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In May, 2000, and in May, 2002, John and Eleanor Blankenbaker traveled to Germany and Austria to visit villages from which our Germanna ancestors immigrated.  This page contains photos taken in Fellinghausen, Germany.
(Each photo is labeled for the month & year it was taken.)
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(Photos of German and Austrian Villages, Copyright © 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 John BLANKENBAKER.)
(Photos of German and Austrian Villages Web Pages, Copyright © 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 George W. DURMAN.)


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Photos of a Hauberg*
at Fellinghausen, Germany


Hauberg
Bark and Wood
Fellinghausen Hauberg
(May, 2000)

At Fellinghausen, a few miles north of Siegen, there is an effort to reestablish a Hauberg, used for centuries to try to obtain the necessary oak bark for the tanneries. Two of the other byproducts of a Hauberg are wood for charcoal and wood for heating and cooking. The wood for the charcoal are the larger pieces. The bundles of twigs are the cooking and heating fuel. (One sees why they used the layered construction of their houses to keep warm.) Only the largest pieces were stripped of their bark. The labor was too much for the return on the smaller pieces. The entire process, in all aspects, was very labor intensive.

The larger city in the background is Kreutzal.


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Hauberg
Wood for Charcoal
Fellinghausen Hauberg
(May, 2000)

More wood destined to become charcoal. The smaller pieces still have their bark because it was not easy to remove. It takes fifty pounds of wood to smelt one pound of iron!


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Hauberg
Bark for Tanning
Fellinghausen Hauberg
(May, 2000)

Here is some bark down on the ground where we can see it close up. It is heavy bark even though the trees are young. The strips are in big pieces and usually run for the length of the cut.

According to my Langenscheidt reference work, the primary purpose of a Hauberg is the production of oak bark for the tanneries. It is no longer necessary, as chemicals have replaced the bark. The Fellinghausen project is of historical interest as it brings the past into the present.

Several of our Germanna people ran tanneries in Virginia and faced the problem of obtaining oak bark.


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Hauberg
Bark
Fellinghausen Hauberg
(May, 2000)

After the bark is removed from the tree or the upper branches, it is bundled and tied and usually left in an upright position. If it rained, it would dry out quickly.


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Hauberg
Bark
Fellinghausen Hauberg
(May, 2000)

The bark is stripped from the tree while it is still standing and left to dry. In this position, even it rains, the bark dries out quickly. Stripping goes up about twelve feet; a ladder is necessary. These photos were taken in the month of May, so the harvesting of wood and bark is a spring-time effort. After the tree has been felled, some more wood and bark can be salvaged from the upper branches.


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Go to John's Germanna Notes

Starting Here.



*For other websites to read about Haubergs, click one of the below:

  1. HAUBERG-Production of Charcoal (Translated by Google to English);
  2. HAUBERG-Production of Charcoal (In German);
  3. Der Siegerländer Hauberg (In German)  (Click on "Haubergsarbeiten im Jahreslauf", "Der historische Hauberg", and "Einführung" on the right.)

NOTE !!!!!

(Photos of German and Austrian Villages, Copyright © 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 John BLANKENBAKER.)
(Photos of German and Austrian Villages Web Pages, Copyright © 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 George W. DURMAN.)
(While we allow downloading of these pictures for your enjoyment, and for personal genealogical uses, they are copyrighted material and commercial use of them is FORBIDDEN.)

(If you find errors on this page, please email me.)

Go To Top.

Aufkirchen   (2002)

Bergnerzell   (2002)

Beyerberg   (2002)

Falkenstein   (2002)

Fellinghausen   (2000)

Frankenhofen   (2002)

Freudenberg   (2000)

Gemmingen   (2000)

Gresten (Austria)   (2000 & 2002)

Guttenberg Castle   (2000)

Haundorf   (2002)

Heidelberg   (2000)

Hüffenhardt   (2000)

Illenschwang   (2000)

Illenschwang   (2002)

Kettenbach   (2000)

Klings   (2002)

Kühnhardt   (2002)

Lambsheim   (2002)

Marienthal   (2002)

Mosbach   (2002)

Neuenbürg   (2000)

Oberfischbach (2000)

Obermichelbach (2002)

Ötisheim   (2000)

Rödgen   (2000)

Schwaigern   (2000)

Seiderzell   (2002)

Siegen   (2000)

Sulzfeld/Ravensburg   (2000)

Stetten   (2002)

Trupbach   (2000)

Waldbach   (2002)

Zaberfeld   (2002)


Gaar Family Villages   (2002) Utz Family Villages   (2002) Map of 2nd Colony
Villages in Germany (2000)

[Germany and Austria Photo Gallery]