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Chapter VIII

COLONIAL SCHOOL LAW.--SCHOOLS IN HOLLIS BEFORE THE REVOLUTION.--SCHOOL
DISTRICTS.--SCHOOL HOUSES.--THE GRAMMAR
SCHOOL.--TEACHERS OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL.--COLLEGE
GRADUATES, ETC., BEFORE 1800.--LETTER OF GOV. JOHN
WENTWORTH TO REV. MR. EMERSON.--1746 TO 1775.

I am indebted to my kind friend the late Rev. Dr. Bouton, for the following very sensible and graceful letter written to Mr. Emerson, in 1770, by Gov. John Wentworth, upon committing to the tutorship of Mr. Emerson, a young orphan nephew. The letter is alike creditable to the head and heart of Gov. Wentworth, and is pleasant and pertinent evidence that the good reputation of Mr. Emerson as an instructor of youth and friend of education was well understood beyond the limits of Hollis.

"WENTWORTH HOUSE, WOLFEBOROUGH, 28, July 1770.

"The Rev. Mr. Emerson at Hollis,

"Rev. Sir:--In consequence of a letter I have just received from Major Hobart, who writes me that you are ready to receive my nephew, Mark Wentworth, and to take charge of his Education, I herewith send him and Earnestly beg your greatest care of his health and instruction. He is a fine boy, of great Spirit, which naturally leads him to playful negligence. He has also acquired idle habits which will be easily reformed under a strict discipline, equally removed from cruelty and levity. He must know that you in all things are to be obeyed and never suffer any sort of disobedience to your orders. This is more peculiarly necessary for him, as he has to be brought up in the Navy, where implicit obedience is necessary for the service and for him. As to his diet, I prefer simple, plain, and plentiful; his tender age admits no other instruction than reading and writing. But no age is too tender to receive inculcations of practical neatness, honor and virtue. With these, enriched by a just habitual piety, he cannot fail of being a good man, the first
great object of Education. I hope hereafter to have opportunity to confer with you upon a future course of learning adapted to his genius and profession. In the mean time I beg leave to assure you, that I can never think any expense too great which he benefits by, and therefore gladly commit him to your care, not doubting but I shall rejoice in making you the most grateful acknowledgements for his improvement, which is the greatest and most earnest desire of Revd Sir,

Your most humble Servant,
JOHN WENTWORTH."

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