never converted to Christianity, but still one of the three Kings of Princes appointed by the triennial parliament held at Tara in St. Patrick's time, "to review, examine, and reduce into order all the monuments of antiquity, genealogies, chronicles, and records of the kingdom," the other two being Daire or Darius, a Prince of Ulster, and Leary the Monarch.5 He fled, in his youth, to Scotland to avoid the unnatural love of his stepmother.5 He was born. Born during his father's kingship of Munster.2 He was the son of Lugaid mac Ailella Éoganachta and Doilg Ireithneach (?).2,3 Rí Mumhan Conall Corc mac Lugaid Éoganachta married Aibeand ingen Áengusa, daughter of rí Áengus Bolg mac Lugaid; His 1st.6,2 Rí Mumhan Conall Corc mac Lugaid Éoganachta died in 379.1 He was the first generally accepted historical king of Munster and ancestor of the Eóghanachta.2,1

Family

Aibeand ingen Áengusa
Child

Citations

  1. [S470] Prince of Desmond The MacCarthy Mór, "Eóghanacht Kings of Munster".
  2. [S303] Eoghanacht Genealogies, ., 1703 unknown repository.
  3. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Heber Finn, 92.
  4. [S636] Ireland: History in Maps, online http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/kilkenny/2/iremaps.htm
  5. [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, Vol I, pg. 69.
  6. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Íth mac Breogain, 67.
  7. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Heber Finn, 93.

Athanaric, Chieftain of the Visigoths1

d. 381
     Athanaric, Chieftain of the Visigoths remembered for his most important victim, St. Sabas the Goth.1 Visigothic chieftain between 364 and 376.1 He fiercely persecuted the Christians between 369 and 372 at Dacia (approximately modern Romania).1 He was defeated by the Huns in 376.1 He fled with a few followers to Transylvania after 376 at Romania.1 He was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator sought new possibilities for coexistence with the barbarians who had invaded the eastern provinces, and his first result was the friendly reception by the Visigoth Athanaric in 381.2 Athanaric, Chieftain of the Visigoths died in 381 at Constantinople. Fleeing the Huns, he sought refuge in the Roman Empire. He was welcomed by Theodosius I who wished to improve relations with the barbarian tribes. He died in Constantinople a fortnight after his arrival.1

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Athanaric.
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.

imperator Gratian Valentinianus1

b. after 345, d. August 383
imperator Gratian Valentinianus|b. a 345\nd. Aug 383|p287.htm#i12344|imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder|b. 321\nd. 17 Nov 375|p287.htm#i10640|Marina Severa|b. c 325|p101.htm#i12343|Gratianus Valentinianus the Elder|b. c 291|p83.htm#i10641||||||||||
Fatherimperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder2 b. 321, d. 17 November 375
MotherMarina Severa2 b. circa 325
      Imperator Gratian Valentinianus was born after 345. He was the son of imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder and Marina Severa.2 Emperor between 375 and 383. Imperator Gratian Valentinianus was a witness where Mallobaudes, King of the Franks, in Worms appointed as commander of household troops by Gratian and sent with general Nannianus against Lentienses Alemanni (Ammianus Marcellinus, XXX, 3,7), defeating the Alemans near the Rhine and killing King Priarius (AM XXXI, 10,6) in 378.3 Imperator Gratian Valentinianus appointed Mallobaud of the Franks as commander of household troops and sending him against the Alemanni in 378.3 He was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator summoned to the court of emperor Gratian following the catastrophic defeat of the emperor Valens, who perished at the hands of the Visigoths and other barbarians near Adrianople on 9 August 378.4 Imperator Gratian Valentinianus was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator proclaimed co-Emperor by Gratian when he once again proved his military ability by a victory over the Sarmatians, and his dominion was to be the eastern part of the empire, including the provinces of Dacia (present-day Romania) and Macedonia, which had been especially infiltrated by barbarians in the preceding few years, on 19 January 379.4 Imperator Gratian Valentinianus died in August 383. Suspicions that Theodosius was in collusion with the usurper Maximus and thus implicated in the death of Emperor Gratian are unfounded.1,4

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 52, genealogy table 2..
  2. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 227.
  3. [S218] The Oxford Merovingian Page, online ..
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.

Richomer, Consul

b. circa 350, d. 384
Richomer, Consul|b. c 350\nd. 384|p287.htm#i10454|Mallobaudes, King of the Franks, in Worms|b. 320|p81.htm#i10458||||Malaric, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie|b. 295|p81.htm#i10460|N. N. of the Gauls|b. c 300|p81.htm#i10461|||||||
FatherMallobaudes, King of the Franks, in Worms b. 320
     Hearkening to a third-century funery inscription for a soldier in Pannonia: "Francus ego cives, miles romanus in armis." ("I am a Frank by nationality, but a Roman soldier under arms.") This could have been written as well for Richomer.1 Richomer, Consul was born circa 350. He was the son of Mallobaudes, King of the Franks, in Worms. Richomer, Consul married Ascyla (?), daughter of Ascyllius (?). Richomer, Consul died in 384. Murdered. Consul (FLAVIVS RICHOMERES) at Rome in 384.2

Family

Ascyla (?) b. circa 354, d. 413
Child

Citations

  1. [S445] Patrick J. Geary, Before France & Germany, pg. 79.
  2. [S721] Rulers of Rome, online (did not capture).
  3. [S504] Christian Settipani, AdC-Addendas.

Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta

b. circa 352, d. 385
     Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta was a Spaniard.1 She was the mother of Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus; the younger son of Theodosius I and Aelia Flacilla.2 Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta was born circa 352 at Spain. She married Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator, son of Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis and Thermantia the elder, before 377; His 1st.3 Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta died in 385. Died shortly after the succession of her husband to Emperor.3

Family

Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator b. 11 January 347, d. 17 January 395
Children

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Honorius.
  3. [S451] Leslie Mahler, later roman empire in "later roman empire," listserve message 05/02/1998.
  4. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..

Manuel Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia1

b. circa 328?, d. 385
Manuel Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia|b. c 328?\nd. 385|p287.htm#i25560|Artashir Mamikonean||p243.htm#i27501||||||||||||||||
FatherArtashir Mamikonean1
     Manuel Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia was born circa 328?. He was the son of Artashir Mamikonean.1 Manuel Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia was the hero of Armenia after the Persian devastation in 364.2 He returned to Armenia after imprisonment in Iran and seized the sparapetut'iwn, killing Bat Saharuni and his sons, and expels Varazdat in 378.3 He married his own daughter Vardanduxt to the youth Arshak Arshakuni, making him his son-in-law.4 He was the real ruler of Armenia, ruling not as king, but as a "trustee" of the monarchy between 378 and 385.4 He died in 385. He died of a fatal illness.4,5

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 260.
  2. [S1272] Robert H. Hewsen, Armenia atlas, pg. 95.
  3. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  4. [S328] Robert Bedrosian, "Dayeakut'iwn", II. P'awstos Buzand.
  5. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 282.
  6. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 265.

Isaac I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids1

b. circa 340, d. after 387
Isaac I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 340\nd. a 387|p287.htm#i6392|Smbat II, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 315\nd. a 374|p287.htm#i6394||||Bagrat I., Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 290|p54.htm#i6396||||||||||
FatherSmbat II, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids b. circa 315, d. after 374
     Sources: 1. Toumanoff, C. 'The Orontids of Armenia' in 'Studies in Christian Caucasian History' (1963) pp.337-342. ; 2. Toumanoff, C. 'The Early Bagratids' in La Museon, (1949), pp.21-54. Presiding Prince of the Bagratids. Isaac I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids was born circa 340. The placement of Isaac II as son of Smbat II seems to fit historically and chronologically but has not been proven. He was the son of Smbat II, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids. Isaac I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids died after 387.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S197] Toby Dills, "Descendant of Antiquity," gedcom to Robert Stewart, 5 Feb 1999.

Miecislaus I of the Heruli

b. circa 297, d. 388
Miecislaus I of the Heruli|b. c 297\nd. 388|p287.htm#i10662|Wisimar of the Heruli|b. c 267\nd. 340|p286.htm#i10663||||Alberic I. of the Heruli|b. b 237\nd. 292|p285.htm#i10664||||||||||
FatherWisimar of the Heruli b. circa 267, d. 340
     Miecislaus I of the Heruli was born circa 297. He was the son of Wisimar of the Heruli. As of before 388, also called King of the Heruli. Miecislaus I of the Heruli died in 388.

Family

Child

Western Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine1,2

b. circa 340, d. 388
Western Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine|b. c 340\nd. 388|p287.htm#i11580|imperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans|b. bt 320 - 323\nd. c Feb 350|p286.htm#i11584||||Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus|b. 27 Feb 272\nd. 22 May 337|p286.htm#i10582|Flavia M. F.|b. c 288\nd. 326|p286.htm#i11582|||||||
Fatherimperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans1 b. between 320 and 323, d. circa February 350
     Also called Magnus Maximus.3 Also called Macsen Wledig of Britain.1 Western Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine was born circa 340 at Roman Iberia.1 He was the son of imperator Constans I Flavius Julius Constans.1 Western Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine married St. Elen Lwyddog verch Eudaf of Britain, daughter of King of Ewyas Eudaf Hen ab Einydd of Britain, before 355; His 2nd.1,2 Western Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine married Ceindrech verch Rheiden, daughter of Rheiden ab Eledi, before 358; His 1st.1 Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur 383: "In this year Macsen Wledig marched from Britain under the Red Dragon."4 High King of Britain between 383 and 388.2 Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur 388: "In this year Macsen Wledig fell."5 Western Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine died in 388.1,2 He was the predecessor of Dux Britanniarium Coel Hen Guotepauk of Britain; High King of Britain.2

Family 1

St. Elen Lwyddog verch Eudaf of Britain b. circa 340
Children

Family 2

Ceindrech verch Rheiden b. circa 340
Child

Citations

  1. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  2. [S640] History Files, online http://homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33/history.htm
  3. [S665] Vortigern Studies, online www.vortigern.org.
  4. [S1383] The Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur, online www.webexcel.ndirect.co.uk/gwarnant/hanes/chronicle/chronicleintro.htm, 383.
  5. [S1383] The Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur, online www.webexcel.ndirect.co.uk/gwarnant/hanes/chronicle/chronicleintro.htm, 388.

Šahpur III, Shah of Iran

d. 388
Šahpur III, Shah of Iran|d. 388|p287.htm#i13535|Šahpur II, Shah of Iran|b. c 305?\nd. 379|p287.htm#i13536||||Hormazd I., Shah of Iran|d. 309|p285.htm#i13537|Princess of Kabul|b. c 283?|p113.htm#i13538|||||||
FatherŠahpur II, Shah of Iran1 b. circa 305?, d. 379
     Šahpur III, Shah of Iran was the son of Šahpur II, Shah of Iran.1 Šahpur III, Shah of Iran was son of Shapur II.2 He was a witness where Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae served on an embassy to the Persian king Shapur III in 383.3 Šahpur III, Shah of Iran received the Roman embassy, which included Flavius Stilicho, in 383.3 Shah of Iran at southwestern Asia between 383 and 388.2 He died in 388. Probably murdered.4 He was the predecessor of Bahram IV, Shah of Iran; Shah of Iran.5

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-56.
  2. [S1228] Coins and history, online www.grifterrec.com.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Stilicho, Flavius.
  4. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-55.
  5. [S1628] Unknown author Encyclopædia Iranica, III:517.
  6. [S1628] Unknown author Encyclopædia Iranica, III:518.

Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs1

b. circa 328, d. 389
     Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs was the first Duke under the Romans, to whom the Franks were forced to pay tribute.1 He was born circa 328.1 He was the predecessor of duc des Francs Genebaud II des Francs Ripuaires; Duke of the Franks.2 Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs was the predecessor of Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires; Duke of the Franks.2 Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs was the predecessor of Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires; Duke of the Franks.2 Duke of the Franks in 389.1 Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs died in 389.1

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S232] David Starr Jordan & Sarah Louise Kimball, Your Family Tree, pg 66..
  2. [S504] Christian Settipani, AdC-Addendas.

imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger

b. 371, d. 15 May 392
imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger|b. 371\nd. 15 May 392|p287.htm#i10643|imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder|b. 321\nd. 17 Nov 375|p287.htm#i10640|Justina|b. c 321|p83.htm#i10642|Gratianus Valentinianus the Elder|b. c 291|p83.htm#i10641||||N. N. Justis|b. c 300|p147.htm#i16743||||
Fatherimperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder1 b. 321, d. 17 November 375
MotherJustina1 b. circa 321
      Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger was born in 371.2 He was the son of imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder and Justina.1 Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger was the successor of imperator Gratian Valentinianus; Emperor. Emperor at Western Roman Empire between 22 November 375 and 13 May 392. Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger was Consul in 376. He was Consul with Valens in 378. He was co-ruler with Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator; co-Emperor.3 Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator acknowledged the sovereignty of Gratian's stepbrother Valentinian II in August 383.2 Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger was acknowledged by Theodoisus I as sovereign in August 383. He was forced to flee to Thessalonica by the usurper Maximus in 387.2 He was Consul with Eutropius in 387. He was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator again relinquished the West to his young co-emperor Valentinian but secured his own influence by placing the Frankish general Arbogast, a man he trusted, at Valentinian's side as principal adviser after August 388.2 Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger was Consul with Flavius Neoterius in 390. He was the predecessor of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator; Emperor of the East and West.3 Imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger died on 15 May 392 at age 21 years. Either a victim of suicide or killed by Arbogastes, though more than likely it was suicide.

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 52, genealogy table 2..
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.
  3. [S25] J. M. Hussey, Cambridge Medieval History, Vol 4, Part 1, pg. 776.

Arbogast des Francs1

d. 394
Arbogast des Francs|d. 394|p287.htm#i24974|Bauton des Francs|b. c 350|p147.htm#i16742|N. N. des Francs||p50.htm#i24972|||||||Mallobaudes, King of the Franks, in Worms|b. 320|p81.htm#i10458||||
FatherBauton des Francs1 b. circa 350
MotherN. N. des Francs1
     Arbogast des Francs was the son of Bauton des Francs and N. N. des Francs.1 Arbogast des Francs was a witness where Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires and Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires forced to accept a treaty with Rome by the Roman General Arbogast, himself a Frank, in 389.2 Arbogast des Francs died in 394.1

Citations

  1. [S504] Christian Settipani, AdC-Addendas.
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Arbogast (Roman gen.) .

Galla Valentiniana1

b. circa 363, d. 394
Galla Valentiniana|b. c 363\nd. 394|p287.htm#i10610|imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder|b. 321\nd. 17 Nov 375|p287.htm#i10640|Justina|b. c 321|p83.htm#i10642|Gratianus Valentinianus the Elder|b. c 291|p83.htm#i10641||||N. N. Justis|b. c 300|p147.htm#i16743||||
Fatherimperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder2,3 b. 321, d. 17 November 375
MotherJustina3 b. circa 321
     Galla Valentiniana was the sister of Valentinian II.4 She was born circa 363.1 She was the daughter of imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder and Justina.2,3 Galla Valentiniana was a widower in 386.4 She married Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator, son of Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis and Thermantia the elder, in 387; Her 2nd. His 2nd.3,5,4 Galla Valentiniana died in 394. Died in childbirth together with her new-born son John.1,3,5

Family

Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator b. 11 January 347, d. 17 January 395
Child

Citations

  1. [S242] Imperium, online http://www.ghgcorp.com/shetler/oldimp/
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 52, genealogy table 2..
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.
  5. [S451] Leslie Mahler, later roman empire in "later roman empire," listserve message 05/02/1998.
  6. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..

Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li1

b. circa 355?, d. 394?
Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li|b. c 355?\nd. 394?|p287.htm#i25496|Mirdat III, King of K'art'li|b. c 325?|p221.htm#i25498||||Bak'ar I, King of K'art'li|b. a 295|p221.htm#i25499||||||||||
FatherMirdat III, King of K'art'li1 b. circa 325?
     Also called Aspacures III of Kartli.1 Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li was an evil man lacking in faith, and did nothing worthy of recall.1 Also called Varzabak'ar of Kartli.1 He married N. N. of Kartli, daughter of King of K'art'li Rev of Kartli; His 1st.1 Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li married N. N. of Gugark', daughter of N. N. of Gugark'; His 2nd.1 Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li was born circa 355?. He was the son of Mirdat III, King of K'art'li.1 Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li was the successor of Mirdat III, King of K'art'li; 26th King of Kartli.2 27th King of Kartli at Transcaucasia between 380 and 394.3 Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li died in 394?. He was the predecessor of Trdat, King of K'art'li; 28th King of Kartli.4

Family 1

N. N. of Gugark'
Child

Family 2

N. N. of Kartli
Children

Citations

  1. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chap. 12.
  2. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 365-80.
  3. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 380-94.
  4. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 394-406.

Ennodius, proconsul of Africa1

b. 355, d. after 395
     Ennodius, proconsul of Africa was born in 355.1 He died after 395.1

Family

Child
  • N+ b. 3801

Citations

  1. [S1650] Christian Settipani, Settipani-Continuite Addenda, I, pg. 13.

Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator

b. 11 January 347, d. 17 January 395
Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator|b. 11 Jan 347\nd. 17 Jan 395|p287.htm#i10611|Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis|b. c 316\nd. 376|p287.htm#i10612|Thermantia the elder|b. c 321|p83.htm#i10688|||||||||||||
FatherFlavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis1,2 b. circa 316, d. 376
MotherThermantia the elder2 b. circa 321
      Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator was related to Serena Theodosia; the favourite niece of the emperor Theodosius.3,4 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator was the father of Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus; the younger son of Theodosius I and Aelia Flacilla.5 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator was born on 11 January 347 at Cauca [Coca], Gallaecia, Spain.6,2,7 He was the son of Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis and Thermantia the elder.1,2 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator participated in his father's campaigns against the Picts and Scots between 368 and 369 at Britain.6,7 He campaigned with his father against the Alemanni in 370 at Gaul.7 He campaigned with his father against the Sarmatians between 372 and 373 at the Balkans.7 Dux at Moesiae Primae in 374.6 He was defeated, as a military commander, the Sarmatians in 374.7 He was the successor of imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger; Emperor. Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator withdrew to his Spanish estates when his father was sentenced to death and executed as a result of political intrigues by enemies at court in 376.7 Magister militum at Illyricum between 376 and 19 January 379. He married Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta before 377; His 1st.2 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator was summoned to the court of emperor Gratian following the catastrophic defeat of the emperor Valens, who perished at the hands of the Visigoths and other barbarians near Adrianople on 9 August 378.7 He lived between 379 and 380 at Thessalonica.7 He was proclaimed co-Emperor by Gratian when he once again proved his military ability by a victory over the Sarmatians, and his dominion was to be the eastern part of the empire, including the provinces of Dacia (present-day Romania) and Macedonia, which had been especially infiltrated by barbarians in the preceding few years, on 19 January 379.7 Co-Emperor at Eastern Roman Empire between 19 January 379 and 392.8 He lived from 380 to 387 at Constantinople, Byzantium.7 He ruled that all Christians shall believe in God as defined by the Nicene Creed, thereby legislating the principle of religious intolerance on 28 February 380.9,7 He summoned a council of the whole church (the so-called Second Ecumenical Council of the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed) which ratified his doctrinal decree for all Christendom in 381.9 He sought new possibilities for coexistence with the barbarians who had invaded the eastern provinces, and his first result was the friendly reception by the Visigoth Athanaric in 381.7 He concluded a treaty of alliance, or foedus, with the main body of the Visigoths in the fall in 382.7 He witnessed the death of Athanaric, Chieftain of the Visigoths in 381 at Constantinople; Fleeing the Huns, he sought refuge in the Roman Empire. He was welcomed by Theodosius I who wished to improve relations with the barbarian tribes. He died in Constantinople a fortnight after his arrival.10 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator acknowledged the sovereignty of Gratian's stepbrother Valentinian II in August 383.7 He was a witness where imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Younger acknowledged by Theodoisus I as sovereign in August 383. Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator witnessed the death of imperator Gratian Valentinianus in August 383; Suspicions that Theodosius was in collusion with the usurper Maximus and thus implicated in the death of Emperor Gratian are unfounded.11,7 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator married Galla Valentiniana, daughter of imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder and Justina, in 387; Her 2nd. His 2nd.11,2,7 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator set out with the main body of troops to move against Maximus' army, which had invaded Pannonia in 388 at the spring, the Balkans.7 He was rebuked by Bishop Ambrose of Milan for daring to punish fanatical Christians for burning down a Jewish synogogue in 388.9 He defeated the army of Maximus in July 388.7 He accepted the surrender of Maximus at the end of August, whom he branded as a usurper, but generally treated the followers of Maximus with leniency in August 388.7 He again relinquished the West to his young co-emperor Valentinian but secured his own influence by placing the Frankish general Arbogast, a man he trusted, at Valentinian's side as principal adviser after August 388.7 He visited Rome, where, accompanied by his four-year-old son Honorius, he made a triumphant entry in 389.7 He was a witness where Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus accompanied his father, Theodosius, to Rome during the reign of Valentinian II in 389.7 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator readmitted to communion in 390 at Christmas.7 He issued an order for brutal retaliation following the murder of one of his generals, but the result was so horrible a massacre that Ambrose had the Emperor's action condemned in a church council and bade him do public penance in 390 at Thessalonica.7 He remained in Italy until the spring of 391, residing mostly in Milan, and hereby emphasizing his claim to supreme authority throughout the empire in 391.7 He prohibited all sacrifices and attendance at any pagan temples (while Christians in Alexandria, Egypt, burn the library) in February 391.9,7 He moved his residence back to Constantinople after quarrels between his second wife, Galla, and his son Arcadius, as well as his own view of the eastern capital as the centre of the empire, in November 391 at Constantinople, Byzantium.7 Emperor of the East and West at Roman Empire between 392 and 395.8 He completely prohibited the worship of pagan gods on 8 November 392.9 He elevated his son Honorius to Augustus on 23 January 393.7,5 He was a witness where Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus elevated to the rank of augustus by his father on 23 January 393.5 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator was a witness where Alarico I, rey Visigodo the leader of auxiliary mercenary troops employed by the Roman emperor Theodosius I in 394.12 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator was the predecessor of Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator; Emperor.8 Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator died on 17 January 395 at Mediolanum [Milan], Italy, at age 48 years and 6 days.2,7 He was the predecessor of Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus; Emperor.5

Family 1

Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta b. circa 352, d. 385
Children

Family 2

Galla Valentiniana b. circa 363, d. 394
Child

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  2. [S451] Leslie Mahler, later roman empire in "later roman empire," listserve message 05/02/1998.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Stilicho, Flavius.
  4. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, XXIX.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Honorius.
  6. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.
  8. [S25] J. M. Hussey, Cambridge Medieval History, Vol 4, Part 1, pg. 776.
  9. [S911] Hadrian to Islam, online http://users.iafrica.com/l/ll/lloyd/1-TimeLine/…..
  10. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Athanaric.
  11. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 52, genealogy table 2..
  12. [S262] MS Encarta 99.

Priaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie

b. 324, d. 396
Priaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie|b. 324\nd. 396|p287.htm#i10464|Malaric, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie|b. 295|p81.htm#i10460|N. N. of the Gauls|b. c 300|p81.htm#i10461|Merogais des Francs Ripuaires|b. c 270\nd. 306|p285.htm#i10462||||||||||
FatherMalaric, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie b. 295
MotherN. N. of the Gauls b. circa 300
     King of the Franks at Toxandrie. Priaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie was born in 324. He was the son of Malaric, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie and N. N. of the Gauls. Priaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie was a witness where Mallobaudes, King of the Franks, in Worms appointed as commander of household troops by Gratian and sent with general Nannianus against Lentienses Alemanni (Ammianus Marcellinus, XXX, 3,7), defeating the Alemans near the Rhine and killing King Priarius (AM XXXI, 10,6) in 378.1 Priaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie died in 396 at age 72 years.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S218] The Oxford Merovingian Page, online ..
  2. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.

Bahram IV, Shah of Iran1

d. 399
Bahram IV, Shah of Iran|d. 399|p287.htm#i26204|Šahpur III, Shah of Iran|d. 388|p287.htm#i13535||||Šahpur I., Shah of Iran|b. c 305?\nd. 379|p287.htm#i13536||||||||||
FatherŠahpur III, Shah of Iran2 d. 388
     Bahram IV, Shah of Iran was the son of Šahpur III, Shah of Iran.2 Also called Bahram IV, Kerman Šah.2 Bahram IV, Shah of Iran was the successor of Šahpur III, Shah of Iran; Shah of Iran.3 Shah of Iran between 388 and 399.1 Bahram IV, Shah of Iran negotiated with emperor Theodosius I over Armenia and they divided the land between their empires in 389.2 He died in 399. A weak ruler, Bahram fell victim to a conspiracy by powerful nobles and lost his life.2 He was the predecessor of Yazdgard I, Shah of Iran; Shah of Iran.4,3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1628] Unknown author Encyclopædia Iranica, III:517.
  2. [S1628] Unknown author Encyclopædia Iranica, III:518.
  3. [S1228] Coins and history, online www.grifterrec.com.
  4. [S262] MS Encarta 99, "Persia," Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved..

Hunimund "the Younger", King of the Goths

b. before 370, d. circa 400
Hunimund "the Younger", King of the Goths|b. b 370\nd. c 400|p287.htm#i9828|Ermanaric, king of the Getae|b. c 303\nd. bt 370 - 376|p286.htm#i9814||||Achiulf|b. c 273|p75.htm#i9811||||||||||
FatherErmanaric, king of the Getae1,2 b. circa 303, d. between 370 and 376
     Hunimund "the Younger", King of the Goths fought successfully against the race of the Suavi.3 He was a man fierce in war and of famous personal beauty.3 He was son of Hermanaric.3 Also called King Hunimund of the Ostrogoths. He was born before 370. He was the son of Ermanaric, king of the Getae.1,2 Hunimund "the Younger", King of the Goths succeeded Vinitharius to rule the Goths under Hunnic dominion circa 390.4 King of Goths between 390 and 400. He died circa 400.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica, XIV-81.
  2. [S713] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1997, pg. 25, figure 2.
  3. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica, XLVIII.
  4. [S253] Peter Heather, Heather, P., pg. 114.

Kilab al-Qurayshi1,2

b. circa 365, d. circa 400
Kilab al-Qurayshi|b. c 365\nd. c 400|p287.htm#i10907|Murra al-Qurayshi|b. c 335|p86.htm#i10914|Hind (?)||p86.htm#i10915|Ka'b bayt Kedar||p86.htm#i10916|Makhshiya (?)||p86.htm#i10917|||||||
FatherMurra al-Qurayshi3,2 b. circa 335
MotherHind (?)3
     Kilab al-Qurayshi was born circa 365.1 He was the son of Murra al-Qurayshi and Hind (?).3,2 Kilab al-Qurayshi married Fatima (?) before 400.1 Kilab al-Qurayshi died circa 400 at Mecca, Arabia.1

Family

Fatima (?) b. circa 375
Children

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 432-51.
  2. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Ishmael, 75.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 432-52.
  4. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Ishmael, 76.
  5. [S955] Reference 2, online http://www.ahle-sunnat.org.uk/PLINAGE3.html

Sunno des Francs Ripuaires1

b. circa 358, d. 401
Sunno des Francs Ripuaires|b. c 358\nd. 401|p287.htm#i10521|Priaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie|b. 324\nd. 396|p287.htm#i10464||||Malaric, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie|b. 295|p81.htm#i10460|N. N. of the Gauls|b. c 300|p81.htm#i10461|||||||
FatherPriaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie1 b. 324, d. 396
     General of the Franks. Sunno des Francs Ripuaires was born circa 358.1 He was the son of Priaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie.1 Sunno des Francs Ripuaires married Merowna the Thuringian, daughter of Merwig I the Thuringian, before 390.1 Sunno des Francs Ripuaires died in 401.1

Family

Merowna the Thuringian b. circa 367, d. circa 407
Child

Citations

  1. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.

Thorismund, King of the Goths1

b. 385?, d. 402?
Thorismund, King of the Goths|b. 385?\nd. 402?|p287.htm#i9827|Hunimund "the Younger", King of the Goths|b. b 370\nd. c 400|p287.htm#i9828||||Ermanaric, king of the Getae|b. c 303\nd. bt 370 - 376|p286.htm#i9814||||||||||
FatherHunimund "the Younger", King of the Goths2,1 b. before 370, d. circa 400
     King of Goths.3 Thorismund, King of the Goths succeeded his father, Hunimund, in the very bloom of youth, to rule over the Goths.3,4 He was "castitas".1 Also called Thorismud.1 He was born in 385?. He was the son of Hunimund "the Younger", King of the Goths.2,1 Thorismund, King of the Goths died in 402? At age 17 years. In the second year of his rule he moved an army against the Gepidae and won a great victory over them, but is said to have been killed by falling from his horse.4

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S713] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1997, pg. 25, figure 2.
  2. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica, XIV-81.
  3. [S253] Peter Heather, Heather, P., pg. 114.
  4. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica, XLVIII.

Aelia Eudoxia des Francs

b. circa 380, d. 404
Aelia Eudoxia des Francs|b. c 380\nd. 404|p287.htm#i10624|Bauton des Francs|b. c 350|p147.htm#i16742||||||||||||||||
FatherBauton des Francs1,2 b. circa 350
     Aelia Eudoxia des Francs was daughter of Bauto, a general of the Franks in the service of Rome.2 She was born circa 380. She was the daughter of Bauton des Francs.1,2 Aelia Eudoxia des Francs married Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator, son of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator and Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta, circa 400.2,3,1,4 Aelia Eudoxia des Francs abetted the persecution of the patriarch St. John Chrysostom in 403.4 She died in 404.3

Family

Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator b. 377, d. 408
Children

Citations

  1. [S451] Leslie Mahler, later roman empire in "later roman empire," listserve message 05/02/1998.
  2. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, XXIX.
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Arcadius (Roman emp.).

King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia

b. circa 325, d. circa 405
King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia|b. c 325\nd. c 405|p287.htm#i11493|King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain|b. c 305\nd. c 367|p286.htm#i11494|St. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia|b. c 305\nd. c 410|p287.htm#i11495|Gereint a. E. of Britain||p91.htm#i11498||||Brenin Dumnonia Dynod a. C. o Dumnonia|b. c 280|p91.htm#i11496||||
FatherKing of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain1,2 b. circa 305, d. circa 367
MotherSt. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia1,2 b. circa 305, d. circa 410
     Also called Catamanus Latin. Also called Gadion.2 King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia was eldest son of Conan Meriadoc by Ursula, and half-brother of Erbin who ruled Brittany.2 Also called Gideon English. He was born circa 325 at Rome, Italy.1 He was the son of King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain and St. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia.1,2 King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia was the successor of King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain; King of Dumnonia.2 King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia acceded King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia in 367. King of Dumnonia at Britain between 387 and 390.2 He was the predecessor of King of Dumnonia Gwrfawr ap Cadfan o Dumnonia; King of Dumnonia.2 King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia died circa 405.

Family

Children

Radagaisus of the Vandals

b. circa 334, d. 405
Radagaisus of the Vandals|b. c 334\nd. 405|p287.htm#i10660|Miecislaus I of the Heruli|b. c 297\nd. 388|p287.htm#i10662||||Wisimar of the Heruli|b. c 267\nd. 340|p286.htm#i10663||||||||||
FatherMiecislaus I of the Heruli b. circa 297, d. 388
     Radagaisus of the Vandals was born circa 334. He was the son of Miecislaus I of the Heruli. Radagaisus of the Vandals married Cella (?) before 359. Radagaisus of the Vandals journeyed to Italy in the time of Emperor Honorius after 395. He died in 405 at Italia.

Family

Cella (?) b. circa 334

Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann

d. 405
Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 405|p287.htm#i13865|Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 365|p286.htm#i13872|Cairenn Chasdubh of Britain||p280.htm#i13874|Muiredach T., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 356|p286.htm#i13879||||King Scal M. of Britain||p55.htm#i14017||||
FatherEochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann1,2 d. 365
MotherCairenn Chasdubh of Britain3
     Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the eponymous ancestor of the Uí Neill, whose descendants were to dominate the Irish high kingship. He was a stout, wise, and warlike prince, fortunate in all his conquests and achievements and therefore called "Great".4 He was responsible for having captured the young boy, later to be St. Patrick, along with his 2 sisters during a raid along the coast of Britain.5 He was so described: hair as "yellow as the primrose."3 He was born. The 4th and only son of Eochaidh by the second wife.4 Also called Niall Mor. He was the son of Eochaid Mugmedón, Ard-rí na h'Éireann and Cairenn Chasdubh of Britain.1,2,3 Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was called Niall Naoighiallach, i.e., Nial of the Nine Hostages, from the hostages taken from the nine several counties subdued and made tributary by him, viz., Munster, Leinster, Connacht, Ulster, the Britons, the Picts, the Saxons and the Morini, a people of Gaul towards Calais and Picardy.4 Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann also went by the name of Niall "of the Nine Hostages". He married Indíu ingen Lugdach Dál Fiatach, daughter of rí Uladh Lugaid Lorc mac Áengusa Dál Fiatach.6 Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann married Rígnach ingen Meadaib, daughter of Meadaib mac Ros.7 Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann married Ine ingen Dubthaig, daughter of Dubthach mac Moindach.5 Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the ancestor of Suibne mac Colmáin, rí Midi; son of Colmán Mór son of Diarmait Derg son of Fergus Cerrbél son of Conall of Cremthann son of Niall Naígiallach.8 Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the ancestor of Áed Sláine mac Diarmata, rí Bregh, Ard-rí na h'Éireann; son of Diarmait Derg son of Fergus Cerrbél son of Conall of Cremthann son of Niall Naígiallach.9 Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the grandfather of Ardgal a quo Cenél nArdgail; the son of Conall Creamhthainne, son of Niall.10 Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann witnessed the death of Mong Finn ingen Fiodhaig Éoganachta in 365 at Inish Donglais, County Mayo, Ireland; Died when she drank from the poisoned cup she had given her brother, Criomthann. Though she herself had filled the cup with poison, she too drank from it to avoid suspicion. Whether it was from the horror that she killed her own brother, or some other reason unknown, her children were set aside from the Irish throne in favor of their half-brother, Niall.11,4,12 1st High-King of Ireland between 379 and 405.1,13 Annals of the Four Masters 379: "The first year of Niall of the Nine Hostages, son of Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin, in the sovereignty of Ireland. / An céd-bhliadhain do Niall Naoighiallach, mac Eathach Moighmhedhoin, h-i righe n-Ereann." ( (an unknown value)).1 Chronicon Scotorum 384: "Niall of the Nine Hostages reigned twenty-seven years."14 Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann died in 405. After twenty-seven years of rule, he was slain by Eochaidh, son of Enna Ceinnseallach, at Muir nIcht, i.e. the sea between France and England.15 He died in 405 at Gaul. Niall was killed by Eocha, Prince of Leinster while in Gaul (France) in a ford of the river Leon (now called Lianne) that spot is now called the Ford of Niall near Boulogue-sur-mer.4,5 Annals of the Four Masters 405: "After Niall of the Nine Hostages, son of Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin, had been twenty seven years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Eochaidh, son of Enna Ceinnseallach, at Muir nIcht, i.e. the sea between France and England. / Iar m-beith seacht m-bliadhna fichet 'na righ ós Erinn do Niall Naoighiallach mac Eathach Moighmhedhoin, do-rochair la h-Eochaidh, mac Enna Cendsealaigh, occ Muir n-Iocht .i. an mhuir edir Franc & Saxain." ( (an unknown value)).15 Chronicon Scotorum 411: "Niall of the Nine Hostages died, after being wounded by Eochaidh, son of Enna Cennsealach, at the Ictian Sea."16

Family 1

Indíu ingen Lugdach Dál Fiatach
Child

Family 2

Rígnach ingen Meadaib
Children

Family 3

Ine ingen Dubthaig
Child

Citations

  1. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M379.1.
  2. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, ¶954].
  3. [S595] History of Scots, Picts, Britons, online http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/DavidDale1\index.html.
  4. [S291] Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm
  5. [S299] Genealogy of Family O'Neill, online http://www.cgocable.net/~aoneill/
  6. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Eochaid mac Sin, 97.
  7. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Sirchad mac Fiataig, 99.
  8. [S897] [unknown], AU, U600.2.
  9. [S897] [unknown], AU, U604.2.
  10. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M513.3.
  11. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Dáire Cerbba mac Ailella, 92.
  12. [S303] Eoghanacht Genealogies, ., 1703 unknown repository.
  13. [S1445] Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings, pg. 280.
  14. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. 2A.D.384.
  15. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M405.1.
  16. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. iv. A.D.411.
  17. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M507.2.
  18. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M494.2.
  19. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Conall Gulban mac Néill, 100.
  20. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M464.3.
  21. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M440.2.
  22. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Annal CS440..
  23. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M458.1.
  24. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M475.2.
  25. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M465.3.
  26. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, ¶1014].

Trdat, King of K'art'li1

d. 406?
Trdat, King of K'art'li|d. 406?|p287.htm#i25497|Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li|b. c 355?\nd. 394?|p287.htm#i25496|N. N. of Kartli||p221.htm#i25494|Mirdat I., King of K'art'li|b. c 325?|p221.htm#i25498||||King of K'art'li Rev of Kartli||p221.htm#i25495||||
FatherVaraz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li1 b. circa 355?, d. 394?
MotherN. N. of Kartli1
     Trdat, King of K'art'li was the son of Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li and N. N. of Kartli.1 Trdat, King of K'art'li was the successor of Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li; 27th King of Kartli.2 28th King of Kartli at Transcaucasia between 394 and 406.3 Trdat, King of K'art'li died in 406?. He was the predecessor of P'arsman IV, King of K'art'li; 29th King of Kartli.4

Citations

  1. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chap. 12.
  2. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 380-94.
  3. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 394-406.
  4. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 406-9.

Merowna the Thuringian1

b. circa 367, d. circa 407
Merowna the Thuringian|b. c 367\nd. c 407|p287.htm#i10522|Merwig I the Thuringian|b. c 337|p82.htm#i10527||||||||||||||||
FatherMerwig I the Thuringian1 b. circa 337
     Merowna the Thuringian was born circa 367.1 She was the daughter of Merwig I the Thuringian.1 Merowna the Thuringian married Sunno des Francs Ripuaires, son of Priaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie, before 390.1 Merowna the Thuringian died circa 407.1

Family

Sunno des Francs Ripuaires b. circa 358, d. 401
Child

Citations

  1. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.

Serena Theodosia

b. circa 356, d. 408
Serena Theodosia|b. c 356\nd. 408|p287.htm#i10614|Honorius Theodosius|b. c 346|p82.htm#i10613||||Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis|b. c 316\nd. 376|p287.htm#i10612||||||||||
FatherHonorius Theodosius1 b. circa 346
     Her beauty and accomplishments were universally admired by the obsequious court.2 Serena Theodosia was the favourite niece of the emperor Theodosius.3,2 She was born circa 356. She was the daughter of Honorius Theodosius.1 Serena Theodosia married Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae after 383.1,3,2 Serena Theodosia died in 408.4,1

Family

Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae b. 365, d. 22 August 408
Children

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  2. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, XXIX.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Stilicho, Flavius.
  4. [S242] Imperium, online http://www.ghgcorp.com/shetler/oldimp/

Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator

b. 377, d. 408
Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator|b. 377\nd. 408|p287.htm#i10618|Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator|b. 11 Jan 347\nd. 17 Jan 395|p287.htm#i10611|Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta|b. c 352\nd. 385|p287.htm#i10617|Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis|b. c 316\nd. 376|p287.htm#i10612|Thermantia the elder|b. c 321|p83.htm#i10688|||||||
FatherFlavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator1,2 b. 11 January 347, d. 17 January 395
MotherÆlia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta1,2 b. circa 352, d. 385
      Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator was related to Theodosius II, imperator; the son of the Eastern emperor Arcadius.3 Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator was born in 377 at Spain.4,5,6 He was the son of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator and Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta.1,2 Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator was ruled conjointly with his father from 383 to 395.5 He was the successor of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator; Emperor of the East and West.7 Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator became the first Emperor of the East in the newly divided Empire (his brother, Honorius, became Emperor of the West) in 395. Emperor at Eastern Roman Empire between 395 and 408.7 He was frail and ineffectual and dominated by his ministers, Rufinus, Eutropius, and Anthemius.5 He and Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus were Consul with his brother in 396. Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator married Aelia Eudoxia des Francs, daughter of Bauton des Francs, circa 400.8,1,2,6 Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator associated his son, Theodosius II, with his own rule in 402.5 He died in 408 at age 31 years.2,6 He was the predecessor of Theodosius II, imperator; Emperor.9,3

Family

Aelia Eudoxia des Francs b. circa 380, d. 404
Children

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  2. [S451] Leslie Mahler, later roman empire in "later roman empire," listserve message 05/02/1998.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius II (Roman emp.).
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Arcadius.
  6. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Arcadius (Roman emp.).
  7. [S25] J. M. Hussey, Cambridge Medieval History, Vol 4, Part 1, pg. 776.
  8. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, XXIX.
  9. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html
  10. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.

Empress Maria Stilichio

b. circa 385, d. 408
Empress Maria Stilichio|b. c 385\nd. 408|p287.htm#i10620|Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae|b. 365\nd. 22 Aug 408|p287.htm#i10615|Serena Theodosia|b. c 356\nd. 408|p287.htm#i10614|||||||Honorius Theodosius|b. c 346|p82.htm#i10613||||
FatherFlavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae1,2 b. 365, d. 22 August 408
MotherSerena Theodosia2 b. circa 356, d. 408
     Empress Maria Stilichio was born circa 385. She was the daughter of Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae and Serena Theodosia.1,2 Empress Maria Stilichio married Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus, son of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator and Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta, in 398; His 1st. 1st cousins, 1x removed.1,3,4,2 Empress Maria Stilichio died in 408. Maria died a virgin, after she had been ten years a wife. d.s.p.2

Family

Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus b. 9 September 384, d. 15 August 423

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  2. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, XXIX.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Honorius.
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Stilicho, Flavius.

Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae

b. 365, d. 22 August 408
      Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae was half-Roman, half-Vandal by birth.1 He was son of an officer of barbarian cavalry in the service of Valens.2 He was born in 365.1 He served on an embassy to the Persian king Shapur III in 383.1 He was a witness where Šahpur III, Shah of Iran received the Roman embassy, which included Flavius Stilicho, in 383.1 Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae married Serena Theodosia, daughter of Honorius Theodosius, after 383.3,1,2 Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae was appointed count of the domestics (commanding the Emperor's household troops) circa 385.1,2 He was appointed "magister utriusque militiae," master of both services (i.e., commander in chief of the army) circa 393.1 He was a witness where Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus saw the real power exercised by his master of soldiers, Flavius Stilicho, between 393 and 407.4 Master of Both Services between 393 and 22 August 408.1 Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae was regent for the Roman emperor Honorius and one of the last great Roman military commanders in the West between 394 and 408.1 He was Consul with Aurelianus in 400. He was a witness where Alarico I, rey Visigodo defeated by the Roman general Flavius Stilicho and forced to withdraw from the peninsula on 6 April 402 at Pollentia (modern Pollenza), Italy.5 Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae defeated Alaric and the Visigoths and forced them to withdraw from the peninsula on 6 April 402 at Pollentia (modern Pollenza), Italy.5 He was Consul with Flavius Anthemius in 405. He died on 22 August 408 at Ravenna, Italy, at age 43 years. He was executed on suspicion of treason. A certain Olympius, a palace official, spread the rumour that Stilicho was preparing to put his own son on the Eastern throne.3,4,1

Family

Serena Theodosia b. circa 356, d. 408
Children

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Stilicho, Flavius.
  2. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, XXIX.
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Honorius.
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Alaric.

Eucherius Stilichio

b. circa 387, d. after 22 August 408
Eucherius Stilichio|b. c 387\nd. a 22 Aug 408|p287.htm#i10616|Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae|b. 365\nd. 22 Aug 408|p287.htm#i10615|Serena Theodosia|b. c 356\nd. 408|p287.htm#i10614|||||||Honorius Theodosius|b. c 346|p82.htm#i10613||||
FatherFlavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae1 b. 365, d. 22 August 408
MotherSerena Theodosia b. circa 356, d. 408
     Eucherius Stilichio was born circa 387. He was the son of Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae and Serena Theodosia.1 Eucherius Stilichio died after 22 August 408. He was put to death shortly after his father.2

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Stilicho, Flavius.

P'arsman IV, King of K'art'li1

d. 409?
P'arsman IV, King of K'art'li|d. 409?|p287.htm#i25501|Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li|b. c 355?\nd. 394?|p287.htm#i25496|N. N. of Gugark'||p221.htm#i25500|Mirdat I., King of K'art'li|b. c 325?|p221.htm#i25498||||N. N. of Gugark'||p221.htm#i25502||||
FatherVaraz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li1 b. circa 355?, d. 394?
MotherN. N. of Gugark'1
     P'arsman IV, King of K'art'li was the son of Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li and N. N. of Gugark'.1 Also called Pharasmanes IV of Kartli. Also called King P'arsman IV of Kartli.2 P'arsman IV, King of K'art'li was the successor of Trdat, King of K'art'li; 28th King of Kartli.3 29th King of Kartli at Transcaucasia between 406 and 409.4 P'arsman IV, King of K'art'li died in 409?.1 He was the predecessor of Mihrdat IV, King of K'art'li; 30th King of Kartli.1,5

Citations

  1. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chap. 12.
  2. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380.
  3. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 394-406.
  4. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 406-9.
  5. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 409-11.

St. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia1

b. circa 305, d. circa 410
St. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia|b. c 305\nd. c 410|p287.htm#i11495|Brenin Dumnonia Dynod ap Caradoc o Dumnonia|b. c 280|p91.htm#i11496||||Brenin Dumnonia Caradoc o Dumnonia|b. c 250|p94.htm#i11722||||||||||
FatherBrenin Dumnonia Dynod ap Caradoc o Dumnonia1 b. circa 280
     St. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia was born circa 305.1 She was the daughter of Brenin Dumnonia Dynod ap Caradoc o Dumnonia.1 St. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia married King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain, son of Gereint ab Einudd of Britain, before 325 at Rome; Probably married by Pope Cyriacus.1,2 St. Ursula verch Dynod o Dumnonia died circa 410 at Cologne, Germany. On a pilgramage with 11,000 virgin handmaidens, they stopped in Cologne. In a dreadful massacre, the Huns beheaded all the virgins and, with bow and arrow, their leader shot Saint Ursula dead.1

Family

King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain b. circa 305, d. circa 367
Child

Citations

  1. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  2. [S750] Robert B. Stewart, "My Theories", Except Siricius was not Pope until 384-399..
  3. [S640] History Files, online http://homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33/history.htm

Alarico I, rey Visigodo

b. circa 370, d. 410
     Alarico I, rey Visigodo was a nobleman by birth.1 He was born circa 370 at the delta of the Danube River, on an island, Peuce Island, [now Romania].2,1 He led the migration, with Huns attacking at their rear, of the Visigoths into the western part of the Roman Empire before 394.2 He was the leader of auxiliary mercenary troops employed by the Roman emperor Theodosius I in 394.2 He served for a time as commander of Gothic troops in the Roman army before 395.1 He led the Visigoths out of Moesia and moved them first southward into Greece and then to Italy in 395.3 He was acknowledged as king by the Visigoths after their previous allegience to Rome is ended with the death of Theodosius in 395.2 Chief of the Visigoths at Pannonia between 395 and 410.1 He was appointed magister militum ("master of the soldiers") by Eastern emperor Flavius Arcadius, who hoped to placate the Visigoths, in 397 at Illyricum.1 He married N. N. (?) before 400.4 Alarico I, rey Visigodo invaded Italy in 401.1 He was defeated by the Roman general Flavius Stilicho and forced to withdraw from the peninsula on 6 April 402 at Pollentia (modern Pollenza), Italy.1 He was a witness where Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae defeated Alaric and the Visigoths and forced them to withdraw from the peninsula on 6 April 402 at Pollentia (modern Pollenza), Italy.1 Alarico I, rey Visigodo laid siege to Rome until the Senate granted him another subsidy and assistance in his negotiations with Honorius in 408.1 He again surrounded Rome, and lifted his blockade after proclaiming Attalus as Western emperor in 409.1 He was appointed magister utriusque militiae ("master of both services") by Attalus but not given permission by him to send an army into Africa in 409.1 He was a witness where Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus rejected the terms offered by Alaric the Visigoth before 410.5 Alarico I, rey Visigodo besieged Rome for the third time, after negotiations with Honorius broke down, and after he'd deposed Attalus, in 410 at summer.1 He sacked Rome for three days after allies within it's walls opened the gates for him, but he treated its inhabitants humanely and burned only a few buildings, a milestone in the collapse of the Roman Empire, on 24 August 410.5,1 He died in 410 at Cosentia [now Cosenza], Bruttium [now Italy]. He died following the sack on the march northward.1

Family

N. N. (?) b. circa 375
Child

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Alaric.
  2. [S262] MS Encarta 99.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Visigoth.
  4. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 132, genealogy table 4..
  5. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Honorius.

Godegisel, King of the Vandals1

b. circa 359, d. circa 411
Godegisel, King of the Vandals|b. c 359\nd. c 411|p287.htm#i10657|Visimar Asdingi||p173.htm#i19466||||two k. ?. Asdingi||p173.htm#i19467||||||||||
FatherVisimar Asdingi1
     Godegisel, King of the Vandals married unfree woman (?).1 Godegisel, King of the Vandals was born circa 359. He was the son of Visimar Asdingi.1 Godegisel, King of the Vandals married free woman (?) before 379. King of the Vandals at Gaul in 406. Godegisel, King of the Vandals invaded Gaul in 406. He died circa 411. At the the time Rome was captured and destroyed by the Goths, "the Vandals were hard-pressed in their war against the Franks, their King Godegisel was killed and about twenty-thousand of their front-line troops had been slaughtered, so that, if the army of the Alani had not come to their rescue in time, the entire nation of Vandals would have been wiped out."2

Family 1

free woman (?) b. circa 355
Child

Family 2

unfree woman (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S713] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1997, pg. 164, figure 3.
  2. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, II.9.
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 132, genealogy table 4..

King of the Britons Constantine ap Solomon of Britain1

b. circa 375, d. 411
King of the Britons Constantine ap Solomon of Britain|b. c 375\nd. 411|p287.htm#i11553|High King of Brittany Salomon I ap Gradlon of Brittany|b. c 355\nd. 446|p288.htm#i11527|N. N. filia Patricius Flavius|b. c 355|p91.htm#i11528|King of Brittany Gradlon M. a. C. M. of Brittany|b. c 330|p279.htm#i11529|Tigridia of Ireland|b. c 330|p91.htm#i11530|||||||
FatherHigh King of Brittany Salomon I ap Gradlon of Brittany2 b. circa 355, d. 446
MotherN. N. filia Patricius Flavius2 b. circa 355
     King of the Britons Constantine ap Solomon of Britain was the brother of Aldroen, King of Lesser Britain.3 King of the Britons at Britain.4 He was promoted to the throne by the Britons, following a victory, at Silchester, Britain.4 He was the father of Constans, Aurelius Ambrosius, and Uther Pendragon.4 Also called Custennin ap Selyf.2 He was born circa 375.2 He was the son of High King of Brittany Salomon I ap Gradlon of Brittany and N. N. filia Patricius Flavius.2 King of the Britons Constantine ap Solomon of Britain married Ivoire ferch Llancelod (?), daughter of Llancelod (?), before 395.2 King of the Britons Constantine ap Solomon of Britain died in 411.2 He died in 443.1

Family

Ivoire ferch Llancelod (?) b. circa 375
Children

Citations

  1. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Constantine, King of Britain, 77.
  2. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  3. [S624] Geoffrey of Monmouth, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Book VI, Chapt. 4.
  4. [S624] Geoffrey of Monmouth, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Book VI, Chapt. 5.
  5. [S624] Geoffrey of Monmouth, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Book VIII, Chapt. 15.

Mihrdat IV, King of K'art'li1

d. 411
Mihrdat IV, King of K'art'li|d. 411|p287.htm#i25466|Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li|b. c 355?\nd. 394?|p287.htm#i25496|N. N. of Kartli||p221.htm#i25494|Mirdat I., King of K'art'li|b. c 325?|p221.htm#i25498||||King of K'art'li Rev of Kartli||p221.htm#i25495||||
FatherVaraz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li1 b. circa 355?, d. 394?
MotherN. N. of Kartli1
     Mihrdat IV, King of K'art'li was the son of Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li and N. N. of Kartli.1 Mihrdat IV, King of K'art'li was an insolent, senseless man who did not pay taxes to Iran.1 He was grandson of King Rev.1 He was the successor of P'arsman IV, King of K'art'li; 29th King of Kartli.2 30th King of Kartli at Transcaucasia between 409 and 411.1,3 Mihrdat IV, King of K'art'li died in 411.1 He was the predecessor of Arch'il, King of K'art'li; 31st King of Kartli.4

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chap. 12.
  2. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 406-9.
  3. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 409-11.
  4. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 411-35.