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http://www.storm99.com

LAMINATED GLASS

Impact-resistant glass uses a layer of PVB (polyvinyl butyral) laminated between two layers of glass (similar to a car windshield).

"Like anything else, the laminated glass is part of a recipe - it goes into the window and the window has to pass the test," said consultant Paul Beers of Glazing Consultants Inc. in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Because laminated glass windows cost up to double a regular window, it is an expensive protection for existing homes. "The cost of window with laminated glass is about equal to a window plus shutter," Beers said.

Impact-resistant film can be applied to existing windows, but the applied film does not meet the new hurricane-protection testing standards.

DURAFRAME WINDOW JAMB SYSTEM

This custom system creates a frame to house the window (homeowners' choice) and hurricane panel. Removable hurricane panels slip into the frame and screw in place, without interfering with the architecture.

The lightweight panels are made of a patented composite that includes Fiberglas. Owner Jim Fullwood said he came up with the idea because shutterscan ruin a home's architecture. Storage can be a problem, but the firm offers a cabinet of the same lightweight composite that can hang from garage ceilings. mes, but the West Palm Beach, Fla., firm is developing a retrofit system for existing homes.

GARAGE DOORS

If you don't protect your garage door, you've missed the largest opening in your house. If you don't have a wind-loaded garage door, you can buy vertical support bars. Cost is about $300 for a single door, $500-$600 for a double door.

FRONT DOORS

Experts say the knob, deadbolt and doorjamb won't keep out winds. They suggest adding bolts at the top and bottom.

INTERIOR DOORS

Create a safe room. Determine where your family would take cover. The interior room should offer some ventilation (but no windows) and should have a solid door.

SHEDS

Tie down sheds, swing sets, fountains - use straps or rope and attach to anchors secured (if possible) in concrete or buried deep in the ground.

Go to the Emergency Preparedness Information page, on to Preparing Your Horses and Large Animals, or back to Preparing Your Boat.