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Louis Karstedt was born (date unknown). Parents: August Karstedt and Marie Danhausen.


Mable Elizabeth Karstedt was born on 7 December 1896 in Indiana, United States. Parents: Rev. William M. Karstedt and Elizabeth Stade.

Spouse: Clarence Liechty. Children were: Living, Living, Jordan Liechty, Living, Living, Living.


Mamie Marie Karstedt was born on 9 March 1886 in Canada. She died on 27 January 1950 at the age of 63. She was buried after 27 January 1950 in Round Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, United States. She is buried between her father and sister, Charlotte. Parents: Rev. William M. Karstedt and Elizabeth Stade.

Spouse: Charles Miller. Mamie Marie Karstedt and Charles Miller were married . Children were: Elizabeth Kirstine Miller, Lorena Mamie Miller.


Living (private). Parents: Carl Samuel Karstedt and Hazel Maxfield.


Living (private). Parents: Carl Samuel Karstedt and Hazel Maxfield.


Living (private). Parents: Frederick William Karstedt and Katherine Britzius.


Living (private). Parents: Kephart Castle Karstedt and Lyndal Hile.

Spouse: Mary .


Robert Karstedt was born on 18 November 1923. He died on 5 October 1943 at the age of 19. He was killed in an accident, which occurred while he was on his way to be inducted into the U. S. Army during World War II. Parents: Robert John Karstedt and Isabelle Shoemaker.


Robert John Karstedt was born on 27 January 1902. Parents: Rev. William M. Karstedt and Elizabeth Stade.

Spouse: Isabelle Shoemaker. Children were: Robert Karstedt.


Ruth Ester Karstedt was born on 14 January 1899 in Indiana, United States. Parents: Rev. William M. Karstedt and Elizabeth Stade.

Spouse: Rev. Dale D. Mumaw. Ruth Ester Karstedt and Rev. Dale D. Mumaw were married . Children were: Living, Living.


Sophia Karstedt was born (date unknown). Parents: August Karstedt and Marie Danhausen.


Rev. William M. Karstedt was born on 15 December 1861 in Canada. About 1883 he was a Stone Mason in Canada. He had not been privileged to get the education he wanted in his youth, as it was necessary for him to go to work early in life to help with the expense of rearing the family of eight children. In 1889 he was a Church Pastor in Fonthill, Welland County, Ontario, Canada. His daughter, Charlotte, writes, "Feeling the call to the Christian ministry, he prepared himself for service in the Church of the United Brethern in Christ. It was mid-winter that his conversion occurred, and he insisted on being baptized at once. It was so cold that they had to break the ice in the stream for his baptism. Although their clothes were frozen to them when they returned home, neither he nor the Pastor took cold from the experience."
His first pastorate was in 1889, in the town of Fonthill, Ontario, about ten miles from Niagara Falls. After that, he served in Vienna and then Port Elgin. One night in 1893, the house the family was living in caught fire from an adjoining building, and burned to the ground. Most of their clothes and furniture were lost. The horse and dog were saved, but the mother cat lost her life trying to save her kittens.
Charlotte writes, "Another house was found for us by daylight, and the good townsfolk and members of the church saw to it that we were made comfortable in it. Mother always said that Dad's hair, which had been coal black, began to turn gray from that night when he came so near to losing his life by going back into the burning house to look for me, when he learned that I was not with the rest of the family in a nearby home. He had just emerged from the front door when the entire roof caved in. It was then that he learned that I had been taken to another home where I was sitting on a bed with a little friend of mine, watching the fire from the window." Before 1896 William was a Church Pastor in Sheffield, Ontario, Canada. After leaving Port William, William served the church in Sheffield, Ontario. During that time, the congregation built a beautiful stone church to replace the barn-like building which had been their meeting place. The old building was moved to the property, which was purchased for the parsonage and used as a barn there. He immigrated in 1896 to Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, United States. The 1920 Federal Census shows his year of immigration to the United States as 1896, along with his wife and first six children. From 1896 to 1898 he was a Church Pastor in Noblesville, Hamilton County, Indiana, United States. In 1896 William transferred from the Canadian Conference to the White River Conference in Indiana. The family moved to Noblesville, where they lived for two years. About this, Charlotte writes, "This was a memorable event in the lives of all of us. After seeing to the packing of the household goods, Dad's books in boxes, and the dishes and countless jars of canned fruit in barrels, mother took five of the six children and went to spend a couple of weeks on Grandpa Stade's farm, while Dad and Fred went ahead to our new home. They traveled in the freight car with the furniture, etc. in order to care for the horse and dog. It was a long and wearisome trip for them being shented from the railroad system to another and lying at for what must have seemed wendless hours on a siding. Once, they were locked in the car by some hobos and it was some time before they succeeded in making the fact known to the train crew, who released them. On finally getting to Noblesville, Dad, with the wonderful help of church members, got the household goods all in place and ready, even for a sumptuous meal, for the homecoming of the family."
"Meanwhile, our visit over, we started on our train trip. Coming through the tunnel under the Detroit River, the customs inspector came through the train examining folks' luggage. Mother unfastened and opened the various valises, fully expecting the contents to ge gone through and disarranged, perhaps even dumped. Coming to our seat, the inspector glanced at the open luggage, then around at all of us children and asked, 'are all of these yours?' When she replied that they were, he said it was plain she hadn't anything more than she needed and walked on. Then there was the long wait--over in the depot in Detroit--from 7:00 AM to 3:00 PM. It was fun to run and slide on the nice slick marble floors, but when Emma, who was four years old, dropped her doll and broke its head--that was a tragedy! Then, too, two year old Kephart cried incessantly that he wanted to "go home." Finally boarding the train, our next stop was to be Peru, Indiana, where we hoped to make connections with another line and get to our destination that evening. However, we learned on arrival that we couldn't get a train for Noblesville until 7:00 AM the next morning. Mother left us all there in the train station under the care of twelve year old Carrie while she went out to find a place to spend the night."
"Fortunately, she was able to obtain a room in a hotel just across the street. Here she had her first experience with gas lights. The gas jet was lighted, but she had no idea how to put the light out once we were all settled in for the night, so she left the light burn all night. She had us all up, dressed, and ready to board the train at 7:00 AM on that Wednesday morning. Dad and the church folks had expected us to arrive on Tuesday evening, and they had one great banquet table set in the parsonage, which was all furnished and ready to live in. When we did finally get there on Wednesday forenoon, the food was all waiting, but of course had to be wormed up, and as anybody knows, warmed over food, however good it may be, is never quite as good as it was originally. The same can be said of a delayed reception. One item which might well be mentioned here is the fact that the year 1896 was an election year in the U. S. A., and one of the candidates was on the rear platform of our train when it stopped at Noblesville, and there were throngs there to greet and hear him. Not all the folks on the station platform were there to welcome the family of the new United Brethern preacher! They were there to greet and hear William Jennings Bryan."
"I might interpose here that we eventually became accustomed to the use of natural gas. There was a gas jet on the wall in each room, and the living room fireplace heated the room with a gas burner. Previously, our only lamps were those burning coal oil."
William's Noblesville charge included two country churches, Union and Bethlehem. William lived in Noblesville, Hamilton County, Indiana, United States from 1896 to 1898. From 1898 to 1901 he was a Church Pastor in Kokomo, Howard County, Indiana, United States. In the fall of 1898, the family moved to Kokomo, where the church building was a barn-like structure like the one in Sheffield. In rainy weather, the church was surrounded by water, so a raised boardwalk led to the church. In time, a beautiful new church was erected on the northeast corner of Washington and Monroe Streets. It was known for its beautiful stained glass windows. The annual meeting of the White River Conference was held there in 1901. It was during one of the afternoon sessions that word came of the assassination of President William McKinley. After 1901 he was a Pastor of First Church in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, United States. At the 1901 Conference meeting, William was assigned to the First Church in Indianapolis on, on the corner of 21st Street and Central Avenue. It consisted of just the Sunday School unit. In 1902, William L. Elder, a real estate broker, made a proposition to William Karstedt. He would donate ten acres of land and put up a $40,000.00 building to be used for a United Brethern College, provided the church people would buy the lots he would plot out in a subdivision in the vicinity, which he proposed to call University Heights. That fall, the two men submitted the proposition to the Indiana Conference Session, the White River Conference, and the Saint Joseph Conference. So began the plans for establishing Indiana Central College, which was opened in the fall of 1905. It was during that same year that the White River Conference sent Rev. S. B. Ervin to University Heights to organize the local United Brethern Church. Of the twenty-three charter members, six were from the Karstedt family, William, Elizabeth, Mamie, Fred, Emma, and Charlotte. William lived in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, United States after 1901. About 1906 he was a Real Estate Agent in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, United States. William resigned his position as Pastor of First Church in order to devote his time to the business of selling home lots to the United Brethren folks throughout the state. He selected two choice lots on Hanna Avenue midway between the campus and Shelby Street, where he built the first home he owned since entering the ministry. For one year, he served as the pastor of the Ebeneezer Church in the country between University Heights and Shelbyville. Transportation was by horse and buggy.
Having found that he had a real liking for the real estate business, he decided to give up the ministry and go into business for himself in order to pay for the home in which to raise his family. He wanted his children to have the best educational advantages, and to enjoy his declining years. He acquired the corner lot at Hanna and Shelby, and put up a business building. The ground floor first housed a grocery and notion store, and the upstairs was a hall for students. It was here in this hall, in 1913, that University Heights Christian Church was organized with twenty six members. The 1920 Federal Census shows William at 59 years of age in University Heights as a grocer who owns his own business. He died on 3 February 1937 at the age of 75 in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, United States. William was buried about 6 February 1937 in Round Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, United States. He is buried here beside his wife. He received a Divinity (Doctor of Divinity) and Philosophy (PhD) degree. William persisted in educating himself by reading and correspondence courses, acquiring a sizable library over the years. The schools that awarded the degrees are not known. Parents: August Karstedt and Marie Danhausen.

Spouse: Elizabeth Stade. Elizabeth Stade and Rev. William M. Karstedt were married on 31 January 1883 in Elmwood, Frontenac County, Ontario, Canada. Children were: Caroline Sophia Karstedt, Henry Karstedt, Mamie Marie Karstedt, Anna Charlotte Karstedt, Frederick William Karstedt, Emma Janet Karstedt, Kephart Castle Karstedt, Mable Elizabeth Karstedt, Ruth Ester Karstedt, Goldie May Karstedt, Robert John Karstedt, Carl Samuel Karstedt.


Donna Sue Kass was born (date unknown). Parents: Hyman Kass and Alice .

Spouse: Living.


Hyman Kass was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Alice . Alice and Hyman Kass were married . Children were: Donna Sue Kass.


Dorothy M. Kastner was born on 27 October 1926. She died on 17 June 1980 at the age of 53.

Spouse: Living. Children were: Living, Living, Living.


Mary Kaston was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Edward B. Smith. Mary Kaston and Edward B. Smith were married .


Kathie was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Timothy James Russell. Kathie and Timothy James Russell were married .


Living (private).

Spouse: Patricia Lord. Children were: Living, Living.


Living (private). Parents: Living and Patricia Lord.


Living (private). Parents: Living and Patricia Lord.


Living (private). Parents: Maurice Katz and Living.


Living (private). Parents: Maurice Katz and Living.


Maurice Katz was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Living. Children were: Living, Living.


Alma Jean Kaucher was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Living. Children were: Living, Living.


Anna Kauffman was born (date unknown). Parents: David Kauffman and Mary Ann Markley.


Anna Eva Christina Kauffman was born (date unknown). Parents: Johann Peter Kauffman and Anna Barbara Merkle.


David Kauffman lived in Mount Vernon, Knox County, Ohio, United States about 1922.

Spouse: Mary Ann Markley. Mary Ann Markley and David Kauffman were married in 1895. Children were: William Kauffman, Anna Kauffman, Mary Kauffman, Grace Kauffman.


Grace Kauffman was born (date unknown). Parents: David Kauffman and Mary Ann Markley.


Johann Peter Kauffman was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Anna Barbara Merkle. Anna Barbara Merkle and Johann Peter Kauffman were married on 6 September 1707 in Bonfeld, Heilbronn, Baden-W├╝rttemberg, Germany. Children were: Anna Eva Christina Kauffman.


Mary Kauffman was born (date unknown). Parents: David Kauffman and Mary Ann Markley.


William Kauffman was buried at Crown Hill Cemetery in Orrville, Wayne County, Ohio, United States. He died about 18 years of age. Parents: David Kauffman and Mary Ann Markley.


Ervin Kaufman was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Living. Children were: Living, Living.


Kati Kaufman was born in 1856. She died in 1918 at the age of 62. She was buried about 1918 at Concord Cemetery in Wabash County, Indiana, United States.

Spouse: Elijah Tyner. Kati Kaufman and Elijah Tyner were married on 25 June 1882 in Wabash County, Indiana, United States. Children were: Lydia Tyner, Lawrence Tyner, Harvey Tyner, Cora Tyner, Jesse Tyner, Russell Tyner.


Living (private). Parents: Ervin Kaufman and Living.

Spouse: Karen Hirschfeld.


Living (private). Parents: Ervin Kaufman and Living.

Spouse: Karen Bobbett.


Bernhard Kauk was born on 2 August 1842.

Spouse: Margaret Barreth. Margaret Barreth and Bernhard Kauk were married on 5 February 1864 in Vinogradnoje, Rohrbach, Odessa, Ukraine.


Barbara Kausch was born on 14 April 1714.

Spouse: Jacob Merkle. Barbara Kausch and Jacob Merkle were married on 29 July 1739 in Perkiomen, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States. Children were: Eleanor Markley, Elizabeth Markley, Mary Magdalena Markley, Anna Barbara Markley, Hannah Markley.


Bernice Kautz was born (date unknown). Parents: John Kautz.

Spouse: Kent Blacklidge. Bernice Kautz and Kent Blacklidge were married on 6 January 1909 in Howard County, Indiana, United States.


John Kautz was born (date unknown).

Children were: Bernice Kautz.


Rebecca Kautz was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Isaac Leedy. Children were: Amanda Leedy.


Abraham Kavanagh was born (date unknown).

Children were: Mary Kavanagh.


Abram Kavanagh was born (date unknown). Parents: Simon Kavanagh.

Spouse: Eunice Hurlburt. Eunice Hurlburt and Abram Kavanagh were married .


Mary Kavanagh was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Bowman Corning. Mary Kavanagh and Bowman Corning were married .


Mary Kavanagh was born (date unknown). Parents: Abraham Kavanagh.

Spouse: Samuel Flint Killam. Mary Kavanagh and Samuel Flint Killam were married on 6 July 1882.


Simon Kavanagh was born (date unknown).

Children were: Abram Kavanagh, William Kavanagh.


William Kavanagh was born (date unknown). Parents: Simon Kavanagh.

Spouse: Sarah Ann Hurlburt. Sarah Ann Hurlburt and William Kavanagh were married .


Abram Kavanah was born (date unknown).

Children were: Alonzo Kavanah.


Alonzo Kavanah was born (date unknown). Parents: Abram Kavanah.

Spouse: Abigail Jane Crosby. Abigail Jane Crosby and Alonzo Kavanah were married on 28 August 1864.


Simon Kavanah was born (date unknown).

Spouse: Sarah Hurlburt. Sarah Hurlburt and Simon Kavanah were married .


Nell Kay was born in 1911. She died in 2005 at the age of 94.

Spouse: John Edgar Vance. Nell Kay and John Edgar Vance were married . Children were: David Julian Vance, Ed Vance, Vance.