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Gebicca, King of the Burgundii1,2

b. circa 353, d. circa 413
Gebicca, King of the Burgundii|b. c 353\nd. c 413|p288.htm#i9751|Godomar of the Burgundii|b. c 323|p74.htm#i9752||||Gibica of the Burgundii|b. c 293|p74.htm#i9753||||||||||
FatherGodomar of the Burgundii b. circa 323
     Also called Giolahaire.3 Gebicca, King of the Burgundii was born circa 353. He was the son of Godomar of the Burgundii. Gebicca, King of the Burgundii died circa 413.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.
  2. [S234] Germania and Francia, online http://www.friesian.com/francia.htm
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 349-55.

Ascyla (?)

b. circa 354, d. 413
Ascyla (?)|b. c 354\nd. 413|p288.htm#i10407|Ascyllius (?)|b. c 334|p81.htm#i10459||||||||||||||||
FatherAscyllius (?) b. circa 334
     Ascyla (?) was born circa 354. She was the daughter of Ascyllius (?). Ascyla (?) married Richomer, Consul, son of Mallobaudes, King of the Franks, in Worms. Ascyla (?) died in 413. Executed with her son, Theodemer.1 "We read in the consular lists that Theudemer, King of the Franks, son of Richemer, and his mother Ascyla, were executed with the sword."2

Family

Richomer, Consul b. circa 350, d. 384
Child

Citations

  1. [S504] Christian Settipani, AdC-Addendas.
  2. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, II.9.

Theodemer, King of the Franks

b. 364, d. 413
Theodemer, King of the Franks|b. 364\nd. 413|p288.htm#i10450|Richomer, Consul|b. c 350\nd. 384|p287.htm#i10454|Ascyla (?)|b. c 354\nd. 413|p288.htm#i10407|Mallobaudes, King of the Franks, in Worms|b. 320|p81.htm#i10458||||Ascyllius (?)|b. c 334|p81.htm#i10459||||
FatherRichomer, Consul1 b. circa 350, d. 384
MotherAscyla (?)1 b. circa 354, d. 413
      Also called Theudemer of the Franci.2 Theodemer, King of the Franks was cousin of Arbogast, magister militum 388-394.1 He was born in 364. He was the son of Richomer, Consul and Ascyla (?).1 Magister militum in 383.1 Magister militum between 388 and 393.1 Theodemer, King of the Franks married Blesinde des Francs, daughter of Chlogio I des Francs and Princess Blesinde of the Suevi, before 398. King of the Ripuarian Franks.3 Theodemer, King of the Franks died in 413 at age 49 years. Executed with his mother, "by the sword."1,4 "We read in the consular lists that Theudemer, King of the Franks, son of Richemer, and his mother Ascyla, were executed with the sword."4

Family

Blesinde des Francs b. circa 375
Child

Citations

  1. [S504] Christian Settipani, AdC-Addendas.
  2. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, bk II, ch. 9.
  3. [S504] Christian Settipani, AdC-Addendas, pg. 8.
  4. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, II.9.
  5. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.

Exilarch Mar Zutra I ben Kahana beni David1

d. 413
Exilarch Mar Zutra I ben Kahana beni David|d. 413|p288.htm#i12967|Exilarch Kahana I ben Abba beni David||p192.htm#i21389||||Exilarch Abba b. U. beni David||p106.htm#i12969||||||||||
FatherExilarch Kahana I ben Abba beni David2
     Exilarch Mar Zutra I ben Kahana beni David was the son of Exilarch Kahana I ben Abba beni David.2 Exilarch Mar Zutra I ben Kahana beni David died in 413.3 Exilarch at Babylonia between 442 and 455.2 He was the predecessor of Exilarch Kahana II ben Zutra beni David; Exilarch.2,4

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url.
  2. [S920] ., "Babylonian Exilarchs Tree," e-mail to Robert Brian Stewart (91), Thursday, May 17, 2001 6:27 PM.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 329-50.
  4. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Mesopotamia & Arabia, the Resh Galuta.

Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires1

b. after 350, d. 414
Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires|b. a 350\nd. 414|p288.htm#i10298|Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs|b. c 328\nd. 389|p287.htm#i10297||||||||||||||||
FatherDuke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs1 b. circa 328, d. 389
     Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires was born after 350.1 He was the son of Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs.1 Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires and Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires were invaded Gaul in 384.2 Duke of the Franks in 388.3 Arbogast, when he pacified the Rhine frontier, viewed a few Amsivarii and Chatti from afar, with Marcomer as their war-leader. In 389.4 Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires and Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires were forced to accept a treaty with Rome by the Roman General Arbogast, himself a Frank, in 389.2 Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires died in 414.1

Citations

  1. [S232] David Starr Jordan & Sarah Louise Kimball, Your Family Tree, pg 66..
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Arbogast (Roman gen.) .
  3. [S504] Christian Settipani, AdC-Addendas.
  4. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, II.9.

Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires1

b. after 350, d. 414
Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires|b. a 350\nd. 414|p288.htm#i10299|Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs|b. c 328\nd. 389|p287.htm#i10297||||||||||||||||
FatherDuke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs1 b. circa 328, d. 389
     Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires was born after 350.1 He was the son of Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs.1 Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires and Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires were invaded Gaul in 384.2 Duke of the Franks in 388.3 Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires and Duke of the Franks Marcomer des Francs Ripuaires were forced to accept a treaty with Rome by the Roman General Arbogast, himself a Frank, in 389.2 Duke of the Franks Sunno des Francs Ripuaires died in 414.1

Citations

  1. [S232] David Starr Jordan & Sarah Louise Kimball, Your Family Tree, pg 66..
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Arbogast (Roman gen.) .
  3. [S504] Christian Settipani, AdC-Addendas.

King of Dumnonia Gwrfawr ap Cadfan o Dumnonia

b. circa 358, d. circa 415
King of Dumnonia Gwrfawr ap Cadfan o Dumnonia|b. c 358\nd. c 415|p288.htm#i11743|King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia|b. c 325\nd. c 405|p287.htm#i11493||||King of Brittany Conan M. a. G. of Britain|b. c 305\nd. c 367|p286.htm#i11494|St. U. v. D. o Dumnonia|b. c 305\nd. c 410|p287.htm#i11495|||||||
FatherKing of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia b. circa 325, d. circa 405
     Also called Vorimorus.1 Also called Guoremor.1 King of Dumnonia Gwrfawr ap Cadfan o Dumnonia was born circa 358.2 He was the son of King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia. King of Dumnonia Gwrfawr ap Cadfan o Dumnonia was the successor of King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia; King of Dumnonia.1 King of Dumnonia at Britain between 390 and 400.1 King of Dumnonia Gwrfawr ap Cadfan o Dumnonia was the predecessor of King of Dumnonia Tudwal ap Gwrfawr o Dumnonia; King of Dumnonia.1 King of Dumnonia Gwrfawr ap Cadfan o Dumnonia died circa 415.

Family

Children

Theodosius Balthi1

b. after 414, d. 415
Theodosius Balthi|b. a 414\nd. 415|p288.htm#i10606|Athaulf, King of the Visigoths|b. c 372\nd. a 415|p288.htm#i10154|Galla Placidia the elder, augusta|b. 388\nd. 27 Nov 450|p288.htm#i10250|Modares Balthi|b. c 342|p82.htm#i10607||||Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator|b. 11 Jan 347\nd. 17 Jan 395|p287.htm#i10611|Galla Valentiniana|b. c 363\nd. 394|p287.htm#i10610|
FatherAthaulf, King of the Visigoths1,2,3 b. circa 372, d. after 415
MotherGalla Placidia the elder, augusta1,2 b. 388, d. 27 November 450
     Theodosius Balthi was born after 414 at Gaul. He was the son of Athaulf, King of the Visigoths and Galla Placidia the elder, augusta.1,2,3 Theodosius Balthi died in 415. Dying in infancy and destroying an opportunity for a possible Romano-Visigothic rapprochement.1,2,4

Citations

  1. [S242] Imperium, online http://www.ghgcorp.com/shetler/oldimp/
  2. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 132, genealogy table 4..
  4. [S713] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1997, pg. 23, figure 1.

Empress Thermantia Stilichio the younger1

b. circa 386, d. 415
Empress Thermantia Stilichio the younger|b. c 386\nd. 415|p288.htm#i10621|Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae|b. 365\nd. 22 Aug 408|p287.htm#i10615|Serena Theodosia|b. c 356\nd. 408|p287.htm#i10614|||||||Honorius Theodosius|b. c 346|p82.htm#i10613||||
FatherFlavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae2 b. 365, d. 22 August 408
MotherSerena Theodosia b. circa 356, d. 408
     Empress Thermantia Stilichio the younger was born circa 386. She was the daughter of Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae and Serena Theodosia.2 Empress Thermantia Stilichio the younger married Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus, son of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator and Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta, in 408; His 2nd. 1st cousins, 1x removed.2,3 Empress Thermantia Stilichio the younger and Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus were divorced in August 408.3 Empress Thermantia Stilichio the younger died in 415.

Family

Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus b. 9 September 384, d. 15 August 423

Citations

  1. [S1001] Chris Scarre, Chronicle of the Emperors, pg. 227.
  2. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Honorius.

Athaulf, King of the Visigoths

b. circa 372, d. after 415
Athaulf, King of the Visigoths|b. c 372\nd. a 415|p288.htm#i10154|Modares Balthi|b. c 342|p82.htm#i10607||||||||||||||||
FatherModares Balthi1 b. circa 342
     Athaulf, King of the Visigoths was born circa 372. He was the son of Modares Balthi.1 Athaulf, King of the Visigoths was born circa 375. King of the Visigoths at Gaul between 410 and 415. He was the leader who brought the Visigoths out of Italy to settle in Gaul on their expulsion by Constantius III in 412. He carried off the Roman noblewoman, Galla Placidia, as his conquering Visigoths returned to Gaul where he married her in a Roman wedding ceremony circa 414. He married Galla Placidia the elder, augusta, daughter of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator and Galla Valentiniana, in 414 at Narbonne, Gaul; His 2nd. Her 1st.2,3,4,1 Athaulf, King of the Visigoths relocated in 415; to Spain. He died after 415. Murdered.

Family

Galla Placidia the elder, augusta b. 388, d. 27 November 450
Child

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 132, genealogy table 4..
  2. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  3. [S242] Imperium, online http://www.ghgcorp.com/shetler/oldimp/
  4. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..

Hamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia

b. circa 360?, d. circa 416
Hamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia|b. c 360?\nd. c 416|p288.htm#i5963|Manuel Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia|b. c 328?\nd. 385|p287.htm#i25560||||Artashir Mamikonean||p243.htm#i27501||||||||||
FatherManuel Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia b. circa 328?, d. 385
     Hamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia was a relation, but how is unclear, of Artashir son of Manuel.1 Originally princes of Tayk' (Tao) claimed descent from the emperors of China, but appear to have rather decended from the chieftains of the Chanians, and so to have had Georgian origins, as their name implies as "Mama" in Georgian means father or chief.2 The hereditary right to hold the position of High Constable (sparapet) was held by the Mamikoneans.3 He was a sepuh of the Mamikonean tohm.4 Also called Hamazasp I of Taron. He was born circa 360?. He was the son of Manuel Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia. The Armenian king Pap (A.D. 367-374) told prince Mushegh Mamikonean that the Mamikoneans were as respect-worthy as the Armenian royal house itself. For, he says, "their ancestors left the kingship of the land of Chenk', and came to our ancestors [in Armenia].5 The Mamikonean prince Manuel boldly informed king Varazdat of Armenia (374-378) that the Mamikoneans were not the vassals of the royal house, but its equals. "For", he said, "our ancestors were kings of the land of Chen. Because of a quarrel among brothers, to prevent great bloodshed we left [that land]. And to find rest, we stopped here [in Armenia].6 A somewhat altered version of the Chinese origin of the Mamikoneans appears in the History of the 8-9th century anti-Mamikonean historian, Movses Xorenac'i, translated in Thomson pp. 229-231: "When Artashir, son of Sasan, died, he left the throne of Persia to his son Shapuh (240-272). In his days, they say, there came to Armenia the ancestor of the Mamikonean family from the northeast, from a valiant and noble land foremost among all the nations of the north, I mean the land of the Chinese, of whom the following tale is told.

In the year of Artashir's death a certain Arbok Chen-bakur, which means in their tongue "honor of the kingdom" had two foster brothers called Bkhdokh and Mamgon, who were great princes. When Bkhdokh slandered Mamgon, the Chinese king Arbok ordered Mamgon to be killed. But when Mamgon heard of this he did not heed the king's summons but fled with his entourage and came to Artashir, king of Persia. Arbok sent messengers to seek his extradition, and when Artashir refused, the king of China prepared to war against him. But at that point Artashir died and Shapuh came to the throne.

Now although Shapuh did not hand over Mamgon to his lord, nonetheless he did not allow him [to remain] in the land of the Aryans but sent him with all his entourage, as if exiled, to his governors in Armenia. And he sent word to the king of China, saying: 'May it not displease you that I was unable to hand over to you Mamgon, because my father had sworn to him by the light of the sun. But to cause you no trouble I have expelled him from my country to the edge of the earth in the west, which is equivalent to death for him. So let there not be war between you and me'. And because, as they say, the Chinese are the most peaceloving of all the inhabitants on the face of the earth, he agreed to make peace. So it is clear that the Chinese nation is truly devoted to peace and life.

Their land is wonderful in its abundance of all [varieties of] fruits; it is adorned with beautiful plants, rich in saffron, peacocks and silk. It has untold numbers of gazelles and marvellous [creatures] and the animals called 'donkey goats'. There the food of common people, they say, is what among us is aristocratic and food for the few--the pheasant and the swan and other such [delicacies]. The number of precious stones and pearls of the magnates they say no one knows. And as for garments which among us are the robes of the few, for them they are the common dress. So much for the land of China.

So Mamgon, having come to our country against his will, met the returning Trdat. He did not turn back with the Persian army but advanced with all his entourage to meet him with great presents. Trdat received him but did not take him with him in his war against Persia. However he gave his entourage a place [in which to settle] and a stipend for food; he changed their residence from place to place for many years".7 Armenists have interpreted the information found in the Primary History and in P'aswtos in a variety of ways. For example, Nicholas Adontz in 1908 speculated that when the early sources spoke of "the Chenk"' they referred not to the Chinese, but to the Tzans, a warlike people of the Caucasus who lived near the Mamikoneans' hereditary lands in northwestern Armenia. He derived the name Mamikonean from Georgian mama (meaning "father") plus the Armenian deminuitive ending ik. Adontz was challenged by Michael Toumanean who, in an article published in 1911, sought to identify Armenian Chenk' with the house of Cheng which ruled south of Lo Yang in the 5-4th centuries B.C.

According to Toumanean, the Mamikonean emigration from Cheng took place around 221 B.C., at the time of the Qin conquests, when the Man people were expelled. To Toumanean, the name Mamikonean derives from Gun-Man or Xu-Gun Man which was the hereditary title of the head of the house of Cheng. The orientalist H. Skold in 1925 expressed the view that the Chenk' were not Chinese, but a Turkic group dwelling by the Syr-Darya river. H. Svazyan, who placed the Chenk' between the Amu-Darya and Syr-Darya rivers, suggested that the Mamikoneans may have come from Bactria. Finally, Cyril Toumanoff pointed out that the Mamikoneans' claim of exotic royal origins was nothing unusual within the Armenian political reality. Nonetheless, Toumanoff notes that the Mamikonean legend does concern China, even though the legend may not be true.8 Prince of the Mamikonids at Armenia after 387.9 Hamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia married Sahakanoyš Souren-Pahlav, daughter of Sahak, Katholikos of Armenia, before 410.10,11,12 Hamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia died circa 416.10 High Constable of Armenia between 430 and 440.13 He inherited the vast land holdings of the chief bishop Isaac (Sahak), being married to Isaac's only child, Sahakanouysh, in 438.2 "By 439, as a result of the will of St Sahak, the last descendant of St. Gregory, the Mamikoneans acquired the other half of Taron centered in the city of Ashtishat as well as the principalities of Bagravande and Acilisene --making them 'the greatest territorial princes of the Monarchy, ruling a State that nearly sundered it into two halves.13'"

Family

Sahakanoyš Souren-Pahlav b. circa 385
Children

Citations

  1. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia", Conclusions.
  2. [S1272] Robert H. Hewsen, Armenia atlas, pg. 95.
  3. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, pg. xc.
  4. [S327] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : Buzandac'i's (5th C), pg. 265.
  5. [S132] Robert Bedrosian, "China to Armenians", per the 5th century History of Armenia by P'awstos Buzand, pg. 204.
  6. [S132] Robert Bedrosian, "China to Armenians", per the 5th century History of Armenia by P'awstos Buzand, pg. 247.
  7. [S132] Robert Bedrosian, "China to Armenians", footnote 14.
  8. [S132] Robert Bedrosian, "China to Armenians".
  9. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-54.
  10. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 322-53.
  11. [S1035] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : P'arpec'i's (5th C), pg. 56.
  12. [S1037] DFA (Bagrat), online http://www.ut.ee/~votan/articles/bagrat.htm
    , Part 2, V.
  13. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  14. [S1035] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : P'arpec'i's (5th C), pg. 57.

Vramšapuh, King of Iranian Armenia1,2

d. 417
Vramšapuh, King of Iranian Armenia|d. 417|p288.htm#i25574|N. N. Aršakuni||p222.htm#i25573||||||||||||||||
FatherN. N. Aršakuni1
     Vramšapuh, King of Iranian Armenia was the son of N. N. Aršakuni.1 Vramšapuh, King of Iranian Armenia was the brother of Bahram IV of Iran.3 Also called Wahranšapur, King of Persarmenia. King of Armenia at Persia between 401 and 417.4,5 He died in 417.2

Citations

  1. [S1035] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : P'arpec'i's (5th C), pg. 23.
  2. [S1272] Robert H. Hewsen, Armenia atlas, pg. 87.
  3. [S1628] Unknown author Encyclopædia Iranica, III:518.
  4. [S1035] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : P'arpec'i's (5th C), pg. 33.
  5. [S1272] Robert H. Hewsen, Armenia atlas, pg. 82.

Valia, King of the Visigoths1,2

b. circa 353, d. circa 418
     Valia, King of the Visigoths was perhaps a Balth himself, but if not, then at least married into the family.2 Also called Wallia of the Visigoths.3,4 He was the grandfather of Ricimer, Patrician; the grandson of the Visigothic King Valia, via his mother.2 Valia, King of the Visigoths was born circa 353. King of the Visigoths at Gaul and Spain between 415 and 418. He was was an exceeding stern and prudent man. He led his army in a fierce fight against the Vandals before 418. He had been sponsored by the Romans to drive out the Silings, the part of the Vandal confederacy that was plaguing southern Spain. He would have pursued them even into Africa, had not such a misfortune recalled him as befell Alaric when he was setting out for Africa. So when he had won great fame in Spain, he returned after a bloodless victory to Tolosa (Toulouse), turning over to the Roman Empire, as he had promised, a number of provinces which he had rid of his foes. A long time after this he was seized by sickness and departed this life. He was the leader who brought the Visigoths back to Aquitaine under a treaty with the Romans before 418. He died circa 418.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S713] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1997, pg. 23, figure 1.
  2. [S75] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1979, pg. 33.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 380-55.
  4. [S228] Jordanes, Jordanes' Getica.

King of al-Hirah al-Nu'man I ibn 'Amr al-Hirahi1,2

d. after 418
King of al-Hirah al-Nu'man I ibn 'Amr al-Hirahi|d. a 418|p288.htm#i10857|King of al-Hirah 'Amr II ibn Imru'u al-Qays al-Hirahi||p85.htm#i10858||||King of al-Hirah Imru'u al-Qays I bar 'Amr al-Lakhmi al-Hirahi|d. 7 Dec 328|p286.htm#i10859||||||||||
FatherKing of al-Hirah 'Amr II ibn Imru'u al-Qays al-Hirahi3
     King of al-Hirah al-Nu'man I ibn 'Amr al-Hirahi was the son of King of al-Hirah 'Amr II ibn Imru'u al-Qays al-Hirahi.3 King of al-Hirah al-Nu'man I ibn 'Amr al-Hirahi followed Imru'u al-Qays by two or three intervening reigns.4 He was the predecessor of King of al-Hirah 'Amr II ibn Imru'u al-Qays al-Hirahi; King of al-Hirah.5 King of al-Hirah at Mesene, Iraq, between 390 and 418.2,4 King of al-Hirah al-Nu'man I ibn 'Amr al-Hirahi made Hira , under his auspices, prosperous and powerful.4 He was entrusted with the education of the son of Yezdegird, king of Persia, called Bahram Gour,and built for his use on a salubrious site the famous palace of Khawarnac before 410.4 He was a witness where Bahram V Gor, Shah of Iran educated at the court of al-Nu'man I of al-Hirah, who "built for his use on a salubrious site the famous palace of Khawarnac," before 418.4 King of al-Hirah al-Nu'man I ibn 'Amr al-Hirahi converted at last to Christianity, after seeing a dream in which Simeon the Stylte appeared to chide him, and dissatisfied with the world, and anxious to pass the rest of his days in quiet devotion, he abdicated the government in 418.4 He died after 418.1

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 430-51.
  2. [S203] R. F. Tapsell, Royalty of the World, 184.2 (S1), pg. 376.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 430-52.
  4. [S954] Esq., Bengal Civil Service William Muir Muir on Mahomet, Vol. 1, Chap. 3, Sect. 2.
  5. [S203] R. F. Tapsell, Royalty of the World, 184.1 (_), pg. 376.
  6. [S203] R. F. Tapsell, Royalty of the World, 184.3 (S2), pg. 376.

duc des Francs Genebaud II des Francs Ripuaires1

b. circa 350, d. 419
duc des Francs Genebaud II des Francs Ripuaires|b. c 350\nd. 419|p288.htm#i10296|Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs|b. c 328\nd. 389|p287.htm#i10297||||||||||||||||
FatherDuke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs2 b. circa 328, d. 389
     Duc des Francs Genebaud II des Francs Ripuaires was born circa 350.2 He was the son of Duke of the Franks Dagobert des Francs.2 Duc des Francs Genebaud II des Francs Ripuaires joined Marcomer and Sunno in the invasion of Gaul in 384.3,4 Duke of the Franks in 388.1 He died in 419. Died w/o male issue. d.s.p.m.2

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S504] Christian Settipani, AdC-Addendas.
  2. [S232] David Starr Jordan & Sarah Louise Kimball, Your Family Tree, pg 66..
  3. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, II.9.
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Arbogast (Roman gen.) .

Dux Britanniarium Coel Hen Guotepauk of Britain1,2

b. circa 350, d. 420
Dux Britanniarium Coel Hen Guotepauk of Britain|b. c 350\nd. 420|p288.htm#i11475|Tegfan Gloff of Britain||p112.htm#i13449||||Deheuwaint a. T. of Britain||p112.htm#i13450||||||||||
FatherTegfan Gloff of Britain3
     Dux Britanniarium Coel Hen Guotepauk of Britain was known to have ruled in the North of England.4 Also called "Old King" Coel of Britain. He was born circa 350.1 He was the son of Tegfan Gloff of Britain.3 Dux Britanniarium Coel Hen Guotepauk of Britain married Ystradwal verch Cadfan o Dumnonia, daughter of King of Dumnonia Cadfan ap Cynan Meriadog o Dumnonia, before 382.1 Dux Britanniarium Coel Hen Guotepauk of Britain was the successor of Western Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus Constantine; High King of Britain.5 Duke of the Britons at North Britain between 383 and 420.5 High King of Britain between 388 and 406.5 Dux Britanniarium Coel Hen Guotepauk of Britain died in 420. It is said that Coel wandered the unknown countryside following an attack by the Scots and Picts until he eventually got caught in a bog at Coilsfield (in Tarbolton, Ayrshire) and drowned.1 He was the predecessor of King of Northern Britain St. Ceneu ap Coel o Ebrauc; King of Northern Britain.5 Dux Britanniarium Coel Hen Guotepauk of Britain was immortalized in the poem: "Old King Cole was a merry old soul, And a merry old soul was he. He called for his pipe, And he called for his bowl, And he called for his fiddlers, three.".

Family

Ystradwal verch Cadfan o Dumnonia b. circa 360
Children

Citations

  1. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  2. [S595] History of Scots, Picts, Britons, online http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/DavidDale1\index.html.
  3. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Coel Hen Godebog, 69.
  4. [S595] History of Scots, Picts, Britons, online http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/DavidDale1\index.html, Part 1, 10.3.
  5. [S640] History Files, online http://homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33/history.htm

Yazdgard I, Shah of Iran1

d. 421
Yazdgard I, Shah of Iran|d. 421|p288.htm#i13532|Bahram IV, Shah of Iran|d. 399|p287.htm#i26204||||Šahpur I., Shah of Iran|d. 388|p287.htm#i13535||||||||||
FatherBahram IV, Shah of Iran1 d. 399
     Yazdgard I, Shah of Iran was the son of Bahram IV, Shah of Iran.1 Yazdgard I, Shah of Iran was son of Varhran IV.1 He married Šošanduxt of Iraq, daughter of Rash Galutha, exilarch.2 Yazdgard I, Shah of Iran was the successor of Bahram IV, Shah of Iran; Shah of Iran.3 Yazdgard I, Shah of Iran tried to keep peace with the Roman Empire and stopped the persecution of the Christians after 399.2 Shah of Iran at southwestern Asia between 399 and 420.4,1 He at first allowed the Persian Christians freedom of worship and may even have contemplated becoming a Christian himself, but he later returned to the Zoroastrianism of his forebears and launched a 4-year campaign of ruthless persecution against the Christians between 417 and 420.4 He was the predecessor of Bahram V Gor, Shah of Iran; Shah of Iran.4,5,1,6 Yazdgard I, Shah of Iran died in 421. Assassinated.2,5

Family

Šošanduxt of Iraq
Child

Citations

  1. [S1228] Coins and history, online www.grifterrec.com.
  2. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-54.
  3. [S1628] Unknown author Encyclopædia Iranica, III:517.
  4. [S262] MS Encarta 99, "Persia," Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved..
  5. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  6. [S1628] Unknown author Encyclopædia Iranica, III:518.

Smbat III, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids1

b. circa 370, d. after 421
Smbat III, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 370\nd. a 421|p288.htm#i6390|Isaac I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 340\nd. a 387|p287.htm#i6392||||Smbat I., Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 315\nd. a 374|p287.htm#i6394||||||||||
FatherIsaac I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids b. circa 340, d. after 387
     Presiding Prince of the Bagratids. Smbat III, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids was Sources: 1. Toumanoff, C. 'The Orontids of Armenia' in 'Studies in Christian Caucasian History' (1963) pp.337-342. ; 2. Toumanoff, C. 'The Early Bagratids' in La Museon, (1949), pp.21-54.. He was probably the son of Isaac I, fitting historically and chronologically but not proven. He was born circa 370. He was the son of Isaac I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids. Smbat III, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids died after 421.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S197] Toby Dills, "Descendant of Antiquity," gedcom to Robert Stewart, 5 Feb 1999.
  2. [S1641] Cyril Toumanoff, Toumanoff's Studies, pg. 339, The Bagratid Stemma.

Iulius Agricola, consul1

b. 365, d. after 421
     Iulius Agricola, consul was born in 365.1 Consul in 421.1 He died after 421.1

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S1650] Christian Settipani, Settipani-Continuite Addenda, I, pg. 13.

Constantius III, imperator

d. 2 September 421
      Constantius III, imperator was born at Dalmatia (Croatia).1 He was co-ruler with Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus; Emperor.2 Constantius III, imperator came from Naissus (modern Nis, Yugos.) in the province of Moesia.1 He was one of the most important magistri militum of Honorius after the death of Stilicho in 408.3 He helped the western Roman emperor Flavius Honorius, overthrow the usurping emperor Constantine (Flavius Claudius Constantinus) in 411 at Arelate (Arles), (France).1 Magister militum ("master of the soldiers") in 411.1 He was a witness where Athaulf, King of the Visigoths the leader who brought the Visigoths out of Italy to settle in Gaul on their expulsion by Constantius III in 412. Constantius III, imperator married Galla Placidia the elder, augusta, daughter of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator and Galla Valentiniana, in 417 at Rome, Italy; Her 2nd.3,4,5,1 Constantius III, imperator and Galla Placidia the elder, augusta became involved -- on the losing side -- in the controversy over the election of a new bishop of Rome in 419. Constantius III, imperator was Catholic. He was so described: a fierce warrior in public, but he was far more relaxed in private and at banquets.3 He married the sister of the Western Emperor Honorius, and served as co-Emperor with him for 7 months until his death in 421. He was appointed coemperor of the West by Honorius, with the title augustus, on 8 February 421.1 Augustus at Western Roman Empire between 8 February 421 and 2 September 421.1 He died on 2 September 421 at Ravenna, Italy. Died of an illness.3,5,1

Family

Galla Placidia the elder, augusta b. 388, d. 27 November 450
Children

Citations

  1. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Constantius III (Roman emp.) .
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Honorius.
  3. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  4. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  5. [S451] Leslie Mahler, later roman empire in "later roman empire," listserve message 05/02/1998.

Rusticus Decimus, Prefect1

b. circa 370, d. before 423
     Master of the Offices.1 Also called Decimius Rusticus of Trêves.2 Also called Decime Rustique of Lyons.3 Rusticus Decimus, Prefect was born circa 370.3 He married Artemia, daughter of [ Artemia of Clermont-Auvergne ], before 400.3 Rusticus Decimus, Prefect succeeded his friend Apollinaris, the grandfather of Sidonius Apollinaris, as Prefect of Gaul at the time of the tyrant Constantine in 409.4 Prefect of Gaul between 409 and 410.5 He died before 423. Captured by the army commanders of Emperor Honorius and put to death.1 "Sidonius Apollinaris to his friend Aquilinus:

I FIND it certainly to my advantage, friend capable of every virtue, and I trust you will feel the same, that we should have as many ties to bind us as we have reasons for being united. Such ties are hereditary in our families; I do but recall the experience of the past. Let me summon as my witnesses our grandfathers Rusticus and Apollinaris, whom like fortunes and aversions united in a noble friendship. They had a similar taste in letters, their characters were alike; they had enjoyed similar dignities and undergone the same dangers. They were equally agreed in detesting the inconstancy of Constantine, the irresolution of Jovinus, the perfidy of Gerontius; both singling out the fault proper to each person, and both finding in Dardanus the sum of all existing vices.

If we come down to the years between their time and our own, we find our fathers brought up together from their tender youth until they came to manhood. In Honorius' reign, as tribunes and secretaries, they served abroad together in such close comradeship that among all the grounds of their agreement the fact that their own fathers had been friends appeared to be the least. Under Valentinian, one of the two ruled all Gaul, the other only a region of it; even so they managed to balance their dignities with a fraternal equilibrium; the one who held the lower rank had seniority in office. And now the old tradition comes down to us grandsons, whose dearest care it should be to prevent the affection of our parents and our forefathers from suffering any diminution in our persons. But there are ties of all kinds, over and above that of this hereditary friendship, which needs must bring us close together; we are linked by equality of years no less than by identity of birthplace; we played and learned together, shared the same discipline and relaxation, and were trained by the same rule. So then, for what remains of life now that our years touch upon the threshold of age, let us under the providence of God be two persons with but a single mind; and let us instil into our sons the same mutual regard: let us see that the objects which they desire and refuse, pursue or shun, are the same. It would indeed crown our vows if the boys who bear the honoured names of Rusticus and Apollinaris renewed within their breasts the hearts of those illustrious ancestors. Farewell."6

Family

Artemia b. circa 375
Child

Citations

  1. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, pg. 124.
  2. [S1642] Ford Mommaerts-Browne < and e-mail address>, [GEN-ANCIENT] A Speculation in "[GEN-ANCIENT] A Speculation," newsgroup message Mon, 8 Mar 2004 00:14:15 -0600.
  3. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.
  4. [S962] Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters of Sidonius (orig.), pp. clx-clxxxiii; List of Correspondents.
  5. [S962] Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters of Sidonius (orig.), Notes.
  6. [S962] Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters of Sidonius (orig.), V.ix.1.

Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus

b. 9 September 384, d. 15 August 423
Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus|b. 9 Sep 384\nd. 15 Aug 423|p288.htm#i10619|Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator|b. 11 Jan 347\nd. 17 Jan 395|p287.htm#i10611|Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta|b. c 352\nd. 385|p287.htm#i10617|Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis|b. c 316\nd. 376|p287.htm#i10612|Thermantia the elder|b. c 321|p83.htm#i10688|||||||
FatherFlavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator1 b. 11 January 347, d. 17 January 395
MotherÆlia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta1 b. circa 352, d. 385
     Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus was the younger son of Theodosius I and Aelia Flacilla.2 He was born on 9 September 384 at Constantinople, Byzantium.3,2 He was the son of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator and Ælia Flavia Flaccilla Augusta.1 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus was Consul with Flavius Eudius in 386 at Rome. He was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator visited Rome, where, accompanied by his four-year-old son Honorius, he made a triumphant entry in 389.4 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus accompanied his father, Theodosius, to Rome during the reign of Valentinian II in 389.4 He was the successor of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator; Emperor of the East and West.5 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus saw the real power exercised by his master of soldiers, Flavius Stilicho, between 393 and 407.2 He was a witness where Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator elevated his son Honorius to Augustus on 23 January 393.4,2 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus was elevated to the rank of augustus by his father on 23 January 393.2 He was a witness where Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae regent for the Roman emperor Honorius and one of the last great Roman military commanders in the West between 394 and 408.6 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus was named Most Noble Child (nobilissimus puer) before 395. He was a witness where Radagaisus of the Vandals journeyed to Italy in the time of Emperor Honorius after 395. Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus became sole ruler of the West at age 10, upon his father's death on 17 January 395.2 Emperor at Western Roman Empire between 17 January 395 and 423.2 He and Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator were Consul with his brother in 396. Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus married Empress Maria Stilichio, daughter of Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae and Serena Theodosia, in 398; His 1st. 1st cousins, 1x removed.1,2,6,7 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus was a witness where Alarico I, rey Visigodo laid siege to Rome until the Senate granted him another subsidy and assistance in his negotiations with Honorius in 408.8 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus married Empress Thermantia Stilichio the younger, daughter of Flavius Stilichio, magister utriusque militiae and Serena Theodosia, in 408; His 2nd. 1st cousins, 1x removed.1,2 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus was a witness where Constantius III, imperator one of the most important magistri militum of Honorius after the death of Stilicho in 408.3 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus and Empress Thermantia Stilichio the younger were divorced in August 408.2 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus was one of the weakest of the Roman emperors, for when he did intervene in politics, his actions were usually disastrous.2 He rejected the terms offered by Alaric the Visigoth before 410.2 He was a witness where Alarico I, rey Visigodo sacked Rome for three days after allies within it's walls opened the gates for him, but he treated its inhabitants humanely and burned only a few buildings, a milestone in the collapse of the Roman Empire, on 24 August 410.2,8 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus witnessed the death of Rusticus Decimus, Prefect before 423; Captured by the army commanders of Emperor Honorius and put to death.9 Western Emperor Flavius Honorius Theodosius Augustus died on 15 August 423 at age 38 years, 11 months and 6 days.3,2

Family 1

Empress Maria Stilichio b. circa 385, d. 408

Family 2

Empress Thermantia Stilichio the younger b. circa 386, d. 415

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Honorius.
  3. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.
  5. [S25] J. M. Hussey, Cambridge Medieval History, Vol 4, Part 1, pg. 776.
  6. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Stilicho, Flavius.
  7. [S44] Edward Gibbon Gibbon, XXIX.
  8. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Alaric.
  9. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, pg. 124.

Pharamond, rex Francorum1,2,3

b. 370, d. 427
     Faramund = Voice of the Family?? Pharamond, rex Francorum was born in 370.3 He married Argotta des Francs Ripuaires, daughter of duc des Francs Genebaud II des Francs Ripuaires, before 394.3 Duke of the East Franks between 404 and 419. Pharamond, rex Francorum was elected "the first King of France in the reign of Theodosius II (408-450), Emperor of the East". Annals of Monte Fernando 424: "Exordium regum Francorum, primus Faramundus."4 He started his reign over the kingdom of the Franks in 424.4 1st King of the Franks between 424 and 427. He died in 427 at age 57 years.3 He was the predecessor of Chlodion, rex Francorum; King of the Salian Franks.

Family

Argotta des Francs Ripuaires b. circa 374
Child

Citations

  1. [S218] The Oxford Merovingian Page, online ..
  2. [S232] David Starr Jordan & Sarah Louise Kimball, Your Family Tree, pg 66..
  3. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Helenus, King of Epirus, 96.
  4. [S1105] Margaret Lantry, AMF, MF424.1.
  5. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Helenus, King of Epirus, 97.

Gunderic, King of the Vandals1

b. circa 379, d. 428
Gunderic, King of the Vandals|b. c 379\nd. 428|p288.htm#i10655|Godegisel, King of the Vandals|b. c 359\nd. c 411|p287.htm#i10657|free woman (?)|b. c 355|p83.htm#i10658|Visimar Asdingi||p173.htm#i19466||||||||||
FatherGodegisel, King of the Vandals2,1 b. circa 359, d. circa 411
Motherfree woman (?)1 b. circa 355
     Gunderic, King of the Vandals was born circa 379. He was the son of Godegisel, King of the Vandals and free woman (?).2,1 Gunderic, King of the Vandals invaded Spain in 409. He married Elisa of Granada after 409 at Spain. Gunderic, King of the Vandals conquered Baetis, the Roman province roughly equivalent to Andalusia and Murcia, in 411. King of the Vandals at Spain between 411 and 426. He captured Seville in 426. He died in 428. Killed, according to legend, by a thunderbolt after profaning the Basilica which had contained the relics of St. Vincent since the reign of Emperor Constantine I in the previous century.

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Elisa of Granada b. circa 389

Citations

  1. [S713] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1997, pg. 164, figure 3.
  2. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 132, genealogy table 4..

Arch'il, King of K'art'li1

d. 435
Arch'il, King of K'art'li|d. 435|p288.htm#i25465|Mihrdat IV, King of K'art'li|d. 411|p287.htm#i25466||||Varaz-Bak'ar II, King of K'art'li|b. c 355?\nd. 394?|p287.htm#i25496|N. N. of Kartli||p221.htm#i25494|||||||
FatherMihrdat IV, King of K'art'li1 d. 411
     Arch'il, King of K'art'li was the son of Mihrdat IV, King of K'art'li.1 Arch'il, King of K'art'li did away with the fire-temples in the land, taking refuge in the holy Cross.1 He was the successor of Mihrdat IV, King of K'art'li; 30th King of Kartli.1,2 31st King of Kartli between 411 and 435.3 Arch'il, King of K'art'li died in 435. "Piously reposed in Christ."1 He was the predecessor of Mihrdat V, King of K'art'li; 32nd King of Kartli.4

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chap. 12.
  2. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 409-11.
  3. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 411-35.
  4. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 435-47.

Bresal Bélach mac Fiachach Ba Aicced, rí Laigin1,2

b. circa 376, d. 435 or 436
Bresal Bélach mac Fiachach Ba Aicced, rí Laigin|b. c 376\nd. 435 or 436|p288.htm#i12482|Fiacha Ba Aicced mac Cathaír Máir Uí Éremóin|b. c 346|p102.htm#i12484||||Cathair M. m. F., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 122|p284.htm#i12485||||||||||
FatherFiacha Ba Aicced mac Cathaír Máir Uí Éremóin1,3,4,5,6 b. circa 346
     Bresal Bélach mac Fiachach Ba Aicced, rí Laigin was son of Fiacha Aiceadh, grandson of Cathaeir Mor (King of Leinster).3 He was born circa 376. He was the son of Fiacha Ba Aicced mac Cathaír Máir Uí Éremóin.1,3,4,5,6 King of Laigin at Leinster, Ireland, before 435.7 Bresal Bélach mac Fiachach Ba Aicced, rí Laigin died in 435 or 436.3,8,9 Annals of the Four Masters 435: "Breasal Bealach, son of Fiacha Aiceadh, son of Cathaeir Mor (King of Leinster), died. / Breasal Belach, mac Fiacha Aicedha, mic Cathaoir Móir, (ri Laighean) d'ég." ( (an unknown value)).3 Annals of Ulster 435: "Death of Bresal, king of Laigin. / Mors Bressail regis Laighen."8 Chronicon Scotorum 436: "Bresal, King of Laighen, died."10 Annals of Ulster 436: "Or here, the death of Bresal. / Uel hic mors Bresail."9

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S187] Royal Genealogy Database, online http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/
  2. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Láegaire Lorc, 96.
  3. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M435.2.
  4. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, 5.
  5. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, 21.
  6. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, 18.
  7. [S636] Ireland: History in Maps, online http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/kilkenny/2/iremaps.htm
  8. [S897] [unknown], AU, U435.1.
  9. [S897] [unknown], AU, U436.1.
  10. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. iii. A.D.436.

Ingild, King of the Danes

d. 436
Ingild, King of the Danes|d. 436|p288.htm#i13333|Frode IV Fridleifsson, King of the Danes||p111.htm#i13320||||Fridleif I. F., King of the Danes||p111.htm#i13321||||||||||
FatherFrode IV Fridleifsson, King of the Danes1
     Ingild, King of the Danes was the son of Frode IV Fridleifsson, King of the Danes.1 Ingild, King of the Danes was the successor of Frode IV Fridleifsson, King of the Danes; King of the Danes.2 King of the Danes at Denmark between 407 and 456.2 Ingild, King of the Danes died in 436.1 He was the predecessor of Hálfdan II Frodasson, King of the Danes; King of the Danes.2

Citations

  1. [S277] Gene Gurney, Kingdoms of Europe, pg. 430, Denmark.
  2. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html, Scandanavia, Denmark.

Gundahar, King of the Burgunds1

b. circa 383, d. 437
Gundahar, King of the Burgunds|b. c 383\nd. 437|p288.htm#i9732|Gebicca, King of the Burgundii|b. c 353\nd. c 413|p288.htm#i9751||||Godomar of the Burgundii|b. c 323|p74.htm#i9752||||||||||
FatherGebicca, King of the Burgundii b. circa 353, d. circa 413
     Also called Gonthaires. Also called Guntharius.2 Also called Gunther.2 Also called Gundicar.2 Gundahar, King of the Burgunds was born circa 383. He was the son of Gebicca, King of the Burgundii. Gundahar, King of the Burgunds was supported the imperial usurper Jovinus in 411.2 He led the Burgundians across the Rhine in the early 5th century, establishing a kingdom at Worms.2 The Romans transferred control of the stronghold of Worms—which they called Augusta Vangionum—to the Burgundians, a Germanic tribe immortalized in the Nibelungenlied, or Song of the Nibelungs.3 King of the Burgunds at Worms between 413 and 436. He died in 437. Killed in battle against the Huns and Aëtius. This is part of the 12th-century German epic "Nibelungenlied." He became a hero of medieval legends.2

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S234] Germania and Francia, online http://www.friesian.com/francia.htm
  2. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Gunther (Burgundian k.).
  3. [S889] Atlas, MS Encarta Atlas 2001, © 1988-2000 Microsoft and/or its suppliers. All rights reserved.
    .

Eochaid Muinremar mac Áengusa1,2

b. circa 375, d. before 439
Eochaid Muinremar mac Áengusa|b. c 375\nd. b 439|p288.htm#i6581|Áengus Fert mac Feideilmid|b. c 350|p55.htm#i6582||||Fedelmid A. mac Áengusa||p55.htm#i14057||||||||||
FatherÁengus Fert mac Feideilmid3 b. circa 350
     Eochaid Muinremar mac Áengusa was born circa 375. He was the son of Áengus Fert mac Feideilmid.3 Eochaid Muinremar mac Áengusa married Erca (?), daughter of Laorn (?), before 400. Eochaid Muinremar mac Áengusa died before 439.

Family

Erca (?) b. circa 380
Children

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 165-53.
  2. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 110.
  3. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 109.
  4. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M474.2.
  5. [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, RÍG ALBAN. 1697.
  6. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M434.1.

Sahak, Katholikos of Armenia1

b. 352, d. 439
Sahak, Katholikos of Armenia|b. 352\nd. 439|p288.htm#i5965|Nerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia|b. c 335?\nd. 373|p287.htm#i5967|Samdukht Mamikonean of Taraun|b. c 330|p51.htm#i5968|Athenagenes Souren-Pahlav||p278.htm#i5971|Bambishu, Princess of Armenia|b. 315|p51.htm#i5972|Vardan Mamikonean I, nahapet of the Mamikonean tohm|b. c 300\nd. b 367|p286.htm#i5969||||
FatherNerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia2,3 b. circa 335?, d. 373
MotherSamdukht Mamikonean of Taraun b. circa 330
     Also called St. Isaac I "the Great" of Armenia. Sources: 2. Toumanoff, C. 'In the Formative Centuries' in 'Studies in Christian Caucasian History' (1963) pp.209. Sahak, Katholikos of Armenia had no male offspring, only a daughter who was wed to Hamazasp, lord of the Mamikoneans and sparapet of Armenia.4 He was the son of Nerses the Great.3 Also called St. Sahak I of Armenia.5 Also called Catholicos of Armenia St. Sahak I the Parthian.6 He was born in 352. He was the son of Nerses "the Great", Katholikos of Armenia and Samdukht Mamikonean of Taraun.2,3 Prince of the Gregorid Domain between 367 and 373.1 Sahak, Katholikos of Armenia was seated on the patriarchal throne by Xosrov, King of Persia, after 387.3 Catholicos of Armenia between 387 and 436.1,6 He died in 439 at age 87 years. Having reached deep old age, he died peacefully in the village named Blur in the district of Bagrewand.7,4,8 He left a will in 439; St Sahak, the last descendant of St. Gregory, willed to the Mamikoneans the other half of Taron centered in the city of Ashtishat as well as the principalities of Bagravande and Acilisene --making them "the greatest territorial princes of the Monarchy, ruling a State that nearly sundered it into two halves."7

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 416-54.
  2. [S664] Pas on Xerxes, online ..
  3. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 21.
  4. [S1035] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : P'arpec'i's (5th C), pg. 56.
  5. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html
  6. [S1091] Armenian Highland, online http://www.armenianhighland.com/main.html
  7. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  8. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 29.
  9. [S1037] DFA (Bagrat), online http://www.ut.ee/~votan/articles/bagrat.htm
    , Part 2, V.

sub-king of Irish Demetae Anlach mac Cormaic Uí Éremóin1

b. circa 403, d. circa 440
sub-king of Irish Demetae Anlach mac Cormaic Uí Éremóin|b. c 403\nd. c 440|p288.htm#i11626|Cormac ab Urb Uí Éremóin|b. c 387|p93.htm#i11629||||Urb a. A. Uí Éremóin|b. c 371|p93.htm#i11630||||||||||
FatherCormac ab Urb Uí Éremóin1 b. circa 387
     Sub-king of Irish Demetae Anlach mac Cormaic Uí Éremóin was born circa 403.1 He was the son of Cormac ab Urb Uí Éremóin.1 Sub-king of Irish Demetae Anlach mac Cormaic Uí Éremóin married Marchell verch Tewdrig of Garthmadrun, daughter of King of Garth Madryn Tewdrig ap Tudwal of Garthmadrun, before 419.1 Sub-king of Irish Demetae Anlach mac Cormaic Uí Éremóin was a witness where Brenin Brycheiniog St. Brychan ab Anllach o Brycheiniog relocated with his parents to Wales, his mother's homeland, circa 423. Sub-king of Irish Demetae Anlach mac Cormaic Uí Éremóin died circa 440 at Garthmadrun, the Brecon Beacons, Powys, Wales.1

Family

Marchell verch Tewdrig of Garthmadrun b. circa 403
Child

Maine mac Néill Noígiallach Uí Éremóin1

d. 440
Maine mac Néill Noígiallach Uí Éremóin|d. 440|p288.htm#i15343|Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 405|p287.htm#i13865|Rígnach ingen Meadaib||p117.htm#i13867|Eochaid M., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 365|p286.htm#i13872|Cairenn C. of Britain||p280.htm#i13874|Meadaib mac Ros||p119.htm#i14093||||
FatherNiall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann1,2 d. 405
MotherRígnach ingen Meadaib1
     Maine mac Néill Noígiallach Uí Éremóin was the son of Niall Noígiallach a quo Uí Néill, Ard-rí na h'Éireann and Rígnach ingen Meadaib.1,2 Annals of Inisfallen 440: "Death of Maine, son of Niall [Naígiallach]."3 Chronicon Scotorum 440: "Maine, son of Niall, died."2 Maine mac Néill Noígiallach Uí Éremóin died in 440.1,4 Annals of the Four Masters 440: "Maine, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, died. / Maine, mac Néll Naoighiallaigh, d'écc." ( (an unknown value)).1 Annals of Ulster 440: "Some books state that Maine son of Niall perished this year. / Alii libri dicunt Maine filium Neill in isto anno perisse."4

Citations

  1. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M440.2.
  2. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Annal CS440..
  3. [S496] Ed. & trans. Seán Mac Airt, AI, AI440.3.
  4. [S897] [unknown], AU, U440.2.

King of Dumnonia Custennin Gorneu ap Cynfawr o Dumnonia

b. circa 411, d. 443
King of Dumnonia Custennin Gorneu ap Cynfawr o Dumnonia|b. c 411\nd. 443|p288.htm#i11899|King of Dumnonia Cynfawr ap Tudwal o Dumnonia|b. c 395|p97.htm#i11900||||King of Dumnonia Tudwal a. G. o Dumnonia|b. c 375|p92.htm#i11568|Gratianna verch Macsen|b. c 370|p97.htm#i11887|||||||
FatherKing of Dumnonia Cynfawr ap Tudwal o Dumnonia b. circa 395
     Also called Constantine Corneu.1 Also called Constantine Fendigaid.2 King of Dumnonia Custennin Gorneu ap Cynfawr o Dumnonia was the successor of King of Dumnonia Cynfawr ap Tudwal o Dumnonia; King of Dumnonia.1 King of Dumnonia Custennin Gorneu ap Cynfawr o Dumnonia was born circa 411.3 He was the son of King of Dumnonia Cynfawr ap Tudwal o Dumnonia. King of Dumnonia at Britain between 435 and 443.1 King of Dumnonia Custennin Gorneu ap Cynfawr o Dumnonia split the kingdom of Dumnonia between his two sons.1 He died in 443.3 He was the predecessor of King of Dumnonia Erbin ap Custennin o Dumnonia; King of Dumnonia.1 King of Dumnonia Custennin Gorneu ap Cynfawr o Dumnonia was the predecessor of sub-King of Cornubia Merion ap Custennin o Dumnonia; sub-King of Cornubia.1

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S640] History Files, online http://homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33/history.htm
  2. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Cadfan ap Cynan, 79.
  3. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…

Meroveus des Francs Ripuaires

b. circa 390, d. 445
Meroveus des Francs Ripuaires|b. c 390\nd. 445|p288.htm#i10471|Sunno des Francs Ripuaires|b. c 358\nd. 401|p287.htm#i10521|Merowna the Thuringian|b. c 367\nd. c 407|p287.htm#i10522|Priaros, King of the Franks, in Toxandrie|b. 324\nd. 396|p287.htm#i10464||||Merwig I. the Thuringian|b. c 337|p82.htm#i10527||||
FatherSunno des Francs Ripuaires1 b. circa 358, d. 401
MotherMerowna the Thuringian1 b. circa 367, d. circa 407
     Settipani offers Meroveus and Hatilda as parents of Merovech, grandfather of Clovis I of the Franks.1 Meroveus des Francs Ripuaires was born circa 390. He was the son of Sunno des Francs Ripuaires and Merowna the Thuringian.1 Meroveus des Francs Ripuaires married Hatilda (?), daughter of Asturius (?), before 410. Meroveus des Francs Ripuaires died in 445.

Family

Hatilda (?) b. circa 390

Citations

  1. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.

Nath Í, Ard-rí na h'Éireann1

d. 445
Nath Í, Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 445|p288.htm#i14464|Fiachrae a quo Uí Fiachrach||p124.htm#i14463||||Eochaid M., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 365|p286.htm#i13872|Mong F. i. F. Éoganachta|d. 365|p286.htm#i13873|||||||
FatherFiachrae a quo Uí Fiachrach2
     Nath Í, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the son of Fiachrae a quo Uí Fiachrach.2 Nath Í, Ard-rí na h'Éireann came to rule over Ireland to succeed his father's half-brother, Niall of the Nine Hostages, in 405.3 2nd High-King of Ireland between 405 and 428.3,4 Chronicon Scotorum 412: "Nathi, son of Fiachra, reigned twenty-three years."5 Chronicon Scotorum 428: "Nathí, son of Fiachra, perished by lightning at Sliabh Ealpa, after possessing the sovereignty of Erinn, and of the world, so far."6 He died in 428 at Sliabh Ealpa, Ireland. After twenty three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was killed by a flash of lightning.3 Annals of the Four Masters 428: "After Dathi, son of Fiachra, son of Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin, had been, twenty three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was killed by a flash of lightning, at Sliabh Ealpa. / Iar m-beith tri bliadhna fichet i righe n-Ereann do Dathí, mac Fiachrach, mic Eathach Moighmheadhoin, torchair do saighit gealain ag Sleibh Ealpa." ( (an unknown value)).3 Annals of Inisfallen 445: "Nath Í, son of Fiachra, [died]."7 He died in 445.8 Annals of Ulster 445: "Nath Í son of Fiachra of Mag Táil, son of Eochu Mugmedón was killed at the Alps mountain, or died after having been struck by a thunderbolt when he invaded its confines; and he reigned in Ireland for 23 years. / Nath I mc. Fiachrach Mhaighe Tail mc. Eachach Muighmedoin ag Sleib Ealpa, l^ iarna bheim do shoighnen theinntighe og dol tar torainn obiit, & .xx tribus annis regnauit in Hibernia."8

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S1445] Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings, pg. 298.
  2. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachra Foltsnaithech, 100.
  3. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M428.1.
  4. [S1445] Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings, pg. 280.
  5. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. i. A.D.412.
  6. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Kal. i. A.D.428.
  7. [S496] Ed. & trans. Seán Mac Airt, AI, AI445.2.
  8. [S897] [unknown], AU, U445.1.
  9. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachra Foltsnaithech, 101.
  10. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M459.1.

High King of Brittany Salomon I ap Gradlon of Brittany1

b. circa 355, d. 446
High King of Brittany Salomon I ap Gradlon of Brittany|b. c 355\nd. 446|p288.htm#i11527|King of Brittany Gradlon Mawr ap Cynan Meriadoc of Brittany|b. c 330|p279.htm#i11529|Tigridia of Ireland|b. c 330|p91.htm#i11530|King of Brittany Erbin a. C. M. of Britain||p80.htm#i25085||||||||||
FatherKing of Brittany Gradlon Mawr ap Cynan Meriadoc of Brittany1 b. circa 330
MotherTigridia of Ireland1 b. circa 330
     Also called Tudwal Mwyn Fawr.2 High King of Brittany Salomon I ap Gradlon of Brittany was born circa 355.1 He was the son of King of Brittany Gradlon Mawr ap Cynan Meriadoc of Brittany and Tigridia of Ireland.1 High King of Brittany Salomon I ap Gradlon of Brittany married N. N. filia Patricius Flavius before 373.1 High King of Brittany Salomon I ap Gradlon of Brittany was the successor of King of Brittany Gradlon Mawr ap Cynan Meriadoc of Brittany; King of Vannetais.3 High King of Brittany Salomon I ap Gradlon of Brittany took, as the eldest son, on his father's death the Breton heartland of Cornouaille and the over-kingship, while Guitol, his brother, became the first Prince of Domnonée in 421.1 High-King of Brittany at France between 421 and 446. King of Cornouaille at Brittany, France, between 421 and 446. He died in 434.2 He died in 446.1

Family

N. N. filia Patricius Flavius b. circa 355
Children

Citations

  1. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  2. [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Caradoc, Lord of Meiriadog, 76.
  3. [S640] History Files, online http://homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33/history.htm

King of Powys Cadeyrn Fendigaid ap Gwrtheyrn of Britain1

b. circa 404, d. 447
King of Powys Cadeyrn Fendigaid ap Gwrtheyrn of Britain|b. c 404\nd. 447|p288.htm#i11566|Vortigern Vorteneu, High King of Britain|b. c 370\nd. c 459|p289.htm#i11569|Severa verch Macsen|b. c 370|p92.htm#i11570|Guortheneu a. G. of Britain||p219.htm#i24800||||Western Emperor Magnus C. M. Constantine|b. c 340\nd. 388|p287.htm#i11580|St. E. L. v. E. of Britain|b. c 340|p92.htm#i11581|
FatherVortigern Vorteneu, High King of Britain1 b. circa 370, d. circa 459
MotherSevera verch Macsen1 b. circa 370
     Also called Catigernus. King of Powys Cadeyrn Fendigaid ap Gwrtheyrn of Britain also went by the name of Catigern "the Blessed" English, Fendigaid = the Blessed. He was born circa 404.1 He was the son of Vortigern Vorteneu, High King of Britain and Severa verch Macsen.1 King of Powys Cadeyrn Fendigaid ap Gwrtheyrn of Britain met St. Germanus probably during his first visit to Britain receiving his blessing in 429.1 King of Powys at Wales between 435 and 447.2 He was co-ruler with Brenin Powys Cadell Ddyrnllwg ap Cadeyrn o Powys; King of Powys.2 Briton king, Cadeyrn, killed in battle. In 447 at the Battle of Rithergabail. King of Powys Cadeyrn Fendigaid ap Gwrtheyrn of Britain was a warrior king who led the British troops at the Battle of Rithergabail in 447 at Aylesford, Kent, England.1 He was the predecessor of Brenin Powys Cadell Ddyrnllwg ap Cadeyrn o Powys; King of Powys.2 King of Powys Cadeyrn Fendigaid ap Gwrtheyrn of Britain died in 447. Killed at Battle of Aylesford.2 King of Powys Cadeyrn Fendigaid ap Gwrtheyrn of Britain was buried in Aylesford, Kent, England. Buried under nearby Kit's Coyty House, a megalithic dolmen.1 Anglo Saxon Chronicles 455: "the second battle of Vortimer against the Saxons at Episford, where Catigern and Horsa fell."3

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/…
  2. [S640] History Files, online http://homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33/history.htm
  3. [S665] Vortigern Studies, online www.vortigern.org.

Mihrdat V, King of K'art'li1

d. 447
Mihrdat V, King of K'art'li|d. 447|p288.htm#i25463|Arch'il, King of K'art'li|d. 435|p288.htm#i25465||||Mihrdat I., King of K'art'li|d. 411|p287.htm#i25466||||||||||
FatherArch'il, King of K'art'li1 d. 435
     Mihrdat V, King of K'art'li was the son of Arch'il, King of K'art'li.1 Mihrdat V, King of K'art'li was a virtuous man like his father.2 Also called King Mithradates V of Kartli.1 He was the successor of Arch'il, King of K'art'li; 31st King of Kartli.3 Mihrdat V, King of K'art'li married Sagduxt of Ran, daughter of erist'avi of Ran Barzabod of Ran.1 32nd King of Kartli at Transcaucasia between 435 and 447.4 Mihrdat V, King of K'art'li died in 447. He died when his son, Vaxt'ang, was but seven years old.1 He was the predecessor of Vaxt'ang Gorgasali, King of K'art'li; 33rd King of Kartli.5

Family 1

Sagduxt of Ran
Children

Family 2

Child

Citations

  1. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chap. 12.
  2. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chap. 15.
  3. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 411-35.
  4. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 435-47.
  5. [S1186] Robert W. Thomson (translator), The Georgian Chronicle, pg. 380, 447-522.
  6. [S324] Robert Bedrosian (translator), The Georgian Chronicle (from Armenian), Chap. 13.

epscop Arda Macha Seachnall mac Ua Baird1

b. 372?, d. 27 November 447
epscop Arda Macha Seachnall mac Ua Baird|b. 372?\nd. 27 Nov 447|p288.htm#i23910|King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain|b. c 305\nd. c 367|p286.htm#i11494|Darerca verch Calpurnius||p91.htm#i11497|Gereint a. E. of Britain||p91.htm#i11498||||Calpurnius of Britain|b. c 370|p162.htm#i18242|N. N. of Wales|b. c 378|p169.htm#i18802|
FatherKing of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain1 b. circa 305, d. circa 367
MotherDarerca verch Calpurnius1
     Also called Bishop Secundinus of Armagh.1 Epscop Arda Macha Seachnall mac Ua Baird was born in 372?. He was the son of King of Brittany Conan Meriadoc ap Gereint of Britain and Darerca verch Calpurnius.1 Bishop of Ard Macha at (Armagh), Ireland, in 447.1 Epscop Arda Macha Seachnall mac Ua Baird died on 27 November 447 at age 75 years. He yielded his spirit in the seventy fifth year of his age.1 Annals of the Four Masters 447: "Secundinus, i.e. Seachnall Mac Ua Baird, the son of Patrick's sister, Darerca, Bishop of Ard Macha Armagh, yielded his spirit on the twenty seventh of November, in the seventy fifth year of his age. / Secundinus .i. Seachnall mac ua Baird, mac sethar Patraicc .i. Dair Erca, epscop Arda Macha, cúicc bliadhna sechtmoghat a aois an tan ro faoidh a spirat .i. 27 Nouember." ( (an unknown value)).1

Citations

  1. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M447.2.

Clovis, King of the Franks1,2

b. circa 398, d. 448
Clovis, King of the Franks|b. c 398\nd. 448|p288.htm#i7672|Theodemer, King of the Franks|b. 364\nd. 413|p288.htm#i10450|Blesinde des Francs|b. c 375|p80.htm#i10451|Richomer, Consul|b. c 350\nd. 384|p287.htm#i10454|Ascyla (?)|b. c 354\nd. 413|p288.htm#i10407|Chlogio I. des Francs|b. c 345|p81.htm#i10456|Princess Blesinde of the Suevi|b. c 350|p81.htm#i10457|
FatherTheodemer, King of the Franks3 b. 364, d. 413
MotherBlesinde des Francs b. circa 375
     Also called Clodion "the Hairy" Crinitus or Hairy, for the Kings of the Franks kept long hair and this was equated with royal power. Clovis, King of the Franks also went by the name of Clodion "le Chevelu". He was born circa 398. He was the son of Theodemer, King of the Franks and Blesinde des Francs.3 Clovis, King of the Franks married Ildegonde, daughter of Marcomir, King of Cologne and Ildegonde of the Lombards, before 418. King of the Franks at Cologne, Francia Rhinensis, Frankish Kingdoms, before 448. Clovis, King of the Franks died in 448.

Family

Ildegonde b. 399, d. circa 450
Children

Citations

  1. [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., 190-1.
  2. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 171-53.
  3. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.

Chlodoswintha

b. circa 418, d. circa 449
Chlodoswintha|b. c 418\nd. c 449|p288.htm#i10446|Clovis, King of the Franks|b. c 398\nd. 448|p288.htm#i7672|Ildegonde|b. 399\nd. c 450|p288.htm#i8189|Theodemer, King of the Franks|b. 364\nd. 413|p288.htm#i10450|Blesinde des Francs|b. c 375|p80.htm#i10451|Marcomir, King of Cologne|b. c 369|p80.htm#i10452|Ildegonde of the Lombards|b. c 374|p80.htm#i10453|
FatherClovis, King of the Franks1 b. circa 398, d. 448
MotherIldegonde1 b. 399, d. circa 450
     Chlodoswintha was born circa 418. She was the daughter of Clovis, King of the Franks and Ildegonde.1 Chlodoswintha married Merovech, rex Francorum, son of Chlodion, rex Francorum and Basina von Thüringen, circa 435. Chlodoswintha died circa 449.

Family

Merovech, rex Francorum b. circa 415, d. 458
Child

Citations

  1. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.

Amalgaid a quo Tír nÁmalgado, rí Connacht1

d. 449
Amalgaid a quo Tír nÁmalgado, rí Connacht|d. 449|p288.htm#i15344|Fiachrae a quo Uí Fiachrach||p124.htm#i14463||||Eochaid M., Ard-rí na h'Éireann|d. 365|p286.htm#i13872|Mong F. i. F. Éoganachta|d. 365|p286.htm#i13873|||||||
FatherFiachrae a quo Uí Fiachrach2
     Amalgaid a quo Tír nÁmalgado, rí Connacht was the son of Fiachrae a quo Uí Fiachrach.2 Amalgaid a quo Tír nÁmalgado, rí Connacht was son of Fiachra, grandson of Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin.2 He had Tir Amhalghaidh named for him.2 Chronicon Scotorum 440: "Amhalgadh, son of Fiachra, King of Connacht, died, i.e. the first King of Connacht after the faith."3 1st King of Connacht at Ireland.1 He died in 449.2 He was the predecessor of Ailill Molt, rí Connacht, Ard-rí na h'Éireann; 2nd King of Connacht.1 Annals of the Four Masters 449: "Amhalghaidh, son of Fiachra, son of Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin, died. From him Tir Amhalghaidh is named. / Amhalgaoidh, mac Fiachrach, mic Eachach Muidhmhedhoin, diobaidh. Uaidhe Tir n-Amhalgaidh." ( (an unknown value)).2

Citations

  1. [S1445] Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings, pg. 298.
  2. [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M449.2.
  3. [S333] W. Hennessy, Chronicon Scotorum, Annal CS440..

Ildegonde

b. 399, d. circa 450
Ildegonde|b. 399\nd. c 450|p288.htm#i8189|Marcomir, King of Cologne|b. c 369|p80.htm#i10452|Ildegonde of the Lombards|b. c 374|p80.htm#i10453|||||||||||||
FatherMarcomir, King of Cologne b. circa 369
MotherIldegonde of the Lombards b. circa 374
     Ildegonde was born in 399. She was the daughter of Marcomir, King of Cologne and Ildegonde of the Lombards. Ildegonde married Clovis, King of the Franks, son of Theodemer, King of the Franks and Blesinde des Francs, before 418. Ildegonde died circa 450.

Family

Clovis, King of the Franks b. circa 398, d. 448
Children

Citations

  1. [S175] Christian Settipani, AdC.

Theodosius II, imperator

b. 10 April 401, d. 28 July 450
Theodosius II, imperator|b. 10 Apr 401\nd. 28 Jul 450|p288.htm#i10625|Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator|b. 377\nd. 408|p287.htm#i10618|Aelia Eudoxia des Francs|b. c 380\nd. 404|p287.htm#i10624|Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator|b. 11 Jan 347\nd. 17 Jan 395|p287.htm#i10611|Ælia F. Flaccilla Augusta|b. c 352\nd. 385|p287.htm#i10617|Bauton des Francs|b. c 350|p147.htm#i16742||||
FatherFlavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator1,2 b. 377, d. 408
MotherAelia Eudoxia des Francs1 b. circa 380, d. 404
      Theodosius II, imperator was the son of the Eastern emperor Arcadius.3 He was a gentle, scholarly, easily dominated man who allowed his government to be run by a succession of relatives and ministers.2 He was related to Licinia Eudokia Theodosia, augusta; the daughter of Theodosius II and Eudocia.4,5 Theodosius II, imperator was the successor of Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator; Emperor.6 Theodosius II, imperator was born on 10 April 401 at Constantinople, Eastern Roman Empire.2,3 He was the son of Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator and Aelia Eudoxia des Francs.1,2 Theodosius II, imperator was a witness where Flavius Arcadius Augustus, imperator associated his son, Theodosius II, with his own rule in 402.7 Theodosius II, imperator was made coemperor by his father in 402.2 He succeeded his father as Eastern Emperor in 408.2 He governed by Anthemius, praetorian prefect of the East, who was his first regent between 408 and 414.2 Emperor at Eastern Roman Empire between 408 and 28 July 450.8,3 He publically reprimanded the Jewish Patriarch Gamaliel II and stripped him of the rank of 'praefectus praetorio' in 415.9 He married Empress Aelia Eudokia of Athens, daughter of Leontios of Athens, on 7 June 421; The marriage was arrainged by Theodosius' sister, Plechtrude.1,5 Theodosius II, imperator abolished the Jewish Patriarchate and diverted the Jewish tax to the imperial treasury in 429.9 He published the Theodosian Code which, among others, imposed the death penalty on any Jew who tries to convert a Christian to Judaism in 439.9 He died on 28 July 450 at age 49 years, 3 months and 18 days. He fell from his horse in an accident and died shortly thereafter.2,3

Family

Empress Aelia Eudokia of Athens b. after 400, d. 461
Child

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  2. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.
  3. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius II (Roman emp.).
  4. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Valentinian III (Roman emp.) .
  5. [S585] Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter The Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol V, Eudocia.
  6. [S25] J. M. Hussey, Cambridge Medieval History, Vol 4, Part 1, pg. 776.
  7. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Arcadius.
  8. [S261] Regnal Chronologies, online http://www.hostkingdom.net/regindex.html
  9. [S911] Hadrian to Islam, online http://users.iafrica.com/l/ll/lloyd/1-TimeLine/…..

Galla Placidia the elder, augusta

b. 388, d. 27 November 450
Galla Placidia the elder, augusta|b. 388\nd. 27 Nov 450|p288.htm#i10250|Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator|b. 11 Jan 347\nd. 17 Jan 395|p287.htm#i10611|Galla Valentiniana|b. c 363\nd. 394|p287.htm#i10610|Flavius Theodosius the Elder, magister equitum praesentalis|b. c 316\nd. 376|p287.htm#i10612|Thermantia the elder|b. c 321|p83.htm#i10688|imperator Flavius Valentinianus the Elder|b. 321\nd. 17 Nov 375|p287.htm#i10640|Justina|b. c 321|p83.htm#i10642|
FatherFlavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator2,3 b. 11 January 347, d. 17 January 395
MotherGalla Valentiniana1,2,3 b. circa 363, d. 394
     Galla Placidia the elder, augusta was born in 388 at the East.1,4 She was the daughter of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator and Galla Valentiniana.1,2,3 Galla Placidia the elder, augusta was granted her own household, which made her financially independent.5 She was summoned to Milan, and there she witnessed the death of her father in 395.5 She witnessed the death of Flavius Theodosius Augustus, imperator on 17 January 395 at Mediolanum [Milan], Italy.3,6 Galla Placidia the elder, augusta was named Most Noble Girl (Nobilissima Puella) circa 400. She seems to have been raised in the care of her cousin Serena, the wife of the western general Stilicho, and presumably received a classical education, and also knew how to weave and embroider.5 She was carried off with the Visigoths who sacked Rome to Gaul.5 She married Athaulf, King of the Visigoths, son of Modares Balthi, in 414 at Narbonne, Gaul; His 2nd. Her 1st.4,1,2,7 Galla Placidia the elder, augusta was finally restored to the Romans following the death of her Visigoth husband Athaulf in 416.5 She married Constantius III, imperator in 417 at Rome, Italy; Her 2nd.4,2,3,8 Galla Placidia the elder, augusta and Constantius III, imperator became involved -- on the losing side -- in the controversy over the election of a new bishop of Rome in 419. Galla Placidia the elder, augusta was made Augusta (Empress) in 421.5 She died on 27 November 450 at Rome, Italy, at age 62 years.5

Family 1

Athaulf, King of the Visigoths b. circa 372, d. after 415
Child

Family 2

Constantius III, imperator d. 2 September 421
Children

Citations

  1. [S242] Imperium, online http://www.ghgcorp.com/shetler/oldimp/
  2. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 78, genealogy table 3..
  3. [S451] Leslie Mahler, later roman empire in "later roman empire," listserve message 05/02/1998.
  4. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm
  5. [S233] DIR, online http://www.roman-emperors.org/impindex.htm, Galla Placidia.
  6. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Theodosius I.
  7. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 132, genealogy table 4..
  8. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Constantius III (Roman emp.) .

Theodoric I, rex Gotthorum

b. circa 399, d. 451
     Theodoric I, rex Gotthorum was of the Balthi, a dynastic family of Arian Visigoths, similar to the Merovingian and Carolingian Family of the Franks, the Leth Family of the Lombards, and the Agilofing family of Bavaria. Also called Theoderid.1 He was born circa 399. He succeeded Wallia, acquiring the throne by marrying the daughter of Alaric I, in 418. He made his people foederati of Rome in 418.2 He married N. N. the Visigoth, daughter of Alarico I, rey Visigodo and N. N. (?), in 418.3 King of the Visigoths at Gaul and Spain between 418 and 451.4,1 Theodoric I, rex Gotthorum died in 451. He was killed in the battle of the Catalaunian Plains, fighting Attila the Hun on the side of the Roman Aetius.5 He was a witness where Flavius Maccilius Eparchius Avitus, imperator able, by taking advantage of his great influence with the Visigoths who were settled at Toulouse, to persuade their king, Theodoric I, to join the Roman general Aetius in repelling the invasion of Gaul by the Huns under Attila in 451.6 Romans, under Aëtius, with the Visigoths, under Theodoric I, and the Franks, under Merovech, defeat the invading Huns, under Attila. Theodoric killed. On 20 June 451 at the Battle of the Catalaunian Plains, Châlons-sur-Marne, Gaul.7,8

Family

N. N. the Visigoth b. circa 400
Children

Citations

  1. [S75] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1979, pg. 203.
  2. [S963] Goldberg, online http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/journals/EH/EH37/…
  3. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 132, genealogy table 4..
  4. [S713] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1997, pg. 23, figure 1.
  5. [S227] Bishop of Tours Gregory, GT, bk II, ch. 7.
  6. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Avitus (Roman emp.) .
  7. [S176] Christian Settipani & Patrick van Kerrebrouck, Capetiens 481-987, pg. 49.
  8. [S429] John Sweetman, Dictionary of European Battles, pg. 47.
  9. [S172] Various Encyclopaedea Britannica.

Tirots I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids1

b. circa 400, d. after 451
Tirots I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 400\nd. a 451|p288.htm#i6388|Smbat III, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 370\nd. a 421|p288.htm#i6390||||Isaac I., Presiding Prince of the Bagratids|b. c 340\nd. a 387|p287.htm#i6392||||||||||
FatherSmbat III, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids1 b. circa 370, d. after 421
     Also called Prince Tirots I of the Bagratids. Sources: 1. Toumanoff, C. 'The Orontids of Armenia' in 'Studies in Christian Caucasian History' (1963) pp.337-342. ; 2. Toumanoff, C. 'The Early Bagratids' in La Museon, (1949), pp.21-54. Tirots I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids was born circa 400. The placement of Tirots I as son of Smbat III seems to fit historically and chronologically but has not been proven. He was the son of Smbat III, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids.1 Presiding Prince of the Bagratids circa 451. Tirots I, Presiding Prince of the Bagratids died after 451.

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1641] Cyril Toumanoff, Toumanoff's Studies, pg. 339, The Bagratid Stemma.

Vardan II Karmir Mamikonean, Sparapet of Armenia1

b. circa 410, d. 2 June 451
Vardan II Karmir Mamikonean, Sparapet of Armenia|b. c 410\nd. 2 Jun 451|p288.htm#i5888|Hamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia|b. c 360?\nd. c 416|p288.htm#i5963|Sahakanoyš Souren-Pahlav|b. c 385|p51.htm#i5964|Manuel Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia|b. c 328?\nd. 385|p287.htm#i25560||||Sahak, Katholikos of Armenia|b. 352\nd. 439|p288.htm#i5965||||
FatherHamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia2,3 b. circa 360?, d. circa 416
MotherSahakanoyš Souren-Pahlav b. circa 385
      Sources: 1. Toumanoff, C. 'In the Formative Centuries' in 'Studies in Christian Caucasian History' (1963) pp.207-208, note 236. ; 2. Toumanoff, C. 'In the Formative Centuries' in 'Studies in Christian Caucasian History' (1963) pp.209.4 Now when Vardan, lord of the Mamikoneans and the sparapet of Armenia, saw all of this wickedness he summoned his entire family, brothers, azats, servants and the entire multitude of his own court, and began speaking to them as follows: "I did not apostasize my Creator and lord Jesus Christ either voluntarily or out of fear.God forbid. Nor did I repudiate the doctrine and faith of the holy Gospel which my honest grandfather, lord Sahak, taught and inculcated in me. Rather I erred for a moment, making pretexts until the present hour, for the salvation of all of you, so that being with you I might repent and live. For I have learned and remember the preaching of the holy prophets, that: 'I do not desire the death of the sinner, but his conversion and life' [Ecclesiastes 18, 23]; or as the Holy Spirit says in another passage: 'In returning and rest you shall be saved' [Isaiah 30, 15]. Now in exchange for having abandoned Him temporarily, for your sake, I would abandon totally all of these worldly goods. Should any of you find it possible to share my intention, despising all the futile possessions of the land, then together with you for the name of Christ, I will choose to go into exile".5 Vardan II Karmir Mamikonean, Sparapet of Armenia was grandson of Manuel Mamikonean, the hero of Armenia after the Persian devastation of 363.6 He was grandson of lord Sahak (chief bishop Isaac).5,6,7 Also called St. Vardan "the Apostate" of Armenia. Also called Vard.2 He was born circa 410. He was the son of Hamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia and Sahakanoyš Souren-Pahlav.2,3 Vardan II Karmir Mamikonean, Sparapet of Armenia witnessed the will of Sahak, Katholikos of Armenia in 439; St Sahak, the last descendant of St. Gregory, willed to the Mamikoneans the other half of Taron centered in the city of Ashtishat as well as the principalities of Bagravande and Acilisene --making them "the greatest territorial princes of the Monarchy, ruling a State that nearly sundered it into two halves."2 Vardan II Karmir Mamikonean, Sparapet of Armenia was made Marzpan by the Iranian King and had the country of Armenia "placed in his hands".8 He was made "stratelat" by the Emperor Theodosius II.9 "Now others have written about [all of the following events], as that very same History points out: regarding the days of wicked [king] Yazkert's reign, how he wanted to destroy the divine orders (the clergy); how the brave naxarars of Armenia and the zealot of God, the nahapet Vardan called "Karmir" ("the Red") of the Mamikonean House with a brigade of armed comrades, their friends and troops organized and armed for war. [They] took in hand the shield of Faith and zeal for the divine Word clothed them like armor of security and truly before their very eyes you might say they saw their halos descend to them. Thus did they scorn death, considering it better to die on the Divine Path. [The History alluded to above also tells] how the Iranian troops came against them with severe violence and how, when they clashed [the Vardaneank'] received martyrdom and how the blessed witnesses of Christ who had been captured by the pagans underwent martyrdom at Apr Shahr, close to the city of Niwshapuh, at a place called T'eark'uni."1 He led a revolt against the Persians, and the misguided attempt of the Persian Sasanian king Yazdegerd II to impose the Zoroastrian religion upon his Armenian subjects, between 450 and 451.10 High Constable of Armenia before 451.2,11 Persia defeats the Armenians, but the Armenians open the way for eventual independence. Vardan Mamikonean was Commander-in-Chief of the Armenians. On 2 June 451 at the Battle of Avarair.12 He died on 2 June 451 at the Battle of Avarair. He was killed in battle. Though losing the battle he helped throw off the yoke of Iranian oppression.12 He was a witness where Yazdgard II, Shah of Iran attempted to impose the Zoroastrian religion upon his Armenian subjects, which led to war on 2 June 451 at the Battle of Avarair.13,2

Family

Children

Citations

  1. [S589] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA: Sebeos' (7th C), Prologue.
  2. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  3. [S1035] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : P'arpec'i's (5th C), pg. 57.
  4. [S197] Toby Dills, "Descendant of Antiquity," gedcom to Robert Stewart, 5 Feb 1999.
  5. [S1035] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : P'arpec'i's (5th C), Book 2, Ch. 30.
  6. [S1272] Robert H. Hewsen, Armenia atlas, pg. 95.
  7. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 4.
  8. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 29.
  9. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 27.
  10. [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Armenia: The marzpans.
  11. [S1266] Agathangelos, Agathangelos, pg. xc.
  12. [S590] Hye Etch, online http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/armenians/history_p1.html, The Vartanank War, The interregnum (428-861) .
  13. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 408-52.
  14. [S1163] John FR Wright, Tbilisi, pg. 29.

St. Hmayeak Mamikonean1,2

b. circa 410, d. 2 June 451
St. Hmayeak Mamikonean|b. c 410\nd. 2 Jun 451|p288.htm#i5961|Hamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia|b. c 360?\nd. c 416|p288.htm#i5963|Sahakanoyš Souren-Pahlav|b. c 385|p51.htm#i5964|Manuel Mamikonean, sparapet of Armenia|b. c 328?\nd. 385|p287.htm#i25560||||Sahak, Katholikos of Armenia|b. 352\nd. 439|p288.htm#i5965||||
FatherHamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia3 b. circa 360?, d. circa 416
MotherSahakanoyš Souren-Pahlav b. circa 385
     St. Hmayeak Mamikonean was born circa 410. He was the son of Hamazasp I Mamikonean of Taraun, Sparapet of Armenia and Sahakanoyš Souren-Pahlav.3 St. Hmayeak Mamikonean witnessed the will of Sahak, Katholikos of Armenia in 439; St Sahak, the last descendant of St. Gregory, willed to the Mamikoneans the other half of Taron centered in the city of Ashtishat as well as the principalities of Bagravande and Acilisene --making them "the greatest territorial princes of the Monarchy, ruling a State that nearly sundered it into two halves."4 Ambassador of Armenia to the Eastern Empire in 449.2 St. Hmayeak Mamikonean married Dzuik Arcruni, daughter of Vram Arcruni, before 450.2 St. Hmayeak Mamikonean died on 2 June 451 at the Battle of Avarair. A General, he died in battle.

Family

Dzuik Arcruni b. circa 425
Children

Citations

  1. [S197] Toby Dills, "Descendant of Antiquity," gedcom to Robert Stewart, 5 Feb 1999.
  2. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 322-52.
  3. [S1035] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : P'arpec'i's (5th C), pg. 57.
  4. [S323] Robert Bedrosian, "in Armenia".
  5. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 33.
  6. [S664] Pas on Xerxes, online ..
  7. [S1035] Robert Bedrosian (translator), HoA : P'arpec'i's (5th C), Part 3, Ch. 62.
  8. [S1167] Kirakos Ganjakets'i, HoA: Kirakos' (13th C), (Robert Bedrosian, translator): pg. 36, brother of Vahan who was son of Hmayeak.

Thorismund, rex Gotthorum

b. before 419, d. 453
Thorismund, rex Gotthorum|b. b 419\nd. 453|p288.htm#i10609|Theodoric I, rex Gotthorum|b. c 399\nd. 451|p288.htm#i10149|N. N. the Visigoth|b. c 400|p78.htm#i10151|||||||Alarico I., rey Visigodo|b. c 370\nd. 410|p287.htm#i10152|N. N. (?)|b. c 375|p82.htm#i10608|
FatherTheodoric I, rex Gotthorum1,2 b. circa 399, d. 451
MotherN. N. the Visigoth1 b. circa 400
     Thorismund, rex Gotthorum was born before 419. He was the son of Theodoric I, rex Gotthorum and N. N. the Visigoth.1,2 Thorismund, rex Gotthorum was a witness where Tonantius I Ferreolus, praefectus praetorio Galliarum ended the siege of Arles by diplomacy with the Visigothic king Thorismodus between 451 and 453.3 King of the Visigoths at Aquitaine between 451 and 453.2 Thorismund, rex Gotthorum besieged the city of Arles, but stopped after the diplomatic efforts of Tonantius Ferreolus between 451 and 453.3 He died in 453. D.s.p. He was murdered by his brother Theoderic and Frideric.4,5

Citations

  1. [S269] C. W. Previté-Orton sCMH I, pg. 132, genealogy table 4..
  2. [S713] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1997, pg. 23, figure 1.
  3. [S965] Don Stone (e-mail address), Re: Gallo-Roman ancestors of Charlemagne in "Re: Gallo-Roman ancestors," newsgroup message 1998/03/11
    .
  4. [S75] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1979, pg. 202, d.s.p..
  5. [S75] Herwig Wolfram, Wolfram, 1979, pg. 203.