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BUD  HAUGH'S  BADGES

WORLD WAR  II

All  pictures  are  scans  of  Bud's actual  Badges, except where noted.

combinf.jpg (5638 bytes)
Combat  Infantryman Badge

Qualifying for the Combat Infantryman Badge separated ordinary men, in any Infantry Regiment, from those
fully qualified for combat infantry duty. More emphasis was added by the additional ten dollars per month pay,
that went along with the badge. A nice increase considering a Private's pay was fifty dollars a month in 1944.

                                                            marksm.jpg (4995 bytes)      U. S.  Army   Marksman Badge
               

The Marksman Badge was awarded when a soldier qualified, with a weapon, as a Marksman. To be fully  represented, the two loops, at the bottom, would have the name of the weapon with which the soldier had qualified. Like many other awards , in World War II, the military never seemed to get around to issuing, the weapons portion is not present on Bud's metal.

Since he was a qualified Rifleman,  the following should have been attached to the bottom of his badge:  rifbge.jpg (2636 bytes) (file image)

 

 

                                                                                               duck.jpg (2376 bytes) The  Ruptured  Duck Lapel  Button

The Honorable Service Insignia, affectionately renamed the 'Ruptured Duck' by GI's, was possibly the World War II veterans
most cherished award. It meant they had received their discharge and very shortly would be home with their love ones.
Bud's "Ruptured Duck" was issued, by order, as a Lapel Button.

 

The Origin of "The Ruptured Duck" Patch / Lapel Button

duckph.jpg (2134 bytes)

(file image)

The original Ruptured Duck was a cloth insignia, depicting an eagle inside a wreath, the background was diamond shaped.
It was sewn on uniforms above the right breast pocket. Issued to World War II service personnel, about to leave the military, with an Honorable Discharge. It also allowed them to continue to wear their uniform for up to thirty days, after discharged, since there was a clothing shortage at the time. This showed the Military Police they were in transit and not AWOL(Absent Without Leave). The  boys thought the eagle looked more like a duck; and, because it meant they were going home, a popular saying at the time was, "They took off like a Ruptured Duck."
It didn't take long for the nickname to 'stick.' 

                                                        overs.jpg (5201 bytes) OVERSEAS  BADGE ~ WORLD WAR  II

Embroidered on Cloth, attached to metal  backing, containing a pin clasp.
Issued for overseas service during World War II.

 

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