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GHOST STORIES
COAST TO COAST

Page 1

Source:  http://www.digitalcity.com/

ALASKA
ALABAMA
ARIZONA
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

~~~~~

ALASKA

...at least one spirit finds the hospitality so inviting as to stay on through eternity...

Legend of the Lodge

About 245 miles south of Fairbanks, the Gakona Lodge and Trading Post has been a mainstay of south central Alaska since 1904; it's the oldest continuously open roadhouse in Alaska and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Lodge has a colorful past -- as colorful as the characters that came through here: prospectors, hunters, geologists, adventurers, Cold War agents. While no one can recall a significant incident or tragic event to anchor a ghost to the Lodge, at least one restless but benign spirit finds the hospitality so inviting as to stay on through eternity.

The playful ghost jumps on freshly made beds, gently pulls hair, opens shut doors, shuts open doors and fiddles with stereo equipment. The naughty ghost also has a bad habit -- he (or she?) smokes, often leaving the odor of cigarettes in its wake.
- Lisa Galloway

Sources: Blackman, W. Haden 'The Field Guide to North American Hauntings.' Three Rivers Press, 1998;
www.phantomfinders.com

~~~

Mary is said to haunt Room 23...

Hotel Hauntings

The Golden North Hotel, at 3rd and Broadway in Skagway, is the oldest operating hotel in Alaska. It was built in the 1890s to serve a clientele of gold miners, entrepreneurs and adventurers. The digs were lush and the clientele rough, many returning wealthy from the gold fields having set out as impoverished miners. The Gold North has her very own ghost - the rather cranky 'Mary' -- she's been around since the turn of the century.

Mary died of pneumonia in an upstairs room -- she had been a guest at the hotel for some time, waiting for her gold-prospecting fiancé to return from his mining expedition. She passed away before he made it back and is, by all accounts, still a bit miffed with him. Mary is said to haunt Room 23, appearing in the finery of her day to the shock of unsuspecting guests... or not appearing at all, but waiting until the middle of the night to sit on the chests of guests, choking them in a manner reminiscent of the discomfort one might experience while suffering from pneumonia.
- Lisa Galloway

Sources: The Golden North Hotel,
www.goldennorthhotel.com; www.phantomfinders.com

~~~

...he took a fatal bullet in the heart ...


The Sordid Story of Soapy Smith

Soapy Smith was mad, bad and dangerous to know. The turn of the century rogue was a colorful fella, to be sure. He was an original frontier gangster, and as criminal as criminal could be, with a reputation for killing miners and stealing their gold. The law finally caught up with Soapy (no one's too sure why he was called 'Soapy' -- the few photos that have survived don't show a particularly clean-looking man) on a summer's day in 1898. Caught in a shoot out with an ex-lawman by the name of Frank Reid, Smith took a deadly bullet in the heart -- but not before he fatally wounded Reid in the groin. Ironically, today Skagway annually celebrates 'Soapy Smith Days' with much fanfare... do-gooder Frank Reid is only remembered as a footnote to Soapy's story.

Soapy was a troublemaker in life, so it's no surprise that he's not the nicest ghost. He haunts a local hotel (rumored to be the Gold North, also home to the ghost of 'Mary' the abandoned would-be bride), breaking chandeliers and attacking guests from behind.
- Lisa Galloway

Source: Alaska Department of Education,
www.library.state.ak.us/goldrush

~~~~~~~~~~

ALABAMA

...phantom lights started appearing in the house, emanating from the center tower.

Phantom Lights of Drish Mansion

Dr. John Drish built this plantation in Tuscaloosa, with his wife Sarah, in 1830. They lived here happily, and at the death of Dr. Drish, Sarah honored him by lighting dozens of candles and letting them burn while he lay in state. After the funeral, she asked her friends and family that the same candles be used when she died. Closer to her own death, she repeated this wish many times to friends. Her relatives were too busy to look for the candles when she died, however, and she was buried without the ritual. It wasn't long afterwards that phantom lights started appearing in the house, emanating from the center tower. The lights were cause for dozens of false alarms, but the room was shuttered and not a trace of a flame was discovered. Sarah's ghost made it clear to the residents of the home who was responsible for the candlelight, however, by materializing in the downstairs parlor.
- Ann Volkwein

Source: Hauck, Dennis William. 'Haunted Places: The National Directory.' Penguin Books, 2002. 

~~~

Listen closely...you may hear the plaintive voice of Charles Boyington.

Mobile's Boyington Oak

Near a wall of the Church Street Graveyard stands an oak marking the grave of a man hanged for murder February 20, 1835. Charles Boyington was accused of stabbing his best friend, Nathaniel Frost, in that very graveyard, a place where they'd spent hours talking together. His guilt was assumed when Frost's body was found there, stabbed to death. Boyington maintained his innocence, and on the gallows proclaimed that a great oak tree would spring from his gravesite as a symbol of his innocence. The potter's field has since been turned into a playground, but the tree stands tall to this day. Listen closely when the breeze passes through its leaves, you may hear the plaintive voice of Charles Boyington.
- Ann Volkwein

Source: Hauck, Dennis William. 'Haunted Places: The National Directory.' Penguin Books, 2002.

~~~

Sketoe haunted all of the men after he died, and one by one they came to violent ends.

Lynching of Newton

On December 3, 1864, by the Choctawhatchee River Bridge, Bill Sketoe was hanged as a traitor to the Confederacy. Sketoe had been the pastor of the Methodist Church, and was completely innocent of the accusations. The six vigilantes who took it upon themselves to hang him encountered some difficulty in the process. The branch of the oak tree that they chose bent so far as to allow Sketoe's toes to touch the ground. As the men dug a hole underneath his feet, he died a slow, strangling death. Sketoe haunted all of the men after he died, and one by one they came to violent ends. What remains today, next to the new concrete bridge, is the very hole the men had dug. Locals claim that if you fill the shallow depression, it will be dug out the next morning. It seems the ghost of Bill Sketoe does not rest in peace.
- Ann Volkwein

Source: Hauck, Dennis William. 'Haunted Places: The National Directory.' Penguin Books, 2002.

~~~~~~~~~~

ARKANSAS

Her corpse had been cut into seven pieces ...

The Ghost of Crooked Creek

One November 21, 1912 Ella Barham went out riding. By sundown her horse returned home -- but Ella had not. That night hunters would find Ella's body near an old mine shaft. Her corpse had been cut into seven pieces and hidden under a tumbled pile of rocks. Soon the law was chasing Odus Davidson, a young man Ella had spurned. Davidson peppered his socks to throw bloodhounds off of his scent and ran into the woods with the posse in hot pursuit. When caught he denied the crime, admitting that he'd been cutting wood near the spot Ella had been last sighted, and he even offered up that she had ridden through his yard. For all his protestations of innocence he was still found guilty and hanged -- Odus Davidson was the last man to die by the rope before Arkansas switched over to the electric chair.

On autumn nights folks who venture near Crooked Creek report seeing flickering lights and hearing the ring of an axe through the woods. Upon venturing near the old mine, a ghostly figure in a pale dress is seen wandering about... in one piece.
- Lisa Galloway

Sources: Haunted Missouri,
www.waterjanie.com; Central Arkansas Society for Paranormal Research, www.casprquest.com

~~~

..."Petit Jean" wasn't a boy at all, but a petite young woman.

Legend of Petit Jean

Arkansas' first state park -- and one of its prettiest -- is home to breathtaking Cedar Falls and the appropriately named Petit Jean Mountain. "Petit Jean" -- rambled off as "Petty-John" by the locals -- was apparently a real person... and is a real ghost haunting the park in Morrilton. When French explorer Chavet decided to leave his native land and explore America, he was affianced to a lovely young Parisienne named Adrienne. She begged to go with him, but Chavet pronounced his trip too treacherous for a woman, and vowed to marry her upon his return. Chavet set sail with a newly hired crew, including a hardworking young cabin boy called "Petit Jean" by the rest of the men. Once in the New World, Chavet and his men explored their way to what is now Arkansas, in the Ozark Mountains, and settled in for the cold winter. Petit Jean became very ill that season. Native Americans helping to tend the boy discovered that "Petit Jean" wasn't a boy at all, but a petite young woman. Chavet's fiancée, Adrienne, had disguised herself to accompany her fiancé -- so cleverly that no one had suspected a thing. She died in Chavet's arms, and was buried at the top of a nearby peak... now called "Petit Jean Mountain."

Her grave can still be seen, a low mound on the edge of a cliff; folks who live in the valley below report a bright light coming from that sport at night. It's said to be the ghost if Petit Jean, gazing longingly eastward toward her native France.
- Lisa Galloway

Sources: Petit Jean State Park,
www.petitjeanstatepark.com. Central Arkansas Society for Paranormal Research, www.casprquest.com

~~~

...he turns to wish her well, but she's gone...

Haunted Hitchhiker of Little Rock

Every community has a version of the Haunted Hitchhiker story – and certainly at least one of them must be true...

On Highway 365 just outside of Little Rock (usually near Woodson), a pretty young girl in a pale party dress is known to flag down drivers and ask for help. She's bruised and a little bit bloody; she says she's been in an accident and begs a ride home. She's hard to resist, and drivers soon find themselves driving the girl into town. The chitchat is light, she's been at a dance and her boyfriend sped off after the accident leaving her to find her way home. When the driver pulls up to her house, he turns to wish her well but she's gone -- although she did leave her coat. When the driver rings the doorbell the careworn woman who answers the door dissolves into tears: that was her daughter's coat, who died in a horrible accident on the way home from the prom... a decade ago.
- Lisa Galloway

Sources: Whitechapel Press & American Ghost Society,
www.prairieghosts.com

~~~~~~~~~~

ARIZONA

These little gnome-like beings were greenish in color and grumpy.

Tommyknockers

Miners deep in the copper mines of Arizona dreaded the knocking. They knew that when the ''tommyknockers'' started their banging, death was not far away. Hundreds of miners who survived mine collapses reported the ominous knocking that preceded disaster. Many claimed, particularly those of Welsh descent, that the tommyknockers had been trying to warn them. These little gnome-like beings were greenish in color and grumpy -- many a miner trying to get a closer look received a sharp smack for their trouble. As the mines played out, the tommyknockers found work in the homes surrounding the mineshafts. Many a family death and disaster was announced by a knocking in the house. The next time you think that it's just the hot water pipes banging, perhaps you should think again.
- Lisa Galloway

Source: Local oral history

~~~

...its alleged location is within the Superstition Mountains... 

Chasing After Gold

One of the most elusive treasures in American lore is the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, a huge underground cavern seemingly made up of nuggets of pure gold. Its alleged location is within the Superstition Mountains -- and if that name doesn't raise a red flag for you, then perhaps the spirits of lost explorers might. Countless goldrushers have lost their lives in search of this glittering cavern, from Enrico Peralta (whose group was attacked by Apaches) to Dr. Abraham Thorne (who had originally worked with the Apaches to find the cavern, only to get killed by them after trying to seek out the mine without their permission). The Apaches covered the mine's entrance in the late 19th century, but that did not stop people from attempting to find the mine -- and paying with their lives. The spirits of these lost explorers roam the ground around the Superstition Mountains; cheated, lost, and cursed by their frustrated quest for riches and luxury, they add to the air of dread and misery that, it's said, resulted in their deaths originally.
- Mary Jones

Source: Blackman, W. Haden. ''The Field Guide to North American Hauntings.'' Three Rivers Press, New York. 1998. 

~~~

...visions of a giant glowing woman rising from the depths of the canyon... 

Cold Coal Canyon

Sometimes, it's best not to walk toward the light. That's what visitors to Coal Canyon have learned the hard way. Visitors to the gorge report visions of a giant glowing woman rising from the depths of the canyon, enrapturing visitors so fiercely that they are compelled to walk to the canyon's edge. From there, they often plunge to their deaths. This alluring spirit, who glows fiercely against the night sky, is known as the Eagle Woman of Black Mesa. Native Americans believe that this woman, who has had hundreds of encounters with people, was a Hopi widow who committed suicide by leaping to her death in a manner almost identical to that of her victims.
- Mary Jones

Source: Blackman, W. Haden. ''The Field Guide to North American Hauntings.'' Three Rivers Press, New York. 1998. 

~~~

...an elegantly decorated urn, filled with the ashes of a war veteran... 

Finders Keepers?

A long-gone Goodwill in West Plaza was often plagued with strange noises throughout its large warehouse structure. One day, a worker at the store was playing around with a donated Polaroid camera and took a picture, only to see an odd image within the photograph. It was a greenish-yellow reflection in an empty room's window. A few weeks after this photographic spotting took place, the same worker discovered a heavy wooden box underneath the store's register. Inside the box was an elegantly decorated urn, filled with the ashes of a war veteran. The ghostly happenings in the store went away when the urn was picked up by Pentagon officials, who brought the ashes to their rightful resting place.
- Mary Jones

Source: Local lore 

~~~~~~~~~~

CALIFORNIA

...more than a few ghoulish inhabitants from her dark past. 

Alcatraz, "Devil’s Island"

Often called "The Rock" or "Devil’s Island," early Native Americans considered this place evil -- there’s even evidence that it was used as a place of exile for those who violated tribal taboos. Much later, Alcatraz (a twisting of the Spanish term for "pelican") served the US Military as a jail and fort and, in 1934, became a federal maximum-security prison. The 30-year regime of harsh conditions and brutal treatment is well documented, and the prison closed in 1963. Today Devil’s Island hosts a steady stream of curious visitors and so it seems, more than a few ghoulish inhabitants from her dark past. Rangers report inexplicable loud crashes, cell doors that close by themselves, blood-curdling screams and that creepy feeling of someone "watching." Popular spots of the spectral inmates are the warden’s house, the hospital, the hole and the cell block ‘C’ utility door -- where three inmates died in hail of bullets during an escape attempt in 1946.
- Lisa Galloway

Source:
www.prairieghosts.com/gpalcatraz

~~~

...the city called a seance to find its origin... 

Spirits of City Hall

City Hall in 1924 was a lively place -- of the spirit-filled variety. A "ghost, spook or eerie presence of some sort" made its presence known in the chambers of the Board of Public Works. The rapping on the chamber's walls caused such a stir that the city called a seance to find its origin. It was determined that the tapping had come from an "ectoplasmic rod" that would stop by the Public Works' chambers every day at noon. After approxmiately a week (and an increase in lunchtime audiences to almost 250), the rapping stopped -- and was subsequently traced to a cracked steam pipe lurking beneath the walls of the "haunted" room.
- Mary Jones

Source: San Francisco Examiner, 1924. 

~~~

...San Francisco's most famous ghost... 

Flora

A teenager from a wealthy family at the turn of the century, Flora was trying to be forced into a marriage to someone she did not love. She ran away from home, and for 50 years was a missing person. A mystery corpse was found in another city and eventually identified as Flora's body. Since her return, her spirit has been spotted walking up and down California Street. Brief visions of her, wearing white, perfectly serene, not talking, crying or noticing anyone who travels within her path -- have been notorious throughout the city, giving her the title of San Francisco's most famous ghost.
- Mary Jones

Source:
http://www.expage.com/sfghosts/ 

~~~

...Mary's gotten revenge on them by dropping objects on their heads or knocking them over... 

Mary, Mary

Mary Ellen Pleasant was born into slavery, but lived in San Francisco as a free woman. It was rumored that her mother taught her the art of voodoo when she was a child, and when she moved into San Francisco her knack for "rescuing" failing businesses was notorious throughout the city. Today, the corner where Mary's house used to stand is reported to be inhabited by her spirit. Those who slander her name while standing near her corner have reported that Mary's gotten revenge on them by dropping objects on their heads or knocking them over! It's also said that if you make a wish while standing on this enchanted corner, whatever you dream for will come true.
- Mary Jones

Source:
http://www.expage.com/sfghosts/ 

~~~~~~~~~~

COLORADO

...mysterious odors permeate the house, disembodied footsteps echo, chandeliers sway...

Raise High the Ceiling Beam, Ethyl

One of Denver's most famous hauntings, the Bradmar House, is said to be inhabited by its original owner's ghost. As she lay dying, Ethyl Work asked that her corpse be laid out before the fireplace; she predicted that she would split the ceiling beam above it when she laid there. True to her word, Ethyl cracked the beam post-mortem, and has continued to thrive in the house ever since. Starting in the '60s, residents have reported strange paranormal events throughout the premises: objects rise and float across the room, mysterious odors permeate the house, disembodied footsteps echo, chandeliers sway and lights go on and off of their own accord. It's anyone's guess as to why Ethyl continues to disturb her home. Some say she is trapped in there with her first husband's ghost, locked in marital discord for all eternity. Others wonder why she wanted to be laid out before the fireplace. Looks like another case for the crew at Unsolved Mysteries.
- Laura Picard

Source: Norman, Michael & Scott, Beth. 'Haunted America.' Tor Books, 1994

~~~

...a low moaning can be heard late at night...

Cheesman Park

The Denver Civic Center's Cheesman Park used to be the City Cemetery, before that it was known as Boot Hill, and before that the Mount Prospect Graveyard. Lots of bodies were buried here, many of them criminals, epidemic victims and the indigent. In 1893 town fathers advised the City Cemetery that they had 90 days to move all graves to Riverside Cemetery. An undertaking company was hired for the task; 1X3-foot pine boxes were used, remains were broken and shoveled into these tiny receptacles with horrific results. Eyewitnesses recall that 'remains littered the ground, the workers looted the graves...' -- such was the chaos left behind by the undertaker and his henchman that the city eventually had to plow over the area, miscellaneous remains and grave items included. Grass and trees were planted over the desecrated ground creating what is today's modern Cheesman Park. One would be surprised if the place wasn't haunted.

Park neighbors report confused ghosts popping up in mirrors and strolling the nearby streets, while sensitive folks claim an atmosphere of sad confusion and deep loss throughout the park. A low moaning can be heard late at night, while misty figures are often glimpsed flitting from spot to spot as if searching for the specific location of a grave.
- Lisa Galloway

Source:
www.prairieghosts.com

~~~

...an invisible helping hand ties loose shoelaces...

The Molly Brown House

Margaret Tobin Brown is one of Denver's best-loved citizens -- the plucky dame came from modest Missouri beginnings: after a rudimentary education she worked in a Tobacco factory before packing herself up and seeking her fortune in Colorado. There she met and wed J.J. Brown, a lowly miner who would make his fortune upon devising an innovative method of retrieving gold from the bottom of the Little Jonny Mine. Soon after the Brown family's fortunes were made, the outspoken Margaret (no one ever really called her Molly) was the toast of Denver society. An active proponent of women's rights and social reform, her most famous moments came aboard the doomed Titanic. She was returning from Egypt to be by the side of her sick grandson when the ill-fated ship went down. Margaret helped others into lifeboats until forced to abandon ship herself, then helped commandeer Lifeboat number 6 until rescue came. Later in life she would receive the French Legion of Honor for her bravery on the Titanic as well as her volunteer work during the First World War.

Now a museum, the Brown home on Capital Hill is cheerfully haunted by the spirit of Molly. Visitors report an invisible helping hand helping them up the stairs, doors being 'held' for them by invisible forces, an ethereal Molly disappearing around corners and even the spooky yet very helpful tying of loose shoelaces. Cigar smoke can often be detected in the basement and attic (the museum is a non-smoking facility)... evidently J.J., Molly's hubby, had been fond of lighting up in both these places.
- Lisa Galloway

Sources:
http://www.haunteddenver.com; www.prairieghosts.com

~~~

...Native Americans roam the bed and banks of Sandy Creek....

The Sandy Creek Massacre

The mere mention of US Colonel John Chivington is enough to send chills up the spine. The man was the Hero of Glorietta Creek, a bona fide Civil War champion... but it is his horrific actions as the Butcher of Sandy Creek for which the man is best remembered. On November 29, 1864 over 200 Native Americans -- women and children mostly and led by 'Black Kettle,' a chief known as peaceful and cooperative (and indeed was flying both the American flag and a white flag over his lodge) -- were attacked by Chivington and his men at Sandy Creek. The massacre lasted for hours. The Army forces scalped and mutilated many of the bodies, later displaying these gruesome trophies to cheering crowds in Denver.

Legal technicalities prevented Chivington from facing charges -- he would go unpunished. A military tribunal found, however, that the massacre at Sandy Creek was 'a cowardly and cold-blooded slaughter, sufficient to cover its perpetrators with indelible infamy, and the face of every American with shame and indignation.'

Deep in the night on the anniversary of the massacre, campers report numerous sightings of Native American women, children and even warriors roaming the bed and banks of Sandy Creek. Most appear only momentarily, and then seem to 'dissolve' into the creeks sandy soil. They are markedly quiet, suffering in silence.
- Lisa Galloway

Sources:
www.nps.gov/sand/; www.prairieghosts.com; www.shadowlands.com

~~~~~~~~~~

CONNECTICUT

...a faceless apparition floating toward her in a blue dress...

Huguenot House

This 1761 structure in East Hartford rested easily for over two centuries, but its restoration in the early '80s seems to have awakened its long-dormant spirits as inexplicable events began to surface. Construction workers couldn't explain what caused several mysterious on-site crashes and bangs. Astonished witnesses were at a loss to explain how they all heard sounds of heavy hammering ringing throughout the house when no one was inside the premises. And finally, no one dares to posit how shortly after the house's restoration, a faceless apparition in a blue dress floated toward a young girl playing nearby. When the soon-to-be hysterical girl looked up to see who approached, she realized the hovering dress held no occupant.
- Laura Picard

Source: Riccio, Dolores & Bingham, John. 'Haunted Houses USA.' Pocket Books, 1989.

~~~

...he beckoned the spirits of the house to make themselves seen.

The Empty House

At an abandoned home near the New Britain reservoir, unbelievers become quick converts. Long ago, a terrible fire swept though a small brick house, burning to death the man and woman who lived there. Not too soon thereafter, they say a curious young man came upon the abandoned house. After taking a long, inquisitive look at a strange panel of dials and gauges encased in a metal box, the man beckoned the spirits of the house to make themselves seen, taunting and teasing them. Then, though on stable ground, he fell, but managed to escape a believer. Since then, anyone who visits the house experiences a strange mixture of sadness, anxiety and paranoia.
- Daniel Rivkin

Source: The Shadowlands: Ghosts and Hauntings,
http://www.theshadowlands.net

~~~

...one could hear the faint screams of a patient undergoing painful treatment.

Undercliff Hauntings

In the years when the Undercliff Institution in Meriden was a mental hospital, it wouldn't be terribly uncommon to see the a patient darting around hallways to escape the grasp of an orderly or to hear the faint screams of a patient undergoing painful treatment. Undercliff has been abandoned since the mid-1960s, but locals swear they can experience those sights and sounds. Some say one man, who was murdered by fellow patients with plastic forks and knives swiped from the cafeteria, still roams the courtyard of the now-abandoned complex.
- Daniel Rivkin

Source: The Shadowlands: Ghosts and Hauntings,
http://www.theshadowlands.net 

~~~~~~~~~~

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Most of these wraiths seem benign, but there is an ominous and ghostly black cat...

The White House

The White House has a whole host of ghostly inhabitants from our nation's past. Abigail Adams is seen wandering about and folding spectral laundry, William Henry Harrison haunts the attic (he was the first President to die in office) and Andrew Jackson liked his bed in the Rose Bedroom so much that he still sleeps there. The most well-known dearly departed denizen, Honest Abe, appears often to the staff and guests wandering in and about the Lincoln Bedroom. Most of these wraiths seem benign, but there is an ominous and ghostly black cat that is said to appear in the basement on the eve of national tragedies -- such as the fall of the stock market and the assassination of JFK.

One of the most curious ghost stories to come from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue involves, believe it or not, landscaping. First Lady Ellen Louise Axson Wilson, during her husband Woodrow Wilson's term, had wanted to tear down the famous rose garden, home to many press conferences today. Dolley Madison, the wife of James, had planted the garden, and workmen sent in to take their hoes to the ground were stopped in the middle of their tracks by her enraged ghost. The workers' tales of this hair-raising experience have preserved the rose garden better than spring rain. So many spectres -- surely this warrants an independent counsel!
- Lisa Galloway

Sources:
http://theshadowlands.net/places/dc; Blackman, W. Haden. 'The Field Guide to North American Hauntings.' Three Rivers, 1998. 

~~~

...he did not die; he instead spent the remainder of his days in an asylum... 

Eternal Guilt

Located near Lafayette Square, 8 Jackson Place was built at the same time as the White House. Maj. Henry Rathbone, who lived there, was sitting next to Abraham Lincoln on the ill-fated night he died; John Wilkes Booth stabbed Rathbone in the head and neck while making his getaway. Rathbone survived the attack, but he never fully regained his mental faculties. Eighteen years after the attack, he killed his wife and then tried to kill himself in what was apparently supposed to be a murder-suicide. But he did not die; he instead spent the remainder of his days in an asylum. From time to time, people have reported his cries coming in the house, no doubt coming from a longing to return to the happy years before the attack by Booth.
- Mary Jones

Source: Rule, Leslie. 'Coast to Coast Ghosts: True Stories of Hauntings Across America.' Andrews McMeel, 2001. 

~~~

...the ghost still causes a stir on opening nights... 

Opening Night Jitters?

It's said that the National Theater is haunted by one of the men who graced its stage -- and he's even got a fan following him around. John McCullough was a popular actor during the late 19th century, often winning plum roles over other area thespians. One night, a backstage argument between McCullough and a less-renowned actor over his being cast in the lead role of a play turned violent. A gun was drawn, and McCullough was shot and killed. His ghost is said to be friendly, but it still causes a stir on opening nights. In an odd twist, another ghost haunting the theatre named Eddie is there precisely because of his admiration of McCullough.
- Mary Jones

Source:
http://www.nationaltheatre.org/location/ghost.htm 

~~~~~

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