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THE DESCENDANTS OF MICHEL DESLOGES
Records

 

                        THE DesLOGES FAMILY
                (Now DeLoach-DeLoache-DeLoatch)

                                 By
                        Joseph Earle Steadman
                                1981


                                FOREWORD

        The main purpose of this book is to show the origin of the DesLoges-
Deloache family and, by a series of sketches, to show the direct line of
descent of the Reverend Zebulon DeLoache and his children from the
first known ancestor. Data on collateral lines generally has been omitted
with the thought that full information can or will be included in family
records compiled by descendants in those lines.
        This book is dedicated to the memory of my deceased wife,
Sarah/Sallie DeLoache Steadman, who was a kind, gentle, patient, and
loving person, and a faithful wife and mother.
        Gratitude is expressed to my nephew, Paul Matheny DeLoache, for
having this book published.

        Joseph Earle Steadman
        3107 Oakdale Road
        West Columbia, S.C. 29169


                                CONTENTS

Title Page
Foreword
Table of Contents......................................................v
Coat of Arms............................................................vi
The DesLoges Family (not DeLoche)..........................1
Sketch No. 1 - Michael DesLoges...............................7
The Immigrant to Virginia
Sketch No. 2- William DeLoach..................................9
   (also Collins and Oliver)
Sketch No. 3 - William DeLoach, Jr............................13
   (also Wall)
Sketch No. 4- Thomas DeLoach................................17
Sketch No. 4a - Michael Allison DeLoache.................21
Sketch No. 4b - Samuel DeLoache............................26
Sketch No. 5 - Thomas DeLoache, Jr........................29
Sketch No. 6 - Allison DeLoache...............................37
(also Asbill and Burton)
Sketch No. 7 - Zebulon DeLoache............................50
   (also Buzhardt, Howell, Humphries, Matheny,
   Roland, and Wright)
Sketch No. 8 - James Nathaniel DeLoache................65
   (also Boozer, Conwill, Creighton, Dennis,
   Hawkins, Kempson, Lester, and Musgrove)



Coat of Arms

                        THE DesLOGES FAMILY
                  (Now DeLoach-DeLoache-DeLoatch)

                            IN EUROPE

        As a foreword, all readers hereof are urged to distinguish between the
surnames DeLoche and Desloges. The former is pronounced "Duh
Loash", while the latter is pronounced "Duh Lozsh". These surnames
represent two separate and distinct families of ancient and modern
France, and have different origins and meanings. The following infor-
mation is given concerning the DeLOCHE family.

                        DELOCHE

        The DeLoche pedigree and arms are illustrated and described in
"L'Armorial Et Nobiliarie De L'Ancien, Duche' De Savoie", a copy of
this reference being contained in the Congressional Library at
Washington, D.C. The pedigree chart shows several disconnected
branches of this family represented during the period of 1307-1894. One
branch, traced from the year 1405 through the year 1852, includes
representatives who became members of the nobility with titles such as:
--Seigneurs De Servoz, Coseigneurs De Bozel, Barons De St. Martin,
Comtes De Vanzy, etc. The pedigree chart further shows that this family
was settled in the town (or city) of Maglans, Faucigny District of the
Duchy of Savoy, prior to the year 1307 and continuously thereafter for
several generations. In view of such early and continuous residence in
this locality the national origin of the DeLoche family can be determined
by reference to the history of the Duchy of Savoy. That history is briefly
set forth in the following paragraph.

        In the year 1111 Amadeus II, member of a princely family of Northern
Italy, was given the title COUNT OF SAVOY when his dominions were
raised to the status of a county and received the name of SAVOY. In
1391 Amadeus VIII, a later member, was given the title DUKE OF
SAVOY when the family dominions were raised to the status of a duchy
(or dukedom). Except for short periods of time the Duchy of Savoy con-
tinued to be a part of the Italian States during the following 469 years. In
1860 it was ceded to France, and is now divided into the present day
departments of Savoie and Haute Savoie in Eastern France. The above-
mentioned Faucigny District is a territorial division of Haute Savoie.

        From the preceding paragraph it will be seen that the DeLoche family
of the Duchy of Savoie is of Italian origin rather than French origin. The
pedigree chart shows that the family name in Latin was DeOCHIA (or
DeHOCHIA). The derivation of this surname and the transition to its
present form is explained by A. Dauzat on page 188 of his Etymological
Dictionary of Family Names and Christian Names of France -- (Diction-
naire Etymologique Des Noms De Famille Et Pre'noms De France), as
follows:

        Deloche, forme du centre, "de l'oie". Voir Deloye (surnom
d'un Marchand d'oies, etc.) -- Deloche Centre.

        The French word "oie (oies)" in the feminine gender is equivalent to
the English word "goose (geese)". Therefore the literal meaning of the

                                1

above is that the form of spelling the name of the center (market) at
which geese were sold was altered from "de l'oie" to "de l'oche", and
that the latter form eventually became the surname (DeLoche) of a mer-
chant who engaged in business at a goose market. The surname DeLOYE
had a similar origin. -- (For example: -- The name JEAN de l'oche, the
original form for JEAN DeLOCHE, literally meant "Jean of the Goose
Market".) -- The French language is directly descended from Latin, and
has dialect differences in different localities of the country. In the
Spanish language (also directly descended from Latin) the word for
"goose" in the feminine gender is "oca", this being similar to "Ochia"
in the previously mentioned Latin surname DeOCHIA.

                        DesLOGES

        The following references show the derivation of the surname
DesLOGES, together with the social status and place of residence of this
ancient family in France.
        Pages 188 and 197 of A. Dauzat's aforesaid Etymological
Dictionary of Family Names and Christian Names of France.

        Desloges, nom relatif a un nom de domaine, Loge
(primitivement "berceau de feuillage", allemand Laube);
aussi nom de village, surtout de hameau.
        DesLoges; "(Maison) des loges" (au sens ancien "abri de
feuillage", "cabane"), ou "originaire des Loges", nom de
localite' (de meme origine), re'pander surtout dans l'Ouest et le
centre.

        Pages 192 and 216 of Dionne's Origine Des FamilIes
(Origin of Families).
        Desloges - Loges, Seigneuries en Bourgogne, en Norman-
die, et dans le Poitou. Loge, abri de feuillage, cabane, bou-
tique, tribune.
        Desloges - Les Loges, Seigneuries en Normandie et dans le
Poitou. Loge, abri de feuillage, cabane, boutique, tribune.
The French word "loge" is equivalent to the German (allemand) word
`Laube" and the English word "lodge". The above references show that
-i primitive and ancient times the loge was a cradle (berceau) or shelter
(abri) of foliage (feuillage). In later times this word designated a cabin
(cabane), a shop (boutique), or a raised platform (tribune). At some date
in early history a collection of loges constructed in a certain locality
ocalite') was called "Les Loges (The Loges)", that name being given to
this hamlet (hameau) and its particular locality. The hamlet eventually
rew into a village (village) which, with its surrounding lands, became the
omain (domaine) of a member of the nobility. This nobleman lived in a
castle erected within his domain, and was known as the Lord of Loges
(Seigneur Des Loges). The domain was designated as the Lordship of
oges (Seigneurie Des Loges), and the nobleman's children and their
descendants were known as the House of Loges (Maison Des Loges). The
Lid references mention the Lordships of Loges in Burgundy (en
ourgogne), in Normany (en Normandie), and in Poitou (dans le
oitou), these being political divisions of the land area of ancient France.
is stated that the DesLoges family was scattered especially in Western
and Central France (repandu surtout dans l'Ouest et le centre).

                                2


        Though the above references mention three Lordships of Loges it is
probable that there was only one, that one having been created as a fief
in ancient Burgundy at a time when the northwestern corner of that
kingdom (or province) extended into Central France. This fief evidently
was situated within a geographical area which later, as the lines of
political divisions were altered during the course of years, was incor-
porated into Normandy, next into Poitou, and finally into Touraine.
Burgundy was founded as an independent kingdom by the Burgundians,
a German tribe which settled in the southeastern third of the country in
the year 413, and continued as such during many years before becoming
a part of modern France. As is suggested by one of the above references;
the name of the fief might first have been "Laube", a German name
which became Gallicized into "Loges" when the area was merged into
France. It appears that the particular area was that which lies to the
south of the present city of Orleans. Maps which define the political divi-
sions of the territory of ancient France in the year 800 show that parts of
Burgundia, Neustria (became Normandy in the year 912), and Aquitania
(the northern part became Poitou prior to 1189) border on each other at
about twenty-five miles southeast of Orleans. At about the year 1661 the
eastern part of Poitou was formed into the Province of Touraine.
        The "Old Lordship of Loges in Touraine (Desloges-Tour. Vieux
Seigneurie)", together with a description and/or an illustration of the
coat armor of the DesLoges family, is mentioned in the following
references.

        Page 1233 of Reitstap's Armorial General, Vol. 2 (L-Z),
1887. -- (The same description is given in the 1903 and
1904-1914 editions of this reference.)
        Desloges (Tour): D'azur a' une tour d'arg., maconne'e de
Sa., soutenue d'un Croiss du sec.

        Since the Province of Touraine was formed in the year 1661, it is evi-
dent that the Lordship of Loges in that province was existent in the said
year. It is interesting to note from history that the average Frenchman
then represented a nation whose people were the product of the earlier
welding together of several tribes into one. The earliest known in-
habitants of ancient France were the Celts, who were living there as early
as the year 630 B.C. During the centuries from about 630 B.C. to about
912 A.D. the Celts became amalgamated, successively, with invading and
conquering tribes of the Cimbrian, Roman, and Teutonic peoples. We
are thus informed as to the racial origin of the DesLoges family.
        The rise of Protestantism, embracing the doctrines of Martin Luther
and John Calvin, began in France in the sixteenth century. Of all the
kings who ruled there from 1515 to 1715 only Henry IV (1589-1610)
favored the cause of the Protestants. Due to the political and religious
character of the opposition launched against them the Protestants
became welded together into something like political as well as religious
unity, and were termed "Huguenots" by their enemies. The Huguenots
were objects of bitter and violent persecution by the Roman Catholic
Church and its agents, the disfavoring kings being among those agents.
Records of the time show that members of the DesLoges family were ac-
tively associated with the Huguenots.

                                3


        The "Caen Protestant Church Registers", - Volume 1(1571 and 1572)
was the only one available to this writer, - show Estienne Desloges, his
wife Marie, and other persons of the same surname as members of that
church. Caen (now the capital city of the department of Calvados) then
was a city in the old Province of Normandy. It was on 24 August 1572
that the terrible "Massacre of Saint Bartholomew" began in Paris. Dur-
ing the thirty days of slaughter, which spread throughout France, some
70,000 to 100,000 HuguenOts lost their lives.
        In 1624 the Duke - Cardinal Richelieu became the head of affairs in
France and began a crushing warfare against the Huguenots, whose
rallying point then was the fortified city of Rochelle (now the capital city
of the department of Charente - Infe'rieure). This city then was yet in the
large Province of Poitou. As stated by Goodrich in his "History of All
Nations", during the progress of the war "many of the sturdy Protestant
families of Poitou took refuge in Rochelle and were cut off in the
celebrated siege and sack of that city, - an event which took out of France
a large part of its best blood". The siege of Rochelle lasted from about 1
August to 29 October 1628, and more than 22,000 persons died within
the city. It was from Rochelle that some members of the DesLoges family
fled to England after revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
        The Edict of Nantes was revoked by Louis XIV on 18 October 1685.
This edict had been issued by Henry IV on 30 April 1598 and, among
other things, provided that the Huguenots have free exercise of religion
and equal claim with the Roman Catholics to all offices and dignities.
Revocation of the edict deprived the Huguenots of their civil rights and
inaugurated a period of persecution, torture, and murder designed to
compel them to abjure their faith. By this act more than 500,000
Huguenots were driven out of France and went to other countries, leav-
ing practically all of their material wealth behind them. Members of the
DesLoges family were among those who went to England; and some of
them, who fled from the city of Rochelle as previously mentioned,
became affiliated with the French Church on Threadneedle Street in the
city of London. Their names are recorded in the registers of that church
and some of the entries concerning them, as appear in Publications of the
Huguenot Society of London, are shown (in English translation) below
for example.
        (1) Adrian Lafons, young man, native of Rochelle, son of
Raimond Lafons and Elizabeth Tibau, and Marguerite
Desloges, native of Rochelle, daughter of Nicholas Desloges
and Marie Eviellard, announced their intention of marriage,
11 December 1687.
        (2) On 16 February 1688 Adrian Lafons and Marguerite
Desloges were married by Mr. Satur, Minister. Announced in
the Church of London. Certificate 15 February, signed by
Gravisset.
        (3) Marie Desloges, young woman, of Rochelle, 23 years of
age, recognized as a member, 14 June 1688.
        (4) Marie Desloges, born 8 February , married 27
February 1725-6.
        (5) Isaac Mordant, widower, native of Hautretop in Nor-
mandy, married Elizabeth LaFond, native of London,

                                5


daughter of the late Adrian LaFond and the late Marguerite
Desloge, 18 May 1730.
        While the earliest register entry mentioned above was made in the year
1687, Smiles (the author), in his book entitled "The Huguenots", states
that the French church which first was on Threadneedle Street and later
removed to Founders Hall Chapel was active during the period of
1599-1753. He also states that the records of most of the Huguenot chur-
ches were lost, those which were not lost being now preserved at
Somerset House. Therefore, it is understood that the Publications of the
Huguenot Society of London contain entries only from those registers
which were not lost.
        From another source it is learned that one Michael DesLoges was in
England in the year 1663, this being thirty-five years after the siege and
capture of Rochelle in 1628. The said Michael was born about the year
1645. If his birth occurred in France he fled that country and went to
England before or during 1663. If his birth occurred in England it is
probable that his parents fled from France during the years of
persecuting warfare which followed the capture of Rochelle. His name
appears on page 13 of a record entitled "Servants To Foreign Planta-
tions, Vol. II, 1663-1679", as published in a book entitled "Bristol and
America - A Record Of The First Settlers In The Colonies Of North
America, 1654-1685". In 1663 or 1664 he was registered (as Michaell
Deloge) for passage in a ship sailing from Bristol, England, to the
Virginia Colony in North America. Regular navigation across the Altan-
tic Ocean from England to the North American Colonies was first
established, and then was in continuance at Bristol; therefore Michael's
presence at that port can thus be accounted for. He probably went there
from London. The author of "Bristol And America" states that though
these "Servants of the Plantations" were officially known as such, this
name was a misnomer in the majority of cases. The vast majority went
out as free emigrants paying the cost of their own transportation and the
cost of transportation for others who went with them as their
"headrights". It is assumed that Michael paid the cost of his own
transportation, since no subsequent mention of him as a "headright" in
Virginia has been found. In Virginia his surname became Anglicized as
Deloach/DeLoach, which form of spelling some of his descendants
changed to DeLoache or DeLoatch.

                                6


                                 SKETCH NO. 1
                           MICHAEL DesLOGES
                                        the
                        IMMIGRANT TO VIRGINIA

        Michael DesLoges (ca. 1645 - lvg. 1709), founder of the DeLoach -
DeLoache - DeLoatch family in America, arrived in Virginia from
Bristol, England, during the year 1663 or 1664. He then was an unmar-
ried man of about nineteen years of age. He settled in Isle of Wight
County, where he became engaged in the business of tailoring. It is con-
jectured that his parents and/or grandparents owned and operated a
tailoring establishment in France or England, and that Michael served an
apprenticeship in that establishment before coming to Virginia for the
purpose of bettering his lot among the people of that then flourishing
colony. As a newcomer to the colony he received a grant of fifty acres of
land, but its location has not been determined by this writer.
        At about 1668 Michael married Jane Griffith (b. ca. 1650), the only
child of Rowland Griffith who -- if not a native of Wales -- was of
Welsh descent. On 9 April 1663 Governor Francis Morrison of Virginia
granted to Rowland Griffith 765 acres of land situated on Blackwater
River in Isle of Wight County. By his will (9 August 1671) Rowland Grif-
fith of Isle of Wight County gave "all of my estate to Jane Desloges my
only daughter now wife unto Michaell Desloges, taylor"; but they were
not to sell it. Robert Kae and Charles Williams were appointed as
trustees. -- (Isle of Wight County, Va., Wills, etc., Book I, page 238.)
The estate included the said 765 acres of land, which doubtless descended
to one or more children of Michael and Jane.
        It appears that Michael and Jane settled in that part of Isle of Wight
County which then was called Newport (or the Upper) Parish, and that
he was living there as late as 1709. On 20 June 1709 Thomas Cook of the
Upper Parish conveyed to Michael DeLoach of the same parish, for the
sum of 2500 pounds of tobacco, 100 acres of land lying in the Upper
Parish on the Second Swamp. -- (Deed Book 2, page 110). Two days
later, on 22 June 1709, his son Michael DeLoach and wife Mary of War-
wicksqueake (or the Lower) Parish sold to Jacob Harvey land lying in the
Lower Parish. -- (Deed Book 2, page 109.)
        Michael and/or Jane might have died shortly before or during 1719.
The number of children born to them is not known. There probably were
one or more daughters who married but, due to the loss of records, now
cannot be identified as members of the family. Also, there probably were
 one or more children who died before reaching the age of maturity.
However, records of the time which escaped loss or destruction furnish
circumstantial evidence (which has been accepted as proof) that they
were the parents of three sons who grew to maturity, married, and left
surviving children. These sons were the following named persons.
        1. Michael DeLoach, Jr. (ca. 1671 - 1727). -- He married
        Mary , and they were the parents of
        Michael III and Thomas, as named in their father's will. --
        (Isle of Wight County, Va., Will Book 3, page 38.)

                                7


        2. William DeLoach (ca. 1678 - 1747). -- See SKETCH NO. 2.)
        3. Thomas DeLoach (ca. 1680 - 1748). -- He married ________,
        and they were the parents of Samuel,
        Thomas, William, Solomon, and a son (Richard?) who died
        before the making of his father's will. -- (Isle of Wight County
        ty, Va., Will Book 5, page 117.) In 1980 Mrs. Ernest Rae
        Wiese (nee O'Levia Neal Wilson) of Waco, Texas, was
        gathering data for a record to be published concerning him
        and his descendants.         NOTE: When Earle Steadman
        was writing the book in 1980, Mrs. Neil Wiese was
        gathering material on the DeLoach family, but she did NOT
        publish anything concerning the Thomas DeLoach family.

                                8


                          SKETCH NO. 2
                        WILLIAM DeLOACH

        William DeLoach (c. 1678 - 1747). -- On 9 November 1698, being then
a resident of Isle of Wight County, Va., he deposed as to the oral will
spoken by his landlady, Margaret Wilson, who died interstate on 16
February 1698. At the time of the deposition it was stated that he was
about 20 years of age; therefore, it is evident that he was born about
1678. -- (Isle of Wight Will Book 2, pages 386-7.)
        At about 1701 William married Eleanor Collins (c. 1683 - 1750),
daughter of John and Eleanor (Oliver) Collins of Isle of Wight County.
By his will of record in that county John Collins devised to his daughter
Eleanor 1,750 acres of land which had been granted to him in Southwark
Parish of Surry County, Va., -- 800 acres prior to 20 April 1684 and 950
acres on that date. In early 1705 William and Eleanor DeLoach were liv-
ing on the said land, parts of which they sold at various times, as follows:
        (a) 800 acres sold to William Rowland on 5 March 1705. --
        (Surry County Deed Book 4, page 346.)
        (b) 350 acres sold to Thomas King on 14 February 1720. --
        (Surry County Will and Deed Book, 1715-1730, Part 1, page
        317.)
        (c) 100 acres sold to Zachariah Madera on 15 April 1723. --
        (Idem, page 630.)
        (d) 500 acres sold to Peter Fiveash on 18 April 1727. --
        (Idem, page 694.) It was on this tract of land that William and
        Eleanor lived during their residence in Surry County.
        On 21 November 1704 William bought from Debora Portis (widow of
John Portis) 100 acres of land lying on Freshpond Branch in the Lower
(Warwicksqueake) Parish of Isle of Wight County. -- (Isle of Wight
Deed Book 2, page 17.) On 5 January 1708 he sold this land to his
brother Michael DeLoach, Jr., and Eleanor his wife released her dower
rights. - (Idem, Book 2, page 99.) It is probable that William and Eleanor
had decided to settle on this land, but soon after its purchase they re-
versed their decision and moved to the forementioned land in Surry
County.
        In the year 1719 William and Eleanor sold land to Thomas Day. --
(Virginia Historical Genealogies, page 2.) This land doubtless was
situated in Isle of Wight County. It might have been a proportionate part
(255 acres) of the 765 acres granted to Rowland Griffin/Griffith on 9
April 1663 and devised by him to his daughter Jane Desloges (wife of
Michael 1st), which land they were not to sell. -- (Other sons, Michael
and Thomas, also would have received 255 acres each. It appears that
Jane might have died at about 1719; having survived her husband.)
When the last portion of land in Southwark Parish of Surry County
was sold (on 18 April 1727) William and Eleanor were living in Isle of'
Wight County. The deed for the sale states that they "lately lived" on
that land. The removal to Isle of Wight County probably occurred in
1723, for in that year he was granted 350 acres of land on the south side
of Meherrin River in Isle of Wight County. -- (Grant Book 10, page 261;
Virginia County Records, Vol. 7, page 8.) In 1732 he was granted an ad-

                                9


ditional 50 acres of land, thought to have been adjoining the said 350
acres. -- (Grant Book 14, page 165.) These 400 acres were situated in
that part of Isle of Wight County which in 1720 was incorporated into
the newly formed Brunswick County and which in 1781 became a part of
the present Greensville County. Though Brunswick County was formed
in 1720, because of its sparse population the political affairs and public
records of the county were administered in Isle of Wight County during
the period of 1720-1732. -- (Executive Journals of the Council of Co-
onial Virginia, Vol. IV, page 266.) The said 400-acre tract also bordered
on the Virginia-North Carolina boundary line. In connection with the
survey of that line it was mentioned on 20 September 1728 as William
DeLoach's plantation. -- (North Carolina Colonial - State Records,
Vol. ,page .)
        North Carolina land grants show that William DeLoache patented
lands in that province as follows: -- 200 acres in Edgecombe County on
30 June 1738, 400 acres in Bertie (later Northampton) County on 7 May
1742, 600 acres (in two tracts of 300 acres each) in Edgecombe County on
11 November 1743. -- (North Carolina Records, Vol. 4, pages 332, 619,
and 641; Grant Book 5, page 230; Grant Book 10, page 73.) At some
time before his death he gave the 800 acres of land in Edgecombe County
to his son William, Jr. By his will he gave the 400-acre tract in Bertie
(later Northampton) County to his son Francis. Edgecombe County was
formed from the original Bertie County and then included several of the
modern counties of North Carolina. -- (Corbitt - Formation of North
Carolina Counties, 1663-1943.) The exact location (as to modern county)
of the land given to William, Jr., has not been determined. However, it is
thought that the land was situated either in the present day Warren or
Halifax County.
        The will of William DeLoach of Brunswick County, Va., dated 25
March 1745 and proved on 3 March 1747, is recorded in Brunswick
County Will Book 2, page 140. By this will he disposed of his estate in the
following manner.
        To his wife Eleanor he gave 500 acres of land (the planta-
        tion whereon I now live together with the lands thereunto
        belonging) for the term of her natural life, two female negroes
        to be at her own disposing, and a negro boy during the term
        of her natural life.
        To his son Francis he gave the 500 acres of land and the
        negro boy which were given first to Eleanor during the term
        of her natural life, 400 acres of land on the south side of Wild
        Catt Swamp in Northampton (formerly Bertie) County,
        N.C., and four negroes.
        To his daughter Martha (wife of Harmon Hill) two negroes
        and a chest with key thereto.
        To his daughter Anne (wife of William Hill) three negroes,
        two cows, and two calves.
        To his granddaughter Cela Hill (daughter of William and
        Anne Hill) one cow and calf.
        To his son William two negroes. -- In times past he had
        "already given William lands and negroes equal in value or
        surmounting the value of" what in his will was bequeathed to

                                10


        any one of his other children.
   The 500 acres given to Eleanor doubtless included the heretofore men-
tioned 400 acres in Isle of Wight/Brunswick County and an additonal
100 acres joined thereto at a date not known to this writer. The lands
given to William, Jr., prior to the making of his father's will, doubtless
were the forementioned 200 acres and 600 acres (total of 800 acres) in
Edgecombe County, N.C., and a 100-acre tract in the then Brunswick
County, Va., which on 22 February 1727 William, Jr., sold to Benjamin
Boykin. -- (See SKETCH NO. 3.) In addition to the land (a total of 900
acres) given to William, Jr., he also had received a number of slaves
previous to the time when his father made his will. Thus his portion of
the estate was "equal in value or surmounting the value" of what was
given to any other one of his father's children.
        The will of Eleanor DeLoach, widow, of Brunswick County, Va.,
dated 30 September 1748 and proved on 26 September 1750, is recorded
in Brunswick County Will Book 2 (1739-1785), pages 185 and 186. By
this will she disposed of her personal property in the following manner.
        To her son Francis a negro wench, and all other part of the
        estate not otherwise mentioned.
        To her grandson Thomas DeLoach (son of Francis) a negro
        girl child.
        To her granddaughter Eleanor Hill (daughter of Harmon
        Hill) fifteen shillings current money to buy her a ring.
        To her daughter Anne Hill (wife of William Hill) a riding
        horse and side saddle, a trunk with lock and key and a large
        bottle in the trunk, and all wearing apparel.
        To her granddaughters Celia Philips and Anne Hill
        (daughters of William and Anne Hill) a negro girl child, but
        to Anne only if Celia should die without an heir.
        To her son William, Jr., twenty shillings current money.
        To her granddaughter Eleanor DeLoach (daughter of
        William, Jr.) fifteen shillings current money to buy her a ring.
        The above-mentioned children are not listed in the order of
        birth. There probably were others who died before their
        father's will was made. The order of birth apparently was as
        follows:
        1. William, Jr. (ca. 1702; lvg. 1765) -- See SKETCH NO. 3.
        2. Martha (ca. 1704; bef. 30 September 1748). -- She mar-
        ried Harmon Hill and had issue.
        3. Anne (ca. 1707; lvg. 1748). -- She married William Hill
        and had issue.
        4. Francis (ca. 1710; 1770). -- He married Charlotte (?)
        Hart, and settled in Northampton County, N.C. They were
        the parents of William, Thomas, Michael, Solomon, and
        Charlotte DeLoach.

                                11

                                OLIVER

        John Oliver (died 1655?), maternal grandfather of Eleanor Collins
who married William DeLoach, apparently was an immigrant who came
to Virginia from England during the middle 1600s. On 2 July 1650
Governor Berkeley granted to him 300 acres of land on Blackwater River
in Isle of Wight County. He died while on a trip to England; but before
leaving Virginia, on 19 April 1652 he made a will (recorded on 16 June
1655) in which he mentioned his wife Ellen and gave to his son John and
two daughters the land on Blackwater River. -- (Deed Book 2, p. 79;
Will Book 1, p. 93.)
        John Collins (see below) who married Eleanor Oliver (older daughter
of John) and John Wakefield who married Mary Oliver (younger
daughter of John), with the consent of their wives, on 5 January 1666/7
deeded the 300 acres of land on Blackwater River to John Branch. --
(John B. Bodie -- Historical Southern Families, Vol. II, p. 98.) It ap-
pears that John Oliver the brother of these sisters died, unmarried, prior
to the date of the said deed.

                                COLLINS

        John Collins (died 1692), father of Eleanor Collins who married
William DeLoach, apparently was either an immigrant who came to
Virginia from England during the middle 1600s or the son of an im-
migrant who came at an earlier date. He settled in Surry County, Va.,
where before or after and during 1684 he acquired a total of 1,750 acres
of land. His first wife was Eleanor Oliver (died before 1682), daughter of
 John Oliver of Isle of Wight County, Va. -- (Will and Deed Book 1, p.
93.) She was the mother of Eleanor Collins who married William
DeLoach, and probably was the mother of John Collins, Jr., who died
prior to 1692 leaving his sister Eleanor as her father's heir at law.
        He evidently was a member of the Friends Society (Quakers). On 4
November 1682, at a meeting of men and women Friends in the house of
William Bressies in Isle of Wight County, Va., John Collins and Mary
Tooke (perhaps a widow) of Surry County propounded their marriage.
At a meeting on 8 December 1682, in the house of Thomas Jordan at
Chuckatuck in Nansemond County, Va., they again published their mar-
riage. They were married on 14 December 1682 in the house of John
Barnes his father-in-law (the father of Mary) in Isle of Wight County.
She evidently died prior to 1692, leaving no Collins children. -- (Early
Quaker Records in Virginia, p. 222; Chapman -- Isle of Wight County,
Va., Marriages, p. 103.)
        An inventory of the estate of John Collins, deceased, was taken at his
house in Surry County, and was signed by J. Tooke and other persons on
8 January 1693. The inventory and record of sale were returned to a
Surry County Court held on 3 July 1694. -- (Surry County Deed Book,
1694-1709, Part 1, pp. 12 and 13.)

                                12


                           SKETCH NO. 3
                        WILLIAM DeLOACH, JR.

        William DeLoach, Jr. (ca. 1702 - lvg. 1765). -- He probably was born
in that part of old Surry County, Va., which in 1720 became a part of
Brunswick County and in 1781 became a part of the present Greensville
County, Va. At about 1725 he married Judith Wall (ca. 1707 - lvg. 1755),
daughter of Richard and Lucy Wall. Richard's will (dated 29 February
1752 and proved in August 1755) of record in Northampton County,
N.C., names his daughter Judith DeLoach. -- (Grimes - North Carolina
Wills, 1690-1760, page 390; North Carolina Historical and Genealogical
Register, Vol. 1, page 516.) William and Judith first settled on a 100-acre
tract of land -- (lying on Fountains Creek and Meherrin River in the then
Brunswick County and immediately above the Virginia-North Carolina
boundary line) -- which evidently was given to him by his father. On 22
February 1727, after moving down into North Carolina, he sold this land
to Benjamin Boykin, and Judith the wife of William DeLoach, Jr., re-
nounced her dower rights. -- (Brunswick County, Va., Deed Book 1,
page 406.)
        On 6 June 1731 William DeLoach, Jr., was granted 350 acres of land
situated on the south side of Meherrin River, in that part of old Bertie
County, N.C., which in 1741 was formed into Northampton County. --
(North Carolina State/Colonial Records, Vol. 4, page 624.) -- Hereafter
mentioned as William DeLoach.
        In 1739 William DeLoach and Richard Wall (William's father-in-law
or brother-in-law) were appointed jurors for Bertie-Edgecombe Coun-
ties. On 5 February 1740 William DeLoach appeared on the list of jurors
for those counties. -- (North Carolina State/Colonial Records, Vol. 4,
page 524.)
      By his father's will he was given two negroes, with the statement: -- "I
have already given my foresaid son William DeLoach lands and negroes
in times past equal in value or surmounting the value of which I have
herein bequeathed to any one of my other children and in fore time
delivered to him". The lands given to him were the forementioned 100
acres in Brunswick County, Va., and the 800 acres of land in Edgecombe
County, N.C. No record of the disposition of the said 800 acres has been
found by this writer.
        In 1744-5 William moved to the Welsh Tract on the Pee Dee River in
South Carolina. In a petition (read and approved on 8 February 1745)
presented to the Council of Colonial South Carolina he prayed for a
grant of 350 acres of land in right of seven persons (evidently himself, his
wife, and five slaves, -- 50 acres of land being allowed for each person)
included in his family. For the 350 acres he had previously paid to the
possessor œ 100 currency for his good will, although the possessor then
had neither a warrant nor a grant for the land. The petitioner also stated
his desire to erect a grist mill for serving the people of the Welsh Tract.
The following described actions resulted from this petition.
        (a) On 22 January 1747 William received a grant for 200
        acres on the Pee Dee River and situated in the present
        Chesterfield County, S.C., at a point between the towns of
        Society Hill and Cheraw. This was his home plantation until

                                13


        20 March 1754, when he sold it and moved to land on the
        "South Prong" of Lynches Creek in the present Kershaw
        County, S.C. -- (Plat Books, Vol. 4, page 338; Grant Books,
        Vol. 4, 1752-1774, Class 1, page 116; Council Journals of
        Colonial South Carolina; H.T. Cook - Rambles In The Pee
        Dee Basin of South Carolina, page 64; Deed Book PP, pages
        269-271, at Charleston, S.C., and microfilm of same in the
        State Archives at Columbia, S.C.)
        (b) On 13 September 1746 a plat for 150 acres on the Pee
        Dee River and situated in the present Marlboro County, S.C.,
        was certified for William. He either allowed his warrant for
        the land to lapse or sold it to another person and no grant was
        given to him. -- (Plat Books, Vol. 4, page 339; Council Jour-
        nals of Colonial South Carolina.)
        On 23 March 1748 a survey of 50 acres of land in the present Chester-
field County, S.C., was certified for William, which land apparently was
due him in right of a child who came with him to South Carolina and
died there during 1745 or early 1746. Since no grant was given to
William, he probably sold his warrant for the land to Robert Williams
for whom the plat was certified on 5 May 1752. -- (Plat Books, Vol. 5,
page 169; Council Journals of Colonial South Carolina.)
        After coming to South Carolina William and Judith DeLoach became
members of the Welsh Neck Baptist Church located at James' Neck, on
the Pee Dee River, in the present Marlboro County. At about 1754 a
group of members moved westward from this church towards Lynches
Creek, where on 1 September 1755 they organized the first Baptist
church on that creek. William and Judith went with that group and were
constituent members of the said church, which was located on the east
side of the main stream of the creek in the present Chesterfield County.
--(Leah Townsend -- South Carolina Baptists, 1670-1805, pages 95 and
96n.)
        On 22 January 1756 and on 9 September 1756 separate plats, -- each
for 150 acres of land due him in right of three children who came with
him to South Carolina, -- were certified for William. The said land -- (a
total of 300 acresfor six children) --was situated on the "South Prong"
of Lynches Creek in the present Kershaw County, S.C. Since no grants
were given to William, he probably sold his warrants for the separate
tracts of land, respectively, to William Welsh for whom the first plat was
certified on 2 February 1762 and to Andrew Baskin for whom the second
plat was certified on 1 December 1761. -- (Plat Books, Vol. 7, pages 162
and 188; Council Journals of Colonial South Carolina.)
        Early in 1759 many members of the Baptist Church on Lynches Creek
removed to Coosawhatchie, where on 12 September 1759 a Baptist
church was constituted. This church (now Beach/Beech Branch Baptist
Church) was located at the head of the Coosawhatchie River in the pres-
ent day Hampton County, S.C. It is thought that William and Judith
became members of this church. (Leah Townsend -- South Carolina
Baptists, 1670-1805, pages 47, 48, 95 and 96; Two Centuries of Lawton-
ville Baptists, 1775-1975, pages XX and 15.) Hampton County then was
part of old Granville County, S.C.
        On 2 October 1759 William petitioned the Council of Colonial South

                                14


Carolina for a grant of 100 acres of land in Granville County. At that
time, -- because of disturbed conditions attending the Cherokee Indian
War of 1759-1760, -- no land was surveyed for him. On 6 August 1765
he petitioned that a warrant to him for the land he prolonged. The peti-
tion was read and approved, but no record of further action on the mat-
ter has been found by this writer. It is believed that William died during
or soon after 1765. The requested land apparently was situated in that
part of old Granville County which now is Allendale County, S.C. --
(Council Journals of Colonial South Carolina.)
        On 21 October 1754, prior to his removal to Lynches Creek, William
DeLoatch of Pee Dee, Craven County, S.C., gave power of attorney to
Arthur Bryan of the same place to receive, recover, -- all moneys, -- due
him in the government of Virginia. -- (Records at Charleston, S.C.,
Courthouse: -- Miscellaneous Records, 1754-1758, page 106.) This
writer has not determined what moneys were due to William in the
government of Virginia, unless the moneys were owing to him by persons
who were living in Virginia and had bought William's North Carolina
lands.
        In addition to the seven children who came to South Carolina with
William and Judith there were four others who were born after their
parents' arrival in the province. The total number of children included
the following listed persons.
        1. Thomas (ca. 1726 - ca. 1805). -- See SKETCH No. 4.
        2. William (ca. 1728 - lvg. 1786). -- Born in old Edgecombe County,
N.C.; apparently never married; settled in old Beaufort District, S.C.;
served with the Americans during the Revolutionary War.
        3. A child (ca. 1730 - ca. 1746). -- Born in old Edgecombe County,
N.C.; died in old Craven County, S.C.
        4. Hardy (ca. 1735 - c. 1820). -- Born in old Edgecombe County,
N.C.; married Elizabeth Hart; settled in old Beaufort District, S.C.;
served with the Americans during the Revolutionary War; removed to
Georgia after 1790. A record of him and his descendants will be pub-
lished by His Honor, Judge Harry R. DeLoach of Claxton, Ga.
        5. Michael (ca. 1740 - ca. 1815). -- Born in old Edgecombe County,
N.C.; married Elizabeth Rochell?; settled in old Beaufort District, S.C.;
served with the Americans during the Revolutionary War.
        6. Jesse (1742 - 1817). -- Born in old Edgecombe County, N.C.; mar-
ried Ann _____________________; settled in old Beaufort District, S.C.;
served with the Americans during the Revolutionary War.
        7. Eleanor (ca. 1744 - ca. 1780). -- Born in old Edgecombe County,
N.C.; believed to have been the first wife of Henry King, Sr., and the
mother of the Reverend Henry King, Jr. (Baptist Minister), of old
Craven County and old Edgefield County, S.C.
        8. Averilla (ca. 1746 - lvg. 1783). -- Born in old Craven County,
S.C.; married (1) Giles Burdett of old Edgefield County, S.C.; married
(2) Henry King, Sr., as his second wife. -- (See 7 above.)
        9. Frances? (ca. 1748 - lvg. 1774). -- Born in old Craven County,
S.C.; believed to have been the first wife of Wright Nicholson of old
Edgefield County, S.C.
        10. Elizabeth (ca. 1750 - 1843). -- Born in old Craven County, S.C.;
married (1) Josiah Allen; married (2) Aaron Etheridge married (3)

                                15


___________________ Edwards -- (all of old Edgefield County, S.C.).
She was about 93 years old when she died.
        11. David (1752 - 1815). -- Born in old Craven County, S.C.; married
Rebecca ______________________; settled in old Beaufort District, S.C.;
served with the Americans during the Revolutionary War.
        William and Judith probably had three or four other children who
were born and died in North Carolina before their parents removed to
South Carolina.

                                WALL

        Joseph Wall (died 1727), grandfather of Judith Wall who married
William DeLoach, Jr., apparently was an immigrant or the son of an im-
migrant who came to Virginia from England during the middle or late
1600s. He settled in Surry County, Va., where in 1704 he was the owner
of 150 acres of land. His will (probated on 13 April 1727 and recorded in
Surry County) names his children: -- James, Joseph, John, Richard (see
below), Robert, and Elizabeth. His wife evidently died prior to the mak-
ing of his will. -- (John B. Boddie -- Historical Southern Families, Vol.
II., p. 99.)
        Richard Wall (died 1755) moved to Northampton County, N.C.,
where he was living at the time of his death. His will (dated 29 February
1752 and probated in August Court 1755), of record in that county,
names his wife Lucy and children: -- Sampson, Richard, Arthur,
Samuel, Judith Deloatch (married William DeLoach Jr.), Sarah Boykin
(2nd wife of Francis Boykin), Precila Benson, and Jane Lewis. -- (North
Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 1, p. 511.)

                                16


                         SKETCH No. 4
                        THOMAS DELOACH

        (In this and the following sketches "Saluda County" is
        used interchangeably with "Edgefield County" to more
        specifically designate the location of lands, churches, and
        places of residence.)

        Thomas DeLoach (ca. 1726 - ca. 1805). -- He was born in that part of
old Brunswick County, Va., which in 1781 became a part of the present
Greensville County, Va. Soon thereafter he was taken by his parents to
old Edgecombe County, N.C., and in 1744-5 he went with them to the
present Chesterfield County, S.C. At about 1749 he married Patience
Allison (ca. 1732 - ca. 1805), a supposed relative of Andrew Allison who
was a justice of the peace for old Craven County, S.C. -- (Andrew
Allison, a long-time landowner, lived and died in that part of Craven
County which now is Richland County, S.C.) -- In 1763 Thomas
DeLoach, then living in the present Richland County, "made affidavit
before Andrew Allison as a witness to the execution of a paper by
Abraham Odam and Cibbie his wife", who also were residents of that
county. -- (Kirkland and Kennedy -- Historic Camden, Part One, page
87n; Green -- History of Richland County, S.C., pages 30, 64, 92, and
221.) During the period of 1756-1765 the name of Thomas DeLoache
(also Delotch) appears as an adjacent landowner on certified plats for
other persons. (Plat Books in the State Archives at Columbia, S.C.)
        It is noted from the above cited references that the surname of Thomas
is spelled DeLoach or DeLoache, which forms are in current use by his
descendants who bear that surname. In the remainder of this sketch, and
in the remaining sketches contained in this book, the writer will show the
surname mostly as DeLoache, though it might be shown differently in
records of the time.
        At about 1772-3 Thomas moved from the present Richland County to
that part of old Colleton County, S.C., which in 1765 became a part of
old Ninety Six District, in 1785 became a part of old Edgefield District/-
County, and in 1895 became Saluda County. In response to his petition
to the Council of Colonial South Carolina for a grant of land in his new
location, on 6 April 1773 a precept (writ, or judicial command in writing)
was issued for the survey of 400 acres of land for him. The survey was
certified for him on 4 May 1773 and the grant to him was signed on 31
August 1774. The grant, given to Thomas DeLoache by George the Third
(King of Great Britain), was signed by William Bull the Lieutenant
Governor of the Province of South Carolina. The 400 acres were de-
scribed as follows:
        On Red Bank Creek and on Penn Creek, a branch of Little
        Saludy River in Ninety Six District, bounding north and
        northeastward on Samuel Everidge's/Etheridge's, Jacob
        Smith's, and Joseph Hogan's land; south and westward on
        Mr. Russell's land and land the owner's name not known and
        part vacant land; and partly encloses a tract of Sanders
        Walker and a tract of James Davis (Disones).

                                17

        A record of the above-mentioned grant is contained in the Council
Journals of Colonial South Carolina, in a book of Royal Grants (Vol.
32, 1774, Class 1, page 558), and in a book of Memorials (Vol. 13, page
323) in the State Archives at Columbia, S.C. It also is mentioned on page
171 of Leah Townsend's "South Carolina Baptists, 1670-1805"
        Records in the courthouse at Edgefield, S.C., show that Thomas
DeLoache, Sr., disposed of the foresaid 400 acres of land as follows:
        (a) On 7 March 1777 he sold 200 acres to Jesse Jernigan.
        The witnesses to the deed were Thomas DeLoache, Jr., John
        Cotton, and Charity Cotton. On 2 September 1785 the deed
        was proved by Thomas DeLoache, Jr., and recorded on 10
        October 1796. -- (Deed Book 0/13, 1796-1797, pages
        253-257.) On 8 April 1795 the heirs of Jesse Jernigan sold 75
        acres of this land to William Burdett. The witnesses to the
        deed were Henry King, Averilla King, and Joel Brown. --
        (Deed Book 13, page 247.) On 4 September 1807 William
        Burdett sold the 75 acres to William H. Lewis, who on 29
        December 1813 sold the tract (with other lands) to James
        Bonham. -- (Deed Book JJ/32, page 479.)
        (b) On 31 January 1789 Thomas DeLoache, Sr., and his
        son Michael DeLoache together signed a deed whereby they
        sold 50 acres to Moses Brown. The witnesses to the deed were
        Jacob Brown, James Allen, and Christopher Brooks. --
        (Deed Book 12, 1795-1796, page 23.) It appears that Thomas
        had previously given the land to Michael, but had not yet
        given him a covering deed; therefore the son was not free to
        dispose of the land in his own right. The 50 acres were
        separated, by a branch, from a tract owned by Michael's
        brother Samuel DeLoache.
        (c) On 12 May 1789 he sold 65 acres to Josiah Thomas. The
        witnesses to the deed were Henry King, William Burdett, and
        Samuel DeLoache. The deed was signed by him and his wife
        Patience DeLoache. -- (Deed Book 10, -1794, pages
        95-97.) This land apparently was a part of the 200 acres which
        were sold to Jesse Jernigan, but had been recovered by
        Thomas DeLoache prior to its sale to Josiah Thomas.
        (d) The 150 acres remaining after the sales to Jesse Jernigan
        and Moses Brown apparently were situated a short distance
        above the junction of Red Bank Creek and Penn Creek. This
        evidently was the home place on which Thomas and Patience
        were living at the time of the 1790 and 1800 censuses for
        Edgefield County, S.C. It is assumed that they died there and
        were buried in a graveyard on an adjoining plantation belong-
        ing to their son Samuel DeLoache. The disposition of the 150
        acres has not been learned by this writer.

        Thomas and Patience were living alone, and near to their sons Michael
and Samuel DeLoache, at the time of the 1790 census for Edgefield
County, S.C. At the time of the 1800 census three sons of Michael were
living with them. The known children of Thomas and Patience were the
following named persons.
1. Michael Allison (ca. 1750; ca. 1800). -- See SKETCH No. 4a.

                                19


2. Elizabeth (ca. 1752; ). -- At about 1769 she married Barrett
Travis as his first wife, and they settled on lands near to her brother
Samuel DeLoache in the present Saluda County, S.C. Among their
children were the following named persons. -- (1790 census for
Edgefield County, S.C. -- Barret Travis.)
        2a. Elizabeth (ca. 1770; lvg. 1830). -- She married Mumford Per-
ryman (died 1820). Her uncle Samuel DeLoache was on her bond, as ad-
ministratrix of her husband's estate, for $30,000.00. After her husband's
death she moved to Conecuh County, Ala., where she was reported in
the 1830 census for that county. -- (Family Records of John B. Boddie,
Jr., of Chicago, Ill.; 1790-1820 censuses for Edgefield County, S.C.;
Probate Records at Edgefield, S.C.; 1830 census for Conecuh County,
Ala.)
        2b. Mark (1783-1836). -- In 1808 he married Jemimah Stallworth.
Their firstborn child was William Barrett Travis (1809; 1836), who was
born within four miles of Red Bank Baptist Church in the present Saluda
County, S.C., and was killed in the massacre at the "Alamo" in Texas.
-- (Sarah Sullivan Ervin - South Carolinians In The Revolution, page
135; John A. Chapman - History of Edgefield County, S.C, page 165;
Family Records.)
        3. Thomas, Jr. (20 October 1759; 29 July 1819). -- See SKETCH No. 5.
        4. Samuel (ca. 1762; ca. 1845). -- See SKETCH No. 4b.
        5. Patience (ca. 1765; ). -- In view of her given name and her
husband's association with members of the DeLoache family, it is be-
lieved that she was a daughter of Thomas and Patience (Allison)
DeLoache. At about 1784 she married William Burdett (ca. 1760; )
who at the time of the 1790 census for Edgefield County, S.C., was living
near to Tom (Thomas, Jr.) DeLoache. He doubtless was related to the
heretofore mentioned Giles Burdett whose wife was Averilla DeLoache,
daughter of William DeLoache, Jr. -- (See SKETCH No. 3.) William
Burdett and his wife Patience are mentioned in a deed relating to a tract
of land which was granted in 1787. -- (Edgefield County, S.C., Deed
Book 12, 1795-1796, page .) In 1789 Henry King, William Burdett,
and Samuel DeLoache witnessed a deed given by Thomas DeLoache, Sr.,
to Josiah Thomas. -- (Ibid. Deed Book 10, pages 95-97.) In 1795
William Burdett was deeded 75 acres of land (part of 200 acres sold by
Thomas DeLoache, Sr., in 1777) by Angelica Jernigan (widow of Jesse
Jernigan to whom the land had been sold), James Hart and Elizabeth his
wife, Esau Parnell and Angelica his wife, and Kezia Jernigan, heirs and
heirs at law of Jesse Jernigan. In 1807 William Burdett deeded the 75
acres of land to William H. Lewis who in 1813 deeded it to James
Bonham. -- (Ibid. Deed Book 13, page 247; Ibid. Deed Book 32, page
479.)

                                20


                             SKETCH No. 4a
                        MICHAEL ALLISON DELOACHE

        Michael Allison DeLoache (ca. 1750; ca. 1800). -- He came to
Edgefield (now Saluda) County, S.C., in 1771-2. During the period of
1772-1774 he acquired 550 acres of land situated on Penn Creek, south of
Red Bank Creek, and near to his father and brother Samuel. The
precept/writ for survey of the first 200 acres for him, dated 5 February
1772, shows his name as Michael or Alas DeLoach, which evidently in-
dicates that his full name was Michael Allison DeLoach. When he sold
this land his wife Dorcas DeLoache signed the deed with him. As men-
tioned in SKETCH No. 4, at a later date he acquired 50 acres of land
which were part of the 400-acre tract granted to his father on 31 August
1774. Of the total of 600 acres which he acquired 400 acres were sold to
other persons prior to the year 1800. The remaining 200 acres were sold
at some time prior to 26 March 1806, probably in settlement of his estate.
-- (Council Journals of Colonial South Carolina, Plat Books, Land
Grant Books, and Memorial Books, in the State Archives at Columbia,
S.C.; Edgefield County, S.C., Deed Books 1, 12, 17, and 27 for the
period prior to 1807.)
        No record of Revolutionary War service has been found for him, since
many of the muster rolls and payrolls were lost or destroyed during and
after the war.
        In 1783 he was one of the bondsmen for the administration of the
estate of Giles Burdette, and in 1794 he was one of the witnesses to the
deed given by his brother Thomas DeLoache for the sale of land. --
(Willie Pauline Young - Abstracts of Old 96 and Abbeville District S.C.,
Wills and Bonds, page 31; Edgefield County, S.C., Deed Book 29,
1808-1809, page 277.)
        It is said that Michael moved from Edgefield County to old Beaufort
District, S.C., where he lived for a period of time before and after 1790.
He was not listed in the 1790 census for Edgefield County, but two per-
sons of the name Michael DeLoach are listed in the 1790 census for
Beaufort District. It is believed that he was one of these persons and the
other one was his uncle of the same name. The number of children that
he then had (four males and four females), except for a daughter who
later married, agrees with the total number of children (four males and
three females) included in his family at the time of the 1800 census for
Edgefield County.
        Michael was twice married, the first wife being the mother of all his
children. At about 1777 he married Dorcas Still (ca. 1760; ca. 1795),
daughter of John and Jean Still. John's will, dated 26 September 1797,
mentions his deceased daughter "Dorkes DeLoche". After Dorcas'
death, and before 1800, he married a woman (name not known to this
writer) who then was forty-five or more years of age. She was included in
the 1800 census for Edgefield County as a member of his household. --
The will of John Still is recorded in Edgefield County Will Book A, page
131.

Michael apparently died within one or two days after having been
recorded in the 1800 census for Edgefield County and prior to comple-
tion of the said census. His two younger sons, in addition to a male in-

                                21


fant who already was there, were taken into the home of his parents
(Thomas and Patience DeLoache) and his other children went elsewhere
to live. Of his eight children, apparently born in the following order, the
names of only four are known to this writer.
        1. Son (ca. 1778; lvg. 1800)
        2. Dorcas (ca. 1780; lvg. 1815). -- It is believed that she was the per-
son of that name who married Jordan Smith prior to 1800. On 2 January
1815 Dorcas and Jordan Smith deeded to William DeLoache (son of the
Reverend Thomas DeLoache) 74 acres of land situated on Clouds Creek
of Saluda River. -- (Edgefield County Deed Book 34, page 119.)
        3. Son (ca. 1782; lvg. 1800).
        4. Michael, Jr. (ca. 1784; lvg. 1812). -- He was recorded twice in the
1800 census: -- first as a member of his father's family, and again as a
member of the family of his grandparents (Thomas and Patience
DeLoache). He was listed in the 1810 census for Edgefield County, being
then married and without children. During the War of 1812 he was a cor-
poral in Juhan's Battalion of South Carolina Militia. -- (Records of War
of 1812 in the National Archives at Washington, D.C.)
        5. Daughter (ca. 1786; lvg. 1800).
        6. Daughter (ca. 1788; lvg. 1800).
        7. Thomas (ca. 1791; lvg. 1830). -- He was recorded twice in the 1800
census: -- first as a member of his father's family, and again as a
member of the family of his grandparents (Thomas and Patience
DeLoache). This writer has not identified him in the 1810 and 1820 cen-
suses. He was listed in the 1830 census for Edgefield County, being then
married and the father of seven young children (three sons and four
daughters). He and his wife apparently died before 1840, and the census
for that year apparently shows his sons living with their DeLoache cous-
ins: -- two with F.W. (Floyd?) DeLoache and one with
Luellen/Llewelyn DeLoache. These sons either died or moved from
South Carolina prior to 1850.
        8. Samuel (ca. 1794; lvg. 1870). -- He was living with his grand-
parents (Thomas and Patience DeLoache) at the time of the 1800 census
for Edgefield County. His whereabouts at the time of the 1810 and 1820
censuses has not been determined. At about 1824 he married Mary Morse
(ca. 1804; lvg. 1870).
        On 25 October 1829 Samuel was a purchaser at the sale of the estate of
Jonathan DeLoache, son of Solomon DeLoache who came from
Virginia to Edgefield County shortly before 1800. -- (Edgefield County
Office of Probate Judge, File 8, Pack 288.)
        Samuel was recorded in the 1830 through 1870 censuses as the head of
a family in Edgefield County. In 1850 he was an overseer for Reuben
Bouknight, and in 1860 he was an overseer for W. Bouknight. His
children, as shown in census and family records, were the following
named persons.
        1. Willis (ca. 1825; lvg. 1880). -- At about 1849 he married Elizabeth
(ca. 1820; lvg. 1880), and they became the
parents of the following named children who were born in Edgefield
County. -- Myra (b. 1850), Catherine (b. 1852), Mary (b. 1853), Martha
(b. 1854), Allen (b. 1855), James (b. 1857), Matilda (b. 1858). These
children are named in the 1850 - 1880 census records. Nothing further is

                                22


known concerning them.
        2. Sallie (ca. 1826; lvg. 1840). -- No further information.
        3. Allen (ca. 1829; lvg. 1880). -- At about 1864 he married Matilda
Smith (1840; 1896), and they became parents of the following named
children who were born in Edgefield County. -- Isabelle/Ella (b. 1865),
John (b. 1869), Ida (b. 1873), Michael (b. 1876). These children were
named in the 1870 and 1880 census records. Nothing further is known
concerning them.
        4. Martha (ca. 1830; lvg. 1850). -- No further information.
        5. Samuel, Jr. (ca. 1833; ca. 1869). -- He served as a private with
South Carolina troops during the War Between the States. -- (John A.
Chapman -- History of Edgefield County, S.C., pages 423 and 435.) At
about 1864 he married Mary Ivans (ca. 1844; lvg. 1880), and they became
the parents of two children whose names are recorded in the 1880 census
for Edgefield County, -- Lula (b. 1867) and William/Willie (b. 1868).
Nothing further is known concerning them.
        6. John (ca. 1836; 1869). -- At about 1866 he married Mrs. Mary
(Abney) Walton (ca. 1834; lvg. 1880) and they became the parents of two
children whose names are recorded in the 1880 census for Edgefield
County, -- Pope (b. 1867; a daughter, who married Will Clary) and
Carrie (b. 1868; married Will Crawford).
        7. George (1839-1897). -- He served as a private with South Carolina
troops during the War Between the States. -- (John A. Chapman -
History of Edgefield County, S.C., page 498.) At about 1870 he married
Lavinia Attaway (1852; 1926), and they became the parents of the
following named children who were born in Edgefield County.
        7a. Mattie (b. 1871). -- She married Oliver Butler and had issue.
        7b. James (b. 1873). -- In 1896 he married Lola Haltiwanger (1873;
1958), and had issue: -- Helen (1897; 1939), married Sumpter Gillian; --
Judson, married Ruth Attaway and had issue.
        7c. Walter D. (1874; 1946). -- At about 1899 he married Susan
Turner (1881; 1950), and had issue: -- Mattie Lou (b. 1900), married
Walter J. Home; -- Emmie (b. 1902), married Olin Bryan; -- Elmer
Walker (1904; 1974), married Emma Martin and had issue; -- Ina (b.
1906), married Steve Gallimore; -- Ruby (b. 1908), married 1st Herman
Scurry, divorced, and 2nd Marion Lagrone; -- Lois (b. 1911), married
Victor Shidle; -- Heber (b. 1913), married Myrtis Lybrand and had
issue; -- Sue May (b. 1915), married 1st Lyman Frady and 2nd William
Fordson; -- Maberline (b. 1916), married Edward Fortner; -- Floyd (b.
1919), married Mrs. Lillian (Banks) Burnett and had an adopted son; --
Reginald (b. 1921), married Mary Pool and had issue.
        7d. Lula (b. ). -- Married William P. Stroud.
        7e. Lod D. (1882; 1959). -- Married 1926, Mrs. Alma (Walton)
Morse - DeLoache (1877; 1968). He had no issue.
        7f. George, Jr. (1885; 1927). -- Married, 1911, Nancy Bledsoe (1894;
1928), and had issue: -- Margaret (b. ), married Joe Ben Attaway;
-- Lloyd (1914; 1933), unmarried; -- Herman (b. ); -- George (b.

        7g. Effie (1887; 1944). -- Married Wilber Calloway.
        8. William (1840; 1864). -- He served as a private with the South
Carolina troops during the War Between the States and was killed in bat-

                                23


tle on 21 August 1864. In 1861 he married Elizabeth Reames (1848; lvg.
1880) and had issue whose names are recorded in the 1870 and 1880 cen-
suses for Edgefield County, as follows:
        8a. Luther (b. 1862). -- Married, 1894, Mary Cordelia Rushton, and
had issue: -- Caleb (b. 1895), married 1st Maggie Goldman and 2nd
Ardelia Love; -- Annie (b. 1897), married Fred Bridges; -- Bertha (b.
1900), married 1st Henry Blue, 2nd a Mr. Miller, and 3rd Asbury
Weston; -- Floride (b. 1901), married Dillard Compton; -- Manuel (b.
1905), married Iline Watts; -- W.D. (b. 1908), married lone Wright.
        8b. Webster D./Jeff (1864; 1946). -- Married, 1896/7, Virginia
Susan Dunn, and had issue: -- Arthur William (1897; 1964), married
Sarah ____________________, and they had no issue; -- Alvin Bernard
(1899; 1951), married Louise ______________________, and had a
daughter; -- Bertha Mae (b. ), married Maynard C. Grayson and
had two children (Athlene and Webster D. Grayson).
        9. Caleb (1841; 1897). -- He served as a private with the South
Carolina troops during the War Between the States. -- (John A. Chap-
man - History of Edgefield County, S.C., page 494.) In 1867 he married
Nancy C. Attaway (1844; 1897), and they became the parents of the
following named children who were born in Edgefield County.
        9a. Sophia E. (1868; 1882). -- Unmarried.
        9b. Fannie Lee (1869; 1917). -- Unmarried.
        9c. Thomas Avery (1871; 1964). -- Married, 1895, Belle Berry (1877;
1970), and had issue -- Eloise (died in infancy); -- Eunice (b. 1897),
married, 1917, W. Rufus Wactor, and had issue; -- George Avery (b.
1902), married, 1934, Thelma Louise Minick (b. 1909), and had no issue;
-- Steven Arno (b. 1904), married, 1928, Mary Elizabeth/Lizzie Minick
(1902; 1962), and had an adopted daughter (Patricia) and a son who died
at birth.
        9d. Elizabeth/Lizzie (b. 1872). -- Married James/Jim Salters and
had issue.
        9e. Joseph Samuel (b. 1874). -- Married Annie C. Spivey, and had
issue: -- Harold, married Sallie Bryant and had issue; -- Herman, mar-
ried ______________________, Victor (1909; 1930), married

        9f. Hillary D. (1876; 1905). -- Married 1st Sallie Chapman (
        and 2nd Mary Williams (1895; 1969) and had issue (six by 1st wife
and one by 2nd wife): -- A child who died in infancy; -- John Lee; -- Ira
(1910; 1921); -- Caleb Eugene (1913; 1970), married Ella Louise Chap-
man and had issue; -- Hillary D., Jr.; -- Harvey (1921; 1973), married
Rita Black and had issue; -- Thomas/Tommy.
        9g. James Chesley (1876; 1945). -- Married Sophia Cockrell (1880;
1939), and had issue: -- Mamie, married R. Lee Rushton; -- Annie Bell,
married _____________________ Powell and had issue; -- Olla Mae, mar-
ried Horace Boland and had issue; -- Joseph Evans (1909; 1960), mar-
ried Ollie Morgan and had issue; -- Idessa, married
___________________ Mitchell; -- Maude, married Evan Osborn; --
Sophia, married Carlton Smith; -- Caleb; -- Fannie Lee; -- James
Chesley
        9h. Ola Eustachia (b. 1879). -- married 1st Jeff Gilliam and 2nd
James/Jim ____________________ and had issue.

                                24


        9i. John Pierce (1881; 1884).
        9j. Lillian P. (1883; 1884).
        9k. Sudie (1886; 1918). -- Married James C. Stidham and had issue.
        10. Matilda/Tilda (1842; ).
        11. Milledge (1845; 1921). -- He served as a private with South
Carolina troops during the War Between the States. -- (John A. Chap-
man - History of Edgefield County, S.C., page 494.) He married Sallie
Cunningham (1850; 1891), and they became the parents of children
(order of birth not shown): -- Madge (married George Bladon); -- Leila
(married Peter Bridget); -- Sallie (married Jim Briscoe); -- Mollie (mar-
ried ______________________ Lewis); -- Mattie (married Tilman
Rushton); -- Marion (married Julia Grayson); -- John Pierce (married
Bertha Padget); -- William D. (married Sallie Christie); -- Milledge, Jr.
(married Eva Clark); -- Melvin/Melve (married
McKenny); -- Pick (d. 1940; unmarried); -- Pope (d. 1880, aged 6
months).
        12. Malachi D. (1847; 1921). -- He was twice married, his first wife be-
ing Rebecca _____________________ (1850; 1870) who left no issue. His
second wife was Susan Bethania/Betty Dodgen (b. 1851), who was the
mother of the following named children: -- Frances (b. 1871); -- James
William (1872; 1929), married Lovely Turner and had issue; -- John
Oliver/Oll (1874; ), married Ann Palm Leopard (1877; 1942) and
had issue; -- Barbara (b. 1875), married ____________________ Wicks;

-- Alice (b. 1877), married __________________ Eidson; -- Emma (b.
1879), married ____________________ Moody; -- Ella, married
Anderson; -- Sophia (d. 1927), unmarried; --
Alma (1882; 1917), unmarried; -- Eva; -- Samuel/Mance, married
Young.

                                25


                         SKETCH NO. 4b
                        SAMUEL DELOACHE

        Samuel DeLoache (Ca. 1762; ca. 1845). -- At about 1772-3 he came
with his parents from the present Richland County, S.C., to that part of
old Edgefield District which in 1895 became Saluda County, S.C. During
the Revolutionary War he served as a private in Captain William Butler's
Company of Volunteer State Militia. A payroll of Captain Butler's com-
pany shows that during the period of 1 September 1781 - 1 March 1782
Samuel DeLoach (No. 8) served 182 days for which he was entitled to
pay. His claim for payment was processed on Return No. 50, and War-
rant No. 286 in the amount of 26 œ is. 5d. sterling was issued to him on 12
August 1785. -- (Revolutionary War Records in the National Archives at
Washington, D.C. -- Miscellaneous South Carolina Records, Folder
No. 9; Janie Revill - Copy of Original Index Book of Revolutionary
Claims in South Carolina, page 85; Revolutionary War Records in the
State Archives at Columbia, S.C. -- File No 1851; Alexander S. Salley -
Stub Indents to Revolutionary Claims in South Carolina, Lib. U.) In
1782 a band of Tories under "Bloody Bill" Cunningham, being en-
camped near Bouknight's Ferry on the Newberry side of Saluda River,
was surprised by Captain William Butler's Company of South Carolina
Rangers (Volunteer State Militia). As the panic-stricken Tories fled,
some of them attempting to cross the river to the Edgefield side,
(Samuel) DeLoache raised his gun to shoot, but Captain Butler ordered
him to desist, as it was desired only to capture or disperse the Tories. --
(John A. Chapman -- History of Edgefield County, S.C., page 41.)
        In 1788 Samuel witnessed a deed given by his brother Michael and wife
Dorcas DeLoache to Thomas Williams. In 1789 he was mentioned as a
brother of Michael, in a deed given by the latter to Moses Brown, and he
witnessed a deed given by his parents (Thomas and Patience DeLoache)
to Josiah Thomas. In 1802 Samuel was a purchaser at the sale of the
estate of William Simpkins who died in that year. In 1817 he witnessed a
deed given by John Feaster to William DeLoache (son of Thomas
DeLoache, Jr.). In 1819 and in 1820 he received payment (authorized by
the State Legislature) for service as constable of Edgefield County. In
1820 he proved the will of Mumford Perryman, and was a bondsman for
the widow Elizabeth (Travis) Perryman as administratrix of her hus-
band's estate. In 1825 he was an appraiser of the estate of Eliza Burton,
who perhaps was his mother-in-law. (Courthouse Records at Edgefield,
S.C. -- Deeds, Wills, and Administrations; Laws of South Carolina --
Acts of the Legislature, 1819 - item 19 and 1820 - item 206.)
        Other than in one instance, this writer has found no record of land
owned by Samuel DeLoache in Edgefield County. On 19 February 1819
he and his wife Ferriby sold to Sophia Bonham 200 acres of land (ex-
cluding ¬ of an acre "where the graveyard is near the creek") on the
south side of Red Bank Creek, bounded by Red Bank Creek, Penn
Creek, Hardy's Branch, lands of James Hart, Sophia Bonham, Mrs.
Mobley, and said DeLoache. Witnesses: - Mumford Perryman and
William Foy. -- (Deed Book 42, 1826-1827, page 307.) The adjoining
lands of Samuel DeLoache have not been identified by this writer, but he
probably lived there until about 1826 when he moved to Pickens County,

                                26


Ala. He was listed in the 1830 and 1840 censuses for that county.
        At about 1787 Samuel married Ferriby Burton? (ca. 1765; lvg. 1840)
and they became the parents of children, all of whom were born in
Edgefield County. Census records for the said county show that during
the period of 1790-1820 a total of eleven children were living in his
household, though all of them were not there at the same time. It appears
that at least eight of these persons were his children, while the other three
probably were sojourners. Three of the eight children died in infancy or
childhood, leaving two daughters (names unknown to this writer) who
probably married young and the following named sons.
1. Samuel, Jr. (ca. 1788; 1827). -- At about 1814 he married Mrs.
Tirza Crawford (ca. 1790; ), daughter of William and Sarah
(Johnson) Hagood of Edgefield County. -- (William and Mary College
Quarterly; Margaret Watson - Greenwood County Sketches, page 369.)
She was the widow of James Crawford who died leaving daughters Mary
(married Thomas DeLoache, a brother of Samuel, Jr.) and Eliza (mar-
ried William Baldwin). After the death of Samuel, Jr., Tirza married
James Chiles and bore two children. -- (Letter of Miss Eva Hagood of
Greenwood, S.C., dated 3 February 1932.)
        On 18 February 1819 Samuel DeLoache, Jr., and his wife Tirza sold to
Joseph Stalworth 38« acres of land lying on "waters of 96 Creek, ad-
joining Richardson Hagood and being the tract of land that was deeded
to James Crawford by William Hagood." Witnesses were: -- Mumford
Perryman and William Foy. -- (Edgefield County, S.C., Deed Book
36, . . . -- 1819, page 101.) Tirza probably was a sister of the said
Richardson Hagood, and she evidently was a close relative of Governor-
General Johnson Hagood who later owned lands near Saluda Old Town,
the site of a conference between Indians and South Carolina officials in
1755. -- (John A. Chapman - History of Edgefield County, S.C., page
12; Saluda County In Scene and Story, page 6.)
        Samuel, Jr., was listed in the 1820 census for Edgefield County as head
of a household consisting of himself, 3 males under 10 years of age, 2
females (stepdaughters) 10 to 16 years of age, 1 female (wife) 26 to 45
years of age, and 1 female (mother-in-law) over 45 years of age, and 75
slaves. In 1826 he applied for letters of administration on the estate of
Sarah Hagood, his mother-in-law, and for an order to sell her personal
property. -- (Edgefield County, S.C., Probate Records, Box 13, Pack
371.) In 1827 he, together with one of his sons, died by drowning while
swimming in a river and soon thereafter his widow moved to Tuscaloosa
County, Ala., where in 1828 she bought land from and sold land to
Charles S. Patterson. -- (Tuscaloosa County, Ala., Deed Book F, pages
373 and 432; Alabama Records, Vol. 7, pages 15 and 34.)
        Samuel Jr., and Tirza were parents of the following named children,
all of whom were born in Edgefield County, S.C., -- William Wiles (ca.
1815; lvg. 1850. -- Moved to Alabama with his mother; married, about
1847, M. Louiza McPhail and in 1850 they were living in DeSoto Parish,
La., where he, his wife, and son William E. were included in the census
for that year.); -- Alfred Burton? (ca. 1817; 1827. -- In 1827 he,
together with his father, died by drowning while swimming in a river.);
-- James Madison (1820; 1858. -- Moved to Alabama with his mother.
At about 1841 he married his first wife by whom he had a daughter

                                27


Lavenia. In 1844 he married Cornelia Elizabeth Christopher by whom he
had children: -- James Christopher, 1845; 1904, married Susan Madison
Larkins and had issue; -- Ann Tillman, 1847; died in infancy; -- Mary
Elizabeth, 1849; 1925, married the Reverend Samuel Monroe Thames
and had issue; -- Thomas Henry, born 1850, married Lucy Baltzell and
had issue; -- John Edwin, born 1852, married Julia Smith and had
issue.) -- The family of James Madison DeLoache is included in the
1850-1870 censuses for Choctaw County, Ala.
        2. Thomas (ca. 1799; 1861). -- At about 1820 he married Mary
Crawford (ca. 1805; ca. 1826) and settled in Edgefield County, S.C.,
where he was included in the 1820 census as head of a household con-
sisting of himself, his wife, and (as is believed) two orphaned children of
his deceased uncle Thomas DeLoach (Baptist preacher). Mary, who bore
him two children, was the daughter of James and Tirza (Hagood)
Crawford. At about 1826 he moved to Pickens County, Ala., where in
1829 he married Sarah E. Price (1812; 1894), his second wife, and they
were living there at the time of the 1830-1850 censuses. At the time of the
1860 census Thomas and Sarah were living in Choctaw County, Miss.,
where his son Samuel also then was living.
        The children of Thomas and Mary (Crawford) DeLoache were: -- Ed-
win A. (1820; 1864. --At about 1839 he married Mary A. __________
by whom he had children: -- William, born 1840; -- John E., born 1841;
-- Sarah E., born 1844; --Nancy C.J., born 1849.)-- Thomas G. (1825;
lvg. 1896. -- At about 1845 he married Louise Manerva _____________
by whom he had children: -- James, born 1846; -- Thomas, born 1848;
-- John; -- William; -- Walter; -- Edwin.).
        The children of Thomas and Sarah E. (Price) DeLoache were: --
Samuel (1830; 1909. -- In 1858 he married Mary Jane Holland by whom
he had children: -- Henri Ella, 1860; 1950, married George William
Yeates and had issue; -- Charles Thomas, born 1862; -- William
Samuel, born 1865, married Zillah Johnson; -- Ada Belle, born 1867;
James Edwin, born 1870, married Sue Gains and had issue; -- Javis
Miller, 1873; 1902, unmarried; -- George, 1876; 1876; -- Wyatt Findlay,
born 1880, married Mary Leech and had issue); -- James Madison (1832;
1842); -- Martha Jane (born 1835, married Frank Driver and had issue.).
        3. James William (1804; 1875). -- At about 1826 he moved with his
parents to Pickens County, Ala., where he became a Missionary Baptist
preacher. At about 1830 he married Mary (ca.
1799; ca. 1847), born in Kentucky, who apparently was a widow with
three teen-age children. He settled in Pickens County, where he and his
family are included in the 1840-1860 censuses for that county. His death
was reported in the February 12, 1875, issue of the Livingston (Alabama)
Journal. His known children, as shown by census records and a letter
(dated 12 March 1932) from Mrs. Connie Thames Lloyd of Jackson,
Miss., were the following named persons. -- Frank (ca. 1831; ca. 1849.
-- He was killed in the gold rush to California.); -- Alfred (ca. 1834; ca.
1865. -- He was killed in a difficulty with Federal soldiers shortly after
the War Between the States.); -- Milburn (ca. 1836; ); -- Daughter
(ca. 1837; ); -- Daughter (ca. 1842; ); -- William L. (ca. 1844;
        -- James M. (ca. 1846; ).
        4. Mary (ca. 1806; ).

                                28


                           SKETCH No. 5
                        THOMAS DeLOACHE, Jr.

        Thomas DeLoache, Jr. (20 October 1759; 29 July 1819). -- At about
1772-3 he came with his parents from the present Richland County, S.C.,
to the present Saluda (then Edgefield) County, S.C., and lived with them
in their home which apparently was situated a short distance above the
junction of Red Bank Creek and Penn Creek.
        On 7 March 1777 Thomas DeLoache, Jr., John Cotton, and Charity
Cotton witnessed a deed given by Thomas DeLo ache, Sr., to Jesse Jer-
nigan. This deed was proved by Thomas DeLoache, Jr., on 2 September
1785. -- (Edgefield County, S.C., Deed Book 0, page 257; Ibid, Deed
Book 13, 1796-1797, page 253.)
        Thomas, Jr., was thrice married, all of his wives being residents of the
Ridge Section of the present Saluda County. At about 1779 he married
Mary (ca. 1760, ca. 1801), who is said to have
been a Miss Asbill or a Miss Crawford; however, this writer believes that
neither of these surnames is correct. Thomas' son Allison DeLoache
married a granddaughter of Aaron Asbill and his nephew Thomas
DeLoache married Miss Mary Crawford. Census records of 1790 and
1800 for Edgefield County, S.C., indicate that the first wife was the
mother of twelve children, four of whom died in infancy or childhood.
Eight of these children are named in their father's will. At about 1803 he
married Sarah Watkins ( August 1780; 9 June 1818), probably a
daughter of John Watkins, who bore him nine children whose names are
recorded in their parents' family Bible. At about 1805 he moved to Lex-
ington County, S.C., where he acquired land and was listed in the 1810
census for that county as the owner of one slave. Prior to or during 1814
he returned to Edgefield County. Shortly before his death in 1819 he
married Mrs. Charity Cotton (widow of the Reverend John Cotton) who
bore him no children and who was the administratrix of his estate. The
1820 census for Edgefield County shows her as head of a household in-
cluding herself and two males (18 to 26 years of age) who are believed to
have been the two oldest sons of Thomas' son William DeLoache. She
then was the owner of five slaves. In 1823 she was living in Butler Coun-
ty, Ala.
        After their arrival in the present Saluda County it is probable that
Thomas DeLoache, Jr., his parents, brothers, and sisters became
members of the Mine Creek Baptist Church on Mine Creek of Little
Saluda River, which was situated a few miles distant from their new
home. This church was organized in September 1770 and held its
meetings in the home of Benjamin Bell until it was continued or replaced
to some extent by Red Bank Baptist Church in 1784. -- (Leah Townsend
- South Carolina Baptists, 1670 - 1805, page 148.) This DeLoache family
evidently moved their membership to the Red Bank Baptist Church,
which was located nearer to their homes and with which many of their
descendants were affiliated during subsequent years.
        Soon after its establishment in the spring of 1790 Thomas, Jr., became
a member of Clouds Creek Baptist Church (now West Creek Baptist
Church) in the present Saluda County. In 1793 he, as a lay member of

                                29


that church, was sent as a messenger to the meeting of the Bethel Baptist
Association with which the said church was affiliated. In 1793/4 he was
licensed as a local preacher, and after the departure of the pastor
(Patrick Quartermus) in 1794 he worked among the congregation until
June 1800. As a licentiate he represented the church at six association
meetings during the period of 1794 - 1800. On 4 Jude 1800 he was or-
dained by the Reverends Charles Bussey and Henry King as a full
minister of the gospel, and soon thereafter assumed the pastorate of the
church. He served the church as pastor continuously during the period of
1800 - 1818, and as a minister or messenger was present at meetings of
the Bethel Baptist Association, Edgefield Baptist Association, Savannah
River Baptist Association, Charleston Baptist Association, and Sarepta
Baptist Association (in Georgia). In 1802 he presented a petition to the
South Carolina State Legislature praying for incorporation of the church
as a society under the name "The Baptist Church of Christ on Clouds
Creek". The petition was granted by Act of 8 December 1802. -- (Leah
Townsend - South Carolina Baptists, 1670-1805, pages 169-171, 269;
Hortense Woodson--History of Edgefield Baptist Association,
1807-1957, pages 21, 22, 78, 81; Laws of South Carolina -- Acts of
Legislature, 1802, page 70.)
        On 5 March 1804, according to call of Clouds Creek Baptist Church,
the Reverends John Landrum, Samuel Marsh, Henry King, and Thomas
DeLoache met at Dry Creek and established the Dry Creek Baptist
Church, situated near the town of Ward in Saluda County. Thomas
DeLoache did most of the preaching there until his death in 1819. When
he died he was buried in the cemetery at this church, and in 1958-9 his
grave was permanently marked by a monument erected by some of his
descendants. -- (John A. Chapman -- History of Edgefield County,
S.C., pages 307-308.)
        In 1814 the Reverends Thomas DeLoache, Francis Walker, and John
Landrum established the Philippi Baptist Church, situated about five
miles southeast of the present town of Johnston, S.C., and Thomas
DeLoache preached there during the period of 1814-1819. -- (John A.
Chapman -- History of Edgefield County, S.C., page 310.)
        The late Mr. Lanis Hite of Johnston, S.C., and New York City found
records showing that, up until the time of his death, the Reverend
Thomas DeLoache preached at the Flat Rock Baptist Church (founded
about 1803 and formerly called Walker's Meeting House), situated two
or three miles east of Mount Calvary Lutheran Church, in the extreme
eastern section of the present Edgefield County. He also found records
of legal citations published by Mr. DeLoache at the churches which he
served.
        The following is an incomplete record of the real estate transactions of
Thomas DeLoache, Jr.

                In Edgefield County, S.C.

On 21 October 1794 Thomas DeLoache sold to James Whittle 50 acres
of land (part of a tract granted to William Holstein, James Warren, and
Hendley Webb on 8 July 1774) bounding north on James Whittle and
east on Hendley Webb. The deed was signed by Thomas DeLoache and
Mary his wife, and witnessed by Samuel Deen and Michael DeLoache. --

                                30


(Deed Book 29, 1808-1809, page 277.) It has not been determined when,
how, or from whom this land was acquired by Thomas DeLoache.
        On 25 February 1803 Thomas DeLoache bought from Arthur Watson
320 acres of land (part of 420 acres originally granted to Arthur Watson)
situated on the road from Augusta to the Ridge, on waters of Beach
Creek and on Dry Creek waters of Mine Creek, bounding on Willis Mur-
phy Watson, Jacob B. Watson, Rolan Williams, and vacant land. The
deed was signed by Arthur Watson and witnessed by John Frederick and
Samuel Lewis. -- On 12 June 1803 Thomas DeLoache sold 83 acres of
this land to Shadrach Bailey. On 15 January 1810 he, then living in Lex-
ington County, S.C., sold 116 acres to William Holston. On 25 March
1819 he sold 50 acres to Elizabeth Kirkland. -- (Deed Book 23, page 2;
Ibid. page 325; Ibid. 30, 1809-1811, page 85; Ibid. 35, 1818-1819, page
29.)
        On 1 January 1806 Thomas DeLoache, then living in Lexington, S.C.,
bought from Job Padget 100 acres of land (part of an original grant to
Job Padget) on Clouds Creek, bounding on Job Padget and Grigsbys
Old Road. The deed was signed by Job Padget and witnessed by William
DeLoache (then living in Lexington County) and Job Padget, Jr. --
(Deed Book 27, page 442.)
        On 5 March 1814 Thomas DeLoache bought from Jacob Dominick
204 acres of land (part of 820 acres granted to Daniel Cannon, Esqr.) on
waters of Clouds Creek, lying on the road from Augusta to Columbia.
The deed was signed by Jacob Dominick and witnessed by William
DeLoache (then of Edgefield County) and Michael Kinard. -- (Deed
Book 32, page 405.)

                        In Lexington County, S.C.

        On 9 November 1807, Thomas DeLoache, then living in Lexington
County, sold (for the amount of $20.00) to John Quattlebaum 16 acres
of land in Lexington County. -- (Brent H. Holcombe - Memorialized
Records of Lexington County, S.C., 1814-1825, pages 92 and 93.) At
about 1809 (actually in 1807) John Quattlebaum moved from his home
two miles north of the present town of Leesville (Lexington County),
S.C., to a mill site on Lightwood Creek four miles south of Leesville. --
(Paul Quattlebaum -- Quattlebaum, a Palatine Family in South
Carolina, page 7.) In view of this circumstance it appears that John
Quattlebaum established his new home on the 16 acres of land which he
bought from Thomas DeLoache, and that the said 16 acres were part of a
larger tract acquired and lived on by Thomas DeLoache while he was a
resident of Lexington County during the period of 1805-1814. Most of
the records in Lexington County courthouse were burned during the War
Between the States; therefore, nothing further is known concerning
Thomas' land holdings in that county. In this connection it is noted that
at the time of the 1840 census Thomas' son Allison DeLoache was living
in Lexington County, and then was the owner of twenty slaves. -- (Did
Allison buy or inherit property which formerly was part of his father's
estate?)
        The above-mentioned transactions indicate that Thomas acquired at
least a total of 674 acres of land in Edgefield County, of which he sold
299 acres and retained at least 374 acres until the time of his death.

                                31


        On 22 June 1810, while living in Lexington County, Thomas
DeLoache (preacher of the gospel and of the Baptist order) made his will
in the following "manner and form", the witnesses thereto being
Thomas Barkley, Mary Spencer, Joel Bell, and Shepard Spencer (Justice
of the Peace).
        "My will is that all my estate lands, goods and chattels,
        profits, debts, dues, demands and income shall remain in the
        hands of my beloved wife, Sarah, during her natural life or
        widowhood in order that she may thereby be enabled to
        school and educate my children but, and if my wife, Sarah,
        shall marry again then my wish is that all of my estate, real
        and personal, be sold on a credit of twelve months and the
        money arising from such sales to be divided in the following
        manner, to writ: To my eight eldest children, William
        DeLoache and Lucy Hunter and Cata Hunter, Thomas
        DeLoache and Elizabeth Bush and John DeLoache and Polly
        and Nancy, I give one dollar to each of them, and the rest of
        my estate to be equally divided amongst my wife, Sarah, and
        her children which she may have by me, my wife to have a
        child's part, but and if my wife, Sarah, shall decease without
        a second marriage, at her death, I leave my estate to be sold in
        the manner that is aforesaid described and divided amongst
        my children as aforesaid, that is, my eight oldest children to
        have one dollar each of them and the rest to be equally divid-
        ed amongst my children which I have got by my last wife,
        Sarah. And I do nominate, constitute and appoint my said
        wife, Sarah, sole executrix of this my last will and
        testament "---- (The eight children of the first
        wife doubtless had previously received a portion of their
        father's estate, and the gift of one dollar each was to indicate
        that they had not been overlooked.)

        On 4 October 1819 the will was proved in Edgefield County by
Shepard Spencer; and on 18 October 1819, the second wife being then
deceased, the third wife was appointed to act as executrix and "ad-
minister to the estate". An inventory (apparently a partial one) of the
personal property of Thomas DeLoache, was returned on 6 November
1819. -- (Edgefield County, S.C., Probate Records: File 8, Pack 296;
Will Book C, page 34; Inventories, 1800-1820: -- Book E, 1816-1820,
page 442.) The probate records also include a sworn statement made on
20 December 1823 by Charity DeLoache (the third wife) as to correctness
of the following items in the settlement account of Thomas' estate. She
then was living in Butler County, Ala.
        a. Cash paid to William Ridlehoover.
        b. Purchasers at sale of the estate:
        Charity DeLoache (widow of the testator).
        William DeLoache (son of the testator).
        Mahala DeLoache (daughter of the testator).
        Sarah DeLoache (daughter of the testator).
        Thomas DeLoache (son of the testator).
        
        From Thomas' will it is noted that he had a particular concern that his
children be educated. At the time of the 1800 and 1810 censuses only his

                                32


youngest children in each of these years were living in his home. The
oldest children, except those who had died, evidently were attending
school away from home and some of them married prior to 1810-1820.
        The following information is known concerning the eight children
named in Thomas' will and the nine children whose names are recorded
in a family Bible owned by Mr. C.B. Smith (descendant of one of the
daughters) who in 1940 was president of State Teachers College at Troy,
Ala. Some of these children were born in the present Saluda County and
others were born in Lexington County.
        1. William (ca. 1780; lvg. 1840). -- See previous mention of him in
this sketch. In correspondence with certain persons during 1969-1972/3
this writer inadvertently identified him as a son of his uncle Michael
Allison DeLoache (SKETCH No. 4a) who probably also had a son
William.
        At about 1800 William married Francis? Gossett, a daughter of John
and Sarah Gossett. The 1800 census for Edgefield County shows him and
his wife as sojourners in his father's home. On 10 November 1817 Sarah
Gossett, widow, relinquished her right and claim of administration of
her deceased husband's estate and letters of administration were granted
to William DeLoache on 10 November 1817. At the time of the 1820 cen-
sus she was living in William's home. -- (Edgefield County, S.C., Pro-
bate Records: Box 11, Pack 381.) -- In June 1805 he was a member of a
committee which met at Mount Willing (in the present Saluda County) to
draft a constitution for Sardis Baptist Church, which was constituted
(organized) from Clouds Creek Baptist Church in June 1804. -- (H.L.
Baggott -- History of Sardis Baptist Church, 1804-1904, page 2; Leah
Townsend -- South Carolina Baptists, 1670-1805, page 303.) -- In the
1810-1830 censuses for Edgefield County he is listed as the head of a
separate household, and in that county he bought and sold land -- (Deed
Book 32, page 211; Deed Book 34, page 119; Deed Book 35, page 461.)
-- In 1817 and again in 1821 he was appointed Justice of the Peace for
Edgefield District. -- (Laws of South Carolina -- Acts of the
Legislature, 1817 and 1821.) -- At about 1835 he moved to Harris Coun-
ty, Ga., where some of his sons and their wives previously (on 8
September 1832) had become charter members of Bethany Baptist
Church in that county. His wife died prior to the 1840 census for Harris
County, and at the time of that census he was living with his son
Augustus Wiles DeLoache.
        William was the father of thirteen children whose names were learned
from various records (including family records of some of his descen-
dants). -- SAMUEL was twice married (second wife was Catherine) and
had issue. He lived variously in Monroe County, Ga. (1830), Harris
County, Ga. (1832 - charter member of Bethany Baptist Church), Macon
County, Ga. (1840), Barbour County, Ala. (1850), and Pike County,
Ala. (1860). At the time of the 1820 census he was living with his grand-
father's widow (Charity DeLoache) in Edgefield County, S.C., --
THOMAS was twice married (wives were Julia Ann Elizabeth Martin?
and Jane N. Cargil) and had issue. He lived variously in Monroe County,
Ga. (1830), Harris County, Ga. (1832 - charter member of Bethany Bap-
tist Church, and participated in the Land Lottery; listed in the 1840 cen-
sus), Macon County, Ala. (1850), and Tallapoosa County, Ala. (1860).

                                33


At the time of the 1820 census he was living with his grandfather's widow
(Charity DeLoache) in Edgefield County, S.C. -- JOHN was twice mar-
ried (wives were Elizabeth Sawyer and Rebecca ______________________
and had issue. He lived variously in Harris County, Ga. (1840), and
Claiborne Parish, La. (1850 and 1860). -- JAMES A. married and had
issue. In 1832 he became a charter member of Bethany Baptist Church in
Harris County, Ga., and was listed in the 1840 census for that county. In
1836-7 he was on the muster roll of the 67th Regiment, 2nd Division,
from Harris County. -- WILLIAM P. was twice married (wives were
Mary Hickey and Frances _____________________) and had issue. In
1832 he and his wife Frances became charter members of Bethany Baptist
Church in Harris County, Ga., and he participated in the Land Lottery.
He was listed in the 1840 and 1850 censuses for that county. In 1836-7 he
was on the muster roll of the 67th Regiment, 2nd Division, from Harris
County. -- ROBERT participated in the 1832 Land Lottery, being then a
resident of Harris County, Ga. -- AUGUSTUS WILES on 25 September
1833 became a member of Dry Creek Baptist Church in the present
Saluda County, S.C. At about 1835 he moved to Harris County, Ga.,
where in 1837 he married Theodocia Spence by whom he had issue. He
was listed in the 1840 and 1850 censuses for Harris County. His widow
and children were listed in the 1860 census for Coosa County, Ala. In
1836 he (apparently as "Austin" DeLoach) was on the muster roll of the
Georgia 6th Regiment. -- NATHAN participated in the 1832 Land Lot-
tery, being then a resident of Harris County, Ga. -- MICHAEL
ALBERT was twice married (wives were Charity Whittle and Mrs.
Emeline, nee Haltiwanger, Rushton) and had issue. He lived variously in
Harris County, Ga. (1832 - charter member of Bethany Baptist Church),
Monroe County, Ga. (1840-listed in census for that year), Harris Coun-
ty, Ga. (1842 - bought land), and Edgefield County, S.C. (listed in the
1850 through 1890 censuses; acquired land in that part which is now
Saluda County). He died in 1892 and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery
at Ninety Six, S.C. -- SON (apparently died in childhood). --
DAUGHTER (Was she Elizabeth DeLoach who in 1843 married David
Phelps in Harris County, Ga.?) -- MARY married Thomas L. Grimmett
of Merideth - Harris County, Ga. -- DAUGHTER (Was she Jane
DeLoach who in 1845 married James Gandy in Harris County, Ga.?)
        2. Lucy (ca. 1781; lvg. 1810). -- Prior to 1810 she married
Hunter.
        3. Cata/Katie (ca. 1783; lvg. 1810) -- Prior to 1810 she married
Hunter.
        4. Thomas (22 October 1789; 25 November 1872). -- In 1813 he mar-
ried Sarah Bush (1797; 18 March 1877 -- daughter of Isaac and
Sarah/Sally Bush) and settled in Edgefield County, S.C., where he ac-
quired land and lived the remainder of his life. He was listed in the 1820
through 1870 censuses for that county. In 1856 he was mentioned as Cap-
tain Thomas DeLoache. He and his wife are buried on the "DeLoache
farm" near Harmony United Methodist Church. They were the parents
of the following named fifteen children whose names are recorded in
their family Bible. LEWELLYN (15 September 1814; lvg. 1860) married
and had issue. -- LAVINIA (14 October 1816; 15 May 1900) was twice
married (husbands were Silas A.B. Villard and the Reverend Henry Dun-

                                34


ton). -- NATHAN BUSH (14 October 1818; 3 June 1847). Unmarried.
He was killed in the War with Mexico. His name is inscribed on a monu-
ment erected on the State House grounds in Columbia, S.C., -- SARAH
ANN (26 October 1820; ) married Andrew Ramsey. --
MARY CAROLINE (3 November 1822; 30 December 1886). Unmarried.
-- ELIZABETH AMANDA (23 October 1824; 19 November 1899) mar-
ried Jarrett D. Burkhalter. -- FRANCES EMALINE (23 June 1826; 14
October 1882). Unmarried. -- LUCINDA ADELINE (21 September
        1828, ) married J. Bud Davis. -- JOHN CALVIN (23
October 1830; killed in War Between the States). Unmarried. --
THOMAS PRESTON (15 March 1833; 9 June 1878). Unmarried. --
LUCRETIA (27 May 1835; ) married Hudson Burkhalter.
-- JOSEPHINE (15 May 1837; died in infancy). -- JABEZ MILLEGE
(13 July 1839; 3 December 1911) married Catherine Warren and had
Issue. -- CQRDELIA JOSEPHINE (6 April 1841; 3 October 1883) mar-
ried Milledge B. Ward. -- WILLIAM MANLY (18 August 1844; 20
September 1914) married Emily E. ___________________ and had
issue.
        5. Elizabeth (ca. 1790; ca. 18 18-20?). -- In 1806-7 she married Herrin
Bush, as his first wife, and had issue.
        6. Polly (ca. 1792; ) married a Mr. Brooks or a Mr. Williams.
        7. John (ca. 1794; lvg. 1850). -- At about 1818 he married Lucy
Fluker (ca. 1798; lvg. 1850), who apparently was a daughter of Thomas
Clement, the widow of Will Fluker, and the mother of three young
daughters. He was a schoolteacher, and had moved from Edgefield (now
Saluda) County, S.C., to central Georgia where he and Lucy were mar-
ried. He lived variously in Clarke County, Ga. (1820), Perry County,
Ala. (1830 and 1840), and Marengo County, Ala. (1850), being listed in
the respective censuses for those counties. He and Lucy were the parents
of seven children, two of whom (a son and a daughter) died in infancy or
childhood. The surviving children were: -- THOMAS CLEMENT (ca.
1819; lvg. 1860) married Mary S. Perryman and had issue. He was a
practicing physician in Perry County, Ala. (1850) and in Marengo Coun-
ty, Ala. (1860). -- MARIAH (ca. 1829; lvg. 1850). -- WILLIAM L. (ca.
1831; lvg. 1860). He was a practicing physician in Marengo County, Ala.
(1860). -- JOHN (ca. 1834; lvg. 1850). -- JAMES H. (ca. 1840; lvg.
1860).
        8. Nancy (ca. 1796; ) married a Mr. Williams or a Mr. Brooks.
        9. Mahala (3 April 1804; ca. 1845-6). -- At about 1828 she married
William Ridlehoover (ca. 1795, ca. 1865), as his first wife, and became
the mother of William, Jr., Joseph, Allison, Susan, Margaret and Julia
Ridlehoover.
        10. Sarah (15 August 1805; lvg. 1860). -- At about 1828 she married
John Henry Axson (7 July 1797; 7 March 1879) and became the mother
of Robert Edward, Thomas, William A., John W., and Daughter (died
in childhood) Axson.
        Some data on the DeLoache-Axson family, apparently assembled by
Mrs. Martha Ruth (Axson) Massie, was filed with the Caroliniana
Library (at the University of South Carolina) in Columbia, S.C., prior to
the year 1968. This data includes a copy (with many typing errors) of a
letter sent by this writer to Mrs. Ralph L. Axson of St. Matthews, S.C.,

                                35


under date of 19 September 1948. On page 2 (paragraph 3)of this letter
the name of "Samuel (who died 1760 in Edgecombe County, N.C.)", as
had been given to this writer by a correspondent, was erroneously includ-
ed as a son of William DeLoache, Jr.
        The said data also includes a copy of a DeLoache record contained in
THE HIGHLANDER, published by The Clan Campbell Association of
America, 1937-1939. This record gives an erroneous origin of the
DeLoache (DesLoges) family, and does not show its proper coat of arms.
Furthermore, among other serious errors, the record contains a number
of erroneous dates and wrongly shows the forementioned Samuel
DeLoache as a son of William DeLoache, Jr.
        11. Simeon (17 August 1807; 14 November 1822).
        12. Floyd (10 September 1808; lvg. 17 March 1845). -- He perhaps was
the F.W. DeLoache listed in the 1840 census for Edgefield County, S.C.,
with a number of persons included in his household.
        13. Allison (22 April 1810; 2 July 1887). -- See SKETCH No. 6.
        14. Madison (12 March 1812; ). -- No further informa-
tion.
        15. Marandia (14 October 1813; lvg. 1865). -- In 1833 she married
Jacob Sherwood Fannin (25 January 1811; 6 August 1881) at Mount
Willing, S.C., and shortly thereafter they moved to Alabama. The 1860
census shows that they then were living in Coffee County, Ala. On one
occasion her brother Allison DeLoache visited them in their Alabama
home. Both of them died at Shady Grove (Pike County), Ala. They were
the parents of thirteen children: -- Mahaly Elizabeth, Lucretia Caroline,
Daniel Herlong, John Broxon, Martha Maranda, Thomas DeLoach,
Sarah Ann Wadkins, Mary Milburn, Tilithia Lucinda, James R.
Abraham, Rebecca, Jacob Berton, and John Floyd Powell Fannin. --
(Information concerning this family was furnished to this writer by Mr.
C.B. Smith, a descendant, who in 1940 was president of State Teachers
College at Troy, Ala. He then had in his possession an old Bible which
belonged to his great-grandmother "Miranda" DeLoache Fannin. This
Bible contained a record of the children of the Reverend Thomas
DeLoache and his second wife, Sarah Watkins.)
        16. Bainbridge (18 May 1816; ). -- No further information.
        17. Lucretia (7 June 1818; ). -- No further information.

                                36


                          SKETCH No. 6
                        ALLISON DeLOACHE

        Allison DeLoache (22 April 1810; 2 July 1887). -- He was born in Lex-
ington County, S.C., where his parents then were living. They took him
with them on their return to Edgefield (now Saluda) County, S.C. He
was eight years of age when his mother died and nine years of age when
his father died. After their deaths he probably lived with his mother's
parents (John Watkins and wife of Edgefield County ?). After his sister
Sarah's marriage to John Henry Axson (in 1828) he lived in their home
until about 1837, when he married Susannah Catherine Burton (9
January 1817; 29 September 1867) who was a daughter of Nathaniel and
Susannah (Asbell) Burton of Edgefield County.
        After their marriage Allison and Susannah settled in Lexington Coun-
ty, on lands which probably were formerly owned by his father, where
the 1840 census lists him as the father of an infant son and the owner of
twenty-four slaves. Prior to 1848 he returned to Edgefield County where
he lived until the time of his death. He and his wife are buried in the
cemetery at Red Bank Baptist Church in the present town of Saluda,
S.C. He was an honored member and deacon of the said church.
        The total of the land holdings of Allison DeLoache has not been deter-
mined by this writer. He doubtless owned the land on which he lived in
Lexington County. The following listed real estate transactions engaged
in by him are of record, as appropriate, either in the State Archives At
Columbia, S.C., or in the courthouse at Edgefield, S.C.
        Prior to 1848 Allison DeLoache and William Bouknight acquired 150
acres of land situated on waters of Mine Creek and bounded by lands of
John Wingard, William Watkins, Jacob Pow, Jane Weaver, Jacob Pow,
and Smith. On 3 January 1848 they sold this land to Ellen Crowder for
$600.00 -- (Deed Book HHH, page 302). It is assumed that Allison had a
one-half interest in this land.
        On 1 June 1852 Allison DeLoache was granted 364 acres of land
situated in Edgefield District on the Canebrake Creek of Little Saluda
River. -- (Land grants, Vol. 88, page 20.) The grant was signed by His
Excellency J.H. Means, Governor and Commander-in-Chief in and over
the State of South Carolina. On 5 February 1885 Allison sold 300 acres
of this land to his son Zebulon DeLoache for the amount of $100.00.
This land then was described as adjoining lands of B.J. Bouknight, J.M.
Forrest, Bailey Matthis, the said Allison DeLoache, and others. In the
deed Allison stated: -- "Now I the said Allison DeLoache do intend by
this deed to give my son the said Zebulon DeLoache this advantage over
the rest of my children. That is, the above specified tract of land being
the home tract or the tract I now live on or so much of it as above
specified to the said Zebulon DeLoache being crippled and not an able
bodied man." -- (Deed Book 8, page 487.)
        On 14 October 1858 Allison DeLoache bought from Tillman H. Clark
100 acres of land which formerly belonged to Samuel Banks. This tract
adjoined lands of Willis L. Stone, Mark Etheredge, R.R. Grigsby, and
former land of James Rushton. At the same time he bought from Clark
19¬ acres of land formerly belonging to James Rushton. This tract ad-
joined lands of John Gillion, Rhydon Grigsby, and the said 100 acres.

                                37


The amount of $1,041.00 was paid for the two tracts as a whole. --
(Deed Book JJJ, page 418.)
        On 16 October 1866 Allison DeLoache bought from Z.W. Carwile
(Commissioner of the Equity Court) 200 acres of land belonging to the
estate of Willis L. Stone, Tract No. 4, adjoining lands of Mark
Etheredge and others. The purchase price of the land was $1,030.00, and
DeLoache gave bond to Carwile to insure payment. -- (Deed Book
MMM, pages 188 and 227.)
        On 1 December 1876 Allison DeLoache bought from Stanmore B.
Griffin and Richard G. Bonham 472 acres of land (formerly land of J.
Robert Pow) situated on Dry Creek waters of Little Saluda River and
bounded by lands of Mrs. Elizabeth Stone (widow of Willis L. Stone),
George Bell, J.S. Pow, Thomas Whittle, and others. The purchase price
of the land was $1,000.00 -- (Deed Book TTT, page 616.) -- On 14
January 1882 Allison sold the land to J. Robert Pow, the former owner.
-- (Deed Book 6, page 390.)
        On 1 November 1879 Allison DeLoache bought from James Rushton
30 acres of "piney woods" land (known as the "Rushton Tract") bound-
ing on the estate of Mark Etheredge and lands of James Rushton, Bailey
Matthews, and Allison DeLoache. The purchase price of the land was
$150.00. -- (Deed Book 8, page 488.) By his will Allison gave his son
Zebulon DeLoache limited use of this land, after which it was to be sold
and the proceeds to be equally divided among his (Allison's) heirs.
        On a date and in a manner not yet determined Allison DeLoache ac-
quired 217 acres of "piney woods" land known as the "Watkins Place".
After his death this land was to be sold and the proceeds to be equally
divided among his (Allison's) heirs. -- (Deed Book F, page 641 -- Will
of Allison DeLoache.)
        The following listed sales of land by Allison DeLoache, in addition to
those heretofore mentioned, are of record in the courthouse at Edgefield.
        On 1 January 1873 Allison DeLoache sold to Bailey Matthews 76 acres
of land bounding on lands of Allison DeLoache, Mrs. Mary Bouknight,
Bailey Crouch, and J.W. Edwards. -- (Deed Book 4, page 41.)
        On 11 September 1873 Allison DeLoache sold to Thomas Whittle
128« acres of land bounding on lands of Mark Etheredge, Elizabeth
Stone, John Gillion, and Thomas Whittle. The sale price of the land was
$1,000.00. -- (Deed Book 2, page 245.)
        From the foregoing it will be noted that in the aggregate over a period
of years Allison acquired at least 1,477 ¬ acres of land in Edgefield (now
Saluda) County, S.C. At the time of his death he owned none of this ex-
cept the 247 acres mentioned in his will. During his lifetime he disposed
of 1,230 ¬ acres, of which 1,05 1« acres were disposed of by known
deeds of sale; but such deeds for the remaining 178_ acres were not
found in the records searched by this writer. At the time of the 1860 cen-
sus for Edgefield County the value of his real estate and personal proper-
ty was reported as $17,250.00. In addition to being a planter, for a
number of years he operated a country store on his home plantation. As
heretofore mentioned, the major portion of this plantation (with all
buildings (including the store building) was sold to his son Zebulon
DeLoache, with whom he lived until the time of his death.
        On 6 March 1854 Allison DeLoache and James Spann witnessed the

                                38


will of Margaret A. Pow of Edgefield (now Saluda) County, S.C.
        Allison DeLoache is listed in the 1840 census for Lexington County
and in the 1850 through 1880 censuses for Edgefield county. The names
of all his children, except one who died when about three months of age,
are shown in these censuses and some of them are mentioned in his will.
        Will of Allison DeLoache, dated 28 April 1887 and probated 10
August 1887. -- (Mobley Township) -- I give to my daughter-in-law
Mary DeLoache my entire possession of household and kitchen fur-
niture; also one note I hold against Zebulon DeLoache for $471.00,
dated 19 January 1881, with interest that may accrue thereon. I give to
my son Zebulon DeLoache the entire use of my piney woods tract of land
known as the Rushton Tract (about 30 acres) to have and to hold until
the youngest child of James N. DeLoache and Mary Carson shall arrive
at the age of 21, after which the said 30 acres reverts to my estate. I direct
that my piney woods tract known as the Watkins Place be rented, leased,
or used to the best advantage for the heirs, which contain about Two
Hundred and 17 acres, until the said minor heirs of James N. DeLoache
and Mary Carson shall have arrived at the age of 21, after which I direct
that my executor put and sell to the highest bidder the above mentioned
tract of land including the said 30 acres of land and that the proceeds be
equally divided among my heirs . . . The residue and remainder of my
estate I order and direct both real and personal to be sold as soon after
my death as my executor sees proper and fit and the proceeds to be equal-
ly divided among my heirs.
And lastly I do hereby appoint and nominate my son-in-law
Josh W. Edwards Executor . . . Witnesses: Baily Matthews,
J.F. Kirkland, James M. Forrest.
        A settlement account (evidently a partial settlement) on Allison's
estate and the original of his will are contained in File 116, Pack 4723, in
the office of the Probate Judge at Edgefield Courthouse. This account
shows that payments were made to his sons-in-law in right of their wives.
        Dr. L.B. Bouchelle $ 500.00
        W.W. Holston 500.00
        Rev. J.A. Carson 1,000.00*
        J.W. Edwards 500.00
        Dr. J.G.J. Davis 500.00
     * He married two of Allison's daughters.
        Allison and his wife Susannah were the parents of the ten following
named children. Some of them were born in Lexington County and all
others were born in the present Saluda County.
        1. Wilson (16 September 1838; 16 September 1854). -- He is buried in
the cemetery at Red Bank Baptist Church.
        2. Sarah/Sallie S. (ca. 1840; lvg. 1930)-- In 1859 she was in charge of
Spring Field Academy (near Mount Tabor Church in Edgefield County,
where she taught ancient history and mental and practical arithmetic. On
20 December 1859 she married Dr. Lewis B. Bouchelle, who also was a
schoolteacher. At the time of the 1860 census they were living in the
home of Jacob and Nancy Wright at Fruit Hill in the present Saluda
County. In 1930 she was living at Tennille, Ga. She and her husband
were the parents of: -- Susan (married Henry Wight. In 1948 they were
living in Falls Church, Va.), Sophia (unmarried), Fred (married and lived

                                39


in West Virginia).
        3. Elvira/Ellie (27 February 1843; 9 August 1915). -- At about 1866-7
she married Joshua Walter Edwards (3 January 1843; 28 April 1910) and
they settled on lands in the present Saluda County, S.C. He was the ex-
ecutor of the will of his father-in-law, Allison DeLoache. "Josh" and
Ellie were members of Red Bank Baptist Church, and they are buried in
the cemetery at that church. They were the parents of: -- Wilson Clark
(married Laura Lawton Meredith and had issue), an unnamed son and
an unnamed daughter who died in infancy, John Broadus (married An-
nie Belle Kenney and had issue), Robert Lee (died in infancy), William
Allison (married Jessie Lane and had issue), Susan (married John Black;
no issue), J. Bee (died ininfancy), and Elizabeth/Bess (Kg. in 1981, over
99 years of age and the last surviving member of her immediate family;
unmarried).
        4. Louisa/Lou (ca. 1845; ca. 1916). -- At about 1867-8 she married
Woodruff Wilson Holstein (ca. 1844; ) and they settled on lands in
the present Saluda County, S.C. "Woody" and Lou were members of
West Creek Baptist Church in Saluda County. They were the parents of:
-- Mae (died unmarried), Sarah/Sallie (married John Wise and had
issue), Geulah E. (died unmarried), Maud (died unmarried), James Con-
nor (married Mamie Bodie; no issue), Webster/Webb B. (married
Mamie Smith and had issue), and David Woodruff (died in the Spanish-
American War; unmarried).
        5. Zebulon/Zeb (23 October 1847; 17 September 1934). -- See
SKETCH No. 7.
        6. Sophia/Soph (1850; 16 January 1930). -- During a period of about
thirty years she was a schoolteacher in the present Saluda County, S.C.,
and was the organizer of the first "Bond of Mercy" group in the state.
Following her teaching career, and after graduating from medical col-
leges when it was difficult for a woman to enter the practice of medicine,
she became the city physician in Augusta, Ga. She married Dr. John/-
Jack G.J. Davis, and together they practiced medicine in Augusta until
the time of his death. After continuing her practice for a period of time
she retired therefrom and organized in Augusta a humane society for the
prevention of cruelty to animals, and ardently served many years as its
president and later as a field worker. She and her husband are buried in a
cemetery at Tennille, Ga. A lengthy tribute to her was published in the
Augusta Herald and republished in an issue of the Saluda Standard. She
was the mother of Sophia Carrie Davis, an adopted daughter.
        7. James Nathaniel (30 August 1852; 12 July 1879). -- He died by
drowning in Little Saluda River, in Saluda County, S.C. At about 1873
he married Elizabeth/Lizzie E. Edwards (11 June 1846; 18 March 1908).
Both of them are buried in the cemetery at Red Bank Baptist Church.
They were the parents of: -- JULIA (ca. 1874; ) married Mr. Wood-
ward. -- SUSANNA A. (28 May 1875; 20 January 1950) married Daniel
P. Norris (12 October 1871; 5 December 1952) and had issue. Both of
them are buried in the cemetery at Red Bank Baptist Church. -- JAMES
ALLISON (ca. 1878; 31 August 1961) married Emma Gregory, and they
were the parents of: -- Clyde E., Allison, Harry Bell, and four daughters
(Mrs. Jimmie Spurlin, Mrs. D.D. Johnson, Mrs. J.L. Temple, and Mrs.
Earl Leopard), all of whom were living in 1961.

                                40


        8. Mary (15 September 1854; June 1879). -- At about 1875 she
married the Reverend James A. Carson (1850; 1929) as his first wife, and
they were the parents of: -- Benjamin Franklin (1876-1968) married
Mattie Sloan and had issue. -- James Allison (1879- ) married
Maude Parrish and had issue. The Reverend James A. Carson and his
son Benjamin Franklin Carson both were Baptist preachers.
        9. Josephine L. (23 August 1858; 8 May 1903). -- At about 1881 she
married the Reverend James A. Carson (1850; 1929) as his second wife,
and they were the parents of: Ora Allein (1882; ) married Bob
Crawford and had issue. -- William Burton (1886; ) married and
had issue. -- Andrew Boyce (1889; ) married Anne Rutledge and
had issue. -- Leta Elvira (1891; ) married Guy Forrest and had issue.
-- William Edwin (1895; ) married Fern Christian and had issue. --
Louis Frederick (1897; ) married Mae Jones and had issue. -- A
child who died in childhood. The Reverend Mr. Carson and his two
wives are buried in the cemetery at Red Bank Baptist Church.


                        ASBILL

        This family name appears in various records under different forms of
spelling, such as: -- Asbald, Asball, Asbel, Asbell, Asbil, Asbill, Asble,
Aspull, and Azbell.
        According to the Magazine of American Genealogy, No. 8 (March
1930), p. 80, and No. 9 (April 1930), p. 81, -- (with reference to Green's
"Early Virginia Immigrants", 1623-1666, pages 13 and 14), -- in 1641
one George Ashall (Asball) was brought to Virginia by Ambrose Ben-
nett; and in 1650 one George Asball was brought to Virginia by Robert
Bird. It is speculated that the one who came first was a son of the one
who came last. It is said that these men came from Devonshire (County
Devon), England, and that there were three brothers in the family, name-
ly: -- George, Richard, and Adam (mentioned as Adam Aspull). In 1652
George Asball (evidently the younger one) was given a grant of 350 acres
of land in Virginia. -- (Handbook of American Genealogy, Vol. 47.)
        George Asball (ca. 1610; 1672), one of three brothers, married Mary
Fowler? and settled in Lower Norfolk (later Nansemond) County, Va.
On 1 September 1671 he made his will (proved on 16 February 1672) in
which he described himself as "George Asball of Ye Little Creek in
Linhaven Parish, Lower Norfolk County, Virginia". By this will he gave
to his wife Mary the home plantation to enjoy during her life, but it was
to become the property of his son George when he arrived at the age of
16 years. -- To his older son Richard (see following) he gave the planta-
tion called Wolves Neck (probably the forementioned 350 acres of land)
and other property. To his daughters Elizabeth, Mary, and Susannah he
gave certain property. His wife was named as executor, and his friend
George Fowler (probably a brother-in-law, sometimes called friend when
named in a will) was named as overseer. -- (Brief abstracts of Lower
Norfolk County, Va., Wills, -- Book E, p. 134.)
        Richard Asball (ca. 1633; 1700), son of George and Mary Asball, was
born in Devonshire, England. At about 1655 he married Anne Markes,

                                41


daughter of Peter Markes of Lower Norfolk County, Va., who was the
mother of Asball children among whom were Elizabeth (married William
Charlton) and Anne (married William Privett). Richard, his wife (Anne),
and Elizabeth are named in the will (dated 19 August 1656 and proved on
15 October 1656) of Peter Markes, and Richard was named as sole ex-
ecutor of the will. -- (Brief Abstracts of Lower Norfolk County, Va.,
Wills, -- Book D, p. 10.) ---- After the death of Anne (his wife),
Richard married Mary Martin (living in 1795) who was the mother of
Asball children among whom were Martin (see following) and Mary.
Prior to 1695 he moved to Chowan County, N.C., where he died leaving
a will (dated 15 September 1695). The will mentions his wife (Mary),
daughter Mary, and a child in esse, all of my children (including the
husbands of his daughters Elizabeth and Anne). The will is of record in
the Chowan County Courthouse. -- (North Carolina Genealogical and
Historical Register, Vol. 1, p. 26.)
        Martin Asball (ca. 1680; lvg. 1742), son of Richard and Mary Asball,
probably was born in Chowan County, N.C. At about 1704 he married
Hannah Pierce, daughter of John and Mary Pierce, and settled in Per-
quimans (formerly Berkeley) County, N.C., where he acquired land and
where he probably died. It is said that on 13 April 1730 he made a will,
but the time and place at which it was proved have not been determined
by this writer. Among his children were Pierce (see following), Richard,
Jean (in 1736 her father gave her lands in Perquimans County), Margaret
(born 13 September 1717), and Ann (born 18 July 1734). In addition to
giving lands to his children he sold lands to other persons. -- (North
Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 3, p. 379.)
        Pierce Asball (ca. 1705; ), son of Martin and Hannah Asball, was
born in Perquimans County, N.C. On 3 January 1742 his father gave
him a plantation in that county, the disposition of which has not been
learned by this writer. He moved to Orange County in the Hillsboro
District of North Carolina, where he acquired land. Orange County,
formed in 1752, originally embraced the area included in its five present-
day adjoining counties and parts of six farther removed counties. The ex-
act location of Pierce's residence has not been determined. In the Orange
County records his given name is shown as Pierce or Pearce, and his sur-
name is written in various forms of spelling. The name of his wife, the
total number of his children, and the time and place of his death have not
been learned. Donald Eugene Bennett and George T. Bennett, pages 28
and 29 of their record of "The Asbill Family", mention authentic
records which show the names of four sons: -- John (married Elizabeth
Cornelius), Joseph, James (married Whitnum?),
and Solomon. The finding of this writer concerning these four men,
which in regard to Joseph does not agree with the record of the Messrs.
Bennett, is stated in the following paragraphs.
        1. John. -- He married Elizabeth Cornelius and settled in Chowan
County, where his will (dated 29 July 1796) was proved at the December
1796 term of court. Among his six children he mentions a son Cornelius
(his wife's maiden name). -- (Olds. -- Abstract of North Carolina Wills,
1760-1800, p. 61; North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register,
Vol. 1, p. 516.)
        2. Joseph. -- See following.

                                44


        3. James. -- He married ___________________ Whitnum and set-
tled in Bertie County, N.C., where he is included in the 1790 census.
        4. Solomon (died in 1769). -- He died in Bertie County, N.C., and at
the court term of 1769 his twin sons Joseph and Solomon, aged six years,
were committed to the tuition of Malachi Frazier. -- (North Carolina
Genealogical and Historical Register, Vol. 3, p. 447.) ---- Joseph mar-
ried Fanny ____________________ and settled in Bertie County, where
he is included in the 1790 census and where he died in 1827 leaving a will
(dated 19 October 1826 and proved at the court term of February 1827. -
(Ibid., Vol. 2, p. 498.) The Messrs. Bennett erroneously identify him as
the Joseph Asball who married Dorthy Ross. ---- Solomon (Jr.) mar-
ned (1) Sarah Jernigan on 25 August 1784; and (2) Elizabeth
        who is named in his will (dated 1 November 1849
and proved at the court term of February 1850). -- (Ibid., Vol. 2, pp. 218
and 498.) He supposedly was living in the home of some other person in
Bertie County at the time of the 1790 census.
        Joseph Asball (ca. 1735; lvg. 1790), son of Pierce and Hannah Asball,
was born in Perquirmans County, N.C. During 1761 he served in the
French and Indian War. On 30 May 1778, in Lenoir County, N.C., he
took an oath of allegiance to defend the State of North Carolina against
King George the Third. He served as an inspector to check the loyalty of
North Carolina officials to the American cause. -- (North Carolina State
Records, Vol. 22, p. 172.) He was listed in the 1790 census for Pitt Coun-
ty, N.C., -- which adjoins Lenoir County, -- where he probably settled
prior to or during 1778. At about 1757 he married Dorothy Ross (died
before 1790?), daughter of the Reverend George Aeneas Ross (1676;
1754) who is said to have been a descendant of Mac-an-t-Sagairt (created
Earl of Ross in 1234) of Scotland. The Reverend Mr. Ross, who was
educated at the University of Edinburgh and served both as a
Presbyterian minister and an Episcopalian minister, came to America in
1700 and settled at New Castle, Delaware. It is not stated how, when, or
where Dorothy Ross met Joseph Asball, but after their marriage she
went with him to North Carolina. Their children are said to have been:
-- Aaron (see following), William (married 1. Malinda Ross and 2.
Elizabeth Moore), James (married, 1782, Pauline Coyle), John (married,
1788, Elizabeth Coyle), Elizabeth (married, 1792, Zadock Piercy), Nan-
nie (married, 1797, William Mitchell), and three sons (names not given)
included in the 1790 census for Pitt County.
        Aaron Asball (ca. 1758; 1814), said to be a son of Joseph and Dorothy
Asball, probably was born in Perquimans County, N.C. Among his
descendants were Pierce Belton Asball, Joseph Burton, and Dorothy
Burton, the last two being children of Nathaniel Burton who married 1.
Aaron's daughter Susannah and 2. Edea Whittle. The given names
(Pierce, Joseph, and Dorothy) of these descendants are a strong indica-
tion of Aaron's parentage. At about 1778 he married Ann/Nancy
(born about 1760; died after 1814) who might
have been a Miss Belcher, or a Miss Jarvis who named one of her sons
Jarvis Asball. He settled in Bertie County, N.C., where he bought and
sold land, and was included in the 1790 census for that county. The last
sale of land was made in 1799, and soon thereafter he moved to
Edgefield County, S.C., where he was included in the 1800 census. ----

                                45


In the new location he settled near Ridge Spring, which now is in the
present Saluda County, S.C. He acquired several hundred acres of land,
most of which eventually became the possession of three of his sons. A
tract of 267 acres (the plantation on which he last resided) was acquired
by his son Jarvis Asball on 3 September 1814 following his father's
death. The settlement papers on Aaron's estate, together with other
records, mention his wife Ann and show the names of his sons and their
wives and his daughters and their husbands, as follows: --
        1. Nancy (born ca. 1779). -- Married Josiah Todd.
        2. John (born ca. 1780). -- Married Abigail Frederick.
        3. Penelope (born ca. 1782). -- Married Charles Williamson.
        4. Susannah (11 June 1784; 23 August 1841). -- Married Nathaniel
Burton.
        5. Lewis (born ca. 1786). -- Married Mary/Polly Satcher.
        6. Elisha (born ca. 1788). -- Married A. ____________________
        7. Jarvis (born ca. 1790). -- Married Frances Deshazo.
        8. Hepsibah/Hepsy (born ca. 1792) -- Married John/E.W. Browning.
        In South Carolina the family name now is spelled "Asbill".


                        BURTON

        The name of this family is of English derivation, and is by origin a
place name signifying burgtun or boroughtown. It has been variously
spelled as Bearden, Berden, Burden, Burdine, Burtin, and Burton.
        During the reign (1625-1649) of King Charles the First two Burton
brothers, Thomas (see following) and John, came from England to
Virginia and settled in that part of old Henrico County which later
became Chesterfield County. It is said of these brothers and their descen-
dants in Virginia: -- "Among all the families of which the memory is
preserved, it would be difficult to match the Burtons of Henrico County
for lack of the romantic. They were a most respectable lot, devoting their
lives for one generation after another to getting lands, getting children,
and growing tobacco." -- (Francis Burton Harrison -- Burton
Chronicles of Colonial Virginia.)
        Thomas Burton (ca. 1630-4; 1686), the immigrant, acquired and
disposed of land in Henrico County, Va. Shortly before his death he gave
some of this land to his four sons. -- (Henrico County, Va., Record
Book I, p. 350.) At about 1655 he married Susannah (believed to have
been the daughter of Abraham Wood), who administered his estate and
later married John Stewart. She was the mother of the said four sons, --
Thomas, John (see following), Isaac, and Abraham, -- and perhaps
other Burton children. Abraham Wood was born in 1610 and died in
1684 (?).
        John Burton (1666; 1754). -- The year of his birth is shown by a
deposition made by him on 12 October 1688. -- (Henrico County, Va.,
Record Book V, p. 11.) His stepfather, John Stewart, was his legal guar-
dian for about one year. He became of age in 1687, and then took over
the land which his father had given to him and engaged in farming and

                                46


merchandising. He was a large tobacco grower. During the period of
1701-1720 he acquired an additional 1,480 acres plus a plantation
(acreage not stated in reference) which he leased from Thomas Jefferson
and eventually bought. -- (Record Books of Henrico County, Va.; Fran-
cis Burton Harrison -- Burton Chronicles of Colonial Virginia.)
        At about 1687-8 he married Elizabeth Fowler (ca. 1671; 1757),
daughter of Samuel Fowler, Sr., who mentions her in his will (made in
1688). Her will, probated in 1757, is recorded in Chesterfield County,
Va., Will Book 1, page 314. His will, dated 23 February 1754, is recorded
in Chesterfield County, Va., Will Book 1, page 208. They were the
parents of: -- A daughter (married William Shepherd; died before 1754),
-- John (married Elizabeth _____________________ died in 1747; his son
Robert Burton was in South Carolina on 20 January 1752, and was in-
cluded in the 1790 census for Edgefield County, S.C.), -- Thomas (mar-
ried Joanna ____________________; died in 1773), -- Samuel, -- James
(married Judith ______________________, died in 1783), -- Sarah (married
        Jackson), -- Elizabeth (made will in 1767; mar-
ried ___________________ Turpin), -- Susannah (married
        Tanner), -- Febue/Phoebe (married
___________________ Johnson), -- Ann (married, about 1755,
Charles? Pain), -- Esar/Isaiah (see following), -- Robert (married
_____________________ Ward?).

        Isaiah Burton (ca. 1707; lvg. 1763) was born in Henrico (later Chester-
field) County, Va. In 1728, when he was 21 years of age and apparently
at about the time of his marriage, his father deeded to him 85 acres of
land in that county. -- (Henrico County, Va., Deeds and Wills,
1725-1737, p. 256.) He married Obedience ____________________, who
was living in 1753 when she brought suit against one Charles Burton of
Chesterfield County. In 1736 Isaiah bought 600 acres of land in I-len rico
County from Henry Cary. A county court order issued in February 1745
shows that Isaiah Burton, his son Isaiah Burton, Jr. (born before or dur-
ing 1729), and other persons were named to assist John Branch in survey-
ing a road. In 1751 he deeded to John Fowler the forementioned 600
acres of land, which then were lying in Chesterfield County, and Obe-
dience Burton (his wife) relinquished her dower rights. Nathaniel Burton
(believed to be Isaiah's son) was one of the witnesses. -- (Chesterfield
County, Va., Deed Book 1, p. 252.)
        At some time between 1753 and 1757 Isaiah Burton moved to
Albemarle County, Va., where in the latter year he deeded the foremen-
tioned 85 acres of land in the then Chesterfield County to Abraham
Cowley. (Chesterfield County, Va., Deed Book Ill, p. 129.) On the
same day in 1757 he bought from Ware Rockett of New Kent County,
Va., 200 acres of land (part of 1,500 acres which belonged to his brother
Thomas Burton) in Chesterfield County. -- (Chesterfield County, Va.,
Deed Book Ill, p. 120.).
The next record found of Isaiah Burton, Sr., places him in Buck-
ingham (adjoining Albemarle) County, Va., where in 1763 he deeded the
forementioned 200 acres of land in Chesterfield County to his nephew
John Burton. One of the witnesses was William Burton (believed to be
Isaiah's son). -- (Chesterfield County, Va., Deed Book IV., p. 456.) The
records of Buckingham County have not been searched for further infor-

                                47


mation concerning him. It is said that there is no will recorded for him in
that county; however, nothing is said of a possible administration on his
estate, if he died intestate in Buckingham County.
        In the "Burton Chronicles of Colonial Virginia", from which most of
the preceding data was obtained, no mention is made of any lands which
Isaiah Burton might have acquired while he lived in Albemarle and Buck-
ingham Counties. The lands which he owned in Henrico/Chesterfield
County were sold to persons who were not members of his family, and he
apparently (so far as the known records show) gave nothing to his
children. The total number of his children is not known. Isaiah, Jr. (see
following) is the only son who is definitely known. As heretofore stated,
it is believed that Nathaniel and William were two other sons.
        Isaiah Burton, Jr. (ca. 1729; 1775) was born in Henrico (later Chester-
field) County, Va. In 1745 he, then being a tithable (a male of sixteen
years or over), was ordered to assist John Branch in surveying a road in
the said county. Though this writer has not searched for further informa-
tion concerning him in Virginia, it is believed that he was the Isaiah Bur-
ton who came from Virginia to South Carolina with his wife and children
shortly before or during 1769.
        After his arrival in the new location Isaiah Burton presented the
following petitions to the Colonial Council of South Carolina for grants
of land.
        (a) Based on his previous petition, on 14 March 1769 a plat
        for 200 acres of land situated on Mudlick Creek in Berkley
        (now Newberry) County was certified for him, and the grant
        for the land was signed on 19 June 1772. -- (Grant Book 26,
        p. 26.)
        (b) On 3 April 1770 the Council approved his petition for
        another 200 acres of land in the same county, but the grant
        therefor lapsed due to his failure to take up the land. On 7
        January 1772 the Council approved his petition to certify the
        lapsed grant.
        (c) On 4 December 1770 the Council approved his petition
        for 200 acres of land in Craven (now Newberry) County.

        The petitions of Isaiah Burton for a total of 600 acres of land indicate
that eleven persons (himself, presumably his wife, and nine children)
were included in his family when he arrived in South Carolina. He was
allowed 100 acres for himself and 50 acres for each other person. Ap-
parently no grants for items (b) and (c) were issued in his name, and it is
probable that he sold the warrants for the land to other persons who
received the grants. Newberry County formerly was part of old Craven
County, part of which lay north of Saluda River. In a number of in-
stances the petitions, plats, and grants show Berkley County, which lay
south of Saluda River, whereas the land actually was in Craven County.
        On 7 March 1775 a dedimus was issued to Robert Cunningham, Esqr.
(then of Craven County), to prove the will of Isaiah Burton, deceased,
and to qualify the executors therein named. -- (Brent H. Holcomb --
Probate Records of South Carolina, Vol. 2, p. 150.) This writer made a
fruitless effort to find the will, which probably was destroyed during the
Revolutionary War period. No record known to this writer shows the
number and names of Isaiah's children; however, one of his sons

                                48


evidently was the Nathan Burdine/Nathaniel Burton (see following) in-
cluded in the 1790 census for Newberry County, S.C.
        Nathan Burdine/Nathaniel Burton (born about 1753; lvg. 1790) came
with his father to Newberry County, S.C., prior to or during 1769. One
of his grandsons, then an aged man, stated that his grandfather was an
American soldier during the Revolutionary War; however, as in many
other cases, the record of his service has been lost or destroyed. At the
time of the 1790 census for Newberry County he was the head of a family
consisting of himself, three other males, and seven females. The second
son in the family was Nathaniel Burton, Jr. (see following). The names
of the other children have not been learned by this writer.
        Nathaniel Burton, Jr. (15 March 1778; 5 July 1865) was born in
Newberry County, S.C. At about 1800 he moved to Edgefield County,
S.C., and married Susannah Asbill (11 June 1784; 23 August 1841),
daugher of Aaron Asbill (which see). He acquired land near the present
town of Monetta (now in Saluda County), S.C., where he established a
home and lived during the remainder of his life. He was a successful
farmer, and the owner of a number of slaves. He was included in the
1800-1860 censuses for Edgefield County. He was a captain during the
War of 1812, and he is mentioned as Captain Nathaniel Burton in his
will. On 20 December 1842 he married Edea/Edie Whittle (10 October
1812; 22 December 1885) who, then a widow, was included in the 1870
and 1880 censuses for Edgefield County. At the time of the 1800 census a
female of 26 to 45 years of age and three males under 10 years of age
were living with him. It is believed that these were a widowed sister and
her children. He married Susannah later in that year. Nathaniel Burton,
his two wives, and some of his children were buried in marked graves in
the family cemetery on his plantation near Monetta.
        From family Bible records, tombstone inscriptions, and his will and
estate papers (filed in the office of the Probate Judge at Edgefield, S.C.),
it is known that Nathaniel Burton, Jr., was the father of eleven children
by his first wife and two children by his second wife, these being: --
        1. Penelope (ca. 1801; lvg. 1865). -- Md. Gibeon J. Williams.
        2. Nancy (ca. 1803; lvg. 1865). -- Md. ________________ Reynolds.
        3. Dorothy (ca. 1805; lvg. 1865). -- Md. Wiley Reynolds.
        4. Isaiah (ca. 1806; lvg. 1865). -- Md. Margaret Charity Mims.
        5. Julia (ca. 1808; June 1815).
        6. Washington (24 Octoboer 1810; 2 September 1831). -- Unmarried.
        7. Eleanor/Ellin (17 April 1812; 26 September 1839). -- Md. Wade
        Holstein.
        8. Nathaniel (1 January 1814; 3 June 1848). -- Md. Sophia Connec-
ticut Woodruff.
        9. John (10 January 1816; 31 January 1857). -- Unmarried.
        10. Susannah (9 January 1817; 29 September 1867). -- Md. Allison
DeLoache (which see).
        11. Edna (15 March 1820; 30 August 1841). -- Unmarried.
        12. James Benjamin (17 August 1844; bef. 1850).
        13. Whit Joseph (29 October 1845; 2 April 1929). -- Md. Mary S. Bodie.

                                49


                          SKETCH No. 7
                        ZEBULON DeLOACHE

        Zebulon DeLoache (23 October 1847; 17 September 1934). -- He
probably was born in Edgefield (now Saluda) County, S.C. When about
five or six years of age he was carried by his parents to the home which
his father established on the place which had been granted to him in
1852. Other than during those times when he was attending school away
from home, he lived with his parents during the remainder of their lives.
As heretofore mentioned, on 5 February 1885 his father sold to him this
homestead inclusive of 300 acres of land. He and his family are listed in
the 1880 census for Edgefield County.
        He was a studious and well-read person, having received a good educa-
tion at the schools and academies which he attended. During a period of
time he studied for the practice of medicine but, being of a very sensitive
nature, he discontinued the study after having observed procedures in the
operating room of the medical college which he was attending. He subse-
quently was employed as teacher at Pine Grove School in Edgefield (now
Saluda) County and, together with his father, operated a country store
situated near the home site. After his father's death he carried on farm-
ing operations with the help of hired hands and sharecroppers. He was
not an able-bodied man, having been crippled by a fall from his nurse's
arms during his infancy.
        In the fall of 1898 Zebulon moved from his farm to Leesville, S.C., so
that his children might have the benefit of the schools and college in that
town. He or his son made regular visits to the farm to check on opera-
tions carried on there. In 1900/1 he traded a tract of 272 acres of land
(situated in Orangeburg County, S.C., and bought by him in 1880) to
David B. Busby for 40 acres of land and a commodious house built
thereon. Mr. Busby formerly was the principle of Emory High School
(sometimes called "College"), -- a chartered institution having authori-
ty to grant to its graduates diplomas and the Bachelor of Arts degree, --
which was situated about one air mile distance from Zebulon's farm. The
house had been built by Mr. Busby as a residence for himself and as a
dormitory for boarding students at the "college" which was nearby.
After living in this house for a period of three or four years Zebulon sold
the property (house and forty acres of land) to Walter J. Padgett and
returned to his original home where he continued to live until his death in
1934.
        At an early age he became a devout and dedicated Christian. In 1865,
at the age of eighteen years, he united with the membership of Red Bank
Baptist Church in the present town of Saluda, S.C. Taking turns with
ministers who were present on such occasions, he preached in the annual
"protracted" services which were held at the church. In 1870 he was
licensed as a local preacher in the church; but, both by word of mouth
and exemplary living, he imparted a Christian message to others without
regard of denominational lines. His home was one in which the family
alter held first place. Part of his daily routine was devoted to Bible
reading and study, prayer, spiritual meditation, and the singing of
religious songs. The joy of the Christian religion was truly manifested in

                                50


his daily life, and this joy he always sought to share with others. The
following are some of the many tributes paid to him after his decease.
        "He was one of Saluda County's most beloved and God-
        fearing citizens." -- "One could look the country over and
        not find a more devout Christian and God-fearing man." --
        "The glowing example of his life will live long in the lives and
        hearts of those who knew him and ever fondly admired him."
        -- "He was a man whose almost every conversation led to
        things eternal." -- "Many of us remember his earnest prayer,
        --somehow a sincerity, a power unusual."

        On 8 February 1876 Zebulon married Mary Alice Matheny (24 Oc-
tober 1852; 10 August 1892), daughter of Charles R. and Eleanor J.
(Wright) Matheny. Both of them are buried in the cemetery at Red Bank
Baptist Church. They were the parents of the following named children.
        1. Ellen (26 November 1876; 2 August 1948). -- In addition to attend-
ing the forementioned Emory High School, she was a student at
Johnston Academy (Johnston, S.C.) and Leesville College (Leesville,
S.C.). On 2 November 1899 she married Henry Asbury Spann (ca. 1874;
1916), and on 22 December 1918 she married Benjamin James Padget (18
September 1875; 29 February 1920) as his second wife. She had no
children. She is buried in the cemetery at Red Bank Baptist Church.
        2. Alice (30 March 1878; 10 August 1903). -- In addition to attending
the forementioned Emory High School, she was a student at Johnston
Academy (Johnston, S.C.) and Leesville College (Leesville, S.C.). She
taught school, in Saluda and Orangeburg Counties, S.C., during a
number of years before her death. She died unmarried, being buried in
the cemetery at Red Bank Baptist Church.
        3. James/Jim Nathaniel (28 October 1879; 5 October 1967). -- See
SKETCH No. 8.
        4. Dora (3 December 1881; 5 March 1966). -- In addition to attend-
ing the forementioned Emory High School, she was a student at Monetta
Academy (Monetta, S.C.) and at an educational institution in Leesville,
S.C. She taught school in Saluda County, S.C., during a number of years
before her marriage. On 11 July 1911 she married Van Everett Edwards,
as his second wife, and they lived the whole of their married lives in
Johnston, S.C. Both of them are buried in Mount of Olives Cemetery in
that town. They were the parents of: Mary Alice (married Eugene C.
Mathis and had issue), Helen (married Frank W. Herlong and had issue),
and Van Everett, Jr. (married 1st Alice White and 2nd Mary Gavin and
had issue).
        5. Mary (5 August 1883; 21 October 1961). -- In addition to attend-
ing the forementioned Emory High School, she was a student at Monetta
Academy (Monetta, S.C.) and at an educational institution in Leesville,
S.C. She taught schools in Saluda, Greenwood, and Abbeville Counties,
S.C., during a number of years before her marriage. For a period of two
years between 1910 and 1913 she served as deaconess with a Methodist
Church in Chester, S.C. On 7 June 1916 she married the Reverend Lewis
Hill Smith, and they lived in Greenwood, S.C. during the last years of
their married life. Both of them are buried in the cemetery at Friendship
Pentecostal Holiness Church in Greenwood County. They were the
parents of: -- Mary Ruth (married Arthur Timmerman and had issue),

                                51


Lewis Hill, Jr. (married Ann Mercer and had issue), Rebecca (married
Benjamin Garvin and had issue), and Zebulon DeLoache (married
Rowena Stewart and had issue).
        6. Susan (20 March 1885; 25 December 1972). -- In addition to at-
tending the forementioned Emory High School, she was a student at
Monetta Academy (Monetta, S.C.) and at an educational institution in
Leesville, S.C. During a period of twenty or more years she taught
schools in Saluda County, S.C. On 15 September 1917 she married
George Washington McCarty, and they lived in Saluda County during all
of their married life. Both of them are buried in the cemetery at Butler
United Methodist Church in that county. They were the parents of: --
Dorothy Irene (married Maxwell Earle Stone and had issue).
        7. Daniel (10 April 1888; 2 May 1888). -- He is buried in the cemetery
at Red Bank Baptist Church.
        8. Sarah/Sallie (30 March 1889; 1 July 1959). -- In addition to at-
tending Leesville Elementary School in Leesville, S.C., Pine Grove
Elementary School and Emory Graded School in Saluda County, S.C.,
she was a student at Saluda High School in the town of Saluda. She
subsequently was enrolled as a student in Summerland College near
Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. Soon after entering the college she was com-
pelled to resign because of illness which continued over a lengthy period
of time. During this period she was under the care of her aunt, Dr.
Sophia Davis in Augusta, Ga. After her physical condition improved she
returned home to serve as housekeeper for her father (a widower) while
her brother and older sisters were engaged in other occupations. On 23
June 1914 she married Joseph Earle Steadman, and they lived con-
secutively in Edgefield County, S.C., Greenwood, S.C., Charleston,
S.C., Washington, D.C., Hyattsville, Md., and again in Washington,
D.C. She died in George Washington University Hospital in Washington
and was buried in Edgewood Cemetery at Greenwood, S.C. In 1983 her
remains were removed to the cemetery at Emory United Methodist
Church in Saluda County.
        Sallie and Earle were the parents of: -- Samuel Francis (died in infan-
cy), Sarah Louise (married Charles Dinsmore Wagner and had issue),
Joseph Earle, Jr. (married Bernadette Katherine Hardy and had issue),
James Henry (died in infancy), and Meldred Elizabeth (married Floyd
William Taylor and had issue).

                        BUZHARDT

        Jacob Buzhardt (ca. 1750; 1812) came from Germany to South
Carolina in 1768. It is not known whether he came alone or in company
with his parents. At about 1773 he married Ann Margaret
(ca. 1755; 1817), who also came from Germany
in the same year, and they settled in the Dutch Fork of the present
Newberry County. -- (Information given by their descendants.) He was
erroneously listed in the 1790 and 1800 censuses, respectively, as Jacob
Busert and Jacob Buzzard. His will (dated 14 January 1809 and proved
in 1812) and estate papers show his surname as Buzhart or Buzhardt. --

                                52

(Newberry County, S.C., Wills: - Vol. 2, 1805-1826, Book F, p. 69.) The
will of his wife is recorded on page 70 of the same volume and book.
        On 12 March 1812 Jacob deeded 300 acres of land to his son Philip
Buzhardt. -- (Newberry County, S.C., Deed Book K, p. 208.)
        The will of Jacob Buzhardt names his wife Margaret and children (not
in order of birth): -- Philip (born about 1777; named as executor; md.
Mary Sligh.), Jacob (1774; 1854; named as executor; md. Elizabeth
Sligh.), Elizabeth (1780; ca. 1865; md. James Wright, which see.),
Gasper (md. McNeill.), and Mary. The will also
names his grandson Thomas Write/Wright (son of daughter Elizabeth).


                        HOWELL

        In the early 1700s one Thomas Howell migrated from Mon-
mouthshire, England, to Glamorganshire, Wales, and from thence came
to America at about 1726. He settled in what now is New Kent County,
Del., where he acquired large holdings of land and became a man of in-
fluence. Some of his children moved to New Jersey, where a number of
them became prominent in public affairs. Descendants of this immigrant
are living today in various parts of the United States. -- (Ruby Haskins
Ellis - Who Are You?)
        Prior to or during the Revolutionary War one William Howell (born
about 1729), believed to be a son or grandson of the above mentioned
Thomas Howell, came to old Edgefield County, S.C., presumably from
New Jersey. He evidently was the father of William Howl/Howell, Jr.
(1753; lvg. 1833), Nathaniel Howell (born about 1756), and Thomas H.
Howle/Howell (born about 1763), all of whom were American soldiers
during the Revolutionary War. These men and their father (William
Howl/Howell, Sr.) were separately listed in the 1790 census for Edgefield
County, and all of them were slave holders. William, Sr., then had living
with him two males and three females who evidently were his wife and
younger children. The oldest son among these younger children was
Josiah H. Howell (see following).
        Josiah H. Howell (1770; 15 December 1851) was born in New Jersey
and came to Edgefield County with his parents prior to or during the
Revolutionary War. He was included in the 1800-1850 censuses for that
county. In the latter year he, then being blind, was living in the home of
his son-in-law Jacob Wright (which see) whose wife was Ann/Nancy
Virginia Howell (see following).
        On 27 July 1794 Josiah married Phoebe Humphries/Humphreys or
Humphrey (which see). On 17 December 1796 he bought from John
Mobley, Sr., 338 acres of land situated on Penn Creek waters of Little
Saluda River in Edgefield (now Saluda) County, S.C. -- (Deed Book 13,
p. 519.) This apparently was the first land which he acquired, and settled
there after having lived elsewhere. He and his wife were the parents of
eleven children (all named in the Howell family Bible): -- Kiturah (born
23 August 1795; md. John Humphries), -- William (born 13 November
1797; md. Celia Humphries), -- Daniel (born 16 January 1800), -- Ira
(born 18 January 1802), -- Mary (born 23 March 1804; md. John Wright

                                54


as his second wife), -- Ann/Nancy Virginia (3 March 1806; 25 May 1890;
md. Jacob Wright), -- Josiah H. (born 8 March 1808; md. Sarah Eid-
son), -- Catherine (born 1 May 1810; md. James Wright, Jr.), -- Tresea
(born 23 August 1812), -- Jane (born 23 April 1815; md. John Wright as
his first wife), -- Phoebe (born 18 October 1820; unmarried). Informa-
tion concerning the marriages of these children was furnished by the late
Henry Thomas Wright, a descendant. Josiah's wife (Phoebe) died on 15
October 1847.
        On 29 December 1827 Josiah Howell was named as one of the trustees
to whom land was deeded by William Foy for the Methodist Episcopal
Church (now Gassoway United Methodist Church) on a branch of Red
Bank Creek, waters of Little Saluda River. -- (The Edgefield Advertiser,
issue of 12 July 1939). Josiah and his wife were among the organizers and
long-time members of Bethlehem Methodist Church, which was
established in August 1836. -- (Hamlin Etheredge -- Bethlehem's
Spiritual Empire, pp. 7 and 9.) Both of these churches are situated in the
present Saluda County, S.C.


                        HUMPHRIES

        This family name appears in the records with various forms of spell-
ing, such as: -- Humphries, Humphreys, and Humphrey. On 7 August
1770 the Council of Colonial South Carolina approved the petition of
William Humphreys, who had recently arrived in the province from
Ireland (?), for a grant of 100 acres of land. The size of the grant (100
acres) indicates that, under governing rules, William then was an unmar-
ried man or the head of a family. Since he came alone, and there is no
record of a family for him who came as immigrants earlier or later than
he, his marital status at that time is confirmed. -- (Council Journal entry
of even date.) No search has been made by this writer for a record of the
grant, but it is believed that the land was situated in old Ninety Six
District (later Edgefield and now Saluda County), S.C. During the
period of 1786-1792 he was granted a total of 1,414 acres of land situated
partly on Mine Creek and partly on Red Bank Creek in Ninety Six
District. -- (Land Grant Books and Land Plat Books in the State Ar-
chives at Columbia, S.C.)
        Edgefield County records examined by this writer show that during the
period of 1784-1796 William bought 622 acres of land from other per-
sons. The deeds for this land show that it was situated partly on Dry
Creek, partly on Mine Creek, and partly on Red Bank Creek. This
together with the land which he acquired by grant gave him a total of at
least 2,036 acres, of which he sold 1,220 acres. Since he died intestate it is
assumed that the remaining 816 acres were sold and the proceeds divided
among his heirs.
        During the Revolutionary War William Humphries/Humphreys
served as an American soldier in Captain William Butler's Company of
South Carolina Volunteer Militia from Edgefield District. -- (Revolu-
tionary War Records in the National Archives, Washington, D.C. --
Miscellaneous South Carolina Records, Folder 9; Sarah Sullivan Ervin -
South Carolinians in the Revolution, p. 118.)

                                55


        At about 1770 William Humphries (ca. 1747; 1797) married Ann/Nan-
cy Roland (ca. 1753; lvg. 1800) who probably was a daughter of the John
Rolen/Roland (which see) included in the 1790 census for Orangeburg
District (South Part), S.C. He (William Humphes) was included in the
1790 census for Edgefield County and Ann, then a widow, was included
in the 1800 census for that county. They were parents of the following
listed children. -- (Estate Papers, Box 4, Pack 1552, in the Probate
Judge's Office at Edgefield, S.C.; Hamlin Etheridge -- Bethlehem's
Spiritual Empire, pp. 9 and 19.)
        1. Sarah (ca. 1771; ca. 1805). -- Md. Richard Buffington as his first
        wife.
        2. Jane (ca. 1772; lvg. 1802). -- Unmarried.
        3. Samuel (ca. 1774; 1826). -- Md. Eunice Satcher.
        4. Phoebe (ca. 1775; 15 October 1847). -- Md. Josiah H. Howell
        (which see).
        5. Mary (ca. 1777; ca. 1805). -- Md. James Eidson as his first wife.
        6. Elizabeth (ca. 1778; ). -- Md. Robert Bouleware.
        7. Nancy (ca. 1780; ). -- Md. Spencer Boulware.
        8. William (ca. 1782; ca. 1850). -- Unmarried.
        9. Roland (ca. 1784; 1814). -- Md. Rachel Pou.
        10. Catherine (ca. 1787; ) -- Md. James Foy.

                             MATHENY
                        (Formerly Mathenay)

        During 1934-1936 this writer received from William Blake Matheny
(then a student at the University of Pennsylvania and later a student of
law) data on the Matheny family in Europe. He had spent much time in
research on this family, and had conducted a correspondence with Baron
Albin Pidoux de la Madura who was the author of two books on the
French nobility. The following paragraph is a very brief summary of Mr.
Matheny's data on this ancient family of France.
        The Matheny family originated in Franche - Comte (Department of
Jura, France), which then was part of the Kingdom of Burgundy. It took
its name from the Seigneurie (Lordship) de Mathenay, which it possessed
from the 11th until the 15th century. It is a branch of the very ancient
and venerable family of de Vaudrey, who had the titles Chevalier, Baron,
Comte, and Marquis. The Mathenay family branches off from the de
Vaudrey family after the year 1095 but before the year 1200. The de
Vaudrey arms and the Mathenay arms are almost identical, and the two
Iordships are about five miles apart. The arms of the family "de
Mathenay" of Franche - Cornte (Jura), France, are shown in Volume 2
of Rietstap' s "Amorial Gene'ral".
        Upon the rise of Protestantism in France members of the Mathenay
family affiliated with the Huguenots; and, in order to escape persecution
by the Roman Catholic Church, some of them fled to England and to
other European countries. A descendant of one of these refugees came
from England to America during the middle 1600s and founded the fami-
ly of which this sketch is the subject. The following data shown for per-

                                56


sons in generations 1 through 5 was furnished to this writer by William
Blake Matheny and William Porter Matheny, the latter being head of the
history department at the Terrill School in Dallas, Texas.
        Gen. I. William Mettenye/Mathenay (born about 1600) of County
Kent, England, and his family apparently were members of a Flemish
Huguenot Church in that country. Among his children was a son named
Daniel (see following). It is believed that another son was named Michael
Mettaney/Mathenay.
        Gen. 2. Daniel Mettenye/Mathenay (ca. 1638; ca. 1689) was born in
England and died in Stafford County, Va. At about 1660 he and the
forementioned Michael Mettaney/Mathenay came to Surry or Isle of
Wight County, Va. In 1663 he went to Charles County, Md., and bought
300 acres of land there. -- (Abstract of a Charles County deed in
Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Md.; Charles County Court
records transcribed in the Calvert County copy of the Rent Rolls.)
Maryland records show his surname variously spelled as: -- Macheny,
Mathenya, Mathenia, Mathena, Methenia, or Methena. On 5 August
1664 he purchased from Thomas Wentworth a plantation called "Went-
worth Woodhouse", which was the name of the Wentworth family estate
in England. -- (Charles County Deeds, Liber B. --I, folio 255.) He subse-
quently acquired other lands in Charles County, and established his
home at Mattawoman on a tract which he patented under the name
"Mathena's Folly".
        In 1681 he was one of the leaders in a Protestant uprising against the
Roman Catholics in the Colony of Maryland. On failure of the uprising
he moved across the Potomac River to Stafford County, Va., where in
1683 he bought a plantation ("The Hope") on Acquia Creek adjoining
the home of Colonel George Mason. This plantation remained in posses-
sion of the Matheny family until 1756, when the family moved into the
Shenandoah Valley and scattered to other parts.
        At about 1663-5 Daniel married Sarah Wentworth (presumably a
daughter or sister of Thomas Wentworth) who survived him. They were
the parents of four children, the oldest of whom was William Wentworth
Matheney (see following).
        Gen. 3. William Wentworth Matheney/Matheny (ca. 1666; Nov. 1705)
was born in Charles County, Md., and died in Stafford County, Va.,
where his will (dated 12 November 1705) is of record. On 11 March 1690
he was appointed constable for the Stafford County precincts on
Potomac Creek. In 1691 he married Mrs. Frances Mason (widow of Col-
onel George Mason), and they became the parents of four children, the
oldest of whom was Daniel Matheny (see following).
        Gen. 4. Daniel Matheny (ca. 1693; ca. 1747) was born and died in Staf-
ford County, Va. He lived on the plantation ("The Hope") which
descended to his father and which his father left to him. At about 1719 he
married Mary (died 12 January 1750), and they
became the parents of six children among whom was James Matheny (see
following). The Overwharton Parish register mentions two of his
children who died, respectively, on 4 November and 24 November 1745.
Overwharton Parish was in Stafford County.
Gen. 5. James Matheny (ca. 1725; bef. 1790) was born in Stafford
County, Va., and died in Orangeburgh District (South Part - later Barn-

                                57


well District), S.C. On 12 December 1751, at Overwharton Church in
Stafford County, he married Elizabeth Gains. In 1757 he moved with
other members of his father's family to the Shenandoah Valley of
Virginia, from whence he moved to South Carolina prior to the Revolu-
tionary War. During that war he served in the 5th Regiment of South
Carolina Troops on the Continental Establishment. In 1782-3 he
rendered patriotic service by ferrying continental troops and militia
troops across a local stream of water. -- (Revolutionary War Records in
the National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Alexander S. Salley, Jr. --
Stub Entries to Indents for Revolutionary Claims in South Carolina,
Lib. 0, indent No. 184; Revolutionary War Records in the State Ar-
chives at Columbia, S.C., File AA4827 `/2.) His widow, Elizabeth
Mathueny (died before 1800) and some of their children are included in
the 1790 census for Orangeburgh District (South Part).
        James and Elizabeth (Gains) Matheny were the parents of nine known
children, four of whom went with them to Orangeburgh District (South
Part), S.C., namely: -- Mary (unmarried), Daniel (see following),
Charles, and William. The five other children settled in various counties
of Western Virginia.
        Gen. 6. Daniel Mathney (ca. 1765; 1816) was born in the Shenandoah
Valley of Virginia, and went with his parents to Orangeburgh District
(South Part), S.C., prior to the Revolutionary War. At the time of the
1790 census for that district his sister Mary and brother Charles ap-
parently were living with him, while his brother William was living with
their mother. At about 1792 he married Elizabeth __________________
(living 1820), perhaps a daughter or sister of Hans ford Duncan who was
one of the bondsmen for the administration of Daniel's estate. In 1799 he
was granted a tract of land situated on Grape Vine Creek near the present
towns of Bamberg and Denmark, S.C. -- (Grant Book 43, p. 328; Plat
No. 14 in Bundle 116.) This probably was in addition to land which he
previously had bought.
        Daniel was included in the 1800 and 1810 censuses for Barnwell Coun-
ty, S.C., which (together) show that he was the father of six children and
the owner of slaves. On 25 October 1816 administration papers on his
estate were granted to his widow and son John Matheny. -- (Estate
papers at Barnwell Courthouse: -- Bundle 27, Pack 3.) His children
were: -- Daughter (born about 1793), -- John F. (ca. 1795; ca. 1837, --
md. Rachel Guess), -- William (ca. 1797; 1844, -- md. Priscilla
_____________________ -- Daniel, Jr. (see following), -- Daughter
(born about 1801), -- Charles (ca. 1804; ca. 1855, -- md. Levicy/Louisa

        Gen. 7. Daniel Matheny, Jr. (ca. 1799; 1864) was born in Orangeburgh
District (South Part - later Barnwell District), S.C., and died in the pres-
ent town of Williston, S.C. At about 1823 he married Ann/Nancy
        (died 17 May 1857) and settled in the area be-
tween Grape Vine Creek and Little Salkehatchie River, a few miles
southwest of the present town of Bamberg. They probably became
members of Springtown Baptist Church, which was located within that
area. He was included in the 1830 census for Barnwell County.
        At about 1838 he moved to Edgefield County, S.C., and settled in the
neighborhood of Dry Creek Baptist Church (near the present towns of

                                58


Ward and Johnston), of which he, his wife, and children became
members. He was included in the 1840 and 1850 censuses for Edgefield
County, and then was a farmer, a blacksmith, and a slave owner.
        After his wife's death, on 26 September 1858 Daniel requested and
received a letter of dismissal from Dry Creek Baptist Church, of which
he was a deacon, and went to the forementioned town of Williston (in
Barnwell County), where he lived until the time of his death. His estate
was administered by his son-in-law, Julius Pickens Wright, to whom let-
ters were issued on 30 September 1864. -- (Estate Papers at Edgefield
County Courthouse: -- File 89, Pack. 3574.) He and his wife were the
parents of: -- Catherine (born about 1824; md. Henry B. Raborn), --
Jane (1 January 1826; 12 September 1856, - md. Julius Pickens Wright),
-- Charles R. (see following).
        Gen. 8. Charles R. Matheny (ca. 1831; 19 August 1859) was born in
Barnwell (now Bamberg) County, S.C. At about 1838 he went with his
parents to Edgefield County, S.C.
        On 6 February 1851 he married Eleanor/Ellen Jane Wright (7 May
1832; 11 March 1914), daughter of Jacob and Ann/Nancy Virginia
Wright (which see). They apparently settled on the land which belonged
to his father.
        On 28 August 1853 Charles became a member of Dry Creek Baptist
Church. After having been a member of Bethlehem Methodist Church,
on 26 October 1755 Ellen became a member of the same church as was
her husband. Both of these churches now are in the present Saluda Coun-
ty, S.C. On their deaths he was buried (grave now unmarked) in the
cemetery at the Dry Creek Church and she was buried in the cemetery at
the Bethlehem Church.
        Letters of administration on the estate of Charles R. Matheny were
issued to his father (Daniel Matheny, Jr.) on 10 October 1859. -- (Estate
Papers at Edgefield County Courthouse: -- File 80, Pack. 3199.) He and
his wife were the parents of: -- Mary Alice (24 October 1852; 10 August
1892; -- md. Zebulon DeLoache, which see), -- Thomas Pope (born ca.
1854; md. 1st Mary Elizabeth Calhoun and 2nd Sarah Cicelle Calhoun),
-- Daniel Puckett (13 February 1856; 10 January 1931, - md. Mary
Elizabeth/Betty Rushton), -- Nancy Jane (ca. 1858; died in infancy), --
Margaret/Maggie Anne (1859; 19 , - md. Thomas Edwards).
        Eleanor/Ellen Jane Matheny, widow of Charles R. Matheny, was in-
cluded in the 1860-1880 censuses for Edgefield County as head of a fami-
ly. In the latter year her mother (Nancy Wright) was living with her. She
died in the home of her son, Daniel Puckett Matheny. It was said of her:
- "She was a devout Christian, a true homemaker, a faithful friend, sym-
pathetic, social, and generous; and no one ever heard her knowingly
speak an unkind word to any living soul."


                        ROLAND

        It is claimed that this family descends both from Charlemagne and
from his sister's son Roland. The ancestry of these men is traced through
the following generations.

                                59


        1. Pepin de Landen, an Austrasian nobleman and Mayor of the
Palace during the reign of several kings of the Franks, died in 655 and
was succeeded as mayor by his grandson Pepin de Heristal (see follow-
ing). Austrasia was an ancient kingdom in Midwestern Europe under the
Merovingian line of kings of the Franks. Pepin was the father of an only
child, a daughter --
        2. Becga, who married Adelgisel, son of Arnulph (Bishop of Metz),
and had --
        3. Pepin de Heristal (ca. 630; 714). He was Major-domo at the court
of King Dagobert II. After the king's death in 688 he was appointed
Duke of the Franks, and ruled the kingdom with so much justice that he
was enabled to make his office hereditary in his family. By Alfraida he
was the father of --
        4. Charles Martel (ca. 690; 741). From 714 until 737, as Mayor of the
Palace, he was the acting head of the government of the Kingdom of the
Franks during the reign of three slothful and indifferent kings. From 737
to 741 he ruled the kingdom alone. In 732 he overthrew the Saracens at
Tours, from which he acquired the name of Martel (signifying hammer).
In 741 he bequeathed his hereditary office to his sons Pepin (see follow-
ing) and Carolman. Pepin was a son of Charles' first wife (name not
given).
        5. Pepin (ca. 714; 768) was called Pepin le Bref (the Short) because of
his short stature. Soon after the death of their father Carloman (died in
770) entered a convent, and Pepin assumed all of the benefits of the
hereditary office which had been bequeathed to the two brothers. He was
Mayor of the Palace from 741 until 751. In the latter year, by agreement
of the pope, he was proclaimed King of the Franks and reigned as such
until the time of his death. During the period of 751 - 756 he defeated the
Lombards in Italy, and made the Holy See a present of the lands which
he conquered from them, -- this being the origin of the temporal power
of the popes. He was the founder of the Carlovingian dynasty of kings.
By his wife Berta/Bertrade (called Bertha of the Big Foot), daughter of
Count Laon of Neustria, he was the father of Charles (see following) and
a daughter (see following) whose name has not been learned by this
writer.
        6-1. Charles (742; 814), called Charles the Great, or Charlemagne,
succeeded his father as King of the Franks and reigned as such during the
period of 768-800. Early in his reign he began a war with the Saxons
which, with many interruptions, lasted more than thirty years (772-803).
The conquered Saxons accepted Christianity and the firm, just rule of
Charlemagne. At an interval of quiet during the war, in 778, he invaded
Spain in a campaign against the Saracens. The campaign was a failure,
and the baggage-train and many men were lost as the army fell into an
ambuscade while retreating through a gorge at Roncesvalles. Among the
officers killed was his nephew Roland (see following). On Christmas Day
in 800 Pope Leo III crowned him Emperor of the Romans, which in one
sense was a revival of the Roman Empire of the West. He ruled as
emperor until the time of his death. From the fact that he stamped his
character upon Western Europe and gave direction to the current of its
history for centuries, he is reckoned among the most eminent men of all
time. His eldest son was Charles (see following).

                                60


        6-2. ____________________ (name not learned), daughter of Pepin le
Bref and sister of Charlemagne, was the mother of a son named Roland
(see following)
        7-1. Charles, son of Charlemagne, was made Duke of
Engleheim/Ingleheim by his father. Ingleheim, an estate near Frankfort
(on the Rhine River) in the ancient Kingdom of Austrasia, was a favorite
residence of Charlemagne. Charles married Juliana (see following), a
daughter of his first cousin (Roland).
        7-2. Roland (died 778), son of a daughter of Pepin le Bref and
nephew of Charlemagne, was also called Orlando. He was a hero of the
romances of chivalry, and one of the paladians of his uncle. He was a
brave and loyal warrior. The old French epics "Song of Roland",
"Orlando Inamorato", and "Orlando Furioso" relate to him. His
daughter Juliana (see following) married Charles, Duke of Ingleheim,
her father's first cousin.
        8. Charles (son of Charlemagne and Duke of Ingleheim) and Juliana
(daughter of Roland) apparently had a son Roland, through whom the
subject family claims descent both from Charlemagne and the first
Roland.


                        References

        An Ancient History for Beginners. -- G.W. Botsford.
        History of All Nations, Vol. II. -- S.G. Goodrich.
        Outlines of the World's History. -- William Swinton.
        Six Thousand Years of History, Vol. VI. -- Edgar Sander-
        son, et. al.
        The American International Encyclopedia, Vols. IV, XII,
        and XIII.
        The New Century Dictionary -- DeLuxe Edition, 1952.
        The Noble Lineage of the Delaware - West Family of
        Virginia. -- Ann Woodward Fox.
        Webster's New International Dictionary - 1915 Edition.

        Of particular interest to this writer is the ancestry of Ann/Nancy
Roland who at about 1770 married William Humphries (which see) in
South Carolina. As heretofore stated, it is believed that she was a
daughter of the John Rolen/Roland included in the 1790 census for
Orangeburgh District (South Part), S.C. It is believed that John (born
about 1728), probably a migrant from Virginia, was the father also of
Edward Rolin/Roland (born about 1752) and David Roland (born about
1763) who were included in the same census for Orangeburgh District.
(David was twice listed in that census, probably because of having moved
from one location to another. In 1800 he was included in the census for
the adjoining Edgefield County, S.C., where in 1801 he bought land
which he sold in 1803. -- Deed Book 24, pp. 1 and 90. -- His wife was
named Mary/Polly.) -- Another probable son of John was John Rolan
or Rowland/Roland, Jr.? (born about 1766) who in 1788 bought land in
Edgefield County and was included in the 1790 census for that county.

                                61


His widow Rachel Rolen/Roland, with two young sons and two uniden-
tified females living with her, was included in the 1800 census for
Edgefield County. A third son, evidently a posthumous child, was born
soon after the 1800 census was taken. In 1815 these three sons
(Zachariah, William, and John), his only lawful heirs and represen-
tatives, sold the said land to Daniel Ward. -- (Deed Book 37, p. 117;
Deed Book 47, p. 369.) -- It is probable that this Roland Family of
Orangeburgh District and Edgefield County was closely related to some
or all of the Roland families in Laurens County, S.C., where the given
names Zachariah, William, and John appear in records of the time.
        The descendants of Ann/Nancy (Roland) Humphries, in speaking of
her children state that they were of French descent. Besides a son named
Roland Humphries, many of her descendants of the past were and of the
present are known by the given name of Roland.
        From Janie Revill's "Compilation of Original Lists of Protestant Im-
migrants to South Carolina, 1763-1773", pages 16 through 25, it is noted
that one Piere/Peter Rolland/Roland, a French Protestant (Huguenot)
from the southern part of France, arrived in Charleston, S.C., where his
petition for land and bounty was approved on 18 April 1764. The land
assigned to him was in Bordeau Township (now in Abbeville County) of
the province, but until the spring of 1765 he resided at Fort Lyttleton
near the Atlantic Coast. It apparently was he (Peter Rowland/Roland)
who later settled in Pendleton District (now Anderson County), S.C.,
where he was included in the 1790 census.

                        WRIGHT

        Thomas Wright of Belfast, Ireland, came to Charleston, S.C., in the
year 1773, bringing his wife and children with him. -- (Family Bible
record of his son James Wright and information given by James' grand-
son James Russell Wright and grandson Beauford Wallace Wright.)
Soon after his arrival in South Carolina he settled in Saint Marks Parish,
which in 1768 became known also as Camden Judicial District of old
Craven County, S.C. This parish, or district, was the section of country
lying between Broad River and Lynches Creek. Thomas apparently lived
near Broad River, across from the present Newberry County, S.C.,
where he died about the year 1775. The will of Thomas Wright, - 13 Oc-
tober 1775, - of Saint Marks Parish, Craven County, is recorded in the
courthouse at Charleston, S.C. - (Will Book 1774-1779, p. 435, - or Vol.
17, Book B, p. 583.) The will mentions his wife Mary, and sons Thomas
and James (see following). The son Thomas moved to Newberry County,
where he died at about 1820 leaving at least seven children: - Thomas,
Jr., Margaret, Elizabeth, Jacob, James, John, and Elvira. In 1829
Thomas, Jr., gave bond as guardian of his brothers and sisters. -
(Records in office of Newberry County Clerk of Court - Index to Litiga-
tions: - Box 3, Packs 24 and 25 and Box 80, Pack 55.)
        James Wright (1767; 20 January 1855) was born in Ireland and in
1773, at the age of six years, he came to Charleston, S.C., with his
parents. - (Family Bible record, etc., as above.) It apparently was he

                                62


(James Right) who at the time of the 1790 census, being then unmarried,
was living in the Dutch Fork Section of old Orangeburgh District (North
Part - now Lexington County), S.C. A part of this section was later in-
corporated into Newberry County, S.C. At about 1799-1800 he married
Elizabeth/Betsy Buzhardt (which see) and lived in the Dutch Fork of
Newberry County until his removal to Edgefield County, S.C., prior to
or during 1816. On 10 January 1816 James Wright of Edgefield County
deeded to Robert Park of Newberry a tract of land which he (Wright)
had acquired on 19 November 1813. - (Newberry County, S.C., Deed
Book L, p. 199.) He subsequently was included in the 1820 census for
Edgefield County. His age is erroneously stated in the 1840 and 1850 cen-
suses.
        When James Wright moved to Edgefield County, he acquired and set-
tled on land situated on waters of Rocky Creek, where he lived until the
time of his death. - (In 1860 his widow was living with her widowed
daughter, Margaret Matthews, in the Fruit Hill section of Edgefield
County.) - In 1831 he and his wife became members of Rocky Creek Bap-
tist Church, and (presumably) they are buried in the cemetery at that
place. During many years prior to his death he engaged in hauling goods
from Boston, Mass., to Hamburg and Edgefield, S.C. In his absence
from home one of his older sons took charge of the farming operations
and other affairs. - (Information given by his descendants, James Russell
Wright and Henry Thomas Wright.)
        Family Bible and census records show that James and Elizabeth
(Buzhardt) Wright were the parents of ten children: - Thomas (1800;
1826, - Md. Frances Goodwyn and had issue), Margaret (1803; lvg. 1860,
- md. Mark Matthews and had issue), Elizabeth (1804; 1865, - md.
Young J. Goodwyn and had issue), Jacob (see following), Henry (1807?;
1817), James (1809; 1846, - md. Catherine/Kate Howell and had issue),
Amanda (ca. 1811; bef. 1830), John (1813; 1882, - md. 1st Jane Howell
and 2nd Mary/Polly Howell, sisters, and had issue), William (1816?;
1819?), and Emeline (1819; 1849, - md. Henry B. Rabon).
        Jacob Wright (19 June 1805; 15 June 1863) was born in Newberry
County, S.C., and died at his home (still standing in 1955) near
Bethlehem Methodist Church in the present Saluda (formerly Edgefield)
County, S.C. He is buried in a family graveyard on the plantation where
he lived from the time of his marriage until the time of his death. His
wife and one of his children (John W.) also are buried there. On 15 July
1827 he married Ann/Nancy Virginia Howell (which see). In August
1836 they were among the organizers of the Bethlehem Methodist
Church in Edgefield (now Saluda) County, and remained in its member-
ship until the time of their deaths. -- (Hammond Etheridge -
Bethlehem's Spiritual Empire, p. 7.) They were the parents of thirteen
children: - Kiturah/Kitty May (born ca. 1828, md. Floyd Whittle and
had issue), Thomas C. (ca. 1830; 1864, - unmd.), Eleanor (7 May 1832;
11 March 1914, - md. Charles R. Matheny, which see), Josiah H. (ca.
1834; 1862, - unmd.), William H. (1835; 1911, - md. Lucinda Turner and
had issue), Ira B. (ca. 1836; 1911, - md. __________________ and had
issue), John Wesley (1838; 1864, - unmd.), Anna P. (1839; lvg. 1914, -
md. Amos W. Satcher and had issue), James Russell (1841; lvg. 1914, -
md. 1st Frances Powers and had issue; md. 2nd Mrs. Fannie Smiley and

                                63


had no issue), Jacob Fletcher (ca. 1842; 1931, - md. Carrie Jennings and
had issue), Nancy Virginia/Jennie (ca. 1843; ; - md. Jesse Timmer-
man and had issue), Alvin Curtis (ca. 1844; bef. 1932, - md.
Richards and had issue), and Robert S. (1848;
1911, - md. Lavinia Cogburn and had issue). - (Census records and infor-
mation given by descendants.)

                                64


                             SKETCH NO. 8
                        JAMES NATHANIEL DeLOACHE

James/Jim Nathaniel DeLoache (28 October 1879; 5 October 1967).
-- He was born at the homestead established by his grandfather. In later
years he acquired a part of the land on which the homestead was located,
and built a house in which he lived until the time of his death. He was
educated at the forementioned Emory High School (See SKETCH NO.
7) and at Leesville College (Leesville, S.C.). During 1900-1906 he taught
school in Saluda County, S.C., and during 1907 - 1908 he was the Coun-
ty Superintendent of Education. From 1 April 1911 to 30 April 1935 he
served as County Treasurer, holding that office longer than any one of
his predecessors. The following item, published in The National
Observer - October 1, 1935, attests the superior quality of his service in
the office of treasurer.

                        J.N. DeLOACH

        "It is most important at this time, we feel, to direct atten-
        tion to the manner in which county governments are function-
        ing after the years of the depression.
        "There is nothing which adds so much to the welfare of the
        people in general as to know that their county governments
        are being operated in a manner that is most economical and
        efficient therein.
        "With this thought in mind we are pleased to present to our
        readers the excellent work being done by J.N. DeLoach,
        County Treasurer of Saluda County in the State of South
        Carolina.
        "The problems that confront the county treasurer of this
        county are about similar to those which other counties face,
        the strengthening of the county's financial structure, the
        enhancement of its bonds in the open market, the reduction
        of current expenditures, and the functioning of its various
        departments in the most efficient manner possible.
        "Mr. DeLoach is well known as a sound and capable
        business man with a keen knowledge of existing business con-
        ditions and he has applied constructive policies in his ad-
        ministration of the post he holds and which have been
        reflected in the steady improvement of the county's financial
        status."

        During the period of 1940-1958 he served as secretary for Palmetto
Hosiery Mill, Incorporated, in the town of Saluda. As an activity concur-
rent with duties performed in the positions and offices which he held, he
carried on farming operations in which he had a lifelong interest.
        He was a lifelong and faithful member of the Methodist Church, being
first associated with what now is Emory United Methodist Church
(located near the Emory High School which he attended) and later with
Saint Paul United Methodist Church in the town of Saluda. In one or the
other of these churches he served in the various offices of steward,
trustee, Sunday school teacher, or Sunday school superintendent. One of
the Sunday school classes at Saint Paul was named in his honor. There

                                65


was much about him which reminded one of the Christian life and
character of his father.
        On 25 June 1913 he married Mary Elizabeth Lester (4 March 1885; 14
April 1971), daughter of George B. and Susan Catherine (Kempson)
Lester. She was a graduate of Newberry College (Newberry, S.C.), and
taught school (Bethany and Corinth) in Saluda County before her mar-
riage. Jim and Mary are buried in Travis Park Cemetery in the town of
Saluda. They were the parents of the following named children, all of
whom are living in 1981.
        1. James Lester (8 May 1914; ). - Unmarried. He graduated from
Clemson College (now University) at Clemson, S.C. He served in the
Second World War, and subsequently entered the United States Army
Reserve from which he retired with the rank of lieutenant colonel. He
now lives in Carboro, N.C., where he has real estate interests.
        2. Michael Kempson (12 January 1916; ). - He graduated from
Wofford College (Spartanburg, S.C.). He served in the Second World
War, and subsequently entered the United States Army Reserve from
which he retired with the rank of colonel. During a number of years he
held an official position with Bankers Trust of South Carolina in the
town of Saluda. Now retired, he lives in Saluda County. He is unmar-
ried.

        3. Mary Susan (11 June 1917; ). - She graduated from Furman
University (Greenville, S.C.) and Tulane University (New Orleans, La.)
and engaged in teaching and professional social work. Now retired, she
lives in Saluda County. She is unmarried.
        4. Paul Matheny (31 May 1919; ). - He attended Newberry Col-
lege (Newberry, S.C.). He served in the Second World War as a Staff
Sergeant, Military Police Platoon, attached to the 30th Infantry Division
of the United States Army. He is an executive with Saluda Finance Cor-
portion in the town of Saluda. On 29 January 1953 he married Lois
Kaiser of Lexington County, S.C. They live in Saluda County, and are
the parents of: FRANK (graduated from University of South Carolina in
Columbia, S.C.; married Mary Katherine Kevin; living in Saint
Petersburg, Fla.). -- MICHAEL (graduated from Newberry College in
Newberry, S.C.; unmarried; living in Saluda County, S.C.). -- SUSAN
(student at University of South Carolina in Columbia, S.C.; living in
Saluda County, S.C.; unmarried).
        5. Ruth (30 May 1923; ). - She graduated from Spartanburg
Methodist College (Spartanburg, S.C.). On 6 October 1945 she married
Fletcher Dew Thompson, and they became the parents of: -- Jennie Lee,
Rebecca Lynn, Laurie Kay, and James Fletcher Thompson. Ruth and
Fletcher now live at Moore (Route 1), Spartanburg, S.C.
        6. Dora Elizabeth (13 February 1927; ). - She attended Erskine
College (Due West, S.C.). On 31 May 1947 she married Sidney Bowles
Hare, and they became the parents of: -- Mary Elizabeth, James Sidney,
and John Herman Hare. Dora and Sidney now live in Saluda County,
S.C. She is employed by the South Carolina Judicial Department.
        7. Sarah Eugenia (15 April 1928; ). - She graduated from Spar-
tanburg Methodist College (Spartanburg, S.C.), received a Bachelor of
Arts degree from Columbia College (Columbia, S.C.), and a Master of
Arts degree from Emory University (Atlanta, Ga.). She was Director of

                                66


Christian Education at Trinity United Methodist Church in Sumter,
S.C., and now is a teacher at Wilson Hall School in that city. On 27 June
1952 she married Edward Vause Gibson, and they became the parents of:
-- Frances Elizabeth and Dollie DeLoache Gibson. Sara and "Ed" now
live in Sumter.

                        CONWILL
        This family name has been spelled also as Conwell.
        Bejamin Conwill settled in the area of Newberry County, S.C., prior
to the Revolutionary War, in which he served as a private in the
American army. -- (O'Neall and Chapman--The Annals of Newberry,
p. 62; George Leland Summer, Sr. -- Newberry County, South
Carolina, Historical and Genealogical, p. 9.) He was included in the 1790
census for Newberry County, and apparently died before 1816. He prob-
ably was a brother of James, John, Joseph, and William Conwill, who
also were included in the said census. He married Rachel
        ,and had children among whom were the follow-
ing named.
        1. Benjamin, Jr. -- He was included in the 1790 census for Newberry
County, S.C., and was mentioned in the estate papers of his brother
John Conwill.
        2. John (died 1816). -- He died in Newberry County, S.C., and ap-
parently was unmarried. His estate papers mention his mother Rachel,
and brothers and sister.
        3. Hosea (died in 1829).
        4. Bailey. -- See following.
        5. Wilber.
        6. Elizabeth. -- She married John Rikard.
        Bailey Conwill (died about 1845), a native of Newberry County, S.C.,
married Catherine ____________________ (survived her husband) and
had children (all living in 1845): -- Rebecca (married Benjamin D.
Lake), Ellen, Mary Elizabeth (married Michael H. Kempson, -- which
see), Drayton (remembered by his great-niece, the late Mrs. Ada Eugenia
Grigsby), and Amos. Information concerning him, and his brothers and
sister, is contained in George Leland Summer, Sr's., Newberry County,
South Carolina, Historical and Genealogical", p. 326.


                        CREIGHTON

        Hugh Creighton of Newberry County, S.C., died leaving a will (dated
5 August 1793 and proved on 21 October 1793) in which he mentioned
his wife (not named), his children: -- Mary (married
        Ward), Anne (married John Dennis, -- which
see), other children when they come to proper age; and his grand-
children: -- Creighton Ward, Mary Dennis, and Joel Dennis. He (Hugh
Craton) was included in the 1790 census for Newberry County. --
(George Leland Summer, Sr. -- Newberry County, South Carolina,
Historical and Genealogical, p. 462.)

                        DENNIS

        John Dennis of Newberry County, S.C., served as a private in the
American Army during the Revolutionary War. He was included in the
1790 census for the said county, and was living in the second house from

                                70


his father-in-law Hugh Creighton (Craton). In 1799 he acquired 350
acres of land on Buffalo Creek in Newberry County. He married Anne
Creighton (which see), and had a number of children among whom were:
James (see following), Mary, and Joel. -- (George Leland Summer, Sr.
-- Newberry County, South Carolina, Historical and Genealogical, pp.
10 and 332.)
        James Dennis of Newberry County, S.C., married Prudence Hawkins
(which see). He apparently predeceased her, and she died about 1847
leaving children: -- Martha (married Allen Lester, -- which see), Phoebe
(married Honorias Sheppard), Jesse, Rebecca, and P.H. (Peter
Hawkins) Dennis. -- (O'Neall and Chapman -- The Annals of
Newberry, pp. 642-3; George Leland Summer, Sr. -- Newberry County,
South Carolina, Historical and Genealogical, pp. 277 and 332.)

                        HAWKINS

        Peter Hawkins (died about 1800-2) and his wife Prudence, of English
extraction, came from Virginia before the Revolutionary War and settled
in the southern part of Newberry County, S.C. He served as a private in
the American army during the war. He was included in the 1790 census
for the said county. The children of this couple were: -- Jacob, Edward,
Peter, William, Prudence (married James Dennis, -- which see) and
Elizabeth (married Rankin). -- (O'Neall and
Chapman -- The Annals of Newberry, pp. 643-4; George Leland Sum-
mer, Sr. -- Newberry County, South Carolina, Historical and
Genealogical, p. 345.)

                        BOOZER

Ulrich Boozer (originally Buser), thought to be a Swiss or German im-
migrant to Pennsylvania, came to South Carolina before 1756 and
perhaps as early as the late 1730s. On 1 January 1740 one Ann/Anna
Buser married John Jacob Meyer in the church at Orangeburgh, and on
18 April 1756 Ulrich Booser (son of Ulrich, Sr.) was a surety at a baptism
in the same church. -- (Alexander S. Salley, Jr. -- The History of
Orangeburg County, pp. 95, 107, and 161.)
        On his arrival in South Carolina Ulrich Boozer settled in the lower sec-
tion of old Camden District which lay north of Santee River and east of
old Orangeburgh District. Some of his sons later moved into Lexington
County, and others into Newberry County. He was twice married (names
of wives not learned), the first wife being the mother of George and
Catherine. -- The second wife was the mother of Jacob, John,
Frederick, Henry (see following), Ulrich (settled in Orangeburg County,
-- see above), Gasper, and Rudolph. -- (George Leland Summer, Sr. --
Newberry County South Carolina, Historical and Genealogical, p. 195.)
        Henry Boozer (died about 1837) married and settled in Newberry
County, where he was included in the 1790 census. In 1828 he made a will
in which he mentions his wife Elizabeth (died in 1845) and children: --
David, Henry, Jr. (see following), Frederick, John, Sarah (married

                                71


Jacob Cappleman), Daniel, George, Elizabeth (married Daniel Senn),
Adam, and Rebecca (married Hendrix). --
(Ibid.)
        Henry Boozer, Jr. (died 22 February 1859) settled in Newberry Coun-
ty, where he died leaving as his legatees twelve children and three sets of
grandchildren. The children were: -- Samuel, Timothy, Rebecca (mar-
ried William McCormick), Henry, John A., Daniel, William A.,
Frederick, David W., Andrew, Adam P., and Matthias Pinckney.
Grandchildren: -- Lodoska (daughter of deceased son George; married
David Merchant), Allen, George, and Amanda Lester (children of
deceased daughter Elizabeth Lester - which see), and Thomas and
Permelia (children of deceased son Edward). -- (Ibid.)

                        KEMPSON

        This family name apparently is misspelled as Kampton or Kempton in
the printed copy of the 1790 census for South Carolina. At that time one
Samuel Kampton was living among the Quakers in Newberry County,
with 7 males and 4 females included in his household. He probably came
to South Carolina from Pennsylvania or Maryland, and perhaps was a
close relative of one John Kempson who died in 1750 in Cecil County,
Md., leaving two daughters: -- Elizabeth (wife of George Simcoe) and
Ann (wife of Richard Stedman). John Kempson, his daughters, and their
husbands were members of the Quaker faith. -- (Records in Land Of-
fice, Annapolis, Md. -- Administration Accounts, Vol. 28, p. 133.) One
of the sons of Samuel Kampton/Kempson apparently was Frederick
Kempson (see following).
        Frederick Kempson of Newberry County, S.C., and his wife (name not
learned) were the parents of: -- Michael H. (see following), Katie (mar-
ried George Henry Long), Benjamin (married Ella Summer), Elizabeth
(married Jefferson Kinard), and Annie Louisa (married Luther Buford
Wheeler). -- (The Family History of Saluda County, 1895-1980, p. 237.)
        Michael H. Kempson (5 February 1829; 27 January 1929) was born in
Newberry County, S.C. While living there he married Mary Elizabeth
Conwill (which see), who was ten years younger than himself, and prior
to 1859 they moved to Edgefield (now Saluda) County, S.C. He was one
of the Edgefield County men who served as privates in Company K, Sec-
ond Regiment Artillery, during the War Between the States. The said
company was "enlisted" in August 1861 and surrendered with General
Joe E. Johnston at Greensboro, N.C., in 1865. -- (John A. Chapman --
History of Edgefield County, South Carolina, pp. 499 and 500; The
Family History of Saluda County, 1895-1980, p. 242.) He and his wife
were the parents of: Fred H. (married 1. Cornelia Etheredge and 2. Kate
Bouknight), Susan Catherine (married George B. Lester, - which see),
Peter (married Margaret Sanders), Leila (married Walter Satcher), and
Hattie (married Charlie Davis). -- (Information given by the late Mrs.
Ada Eugenia Grigsby, a granddaughter; The Family History of Saluda
County, 1895-1980, pp. 237 and 242.) The 1880 census for Edgefield
County, S.C., shows that Peter (aged 19 years), Leila/Lenora (aged 16
years), and Harriett/Hattie (aged 14 years) then were unmarried and liv-
ing with their parents.

                                72


                        LESTER

        The Norman-French family of Lester (in earlier times de Leicester, de
Leycestre, or de Laycester) came to England from France with William
the Conqueror in 1066. The family coat of arms is: -- "Argent a fesse
azure between 3 fleurs-de-lis gules. Crest: -- a demi-griffin sergeant
gules". -- (The Norman People).
        During the early colonial period five members of the Lester family im-
migrated from England to Virginia: -- Thomas before 1622, James in
1637, Ralph in 1643, Robert in 1649, and Thomas in 1653. By the time of
the Revolutionary War their descendants numbered fully twenty families
in Virginia, besides others who had migrated to the Carolinas. --
(Biographical History of Virginia; Makers of America.)
        James Lester came to the present Newberry County, S.C., prior to or
during 1760, bringing with him his wife (name not learned) and four
sons: -- Peter (died in 1808 leaving issue), James, Jr., Samuel, and
Charles (see following). He was granted 350 acres of land, apparently in
right of six persons (100 acres for himself and 50 acres each for five other
persons) included in his family. Peter, James, Jr., and Charles served as
privates with the Americans during the Revolutionary War. James (Sr.)
died after 1808 leaving children (younger ones born in South Carolina):
-- James, Jr., Samuel (out of state; died in 1817; unmarried), Charles
(out of state), John, Isaac, Joyce (married James Beaumont and
predeceased her father), Abner (out of state), and Alfred (named in the
will of his brother Charles). -- (O'Neall and Chapman -- The Annals of
Newberry, p. 642; George Leland Summer, Sr. -- Newberry County,
South Carolina, Historical and Genealogical, pp. 9 and 358.)
        Charles Lester born in Virginia, came to Newberry County, S.C., with
his parents. He served in the American army throughout the Revolu-
tionary War. -- (O'Neall and Chapman -- The Annals of Newberry, p.
642; George Leland Summer, Sr. -- Newberry County, South Carolina,
Historical and Genealogical, pp. 9 and 358.) He married a Miss
Musgrove (which see), whose given name has not been learned. During
the period before and/or after 1808 he lived out of the State of South
Carolina, as is mentioned in his father's estate papers, but the place of
his other residence and the time of his return to Newberry County have
not been learned by this writer. His wife apparently predeceased him,
and he died in 1827 leaving children: -- Allen (see following), Smith
(moved to Alabama), Alfred (moved to Alabama), Millbury (married
Dempsey Gilbert), Maria (married George Boozer), and Susan (married
Lacy Havird).
        Allen Lester, probably born in Newberry County, S.C., served in
Company C, Third Regiment, South Carolina Volunteers, during the
War Between the States (1861-1865) and apparently was discharged
because of age. -- (O'Neall and Chapman -- The Annals of Newberry,
p. 425.) He married Martha Dennis (which see), and they became the
parents of: -- James (see following), Charles, William, George, Alfred,
Martha (married Atwood Connelly), Prudence (married
        Rogers), Phoebe (married Warren Kirkland),
Rebecca, and Jane (married Rikard). -- (O'Neall
and Chapman -- The Annals of Newberry, p. 642; George Leland Sum-

                                73


mer, Sr. -- Newberry County, South Carolina, Historical and
Genealogical, p. 358.)
        James Lester, born in Newberry County, S.C., doubtless served in the
War Between the States, as his father and brothers did. The lists given in
"The Annals of Newberry" are not complete for some of the companies,
as stated on page 13 of George Leland Summer's book. His first wife was
Elizabeth Boozer (which see), who was the mother of: -- Allen M.,
George B. (see following), and Amanda (married
Nichols). The second wife was Polly Boozer, who was the mother of: --
Newton, Elizabeth, and Fannie. -- (O'Neall and Chapman -- The An-
nals of Newberry, p. 642.)

        George B. Lester (22 June 1851; 12 October 1933), born in Newberry
County, moved to Saluda County, S.C., in 1884. He was a farmer. He
was the first representative from Saluda County (formed in 1895) in the
state legislature, serving the term of 1896-1898 and again during
1904-1908. In 1879 he married Susan Catherine Kempson (which see),
who was born on 14 March 1859 and died on 18 March 1940. They were
the parents of: --
        1. James Monroe (1880; 1968). -- He married and had issue.
        2. Ada Eugenia (11 September 1881; 14 January 1979). -- She mar-
ried Jacob Levi Grigsby and had issue.
        3. Michael Henry ( ; 1952). -- He married Emma Catherine
Black and had issue.
        4. Mary Elizabeth (4 March 1885; 14 April 1971). -- She married
James Nathaniel DeLoache (which see) and had issue.
        5. Fairy Sula ( ; ). -- She married Ernest Black and had issue.
        6. Joel Allen ( ; ). -- Died young.
        7. Hattie Lee ( ; ). -- She married Ira B. Cromley. No issue.
        8. Annie Laura ( ; ). -- Unmarried.
        9. Ida Peral (1893; 12 May 1974). -- Unmarried.
        Information concerning George B. Lester and his family
was obtained from some of his children and from The Family
History of Saluda County, 1895-1980, pp. 242-3.

                        MUSGROVE

        Edward Musgrove (1716; 1792), a native of England, was one of the
earliest settlers in the upper country of South Carolina. He acquired land
and settled on the north side of Enoree River in the present Laurens
County. He had received a good education, was trained in the law, and
was a practical surveyor. He gave legal advice and drew legal papers for
all who needed them. He was a man of many abilities, being hospitable
and benevolent and of firm and decisive character. At an early date he
built the noted "Musgrove Mills" at which a Revolutionary War battle
was fought in 1780. He was buried in the small graveyard behind the site
of his house and near to the mills. -- (Draper -- King's Mountain and Its
Heroes, pp. 123-4.)
        On 6 February 1760 Edward Musgrove, then a captain of militia on the
Enoree River, wrote a letter to William Bull (royal governor of South

                                74


Carolina) concerning murders committed by the Cherokee Indians. At a
later date he bore the rank of major. -- (Names in South Carolina, Vol.
XXIV, p. 10.) When the Revolutionary War commenced he was living
with his third wife. He then was too old for active duty and remained
neutral in his sympathies, but he prayed each night for a speedy return of
peace and good will among men. His sons took an active part in the war,
some fighting on the side of the British and some fighting on the side of
the Americans. -- (Draper -- King's Mountain and Its Heroes, pp.
123-4; J.S. Bolick -- A Laurens County Sketchbook, p. 10.)
        He fathered children by each of his three wives, but the total number
and pertinent dates have not been learned. His first wife apparently was a
Miss Beeks (relative of Samuel Beeks/Beaks of the 1790 census for
Newberry County, S.C.). She was the mother of several children, among
whom were:
        1. Edward, Jr. (mentioned as "Colonel"). -- He apparently served
with the Americans during the Revolutionary War. The Ann Musgrove
and family included in the 1790 census for Laurens County probably
were his widow and children.
        2. John (mentioned as "Colonel"). -- He married and settled on land
near the Saluda River in Newberry County. His home was in the same
general area in which the Lester, Conwill, and Dennis families lived. He
served with the British during the Revolutionary War, after which he left
South Carolina and probably went to Georgia. -- (O'Neall and Chap-
man -- The Annals of Newberry, pp. 50 and 63-4.)
        3. Beeks. -- He first served with the British and later with the
Americans during the Revolutionary War. His claim for service with the
Americans was audited and forwarded to a legislative committee for ap-
proval during the period of August 1783 - August 1786. He was included
in the 1790 census for Laurens County, being then the head of a family.
-- (Draper-King's Mountain and Its Heroes, pp. 124-5; J.S. Bolick - A
Laurens County Sketch Book, pp. 11 and 12; Revill -- Revolutionary
Claims in South Carolina, p. 252.)
        The second wife of Major Edward Musgrove was a Miss Fancher, who
was the mother of two daughters:
        1. Mary (ca. 1755; ca. 1782). -- She died unmarried. It was her plea
that saved the life of her half brother Beeks Musgrove and resulted in his
switch from the British to the American cause. -- (Draper-King's Moun-
tain and Its Heroes, pp. 124-6; J.S. Bolick -- A Laurens County Sketch
Book, pp. 11 and 12.)
        2. Susan (ca. 1757; ca. 1783). -- She died unmarried. She and three
girl friends acted as pallbearers at the funeral of her sister Mary, this be-
ing in accordance with the sisster's request. -- (Draper-King's Mountain
and Its Heroes, p. 126.)
        The third wife of Major Edward Musgrove was living with him at the
commencement of the Revolutionary War. She was the mother of the
following named children who in 1796, at a sheriff's sale, sold land at
Musgrove Mills. -- (George Leland Summer, Sr. -- Newberry County,
S.C., -- Historical and Genealogical, pp. 300 and 367.)
        1. William -- He was included in the 1790 census for Newberry
County. By his father's will (Laurens County Will Book A, p. 28) he ac-
quired "the dwelling plantation, mill, and all the land", with the stipula-

                                75


tion that his mother benefit from the proceeds from the property for the
duration of her life. -- (Names in South Carolina, Vol. XVII, p. 26.)
        2. Margaret (1768; 1824). -- She married Landon Waters. -- (Draper
        - King's Mountain and Its Heroes, p. 126.)
        3. Rachel. -- Apparently unmarried in 1796.
        4. Leah. -- Apparently unmarried in 1796.
        5. Linney. -- Apparently unmarried in 1796.
        A daughter of the first wife of Major Edward Musgrove or one of his
granddaughters, -- name not learned, -- married Charles Lester (which
see). -- (O'Neall and Chapman -- The Annals of Newberry, p. 642;
George Leland Summer, Sr. -- Newberry County, S.C. -- Historical and
Genealogical, p. 358.)

END


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