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Where did they all go?  To 43 states at least...

Hugh O'Neall's descendants have spread out all across the United States.  They are or have been found in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.  That makes 43 states plus the D. of C!  I currently have contacts/cousins in at least 13 of these states. (Thanks again to all of them.)

It's interesting to look at a breakdown of the migrations by each of his childrens' branches.  I have more information on the lines of William and Hugh and so more detailed information on their destinations.

William O'Neall, the Quaker, moved from Virginia to South Carolina, where he died and was buried.  His son Abijah moved from there to Ohio, in order to remove himself from contact with the institution of slavery, as did many other South-Carolina Quakers at the time.  Abijah's own son, Abijah, moved to Indiana (This branch is now represented by Cousins Judy, Penny and GB.). From Ohio and Indiana, successive generations spread out to Iowa (Cousin Jim), Arizona (Cousin Jon Patrick), Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma (Cousin Julie), Texas (Cousin Rebekah) and Washington (Cousins Don and Carol), some even winding up in far-away places like Hawaii (Cousin Jill) and France (me).  And this list of places is not complete.  The following map indicates schematically the migrations of many of William's descendants.
 
  Migration of William O'Neall's descendants
 


The immigrant Hugh's other Quaker son, Hugh O'Neall, also settled in South Carolina, where he died and where many of his descendants remained (Cousin Tom), even at the time of the major Quaker migration to the Northwest Territory at the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th centuries.  His daughter, Patience, however, moved with her husband, Marmaduke Mills, to Ohio.  Some of the Mills went on to Indiana.  Hugh O'Neall's son, John, moved to Texas, where his daughter, Sarah O'Neall, married a James Madison O'Neill (no relaton) and established a large O'Neill/O'Neall clan there.  Sarah O'Neill's son, George Washington O'Neill, settled in California and founded a branch there.  I have several contacts among Texas O'Neills (Cousins Miriam and Penny).

Migration of Hugh O'Neall's descendants
 


Tory son John O'Neall settled and died in South Carolina.  If one version of his history is correct (Cousin James), his grandchildren, named Harris, moved to Arkansas and founded a large branch of that family there.

Tory son Henry O'Neall settled in South Carolina also, but moved to Florida after the Revolution.  He has many descendants there, most of whom spell the name O'Neill (Cousin Marsha).

Thomas O'Neall settled and died in South Carolina.  His grandson, Thomas Miles O'Neall III, apparently moved to Georgia, as his children were  born there.  A large number of Georgia O'Nealls are descended from him (Cousin Shirley).

Revolutionary son James Neal, who had dropped the O in the spelling of his name, settled after the War in that part of Virginia which has been in West Virgina since the Civil War.  Here, he built a blockhouse at Neal's Station on the site of the present city of Parkersburg.  As far as I know, most of his descendants have stayed in or around West Virginia (Cousins Dick and Ed).

Hugh's youngest son, George Neal, settled in Jessamine County, Kentucky, at the end of the war.  Although many of his descendants stayed in Kentucky, a large branch was established also in Florida (Cousin John).  Others went to Michigan (Cousin Anne), Texas and other mid-southern states (Cousin Mary).

Mary O'Neall and Frederick Jones stayed in South Carolina.  Almost nothing is known of their descendants.



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