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Chapter XVIII

1782-83.--THE LAST YEAR OF THE WAR.--NEW PLAN OF GOVERNMENT.--THE
NEW HAMPSHIRE RANGERS IN 1782.--LAST
SOLDIER OF THE HOLLIS QUOTA.--NUMBER AND NAMES OF
HOLLIS SOLDIERS.--SENTIMENTS IN RESPECT TO THE RETURN
OF THE TORIES.--LAST WAR TAX.--HOLLIS RECORDS AND
DOCUMENTS.--NAMES OF THE COMMITTEES OF SAFETY AND
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.--SOLDIERS LOST IN THE WAR.

NUMBER AND NAMES OF THE HOLLIS SOLDIERS.

It will be found on examination of the various lists and rolls, still existing, of the Hollis soldiers in the Revolution, that most of them enlisted more than once, and many of them on three or more different occasions; but counting each name but once, it will appear that Hollis, at different times during the war, as nearly as can now be ascertained, furnished, with but few exceptions, from its own citizens, more than three hundred soldiers who for a longer or shorter time were in the military service--a number but little less than one-fourth of its whole population.

Of these soldiers, there was one each of the names of Abbot, Adams, Ambrose, Atwell, Auld, Blanchard, Bonner, Boyd, Bruce, Burge, Campbell, Clark, Cowen, Danforth, Davis, Deane, Dickey, Elliot, Farmer, Farnsworth, Flagg, Foster, Gilson, Godfrey, Goss, Hazeltine, Henderson, Hill, Honey, Hopkins, Hosley, Kemp, Kendrick, Keyes, Kinney, Lesley, Lund, McConnor, McHendley, Messer, Minot, Patten, Philbrick, Platts, Poor, Powell, Pratt, Richardson, Rideout, Rogers, Runnells, Russ, Seaver, Shed, Stevens, Tenney, Thurston, Townsend, Twiss, Wallingford, Wood and Wyman.

Two each of the names of Ames, Brooks, Carter, Conant, Connick, Fisk, Grace, Jaquith, Johnson, Leeman, McDaniels, McIntosh, Mooar, Noyes, Pool, Rolfe, Sanderson, Smith, Spalding, Stearns, Wilkins, Willoughby and Woods.

Of the names of Bowers, Chamberlain, Dow, Eastman, Goodhue, How, Merrill, Parker, Patch, Phelps, Read and Stiles, three each.

Four each of the names of Brown, Conroy, Hale, Lawrence, Lovejoy, Pierce, Proctor, Shattuck and Worcester. Of the names of Ball, Colburn, Emerson, Nevins, Taylor, Wheat, Wheeler, Wright and Youngman, five each. Six of the name of Powers. Of the names of Bailey, Boynton, Cumings, Farley and French, seven each. Eight of the name of Hobart, nine of Jewett, ten of that of Hardy, and sixteen of the name of Blood.

Representative to the General Court. At a special town meeting held on the 28th of October of this year Richard Cutts Shannon was elected to represent the town in the General Court to be holden at Portsmouth in December 1782.

1783. Annual Town Meeting. Increase of the State Tax. At the annual March meeting of this year the town "Voted to enlarge the State tax œ200 to defray the necessary charges of the war, and chose Dea. Daniel Emerson, Noah Worcester, Esq., Capt. Daniel Kendrick and Ephraim Burge a committee to assist the Selectmen in settling with the Continental soldiers."

THE SENTIMENTS OF THE PEOPLE OF HOLLIS IN RESPECT TO THE TORIES.

As stated in the early part of this narrative, four of the citizens of Hollis were known as loyalists or tories, one of whom for a time was imprisoned for disloyalty. The remaining three left the country early in the war, and their names were included in the act of confiscation, passed in 1778, by the New Hampshire General Court, and they, with many others, were forbidden to return to the country under the penalty of death.

After the end of the war, the British Commissioners, in their negotiations for peace, were persistent in their efforts to provide for the return of the banished adherents of the crown, and the restoration of their confiscated estates; and this subject was widely and warmly discussed by the American press of the time, and in the primary assemblies of the people. A special town meeting in Hollis was called to consider this subject in the spring of 1783, "and to see if the Town would give their Representative any Instructions in respect to the Absentees from this State and their returning." As will appear from the following extract, which we copy from the record of that meeting, the sentiments of the people of the town upon this question found expression in language more vigorous and
emphatic than forgetful or forgiving, as follows:

"The minds of the people being tried in respect to the Returning of those Miserable Wretches under the name of Tories, Absentees or Conspirators,"

"Voted unanimously that they shall not be allowed to return or regain their forfeited Possessions."

"Voted that a Committee be chosen to give the Representative of this Town particular Instructions which may convey to him the unanimous sentiments of the people in respect to the Absentees above mentioned."

"Voted that Col. John Hale, Noah Worcester, Esq., Master Cumings, Dea. Boynton, Captains Dow, Goss and Kendrick be a Committee to give the Instructions above mentioned."

Representative to the General Court. On the 26th of December of this year Dea. Daniel Emerson was chosen Representative to the General Court to be held at Concord in June.

Annual Town Meeting March 1, 1784. At the annual town meeting of this year Dea. Daniel Emerson was again chosen Representative to the General Court to meet at Concord in June. At the same meeting the town "Voted to raise œ210 to defray the charges of four Continental soldiers, viz., Elijah Clark, John Godfrey, Jacob Hobart and Jabez Youngman, and also that the selectmen should assist the Continental soldiers in preferring a petition to the General Court for a redress of Grievances in respect to their wages."

HOLLIS COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.

Samuel Hobart, Colonel of 2nd N. H. regiment of minute men, and paymaster of N. H. troops in 1775.

Regimental Surgeons,   John Hale,   Peter Emerson.
Assistant Surgeon,   Jonathan Pool.  
Captains.   First Lieutenants.   Second Lieutenants.
Reuben Dow,   Caleb Farley,   William Brooks,
Daniel Emerson, Jun.,   Ebenezer Jewett,   John Cumings,
John Goss,   Robert Seaver,   Samuel Leeman, Jun.
Noah Worcester.   David Wallingford.  

HOLLIS SOLDIERS KILLED OR DIED IN THE ARMY OF DISEASE OR WOUNDS.

James Fisk,   died at Cambridge, May 29, 1775.
Jeremiah Shattuck,   " " May 29, 1775.
Nathan Blood,   killed at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775.
Jacob Boynton,   " " " " " "
Thomas Colburn,   " " " " " "
Isaac Hobart,   " " " " " "
Phineas Nevins,   " " " " " "
Peter Poor,   " " " " " "
Thomas Wheat,   " " " " " "
Ebenezer Youngman,   " " " " " "
Caleb Eastman,   " " 19 "
Josiah Blood,   died Sept. 1776
Minot Farmer,   " May "
William Nevins,   " "
Ezra Proctor,   " May 15 "
Isaac Shattuck,   " "
Samuel Leeman, Jun.,   killed Oct. 1777.
Ebenzer Cumings,   died 1778.
Lebbeus Wheeler,   " July 10 "
John Conroy,   " Sept. "
Daniel Blood,   " Nov. 28 "
Francis G. Powers,   killed 1780

The number of names in the list of deaths, is twenty-two. The Rev. Grant Powers, in his Centennial Address, states the loss of Hollis in the war, in killed or by disease, at thirty. He probably included in that number eight persons who in 1779 died in Hollis of the small pox, which he tells us was supposed to have been communicated by the enemy. The eight who died of that disease, added to the twenty-two, would make the Hollis loss of thirty as Mr. Powers states it.

The Hollis soldiers who received pensions from the Government, on account of permanent disabilities suffered in the service, either from wounds or disease, were Capt. Reuben Dow, Ensign William Wood, Thomas Pratt, (all wounded at Bunker Hill) Samuel Boyd and Stephen Richardson.

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