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Journal Report

Descendants of Samuel Hunt (1)



Generation One



1. SAMUEL1 HUNT (1) was born circa 1765. He married Joanna (--?--) (2) before 1786. He died after 1820.
He appeared on the census of 1810 at Ontario County, New York (unknown compiler, 1810 U.S. Census Ontario County New York Population Schedule (n.p.: n.pub.), Samuel HUNT was in Ontario Co., p 135; 10100-00. Hereinafter cited as 1810 U.S. Census.). He appeared on the census of 1820 at Bloomfield, Ontario County, New York.
Children of Samuel1 Hunt (1) and Joanna (--?--) (2) were as follows:

Generation Two



2. ERASTUS2 HUNT (3) (Samuel1) was born on 24 Oct 1786 at West Bloomfield, Ontario County, New York. He married Mercy Parsons Sears (4), daughter of Jasper Peck Sears (19) and Martha Parsons (20), on 24 Oct 1809 at W Bloomfield, Ontario, New York. He died on 27 Dec 1822 at West Bloomfield, Ontario County, New York, at age 36 (unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address; unknown reader, 1942.). He was buried after 27 Dec 1822 at Pioneer Cemetery, West Bloomfield, Ontario County, New York.
CONFLICT: Although family records indicate Erastus was born in Ontario County, the US census for 1800 does not list a Samuel in Ontario County. The Samuels listed in New York are: Samuel 183A:2 Columbia Co. Samuel 223A:2 Columbia Co. Samuel 083:1 Dutchess Co. Samuel 240:1 Ulster Co. Samuel Jr. 240:1 Ulster Co. Perhaps one of these is Erastus' father, unless Samuel came from out of state. He appeared on the census of 1820; 1820 US Census Bloomfield, Ontario, NY, p. 377: 300110 01110.
Children of Erastus2 Hunt (3) and Mercy Parsons Sears (4) were as follows:

3. RALPH2 HUNT (89) (Samuel1) was born on 13 Aug 1790 (Ibid.). He married Philena ______ (90) before 1809. He died on 21 Dec 1876 at West Bloomfield, Ontario County, New York, at age 86 (Ibid.) (Janet Wyeth Foley, Early Settlers NYS, Page 101.). He was buried after 21 Dec 1876 at Pioneer Cemetery, West Bloomfield, Ontario County, New York (unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address.).
He appeared on the census of 1820 at Bloomfield, Ontario County, New York; Ralph p. 374 Bloomfield: 000210 10110. Ralph appears in the 1830 US Census Index in Rochester, New York. See census notes on Erastus for information on 1820 census.
Children of Ralph2 Hunt (89) and Philena ______ (90) were as follows:

Generation Three



4. FLAVEL SEARS3 HUNT (5) (Erastus2, Samuel1) was born on 1 Apr 1814 at Bloomfield, Genesee County, New York. He was christened in 1817 at West Bloomfield, Genesee County, New York (Ibid., Page 44; Sons of the Revolution Library, 600 So. Central Ave., Glendale, CA. These are the records of baptisms performed by Rev. James Hotchkin at West Bloomfield, NY.). He married Elizabeth Palmer (9), daughter of Reuben Palmer (21) and Huldah ______ (22), on 4 Mar 1836. He died on 13 Nov 1873 at Hamburg, Erie County, New York, at age 59.
Children of Flavel Sears3 Hunt (5) and Elizabeth Palmer (9) both born at Boston, Erie County, New York, were as follows:

Generation Four



5. EDWIN ALLEN4 HUNT (10) (Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) was born on 8 May 1838 at Boston, Erie County, New York (unknown compiler, compiler, "unknown title"; Ancestral File unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "Hunt genealogy."). He married Ellen Post (96). He married Sarah Emogene Austin (12), daughter of Alanson Austin (23) and Eliza ______ (24), on 18 Nov 1862 at Hamburg, Erie County, New York. He died on 8 Sep 1906 at age 68.
There were no children of Edwin Allen4 Hunt (10) and Ellen Post (96).
Children of Edwin Allen4 Hunt (10) and Sarah Emogene Austin (12) were as follows:

Generation Five



6. HORACE FLAVEL5 HUNT (14) (Edwin4, Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) was born on 21 Nov 1864 at Hamburg, Erie County, New York. He married Clara M. Dietrich (29), daughter of Henry Dietrich (35) and Eliza Federspiel (36), on 22 Sep 1887 at Niagara Falls, New York. He died on 2 May 1938 at Erie County, New York, at age 73 (Buffalo Newspapers, 1812-1985, Film 1432340.).
Children of Horace Flavel5 Hunt (14) and Clara M. Dietrich (29) were as follows:

7. GRACE MARIA5 HUNT (17) (Edwin4, Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) was born circa 1867 at Hamburg, Erie County, New York. She married John Edwin Constantine (28). She died on 18 Jul 1920.
Children of Grace Maria5 Hunt (17) and John Edwin Constantine (28) were:

Generation Six



8. EVERETT HOWARD6 HUNT (30) (Horace5, Edwin4, Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) was born on 13 Dec 1888. He married Ethel Jean Totterdale (37) after 5 Jun 1917.
He was also known as Everette Howard Hunt (30) On Everette Howard Hunt's WWI draft registration card, he spelled his name as noted. He was single as of June 5 1917.
Children of Everett Howard6 Hunt (30) and Ethel Jean Totterdale (37) were:

9. HORACE HAMILTON6 HUNT (34) (Horace5, Edwin4, Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) is still living.
Children of Horace Hamilton6 Hunt (34) and Evelyn Gertrude Tooley (42) are as follows:

Generation Seven



10. EVERETT HOWARD7 HUNT JR. (38) (Everett6, Horace5, Edwin4, Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) was born on 9 Oct 1918 at Hamburg, New York. He married Dorothy Louise Wetzel (43) circa 1949. He married Laura Martin (97) in 1977. He died on 23 Jan 2007 at Miami, Florida, at age 88; E. Howard Hunt, 88: Led break-in of Watergate


A former CIA officer, Hunt was best-known for recruiting the 'plumbers' who broke into the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate hotel and for being one of the organizers of the invasion of Guatemala in 1954 and Cuba in 1961

E. Howard Hunt, who stumbled into history after helping organize a botched break-in at the Watergate Hotel that brought down a president, died Tuesday at North Shore Medical Center. He was 88.

The cause of death was pneumonia, said his wife, Laura Hunt.

If Watergate doomed Richard Nixon's presidency, it was, too, a reversal of fortune for a dashing, decorated World War II soldier, Hollywood screenwriter and long-serving CIA spymaster involved in the successful Guatemalan coup and the failed Bay of Pigs invasion.

Hunt had watched through binoculars on June 17, 1972, as five men --four of whom he had recruited as so-called ''plumbers,'' whose job it was to plug information leaks from the White House – were arrested as they searched the offices of the Democratic National Committee for evidence of illegal campaign contributions They found none but were arrested, in business suits, carrying thousands in $100 bills and an address book containing Hunt's name and phone number.

Twenty-six months later, Nixon resigned.

Hunt faced 35 years but spent 33 months in prison after pleading guilty to conspiracy. He was financially ruined and lost his first wife, Dorothy, in a plane crash.

Finished in Washington, he eventually moved to Biscayne Park and made his living writing more than 80 novels, many of them spy thrillers with titles like Guilty Knowledge and The Paris Edge.

All told, 25 men were sent to prison for their involvement in the break-in, which left Hunt perplexed.

Hunt maintained a lifelong bitterness toward Nixon, whom he felt ”should have come forward for me and my compadres. There's a long tradition that when a warrior is captured, the commanding officer takes care of his family. That goes back to the Revolutionary War.''

''He loved George Bush, both of them, and Reagan,'' said Laura Hunt.

Everette Howard Hunt was born Oct. 9, 1918, graduated from Brown
University in June 1940 and entered the U.S. Naval Academy two months after the United States entered World War II.

He volunteered for duty with the Office of Strategic Services, precursor to the CIA, and was sent to China -- where he operated with Chinese guerrillas behind Japanese lines.

At the end of the war, Hunt won a Guggenheim Fellowship in creative writing and worked as a Hollywood screenwriter. Warner Brothers had paid
$35,000 for his fourth novel, Bimini Run, when Hunt joined the CIA in
1949.

For the next 21 years, Hunt served as a covert counterintelligence officer in Latin America, Asia and Europe.

In 1954, Hunt helped organize the overthrow of the elected president of
Guatemala, Jacobo Arbenz.

In 1961, Hunt was assigned to create a provisional government in Cuba to rule after the U.S. invaded the island.

In 1970 he went to work for a PR firm in Washington.

There he met fellow Brown alumnus Charles Colson, special counsel to President Nixon, at a college reunion. Colson offered Hunt a $100-a-day job to do intelligence work for the White House.

In 1972, Hunt was tasked with bugging the telephone lines of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergatel. Hunt reached out to Bay of Pigs vets Bernard L. Barker, Virgilio Gonzalez, Rolando Eugenio Martinez and Frank Sturgis. But the job went bad.

In 1997, Hunt declared bankruptcy.

Martinez, one of the ''plumbers'' Hunt recruited to help plug leaks from the Nixon White House, learned of Hunt's death Tuesday. ''We spent a lot of time together, all the way back to the Bay of Pigs. Martinez, 84, said Tuesday from his Miami Beach home. ”I'm not proud of what happened, but I have tried to move past it.''

Martinez received a pardon from President Ronald Reagan in 1983. But
Reagan, Hunt's hero, rejected a pardon for Hunt.

Gordon Liddy, who organized the Watergate job, has a less sanguine take.

''I did have contact with him after Watergate, up to the moment he decided to spill his guts,'' Liddy said. ”After which point I have never since spoken a word to him. Testifying was a betrayal of his principles. I think he'd stayed in the game too long. He was old and weak. We'd been friends, prior to that. But that pissed me off.''



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E. Howard Hunt Jr., died January 23, 2007 E. Howard Hunt Jr., died January 23, 2007 in Miami, Florida after a lengthy struggle with pneumonia. Mr. Hunt was born on October 9, 1918, in Hamburg, New York, the only surviving son of Everette Hunt, an attorney, and Ethel Jean Totterdale Hunt. His grandfather, Horace F. Hunt, was involved in Republican politics in New York State and helped many political offices.
Mr. Hunt graduated from Brown University in 1940 with a degree in English Literature. He joined the Naval Reserve and graduated from Annapolis as a midshipman in February 1941. Mr. Hunt was assigned as a gunnery officer on the USS Mayo, part of a convoy of destroyers in the North Atlantic. He was honorably discharged from the Navy after sustaining injuries at sea. During his hospitalization, Mr. Hunt wrote his first novel, East of Farewell, the first novel published about World War II by an American participant.
Mr. Hunt went to work for TIME magazine as a documentary film writer, and then became a correspondent for Life magazine in the South Pacific. In 1943 he enlisted in the Army Air Force, earned a second commission, and became an instructor at the Air Force Intelligence School. He volunteered for duty with the Office of Strategic Services, the precursor of the Central Intelligence Agency, and was sent to China where he operated with Chinese guerillas behind Japanese lies.
At the end of the war, he won a Guggenheim Fellowship in creative writing and worked as a Hollywood screenwriter. In 1949, he joined the newly created Central Intelligence Agency and married his first wife, Dorothy Wetzel De Goutiere, with whom he had four children. For twenty-one years, Mr. Hunt served as a covertly counterintelligence officer in the CIA in Latin America, Asia and Europe. Retiring from the CIA in 1970, Mr. Hunt joined a Washington public relations firm, and a year later, accepted a part-time consultancy in the Nixon White House.
In 1972, an entry teams recruited by Mr. Hunt was arrested in the Watergate offices of the Democratic National Committee. Following his first wife’s death in an airplane crash in Chicago, Mr. Hunt was indicted and pled guilty to conspiracy. Provisionally sentenced to 35 years in prison, his cooperation with the Watergate prosecution team resulted in a lesser sentence of which he served 33 months.
He was paroled in 1977, and married second wife, Laura Martin Hunt, with whom he had two children. With the exception of several years living in Guadalajara, Mexico, Mr. Hunt and his wife lived in Miami, Florida.
Mr. Hunt was the author of more than 80 novels and three non-fiction books, including an updated autobiography entitled American Spy (Wiley and Sons) scheduled for publication in March 2007. He was a frequent contributor to national magazines and journals of opinion.

A memorial service will be held at the Miami Shores Presbyterian Chapel at 4 pm on January 29, 2007.
He has been described as "one of the most extraordinary, if controversial, men-of-action-and-letters of our time. [obituary provided by the Howard Hunt family via Major General John Singlaub].
E. Howard Hunt
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Everette Howard Hunt, Jr.
Born October 9, 1918
Flag of United States Hamburg, New York, USA
Died January 23, 2007
Flag of United States Miami, Florida, USA
Charge(s) Conspiracy, burglary, illegal wiretapping
Penalty 33 month imprisonment
Status Deceased
Occupation CIA agent, author
Spouse Dorothy Louise Wetzel, Laura E. Martin
Parents Everette Howard Hunt Sr. and Ethel Jean Totterdale

Everette Howard Hunt, Jr. (October 9, 1918 - January 23, 2007) was an American author and spy. He worked for the CIA and later the White House under President Richard Nixon. Hunt, with G. Gordon Liddy and others, was one of the White House's "plumbers" — a secret team of operatives charged with fixing "leaks". Information disclosures had proved an embarrassment to the Nixon administration when defense analyst Daniel Ellsberg sent a series of documents, which came to be known as the Pentagon Papers, to The New York Times.

Hunt, along with Liddy, engineered the first Watergate burglary. In the ensuing Watergate Scandal, Hunt was convicted of burglary, conspiracy, and wiretapping, eventually serving 33 months in prison.

Early life and career

Hunt was born in Hamburg, New York, United States. A 1940 graduate of Brown University, Hunt during World War II served in the U.S. Navy, United States Army Air Forces, and finally, the Office of Strategic Services. During and after the war, he also wrote several novels under his own name East of Farewell (1942), Limit of Darkness (1944), Stranger in Town (1947), Bimini Run (1949), and The Violent Ones (1950) and, more famously, several spy novels under an array of pseudonyms, including Robert Dietrich, Gordon Davies and David St. John.

[edit] CIA and anti-Castro efforts

Warner Bros. had just bought Bimini Run when Hunt joined the CIA in 1949. He became station chief in Mexico City in 1950. He brought along fellow rookie officer William F. Buckley Jr., working within the Mexican student movement. Buckley and Hunt remained life-long friends.

There, Hunt helped devise Operation PBSUCCESS, the covert plan to overthrow Jacobo Arbenz, the elected president of Guatemala. Following assignments in Japan and Uruguay, Hunt was assigned to create a provisional government to take over after the Bay of Pigs Invasion. The failure of that project damaged his career.

Hunt was undeniably bitter about what he saw as President Kennedy's lack of spine in overturning the Castro regime.[1] In his semi-fictional autobiography, Give Us this Day, he wrote: "The Kennedy administration yielded Castro all the excuse he needed to gain a tighter grip on the island of Jose Marti, then moved shamefacedly into the shadows and hoped the Cuban issue would simply melt away." (p.13-14)

Disillusioned, he retired from the CIA in 1970.

[edit] Watergate

Main article: Watergate scandal

Hunt Testifies Before Watergate Committee
Hunt Testifies Before Watergate Committee

Hunt organized the bugging of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate office building and was also found to be responsible for a break-in at the office of Ellsberg's psychiatrist.[2]

A few days after the break-in, Nixon was recorded saying "This fellow Hunt, he knows too damn much."[3]

Hunt and fellow operative G. Gordon Liddy, along with the five arrested at the Watergate, were indicted on federal charges three months later.

Hunt's wife, Dorothy, was killed in the December 8, 1972 plane crash of United Airlines Flight 553 in Chicago. Congress, the F.B.I., and the NTSB investigated the crash, and found it to be an accident caused by crew error.[4] Over $10,000 in cash was found in Dorothy Hunt's handbag in the wreckage.[5]

Hunt eventually spent 33 months in prison on a conspiracy charge, and said he was bitter that he was sent to jail while Nixon was allowed to resign.

[edit] Later life

In 1981, Hunt was awarded $650,000 in a libel lawsuit against Liberty Lobby, after it published an article by Victor Marchetti in its newspaper The Spotlight accusing the United States House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA) of having a 1966 CIA memo that revealed E. Howard Hunt, Frank Sturgis and Gerry Patrick Hemming had been involved in the plot to kill John F. Kennedy. However, this decision was overturned on appeal in 1983.[6] Mark Lane successfully defended Liberty Lobby by using depositions from David Atlee Phillips, Richard Helms, G. Gordon Liddy, Stansfield Turner and Marita Lorenz, plus a cross-examination of Hunt following which the jury decided that Marchetti had not been guilty of libel by suggesting that Kennedy had been assassinated by CIA agents. Lane outlined his theory about Hunt's and the CIA's role in Kennedy's murder in a 1991 book, Plausible Denial.[7]

Hunt was a prolific author, primarily of spy novels. He declared bankruptcy in 1995 and lived in Biscayne Park, Florida. [8]

A fictionalized account of Hunt's role in the Bay of Pigs operation appears in Norman Mailer's 1991 novel Harlot's Ghost.

Hunt died on January 23, 2007 in Miami, Florida of pneumonia. [9][10] His memoir American Spy: My Secret History in the CIA, Watergate, and Beyond is to be published by John Wiley & Sons in March 2007.[11]

[edit] JFK assassination allegations by family member

Main article: Kennedy Assassination Theories

The April 5, 2007 issue of Rolling Stone contained an extensive article on Hunt, based in large part on an interview with his eldest son St. John. It describes Hunt's alleged deathbed confessions of his supposed knowledge and indirect complicity in the JFK assassination.[12] Among other things, the article claims that Hunt, in hand-written notes and a voice recording to St. John, implicated Lyndon B. Johnson, and CIA operator Cord Meyer as the key players in the JFK assassination conspiracy. According to Hunt's son, Hunt claimed the other assassin was a French gunman on the grassy knoll, often identified in other assassination theories as Lucien Sarti.

[edit] Audio-taped confession

On the April 28th, 2007 edition of Coast to Coast AM hosted by Ian Punnett, an audio tape sent to St. John Hunt contained his father's January 2004 recounting of the persons who were involved in the Kennedy Assassination. In the tape, Hunt named Cord Meyer, Frank Sturgis, David Sánchez Morales, David Atlee Phillips as participants in the assassination with Vice-President Lyndon Johnson apparently approving the assassination for political gain.

A clip of this tape can be heard here.

The following is a transcript of Hunt's confession on the audio tape clip:

I heard from Frank that LBJ had designated Cord Meyer, Jr. to undertake a larger organization while keeping it totally secret. Cord Meyer himself was a rather favorite member of the Eastern aristocracy. He was a graduate of Yale University and had joined the Marine Corps during the war and lost an eye in the Pacific fighting.

I think that LBJ settled on Meyer as an opportunist, parent—like himself a parent—and a man who had very little left to him in life ever since JFK had taken Cord's wife as one of his mistresses. I would suggest that Cord Meyer welcomed the approach from LBJ, who was after all only the Vice President at that time and of course could not number Cord Meyer among JFK's admirers—quite the contrary.

As for Dave Phillips, I knew him pretty well at one time. He worked for me during the Guatemala project. He had made himself useful to the agency in Santiago, Chile where he was an American businessman. In any case, his actions, whatever they were, came to the attention of the Santiago station chief and when his resume became known to people in the Western hemisphere division he was brought in to work on Guatemalan operations.

Sturgis and Morales and people of that ilk stayed in apartment houses during preparations for the big event. Their addresses were very subject to change, so that where a fellow like Morales had been one day, you'd not necessarily associated [sic] with that address the following day. In short, it was a very mobile experience.

Let me point out at this point, that if I had wanted to fictionalize what went on in Miami and elsewhere during the run up for the big event, I would have done so. But I don't want any unreality to tinge this particular story, or the information, I should say. I was a benchwarmer on it and I had a reputation for honesty.

I think it's essential to refocus on what this information that I've been providing you—and you alone, by the way—consists of. What is important in the story is that we've backtracked the chain of command up through Cord Meyer and laying [sic] the doings at the doorstep of LBJ. He, in my opinion, had an almost maniacal urge to become President. He regarded JFK, as he was in fact, an obstacle to achieving that. He could have waited for JFK to finish out his term and then undoubtedly a second term. So that would have put LBJ at the head of a long list of people who were waiting for some change in the executive branch.

[edit] Notes

1. ^ Rosenberg, Carol (June 28, 2001). Plotter of Bay of Pigs, Watergate conspirator: 'File and forget' Castro. Miami Herald
2. ^ Reynolds, Tim (January 23, 2007). Watergate Figure E. Howard Hunt Dies. Associated Press
3. ^ Weiner, Tim (January 24, 2007). E. Howard Hunt, Agent Who Organized Botched Watergate Break-In, Dies at 88. The New York Times
4. ^ NTSB report
5. ^ CNN Live Today, "Deadly Plane Skid in Chicago" Aired December 9, 2005.
6. ^ "Libel Award for Howard Hunt overturned by appeals court." New York Times. December 4, 1983
7. ^ Isaacs, Jeremy (1997). Cold War: Howard Hunt interview excerpts and full transcript. CNN
8. ^ Bardach, A.L. (Oct. 6, 2004). Scavenger Hunt. slate.com
9. ^ Cabron, Lou ((January 25, 2007). 20 Secrets of an Infamous Dead Spy. 10 Zen Monkeys
10. ^ Cornwell, Rupert (January 25, 2007). E. Howard Hunt obituary. The Independent
11. ^ Reed, Christopher (January 25, 2007). E Howard Hunt obituary. The Guardian
12. ^ Hedegaard, Erik (April 5, 2007). The Last Confessions of E. Howard Hunt Rolling Stone

--------------------------------------------

E. HOWARD HUNT: OCTOBER 9, 1918 TO 1943

EVERETTE HOWARD HUNT was born on October 9, 1918, in Hamburg, N.Y., into a family of English and Welsch heritage which traced its lineage to the Revolutionary War. Hunt's Point, in the South Bronx section of New York City, was named after one of HUNT'S ancestors. HUNT'S father, Howard Hunt Sr., was a friend of OSS founder William J. Donovan. When HUNT was eight, his family moved to Miami, where Howard Hunt Sr. entered a business partnership which eventually failed. In Give Us This Day, HUNT described the incident which led to this. On a Saturday, Howard Hunt Sr.'s business partner stole $5,000 from him, then flew to Havana. The next day, Howard Hunt Sr. flew to Havana, found his partner, put a gun to his partner's head, and got all of his money back. The moral to be gained from this story, according to HUNT, was: "An operation conducted with surgical efficiency and maximum speed leaves minimal scars on those involved."

ANALYSIS

This story can be interpreted so that a different moral is extracted from it: rather than report the incident to the local authorities, Howard Hunt Sr. went to Cuba and was willing to execute his ex-partner for $5000. The moral implied by this incident: if you are double-crossed, murder is permissible.

During his teens, HUNT suffered from dyslexia and stammering. He graduated from Brown University in 1940, where he majored in English literature and journalism. He received an Associate Baccalaureate Degree. He was accepted as a play writing student at Yale Drama School. HUNT enlisted in the Naval Reserves. HUNT reported: "Enlisted United States Naval Reserve, August 27, 1940, as Apprentice Seaman, appointed to U.S. Navy Midshipman's School...served aboard USS Destroyer Mayo, discharge by reason of being not physically qualified for retention." In February 1941 HUNT entered the United States Navy. He was on active duty for five months before he was given an honorable medical discharge in late 1942. Tad Szulc reported: "According to incomplete records [HUNT] was injured aboard a ship doing Atlantic convoy duty." HUNT was discharged because of a hearing problem. [FBI 139-4089-1627] HUNT wrote East of Farewell, a fictionalized account of North Atlantic convoy duty, and sold it to Alfred Knopf Publishers. From October 1942 to February 1943 he worked for Time Inc. (March of Time) where he prepared and edited scripts for a monthly newsreel, and produced Naval training films. He was hired by Time and became a war correspondent in the South Pacific from February 1943 to July 1943. HUNT covered the battle of Guadalcanal. He returned to New York City in 1943, where he worked for Fortune magazine and wrote Limit Of Darkness, which he sold to Random House.

HUNT JOINS THE OSS: DECEMBER 1944



HUNT enlisted as a private in the United States Air Force: "After basic training at Fort Dix and Miami Beach, I qualified for Officer Candidate School...After being commissioned, I was sent to Air Force Intelligence School at Orlando, Florida, where, after two weeks as a student, I was placed on the faculty." While he was in Air Force Intelligence, HUNT passed rigorous OSS testing and investigation: "A few days later General William E. Donovan summoned me to his office. There he confirmed that I had been accepted for duty in the OSS and was henceforth relieved of further Air Force duties." During his OSS training period, HUNT met Navy Lieutenant James Donovan and future CIA officers Lawrence Houston and Walter Kuzmuk. HUNT cited Bennett Cerf of Random House as a credit reference. In the 1950's, Bennet Cerf, a friend of J. Edgar Hoover, had arranged for Random House to publish The FBI Story, a puff piece. Then, in the 1960's, Cerf sent the Bureau a pre-publication copy of The FBI That Nobody Knows, and may have helped delay its publication. [Turner RFK 1993 (xvi)] HUNT named Quentin Reynolds as a reference. HUNT stated: " I flew as an observer with VT11, Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, 1943, soloed SO3C type, March 1943, New Hebrides. Graduate of Air Combat Intelligence School, AAFSAT, AFTAC, Florida. Wide experience with intelligence sources and procedures as part of current duties in AFTAC Air Room, plus special research into propaganda analysis ( a standard lecture for the Army-Navy Staff College), plus professional writing and experience as naval officer at start of war. As a War correspondent, I found out that my experience as a naval officer helped me effect easy liaison with Task Force and Air Group commanders in the theater. I am known as a novelist and short-story writer, and contribute to national magazines upon the request of individual editors. December 9, 1944." HUNT was assigned to OSS Detachment 202, headed by Paul Helliwell (born September 17, 1914).



PAUL HELLIWELL



From January 17, 1945 to August 18, 1945, Paul Helliwell served as Chief, Special Intelligence Branch, OSS, China Theater. When the war ended, Paul Helliwell was placed in charge of postwar intelligence, and awarded the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster. In January 1950 he joined the CIA. In 1951 Paul Helliwell helped set up and run Sea Supply Corporation, a CIA proprietary. ANGLETON associate John Hart headed a CIA group of 76 men training the Thai Police via the Sea Supply Corporation. [Indochina Resource Center Study 1.77] Paul Helliwell served as a paymaster during the Bay of Pigs invasion in April 1961.

HUNT listed his OSS and military duty: "CBI Reports Officer, Lecturer on Psychological Warfare at Army-Navy Staff College." HUNT served in the Far East until January 1946. After the war, he went to Mexico on a Guggenheim Fellowship. Later he took up residence in Los Angeles and Miami.



THE ECONOMIC COOPERATION ADMINISTRATION PARIS 1948



HUNT was an Economic Attache at the American Embassy, Paris. HUNT'S associates there included Glen Morehouse, a Paris CIA Station officer, Richard Bissell and Frank Wisner. At the Economic Cooperation Administration, Vienna, HUNT produced an anti-communist film directed toward labor groups, entitled Mit Vereinten Kraeften. In 1948 HUNT was employed by the Economic Cooperation Administration and served in Paris as and aide to Avarell Harriman: "A background investigation conducted by the FBI in July 1949 revealed no indication of instability on the Subject's part, but it was later learned that Subject had been refused an increase in salary with the Economic Cooperation Administration and had been permitted to resign. He was described as highly intelligent, but blindly selfish, and egotistical." HUNT'S employment history stated: "May 1948 to February 1948, Economic Cooperation Administration, Public Relations, J.F. Fleming, U.S. Media Specialist. PR work plus speech writing for Ambassador Harriman; film production. Reasons for Leaving: My publishing affairs deteriorated to such an extent that my presence in America became imperative for financial reasons." On November 23, 1949, HUNT was fingerprinted by the FBI for the CIA.



DOROTHY WETZEL HUNT: 1949

Dorothy Wetzel worked for the State Department in Bern, Switzerland, between July 1944 and January 1946. From April 1946 to May 1947, DOROTHY HUNT worked for the Treasury Department, Shanghai, China. She joined Economic Cooperation Administration in April 1948. She married HOWARD HUNT on September 7, 1949. The CIA reported that "DOROTHY LOUISE HUNT [OS 355,750] was investigated for Agency employment in 1948. Her former husband [Goutiere] was described as an habitual drunkard and not inclined to remain in any one place for any length of time. She did not enter on duty, having accepted a position with the Economic Cooperation Administration in Paris. Our Paris sources later reported that Subject's wife was formerly his mistress and was openly flouted as such for several months. She was then described as an amoral and dangerous individual who underhandedly attacked those persons who incurred her enmity."

HUNT: 1949

In 1949 HUNT'S book, Bimini Run, was published; Warner Brothers paid HUNT $35,000 for the movie rights. On May 18, 1949, HUNT filled out a PERSONAL HISTORY STATEMENT for the CIA. HUNT cited Major J.K. Singlaub as an employment reference. General Singlaub became commander of the Joint Unconventional Warfare Task Force in Vietnam in 1968 and was involved in Operation Phoenix. In 1984 Singlaub headed the World Anti-Communist League. John K. Singlaub had been in HUNT'S OSS unit. On November 8, 1949, HUNT filled out a Personal Status Report. In November 1949 HUNT joined the Office of Policy Coordination (CIA) where he became an International Organization Editor. He remained there until December 1950.

HUNT 1950 TO 1953

On February 17, 1950, HUNT was informed by the CIA's Office of Security that his wife held left-wing attitudes regarding certain minority groups: "With regard to his wife, Mr. HUNT states that she is one of these individuals who carries the torch for minority groups and always has been too ready to take up the battle when any derogatory remarks are made concerning members of these groups. He advised, however, that she is becoming less pugnacious about this because he has constantly made it a point to request her not to express her opinion so strongly. Mr. HUNT advises, as a matter of fact, that at the outset he used to bait his wife on these matters, but as he realized how strongly she feels about them, he ceased the practice. It seems as though Mrs. Hunt becomes so upset concerning racial and minority prejudices that the resultant condition is really injurious to her health. Mr. HUNT advises that he will have a heart-to-heart talk with his wife and ask her to tighten up on the control of her emotions. He will further suggest to his wife that she take the chip off her shoulders, and if remarks are made which disturb her, she should assume the attitude of considering the source. Mr. HUNT believes his wife is becoming less susceptible to remarks which have enraged her in the past. He has promised me to adopt a policy of discontinuing social relations with individuals who constantly discuss matters which are repugnant to his wife. I was very favorably impressed by Mr. HUNT'S attitude concerning my admonitions, and I respect him for his forthright denouncement and evaluation of his wife's shortcomings. I am firm in my belief that Mr. HUNT is throughly patriotic, completely anti-Communist, and that there will be no repetition of past complaints. I sincerely recommend that we close the book on this issue, and start over with a clean slate. (Deleted) OS."



THE DEATH OF CAPTAIN EUGENE KARP

On February 27, 1950, HUNT wrote a memo about his association with U.S. Naval Officer Eugene Simon Karpe.

MEMORANDUM FOR: OSE

SUBJECT: Captain Eugene Karpe, USN, deceased.

1. During 1948 to 1949 I served in Europe as an official of the Economic Cooperation Administration, ranking as an Attache of the American Embassy, Paris.

2. During various periods of temporary duty in Vienna (August to October 1948) I came to know Captain Karpe socially. He came to Vienna frequently on week ends from his Bucharest post, staying, like myself, at the Bristol Hotel.

3. On at least two occasions he flew with me in General Keyes' aircraft from Vienna to Paris, and I had the distinct impression that he wanted to spend as little time as possible in Bucharest because of the annoying and constant surveillance of secret police.

4. On one occasion, returning unexpectedly from Vienna, I encountered Captain Karpe at the Bristol and asked him why he was again in Vienna. He replied that there had been a series of incidents in Bucharest involving servants of Embassy personnel (shadowing, interrogations, etc.) And that I could not imagine how rigorous was the life there for Americans. He added jokingly that he could not even visit a urinal in Bucharest without being accompanied by the Secret Police.

5. At no time did Captain Karpe appear despondent; rather he impressed me a conscientious officer who was undergoing tremendous hardships, but sought relaxation from surveillance at every legitimate opportunity.

6. In October 1949 I encountered Captain Karpe in the Army & Navy Club in Washington, and asked him if his Bucharest assignment had terminated. His answer was rather vague, and my total impression was that he felt I was lucky to be out of Europe, and that he was not anxious to return to Romania.

7. Our association was more than casual, for we had mutual friends in the Navy; one of his classmates, in fact, having been a fellow officer of mine.

8. Although I knew Mr. and Mrs. Robert Vogeler socially in Vienna, I was not aware Captain Karpe knew them, as later events indicate.

HOWARD HUNT PBII/HH/mee.

William Harvey was sent a copy of HUNT'S memorandum regarding Karpe.

Eugene Simon Karpe fell off the Orient Express on February 25, 1950: "A track walker found the body of Captain Eugene Simon Karpe of the United States Navy, a friend of imprisoned Robert A. Vogler, in a railway tunnel south of Salzberg yesterday. His passport was missing. United States Army investigators and Austrian police said they believed Captain Karpe's death had been accidental. American officials in Washington said they were not eliminating the possibility that the officer had been slain. Austrian police said that Captain Karpe, en route to the United States after three years as Naval Attache in Romania, evidently had fallen from a door of the Arlberg Orient express on a curve...Captain Karpe, 45 years old, was sent to Rumania in 1946 as a naval member of the Allied Control Commission. Officers said all passengers appeared to be legitimate travelers and that there was no reason to suspect them of having had any part in Captain Karpe's death."

HUNT and Eugene Simon Karpe were acquainted with Robert A. Vogeler, who had been sentenced to 15 years in prison for espionage by a Hungarian People's Court on February 20, 1950. Robert A. Vogeler was a roving ITT representative who allegedly plotted to sabotage the Hungarian state-owned telephone company. Vogeler was released after having served one year of his sentence. He denied being a spy ; he said all he had done was keep in touch with "Fish" Karpe. [NYT 2.25.50] On Tuesday, March 2, 1950, United States Army investigators "said today that it was possible in the darkness of a Salzberg tunnel Karpe could have been thrown accidentally from the Arlberg-Express." On November 8, 1950, William D. Miller, Assistant Chief, Overseas Branch, sent George P. Loker, Jr. Chief, Special Security Branch, a memo: "Subject (Deleted) OPC) (Deleted) of SAC has been changed to above. Former (deleted) was (deleted). On December 14, 1950, the Chief, Special Security Branch, was informed by the Chief, Overseas Branch, that "(deleted) (Pseudo - Office of Policy Coordination) Please cancel your security clearance dated December 7, 1950. The decision has been made that the Subject is to be considered a semi-covert employee (deleted)."

HUNT IN MEXICO CITY DECEMBER 1950

HUNT'S first assignment for the Deputy Director/Plans took him to Mexico City where he became head of operations against the Soviets under Chief of Station Winston Scott. The CIA stated: "In December 1950 he was assigned as (deleted) Mexico City, and then served as (deleted) until August, 1953." HUNT was trained in Secret Writing, Flaps and Seals and Photography. HUNT described his role in Mexico City as "Chief of the Office of Policy Coordination Station in Mexico City in 1950 to 1952 or 1953." A highly deleted document about the Mexico City CIA Station: "(Deleted) COS Winston M. Scott (deceased) (Deleted) an (retired) (Deleted) (retired) (Deleted)on (retired in Mexico) COVERT ACTION (Deleted) HOWARD HUNT (retired)."

On April 1, 1953, this document about HUNT was generated by the CIA:

MEMORANDUM FOR: Chief, Security Control Staff

SUBJECT: Publication Clearance - HUNT

1. Mr. HUNT is Deputy Chief of a (Deleted) of the Western Hemisphere Division and he has been operating (Deleted).

2. Mr. HUNT has been granted security clearances for several novels during his employment with this Agency. In 1949, just prior to employment with the CIA, he published Day of the Serpent, a fictional work on the OSS in China. He has achieved considerable national prominence as an author of World War II stories.

3. On the last of his PHS he stated that an estimated one million pocket edition copies of two of his books are in circulation. His present publisher, Fawcett Publications, publishes the 25 and 35 cent books which are sold in drugstores, newsstands, hotels, stations etc. throughout the United States. It seems quite probable that Mr. HUNT would be known as a writer by persons in the (Deleted) and that his work would be read by some (Deleted) even though it is in English. It is not known whether or not the pocket book publishing companies have exported their publications in (Deleted).

4. Darkness on the Land is the title of the novel for which security clearance is now requested. There appear to be several objectional aspects in the novel when it is considered in combination with the fact that the author is (Deleted) in Latin America.

5. It would seem that the author's fixation in regard to the superiority of the Nordic to the Latin and Indian races, which permeates the entire novel, would be most offensive to Latin Americans. The Latin American might well argue that Mr. HUNT, like Erskine Caldwell, has taken a sample of the illiterate, amoral minority in Latin America and used it to depict a whole culture.

On September 17, 1953, HUNT generated a MFR on Cornelius Van Manen, a Dutch citizen who was entering the United States military: "Subject stated that it was unfortunate that Hitler did not succeed in his conquest of Europe...HOWARD HUNT SE/CPP." On December 4, 1953, HUNT was granted clearance for attendance at lectures of the Armed Forces Industrial College. HUNT worked with Colonel Edward Landsdale, an Army counterinsurgency expert. During his career with the CIA, HUNT was listed as assigned to the following Staffs and Divisions: PB II, WH/?, SP/?, PY/?, PP/CR/TV, SE/PP, WH/4, DODS/ R & P, DO/CA, OPSER, C/E/CA. In 1953 HUNT earned an Appreciation from Chief, PP, for assistance rendered in the preparation of "PP Operational Aids." In 1953 HUNT won another Appreciation from P.T. Culbertson, American Embassy, (Deleted) for ability, discretion and judgement displayed while assigned to (Deleted).

above is from: http://www.combat-diaries.co.uk/diary27/diary27chapter12.htm

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E. Howard Hunt
Thursday, January 25th, 2007 at 6:36 am
By Frank DeMarco
Filed under Frank's Insights

This obit from the Miami Herald raises troubling questions. Hunt no doubt saw himself as a patriot. So did Liddy. So do the others who do so many ethically questionable things in your name. Is it possible to be a good man in a bad cause? Of course it is. Possible to be a bad man in a good cause? A good man in a good cause? A bad man in a bad cause? Choose your perumutation. The thing is, though, you had better be prepared to continually re-assess your judgment, for we are only as good or as bad as our actions — aren’t we? Or are there other standards to judge by?

But what if our opinion of the actions changes? Hunt is considered to have failed at Watergate and, previously, at the Bay of Pigs invasion, but to have succeeded as a “long-serving CIA spymaster involved in the successful Guatemalan coup.” But what business did he have — did the CIA have — in overthrowing a government merely because it didn’t like that government’s principles and feared where it might lead?

Hunt helped overthrow Arbenz, and the result was decades of savage persecution of the Guatemalan poor. He failed in his attempt to overthrow Castro, and the result was decades of savage persecution of Castro’s political enemies. Was one action right and the other wrong? If so, which?

I do not pretend that any of these questions would have troubled Hunt, any more than they would have troubled Liddy. These are men apparently untroubled by ambiguity. But they ought to trouble the rest of us.

E. Howard Hunt, 88: Led break-in of Watergate

A former CIA officer, Hunt was best-known for recruiting the ‘plumbers’ who broke into the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate hotel.
BY NICHOLAS SPANGLER
nspangler@MiamiHerald.com

E. Howard Hunt, who stumbled into history after helping organize a botched break-in at the Watergate Hotel that brought down a president, died Tuesday at North Shore Medical Center. He was 88.

The cause of death was pneumonia, said his wife, Laura Hunt.

If Watergate doomed Richard Nixon’s presidency, it was, too, a reversal of fortune for a dashing, decorated World War II soldier, Hollywood screenwriter and long-serving CIA spymaster involved in the successful Guatemalan coup and the failed Bay of Pigs invasion.

Hunt had watched through binoculars on June 17, 1972, as five men — four of which he had recruited as so-called ”plumbers,” whose job it was to plug information leaks from the White House — were arrested as they searched the offices of the Democratic National Committee for evidence of illegal campaign contributions, some possibly from Fidel Castro. They found none but were arrested, in business suits, carrying thousands in $100 bills and an address book containing Hunt’s name and phone number.

Twenty-six months later, Nixon resigned.

Hunt faced 35 years but spent 33 months in prison after pleading guilty to conspiracy. He was financially ruined and lost his first wife, Dorothy, to a plane crash.

Finished in Washington, he eventually moved to Biscayne Park and made his living writing more than 80 novels, many of them spy thrillers with titles like Guilty Knowledge and The Paris Edge.

All told, 25 men were sent to prison for their involvement in the break-in, which left Hunt perplexed.

”My reaction was, whatever the president wants to have done, we’ll do it,” he told The Miami Herald in 1997. ‘ Believe me, if someone had come to me and said, `Hunt, we want you to join an assault on the Constitution,’ I would have said, ‘Hey, you’re crazy.’ ”

Hunt maintained a lifelong bitterness toward Nixon, who he felt “should have come forward for me and my compadres. There’s a long tradition that when a warrior is captured, the commanding officer takes care of his family. That goes back to the Revolutionary War.”

”He loved George Bush, both of them, and Reagan,” said Laura Hunt.

Everette Howard Hunt was born Oct. 9, 1918, graduated from Brown University in June 1940 and entered the U.S. Naval Academy two months after the United States entered World War II.

While a gunnery officer on the USS Mayo, Hunt was wounded and honorably discharged. In the hospital, he wrote his first novel, East of Farewell. For a while, he worked as a correspondent for Time and Life magazines.

In 1943, Hunt enlisted in the Army Air Force and became in instructor in the Air Force Intelligence School.

He volunteered for duty with the Office of Strategic Services, precursor to the CIA, and was sent to China — where he operated with Chinese guerrillas behind Japanese lines.

At the end of the war, Hunt won a Guggenheim Fellowship in creative writing and worked as a Hollywood screenwriter. Warner Brothers had paid $35,000 for his fourth novel, Bimini Run, when Hunt joined the CIA in 1949.

That was the year he married his first wife, Dorothy Wetzel De Goutiere, with whom he had four children.

For the next 21 years, Hunt served as a covert counterintelligence officer in Latin America, Asia and Europe.

In 1954, Hunt helped organize the overthrow of the elected president of Guatemala, Jacobo Arbenz.

In 1961, Hunt was assigned to create a provisional government in Cuba to rule after the U.S. invaded the island.

He retired from the CIA in 1970 and went to work for a PR firm in Washington.

There he met fellow Brown alumnus Charles Colson, special counsel to President Nixon, at a college reunion. Colson offered Hunt a $100-a-day job to do intelligence work for the White House.

In 1972, Hunt was tasked with bugging the telephone lines of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergatel. Hunt reached out to Bay of Pigs vets Bernard L. Barker, Virgilio Gonzalez, Rolando Eugenio Martinez and Frank Sturgis. But the job went bad.

Hunt was not reticent about his deeds, granting interviews and writing a soon-to-be published memoir, American Spy, but he came in for occasional criticism.

”We learned to let things just roll off,” Laura Hunt said. “He was serving his country.”

In his later years, Hunt was an avid hunter and tennis player before losing a leg to bad circulation. He read prodigiously and kept the TV tuned to Fox News.

In 1997, Hunt declared bankruptcy.

Martinez, one of the ”plumbers” Hunt recruited to help plug leaks from the Nixon White House, learned of Hunt’s death Tuesday. ”We spent a lot of time together, all the way back to the Bay of Pigs. He was a very good man,” Martinez, 84, said Tuesday from his Miami Beach home. “I’m not proud of what happened, but I have tried to move past it.”

Martinez received a pardon from President Ronald Reagan in 1983. But Reagan, Hunt’s hero, rejected a pardon for Hunt.

Gordon Liddy, who organized the Watergate job, has a less sanguine take.

”I did have contact with him after Watergate, up to the moment he decided to spill his guts,” Liddy said. “After which point I have never since spoken a word to him. Testifying was a betrayal of his principles. I think he’d stayed in the game too long. He was old and weak. We’d been friends, prior to that. But that pissed me off.”



Services will be Monday, but are private. Flowers can be sent to Cofer Funeral Home, 10931 NE Sixth Ave.

Bernard L. Barker, another of Hunt’s Miami recruits, was on his way to a florist Tuesday night to send a bouquet to Hunt’s family.

”My good friend died today,” said Barker, 89. “He was part of the history of the United States.”

Miami Herald staff writer Evan S. Benn contributed to this report.
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-----------------------------------------.
Children of Everett Howard7 Hunt Jr. (38) and Dorothy Louise Wetzel (43) are as follows:
Children of Everett Howard7 Hunt Jr. (38) and Laura Martin (97) are as follows:

11. RICHARD FLAVEL7 HUNT (51) (Horace6, Horace5, Edwin4, Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) is still living.
Children of Richard Flavel7 Hunt (51) and Ann B. Graves (53) are as follows:

12. DONALD EVERETT7 HUNT (52) (Horace6, Horace5, Edwin4, Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) is still living.
Children of Donald Everett7 Hunt (52) and Marjorie M. Farwell (57) are as follows:

Generation Eight



13. LISA TIFFANY8 HUNT (44) (Everett7, Everett6, Horace5, Edwin4, Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) is still living.
Children of Lisa Tiffany8 Hunt (44) and Charles William Kyle (48) are as follows:

14. KEVAN TOTTERDALE8 HUNT (45) (Everett7, Everett6, Horace5, Edwin4, Flavel3, Erastus2, Samuel1) is still living.
Children of Kevan Totterdale8 Hunt (45) and Michael R. Spence (82) are:



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