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Chapter XVII

1780 AND 1781.--VOTES AND RESOLUTIONS.--HOLLIS CONTINENTAL
QUOTA.--WAGES OF SOLDIERS.--MILITIA FOR WEST POINT AND
NORTHERN FRONTIER.--THEIR WAGES AND BOUNTIES.--TAXES
ASSESSED TO PAY THEM.--BEEF FOR THE ARMY IN 1780, 1781.--REDUCTION
OF NEW HAMPSHIRE TROOPS.--REDUCTION OF
THE HOLLIS QUOTA.--TWELVE CONTINENTAL SOLDIERS CALLED
FOR AND ENGAGED.--THEIR NAMES.--BEEF FOR THE ARMY IN
1781 AND HOW OBTAINED.--THE TOWN DIVIDED INTO CLASSES.
NEW CALL FOR TWELVE SOLDIERS.--RUM FOR THE ARMY.--REPRESENTATIVE
IN 1781.

BEEF FOR THE ARMY IN 1781.

The town also at the same meeting voted a tax of œ800, "new emission," to purchase the town's quota of beef for this year, and appointed Capt. Daniel Emerson, Ephraim Burge and Jeremiah Ames a committee to procure it. The report of the committee for hiring these twelve men is not found, and is probably lost. But the returns and army rolls at Concord show that they all enlisted for three years, and the returns of the Hollis Selectmen also show that the town paid each of them a bounty of œ60, or œ200. As the old Continental paper money had now become worthless these bounties were doubtless paid in specie or its equivalent, amounting in all to œ720, or $2,400. Instead of entailing this amount as a debt upon the town to be paid by posterity, as has been too often done in more modern times in like cases, our ancestors at their annual town meeting assessed a war tax of œ800 or $2,666.67, to meet it, to be collected and paid the same year. The names of these twelve men were

John Bonner,   Benjamin W. Grace,   Stephen Parker,
Elijah Clark,   Isaac Hobart,   Ezekiel Proctor,
Edward Deane,   Jacob Hobart,   James Rolfe,
John Godfrey,   John McHendley,   Asahel Twiss.

At a special town meeting held on the 14th of May of this year a resolution was adopted, that for the purpose of engaging soldiers in answer to future calls, the town should be divided into Classes, and the Selectmen and Mr. Ephraim Burge were chosen as a committee to "class the town." It appears that in pursuance of this resolution the town was divided into eight "classes."

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