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Lembach, Alsace

The oldest part of this ancient church in Lembach is the belfry which dates from the 13th century.  The church was originally Catholic but in 1543 the Lords of Fleckenstein introduced the Reformed religion.  It became Lutheran in 1603.  November 10, 1716, the "simultanéun" was introduced to the church in Lembach.  The church was then used by both Catholics and Protestants.  In 1909 the Catholics built their own church.  Since then the ancient church in Lembach has been used only for the Protestants.

For a good number of years, Catholics and Protestants gather at least once a year to pray together.  Sometimes it is in the Catholic church, sometimes in the Protestant church.  They pray that their churches will remain places of Peace, Forgiveness, Reconciliation and Love and hope for these things for all that enter there.
 

Lembach Church Photo & Text for Webpage Courtesy of Marion C. Bale
 
 
  



This pulpit in the ancient church in Lembach was produced from a block of sandstone associated with the Vosges, the mountains in which the village of Lembach is nestled in northern Alsace, France.  The carvings in the stone represent the tree of knowledge.
 

Lembach Pulpit Photo & Text for Webpage Courtesy of Marion C. Bale

 

 

 

 

 

 
 



These rainbows were viewed in the town of Niedersteinbach which is right next to Lembach.  It was seen by Marion Bale as she approached, for the first time, the town of her ancestors, Lembach.  It seemed to promise a peek at the lives of our ancestors, for which so many of us yearn.  It is always to be found just over the next hill.

Niedersteinbach Photo & Text Courtesy of Marion C. Bale


 
 



This is the town of Lembach as viewed from a nearby mountainside.  The town is surrounded by the natural beauty of the Vosges Mountains.  The church steeple on the left is the ancient Church of Lembach.  The steeple on the right is the new Catholic Church built in 1909.
 

Town of Lembach Photo & Text Courtesy of Marion C. Bale
 
 
 
 



Copyright© 1998 by Joan M Young

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