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The Black Family

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The Family of Alexander Black (Son of Peter) & Agnes Cormack

NAME BIRTH LOCATION DEATH LOCATION MARRIAGE LOCATION SPOUSE
Alexander Black [1] 1810 Leith, Scotland October 11, 1865 Boonton, Morris Co., New Jersey    

1) Agnes Cormack

2) Cecilea [2]

Peter Black 14 March 1834 Midlothian, Edinburgh, Scotland 1918 Brooklyn, Kings Co., New York     Sarah Mac Crae
David (or Daniel) Black 1835 Midlothian, Edinburgh, Scotland          
Jane(t) Black 10 June 1837 Fife, Scotland         Daniel Kennard (Cunard) [3]
Alexander Black 1839 Midlothian, Edinburgh, Scotland          
William Black 03 September 1841            

[1] 1841 census in St. Cuthbert's Parish, Edinburgh shows Alexander and Agnes with children; Peter, Daniel, Jane and Alex; however, Agnes died September 17, 1841 in Edinburgh, two weeks after giving birth to their son, William. According to the genealogy prepared by grandson Alexander Robert Black (son of Peter), Alexander "came to America is 1851 sailing from Greenock Sept. 27 and reaching New York on November 7. His son Peter accompanied him. Alexander died in Boonton, New Jersey of cancer of the stomach where he had opened a lamp shop and a plumbing business." No proven USA census record has been found for Alexander in 1860.

[2] The 1851 census in St. Cuthbert's Parish, Edinburgh shows that Alexander has married a woman named Cecilea, age 37 to his 39 and the couple has another son named John, age 9 months. Included in the census are children by his first marriage: Peter, Alexander and William.

[3] 1860 census in Brooklyn, New York shows Peter (24, brass finisher), Sarah (23) and Alexander (2) living in the household of Daniel and Jane Black Cunard in Brooklyn, New York in June. Peter (25, machinist) and Sarah (22) with son Alexander (1) are also enumerated in New York City in July in the household of Blacksmith, John McCray, father of Sarah. Included in the household are John's children Robert, Agnes, Margaret and Mary who are incorrectly given the surname Black.

The Family of Peter Black & Sarah MacCrae

NAME BIRTH LOCATION DEATH LOCATION MARRIAGE LOCATION SPOUSE
Peter Black[1] 14 March 1834 Buccleuch Pend, Edinburgh, Scotland 1918 Brooklyn, Kings Co., New York     Sarah Mac Crae
Alexander Robert Black 07 February 1859 Manhattan, New York 01 May 1940   04 October 1881 New York, New York Elizabeth May Helmle
John William Black 1861   1956       Flora Blaney
David Black 1863   1930       Matilda Turnbull
Jessie Gertrude Black 1866   1940       William C. Lawson
Sarah Black 19 December 1872   1930       Mc Carthy
Peter Black              
Agnes Black              
Fairman Black              

[1] In 1859, the family lived at 200 West 26th Street, New York, but moved to 1 N. 1st Street (near Bedford Ave.) , then 4th Street, Williamsburg in 1863. See note 3 above for 1860 census information. So far, we can find no record in the 1870 census for Peter and Sarah. In 1880, the entire family is enumerated, but, under the name of "Peterson Black" in Kings County, New York. By 1900, Alexander Robert is enumerated with Elizabeth May Helmle Black and all three children in Brooklyn, New York.

The Family of Alexander Robert Black & Elizabeth May Helmle

NAME BIRTH LOCATION DEATH LOCATION MARRIAGE LOCATION SPOUSE
Alexander Robert Black, [1] 07 February 1859 Manhattan, New York
01 May 1940
 

1) 04 October 1881

2) 25 January 1935

1) New York, New York

2) New York, New York

1) Elizabeth May Helmle

2) Florence Edith O'Dell [2]

Black, Mabel Hawthorne 23 December 1883   05 January 1968       Cleland Ruthven Austin
Carlyle Helmle Black, 03 January 1887 Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY 14 August 1973 New Canaan, Fairfield, CN 15 May 1915 Buffalo, Erie Co., NY Louise Cage Fielder
Malcolm Stuart Black 29 April 1894 New York, New York 13 April 1960 South Orange, New Jersey     Ruth Tuttle Atwood

[1] Alexander Robert Black was born at 200 West 26th Street, New York. He was proud to be the first true "Manhattanite" child born into the family. In 1863 the family moved to Williamsburgh, first to N. 1st Street near Bedford then to 4th Street. Later they moved to 299 Broadway between 9th and 10th streets and finally to Fourth 120 Division Avenue when he married Elizabeth Helmle. In this home, Sarah Mac Crae Black died in 1889. Alexander became variously a noted author, newspaperman, inventor and creator of the "Picture Play" from the age of twelve until he died. A movie in his honor was made by Adolf Zukor in 1919 called the "Grandfather of the Picture Play" to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first Picture Play, "Miss Jerry." See this link for more information. In both the 1900, 1910 and 1920 censuses, Alexander and Elizabeth are enumerated living with all or some of their children. In 1930, they are not found, suggesting that they may have been traveiling as Alexander's career had taken off. Elizabeth died on August 25, 1934 in Hopkinton, New Hampshire when a train hit the car in which she was riding.

[2] Florence Edith O'Dell was born in England about 1882. She came to the USA between 1905-1910 and worked as a New York newspaper editer, where she met Alexander Black. After many years of working relationship and professional friendship, one year after the death of Elizabeth Helmle Black in 1934, the couple married and spent the last six years of Alexander's life together. Edith played a key role in the organization of Alexander's papers, making sure they were safely preserved in perpetuity.

The Family of Carlyle Helmle Black & Louise Cage Fielder

NAME BIRTH LOCATION DEATH LOCATION MARRIAGE LOCATION SPOUSE
Carlyle Helmle Black 03 January 1887 Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY 14 August 1973 New Canaan, Fairfield, CN 15 May 1915 Buffalo, Erie Co., NY Louise Cage Fielder
Fielder Black February 27, 1916   August 08, 1963 La Jolla, San Diego Co., CA      
Alexander Black II March 05, 1920 East Orange , Essex Co., New Jersey October 23, 1987 San Francisco, San Francisco, CA October 9, 1941 Chicago, Cook, IL O'Hara, Jean Marie
Sibling (Living)              

[1] Carl Black began his career as a mail room worker for American Can Company. Over time, he advanced himself into the postion of CEO/Chairman of the Board from 1940s until about 1952 - truly he was an excellent example of an American Success Story!

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