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Descendants of JOHN HOWLAND

Generation No. 1

1. JOHN1 HOWLAND. He married EMMA REVALL.

Child of JOHN HOWLAND and EMMA REVALL is:

2. i. HENRY2 HOWLAND, b. ABT 1564, Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England; d. May 17, 1635, Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England.

Generation No. 2

2. HENRY2 HOWLAND (JOHN1) was born ABT 1564 in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England, and died May 17, 1635 in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England. He married MARGARET AIRES.

Children of HENRY HOWLAND and MARGARET AIRES are:

3. i. JOHN3 HOWLAND, b. ABT 1592, Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England; d. February 23, 1672/73, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA.

ii. HUMPHREY HOWLAND, d. July 9, 1646; m. (1) MARGARET CALVERT; m. (2) ANNE (MNU) HOWLAND, November 21, 1622, Middlesex< England.

4. iii. ARTHUR HOWLAND, d. October 30, 1675, Marshfield,MA.

5. iv. HENRY HOWLAND, b. ABT 1604, Scrooby, notts, England; d. January 17, 1670/71, Duxbury,MA.

v. MARGARET HOWLAND, m. RICHARD PHILLIPS, April 26, 1623, FEnstanton, Huntingdonshire, England.

vi. GEORGE HOWLAND, d. February 10, 1643/44.

Generation No. 3

3. JOHN3 HOWLAND (HENRY2, JOHN1) was born ABT 1592 in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England, and died February 23, 1672/73 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by susan E. roser 1989). He married ELIZABETH TILLEY March 25, 1623 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA, daughter of JOHN TILLEY and JOAN ROGERS.

Notes

Ref: "John Howland of the Mayflower", vol. 1, by Elizabeth Pearson White

Passenger on the famous ship Mayflower, which sailed from Plymouth, Englnad, in the autumn of 1620, was the indentured manservant of Mr. John Carver, a wealthy Londoner, who became the first governor of New Plimoth Colony in Massachusetts. On 11th November 1620, as the ship lay at anchor in Cape Cod Bay, John Howland was the thirteenth man to sign the MAYFLOWER COMPACT, agreement which laid the foundation for the new town that the able-bodied men on board the Mayflower planned to create when the group landed in what was to become Plymouth, Massachusetts.

The son of Henry and Margaret Howland, John Howland was born about 1592 and grew up in Fenstanton, a town nine miles northwest of Cambridge on the old Roman Road. No baptismal record has been found for John Howland but he was said to have been "above eighty years" when he died in rocky Nook, Kingston, near Plymouth, 23 February 1672. His father, Henry Howland, yoeman, died in Fenstanton 17 May 1635, and his mother, Margaret, was buried there 31 July 1629. The identity of this family is proved by the probate records of John's brother, Humphrey Howland, a draper, who settled in St. Swithin's Parish in London. Humphrey Howland, in his will written in London 28 May 1646 and proved 10 July 1646 by his second wife, Anne, mentioned his brothers, Arthur, John, and Henry, his sister, Margaret, wife of Richard Phillips of Fenstanton, shoemaker, his "nephew," Simon Howland, and his "niece," Hannah Howland, Simon's sister. Additional information about John Howland's family is found in the records of the intestate estate of another brother, George Howland, a merchant of St. Dunstan's, East London, who had died two years earlier, 10 February 1643/4. His estate was administered by Humphrey Howland's wife, Anne, 11 July 1646. Simon Howland was baptized in Fenstanton 19 August 1604, called "son of Henrye," and was probably the Simon Howland who was apprenticed 19 March 1622, to Humphrey Howland, "citizen and draper of London."

Two of John's brothers followed John to Plymouth. Henry Howland, the youngest brother, was apprenticed to his brother, Humphrey Howland, in London and his name is found there on the Roll of the Drapers Company, 1 October 1623. But less then ten years later, Henry arrived in Plymouth where he was taxed 25 March 1633. John's oldest brother, Arthur Howland, soon followed his younger brother to New England and was listed by thomas Lechford 28 August 1640 as "of Duxbury in New England Planter." Thus the progenitors of three seqarate Howland families arrived in Plymouth colony during the first twenty years of its existence, making it difficult to sort out and identify their many descendants.

John Howland of the Mayflower was called by Governor William Bradford "a lusty younge man". He was one of the hired hands among the Mayflower company, being neither a "Saint," as the Pilgrims were called, nor a "Stranger," engaged for a specific duty, as was the soldier, Captain Myles Standish. During the voyage across the North Atlantic, the Mayflower was buffeted by severe autumn storms during which she was forced to drop her sails and head into the wind, wallowing in the mountainous waves. John Howland ventured on deck and was washed overboard into the boiling sea. In governor Bradford's words, "It pleased God that he caught hould of ye halliards which hunge over board, and rane out at length; yet he was held up... and then with a boat hooke and other means got into ye ship again." It was this tenacity of purpose, perseverance, and the ability to deal with unexpected emergencies that helped John Howland to become a successful leader in the Plymouth community.

The Carver family with whom John lived, survived the terrible sickness of the first winter, during which many Pilgrims died. But the following spring, on an unusually hot day in April, governor Carver, according to Bradford, came out of his cornfield feeling ill. He passed into a coma and "never spake more." His wife, Kathrine, died soon after her husband. Since the Carvers had no children, John Howland is thought to have inherited their estate. It has been said that he immediately "bought his freedom" but no record has survived.

On or about what was then New Year's Day, 25 March 1623 (old style), John Howland married his fellow Mayflower passenger, Elizabeth Tilley. Elizabeth was baptized at Henlow, Huntingdonshire, England, 30 August 1607, the fifth and youngest child of a silk-weaver named John Tilley, and his wife, Joan (Hurst) Rogers. She was the only child of her parents recorded as coming with them to America. At the time of her marriage she was not quite sixteen years of age.

the early records of the Colony of New Plymouth contain an account of the Division of Land in 1623, in which John Howland, as head of a household, received four acres "on the Southside of the brook to the woodward". According to one researcher, John Howland was given one share (or acre) in his own right and three shares for his wife, Elizabeth Tilley, and her seceased parents, John and Joan Tilley. But Franklyn Howland, author of "The History of Arthur, Henry and John Howland and Their Descendants", states that Governor Carver's family consisted of John Carver, himself, his wife, Kathrine, John Howland, Desire Minter, a man servant named Roger Wilder, a boy, Jasper More, a boy, William Latham, and an unnamed servant maid. When Elizabeth Tilley's parents, John and Joan Tilley, and her uncle, Edward Tilley, died the first winter, Elizabeth became part of the Carver household. Roger Wilder died the first winter. Governor Carver died a few months later, in April 1621, and his wife died in May 1621. The boy, Jasper More, died 6 December 1621, and the servant maid died soon afterr. That left John Howland as the head of the household containing four people, the other three being Elizabeth Tilley, Desire Minter and the lad, William Latham.

Desire Minter, one of the members of John Howland's household, had come in the Mayflower with the Carvers. Desire must have been no more fifteen years of age when she arrived in Plymouth. She was the daughter of William and Sarah (Willet) Minter, members of the group of Separatists living in Leiden. her father, William Minter, died before 1618 and her mother, Sarah, married Roger Symondsen in Leiden 18 August 1618. roger was accompanied to his wedding by his friends. Daniel Fairfield and John Carver. It was this same John Carver in whose care Desire Minter sailed in the Mayflower for Plymouth in 1620. Desire's mother was widowed a second time and, before 10 May 1622, she married her third husband, Roger Eastman. On that date Roger and Sarah Eastman signed an agreement with Thomas Brewer, the philanthropist who had supported Elder William Brewster's printing press in Leiden. In the agreement Thomas Brewer of Leiden was entrusted with 1900 guilders to be invested, out of which he was to pay 120 guilders annually for the benefit and support of Desire Minter, Sarah's child by her first husband. Payment was to continue until the child reached the age of twenty-one. The contract was drawn up in the presence of John Kebel and William Jepson.

Thomas Brewer returned to England where he was arrested for his support of the Pilgrim Separatists. On 20 October 1623, Roger Eastman,Sarah's third husband, authorized John Kebel and William Jepson to collect Desire Minter's money from Thomas Brewer, who was in prison at this time. This would seem to indicate that Desire Minter was about fifteen years old when she traveled to Plymouth with John Carver and his wife, Kathrine, in 1620. She was still a minor when her mohter and step-father, Sarah and Roger Eastman, signed the second contract in Leiden in 1623. Therefor she was still under twenty-one, when she was living in the household of the newly married John and Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland at the time the Division of Land was made in 1623.

A few years later, Desire Minter returned to England, perhaps to claim her inheritance. She may have rejoined her mother and stepfather there for, on 1 December 1623, Roger and Sarah Eastman obtained a notarized statement of good character from Thomas Nashe and William Jepson, when they were planning to leave Leiden. John and Elizabeth Howland were very fond of Desire Minter and named their first child "Desire," in her honor.

In 1626 John Howland became one of the forty-two colonists who assumed Plymouth Colony's debt of L1800 owed to the Merchant Adventurers of London. In order to pay off this mortgage, a monopoly in the Colon's trade was granted to William Bradford, Isaac Allerton and Myles Standish, who chose John Howland as one of their partners, or under takers, in the project. Later they established a trading post far to the northward, on the Kennebec River, at the present site of Augusta, Maine. John was put in charge of the trading post and a brisk trade developed there in beaver, otter and other furs gathered by the Indians. John's family may have spent some time with him in Main, and some of his children may have been born there.

When the Division of Cattle was made 1 June 1627, (new style), only forty-two of the original group of ninety-nine people who reached Plymouth in the Mayflower were still living there. All of the members of each family were listed in the records, including John and Elizabeth Howland, who now had two children. Desire and John, Jr. Eight more children were born to them in the ensuing years, whom they named Hope, Elizabeth, Lydia, Hannah, Joheph, Jabez, Ruth and isaac.

In 1633, John Howland was made a freeman of Plymouth. During his lifetime he was appointed or elected to many public offices. In 1641 and 1644, and from 1647 to 1651, John Howland was one of the assessors of Plymouth. In 1650 he was a surveyor of highways. In 1652 and 1659, and from 1661 to 1668, and again in 1670, he was a Deputy to the General Court. in 1655 and 1666 he was a selectman in Plymouth.

In 1639 the Old Comers were given a choice of several additional plantations for themselves and their heirs, around Yarmouth, Dartmouth and Rehoboth. Part of the land which John Howland chose was in Yarmouth, out on Cape Cod, where his son John, Jr., and daughters, Desire (Howland) Gorham and Hope (Howland) Chipman, settled. It was also in the early part of 1639 that John paid L82 for John Jenn's land and dwelling house at Rocky Nook, now in Kingston but then part of Plymouth, which had been built in 1628. And there he lived with his family for the rest of his life.

John Howland also owned a tract of land in Marchfield. Among the deeds that have survived the vicissitudes of time is one that settled an argument between John Howland, Sr., Thomas Bourne and John Dingley, concerning the boundaries of a "parcel" of marsh meadwo there. It was agreed that "the line or Range shall begin att the beach next the sea upon a west line sett by a compas to a homacke in the marsh where there lves an Old Ceader tree there being noe other nor no more trees next to the great Iland but that onely And from the aforesaid west line to the Basse creek To which agreement all the aforesaid parties freely assented unto as aforesaid; alsoe that this agreement bee upon Record both att Marshfield and the court booke att Plymouth to avoid all further Diference for time to Come about the prmises; in witness whereof we and said John Howland senir: Thomas Bourne and John Dignley have put to our hands this fourth of May 1655" This document was signed in the presence of Myles Standish and recorded in 1656

The following year, on 5 March 1657, John Howland exchanged land in Marshfield for a "farme of Land" in the Township of Branstabel owned by Chrishopher Winter, described as "the Govrs farmes," since it had belonged to Governor Bradford. it contained "fourscore and ten acres of upland according to the bounds be it more or less and ten acres of medow...lying next unto the land of William Crocker." the exchange was acknowledged by Mr. John Howland and Christopher Winter in Plymouth. The ownership of the land was confirmed by deed to John Howland, Jr., 10 January 1667/8, when John, Sr., made a gift to him of "upland and medow at Barnstable being late in possission of John Howland, Jr."

John Howland, Sr., died in rocky Nook 23 February 1672/3. In his will dated 29 May 1672, John mentioned his beloved wife, Elizabeth, and his children, named as John, called "eldest son, " Jabez, Isacke, and Joseph, and his married daughter, Desire Gorum(sic), Hope Shipman, Elizabeth Dickinson, Lydia Browne, Hannah Bosworth and Ruth Cushman. John Howland also mentioned his grandchild, Elizabeth howland, "daughter of son John". The inventory of his estate included his dwelling house in Rocky Nook, medow at the Jones River, half of a house and medow in Colchester, a medow near the Jones River bridge in Duxborrow, a house and land in Middlebury, and land near Nemassekett Pond. Also listed among his possessions were "one great Bible and annotations on the five books of Moses", as well as "Mr. Tindall's workes, Mr. Wilson's workes and seven more books."

John's widow, Elizabeth, died in Swansea, 21/31 December 1687, at 80 years of age, in the home of her daughter, Lydia Browne. Three of her daughters Desire Gorham, Hope Chipman and Ruth Cushman had already died, leaving heirs. In her will dated 17 December 1686, Elizabeth Howland named her sons, John, Jabez, Joseph and Isaac, her son-in-law James Browne, her surviving daughters Lydia Browne, Elizabeth Dickason (sic), and Hannah Bosworth, her granddaughters Elizabeth Bursley, Dorothy Browne and Desire Cushman, and her grandsons Nathaniel Howland and James and Jabez Browne. She charged her children to "walke in ye Fear of ye Lord, and in love and peace toward each other."

Children (Howland), first three probably born in Plymouth, Mass., next three possibly born in Main, last four born in rocky Nook, now Kingston, Mass. (see family page for children)

One of the 13 signers of Mayflower Compact. Governor's Asst. 1633-1635 Deputy from Plymouth to General Court 1645-56-58-59-1661-63-66-67-70.

Ref: Mayflower Descendants pp. 16, 150 Vol.1, Early Settlers pp. 196-199

Children of JOHN HOWLAND and ELIZABETH TILLEY are:

6. i. DESIRE4 HOWLAND, b. ABT 1625, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA; d. October 13, 1683, Barnstable, MA.

7. ii. JOHN HOWLAND, b. February 24, 1626/27, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA; d. Aft 1699.

iii. HOPE HOWLAND, b. August 30, 1629, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. January 8, 1683/84, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA; m. JOHN CHIPMAN, 1646, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

iv. ELIZABETH HOWLAND, b. ABT 1631, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. 1691, Oyster, Bay, NY (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. (1) EPHRIAM HICKS, September 13, 1649, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. (2) JOHN DICKINSON, July 10, 1651, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA.

v. LYDIA HOWLAND, b. Aft January 11, 1710/11, Maine (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. 1711; m. JAMES BROWN.

vi. HANNAH HOWLAND, b. ABT 1637, Maine; d. 1708; m. JONATHAN BOSWORTH.

vii. JOSEPH HOWLAND, b. 1640, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. January 1703/04, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. ELIZABETH SOUTHWORTH, December 7, 1664, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

viii. JABEZ HOWLAND, b. 1644, Rocky Nook, MA (Source: September 16, 1637); d. 1708-1712 (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. BETHIAH THACHER.

ix. RUTH HOWLAND, b. ABT 1646, Rocky Nook, MA; d. Bef October 16, 1679, Rehoboth, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. THOMAS CUSHMAN, November 17, 1664, Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by susan E. roser 1989).

x. ISAAC HOWLAND, b. November 15, 1649, Rocky Nook MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. March 9, 1723/24, Middleboro, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. ELIZABETH VAUGHN, 1676, Middleboro, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

4. ARTHUR3 HOWLAND (HENRY2, JOHN1) died October 30, 1675 in Marshfield,MA. He married MARGARET REED Bef June 6, 1643.

Children of ARTHUR HOWLAND and MARGARET REED are:

i. DEBORAH4 HOWLAND, m. JOHN SMITH JR.

ii. MARY HOWLAND, m. (1) TIMOTHY WILLIAMSON; m. (2) ROBERT SANFORD.

iii. MARTHA HOWLAND, m. (1) JOHN DAMON; m. (2) PETER BACON.

8. iv. ARTHUR HOWLAND, b. Bef 1647.

v. ELIZABETH HOWLAND, m. JOHN LOW.

5. HENRY3 HOWLAND (HENRY2, JOHN1) was born ABT 1604 in Scrooby, notts, England, and died January 17, 1670/71 in Duxbury,MA. He married MARY NEWLAND 1628 in England, daughter of WILLIAM NEWLAND and AGNES GREENWAY.

Notes

Ref: A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, By Franklyn Howland, First Edition, New Bedford, MA: Published by the author 1885

Henry Howland and his Descendants.

The youngest (at least the last mentioned in the will of Humphrey) of the Howlands who have been heretofore referred to as arriving at plymouth probably before 1625, was without doubt Henry. It is on record that he was a brother of Arthur, and they all doubtless held the same family relationship to each other. Some of the colonists may have reached greater distinction in civil affairs, but none have a better record for integrity, thrift, uprightness, and unmixed faith in the Divine One, than Henry Howland. It is clear that these virtues did not die with him, but permeated the lives of many of his children, and his children's children, unto the ninth generation. As we read of his vicissitudes, discouragements, perseverance, endurance, courage and victories, let us, like our honored ancestor,

"In the world's broad field of battle, In the bivouac of life, Be not like dumb, driven cattle! But be heroes in the strife."

Search has been made in vain for his name on records of departures from england and arrivals in this country. The first mention made of him in New England is that in the allotment of cattle to the different families in plymouth in 1624, he appears as the owner of the "black cow." On the first page of Vol. I of the court records of new plymouth, is found in a list of freemen, under date of 1633, the name of "Henery Howland". On the 25th of march of the same year he is taxed "s.9 for the publike vse,.....rated in corne at vi s p bushell." His thrift is shown in the fact that on the 27th of march, 1634, he is on the tax list for 18s.

He appears in Duxbury among its earliest settlers, some of the first inhabitants of Plymouth locating themselves there across the harbor, on the north side of the bay. Here he is referred to as living "by the bay side, near love Brewster's," and the record reads that he was "one of the substantial landholders and freemen."

The old records of Plymouth Colony say that "Att a Courte held ye 5 of Jan., Ano 1635," Henry Howland was chosen "cunstable for Duxberry."

"At a Genall Meeting the xxth of March 1636-7" to appoint committees to assign the "Hey Grounds of Ducksbury were appoynted to view the hey grounds from the riuer beyong Phillip Delanoys to the South Riuer." (Mr Edward Winslow, Henry Howland, The messenger Phillip Delanoy.)

In 1640 he purchased five acres of upland and one acre of marsh meadow in Duxbury, the price which he paid being "Twelve bushells of Indian Corne." For several years he was surveyor of highways in the town. in 1643 he was on a list of freemen of Duxbury, and of men able to bear arms. He served on the "Grand Inquest" (grand jury) in 1636, 37, 39, 40, 49, 51, 52, 53, 56.

He was evidently placed on the next grand jury, for his name appears in 1657, June 3d, on a list of those who refused "to serue on the Grand enquest". The apparent reason for this is that he had joined the Friends' sect, which was just beginning to spread in America, and the duties were such that he could not conscientiously perform them.

The Friends had adopted as the guide of their purposes and the polar star of their lives, a religious faith which had for its foundation the pure word of the Almighty Father, and with the strictest conscientiousness they courageously carried out its precepts, as we have said before, against the fiercest opposition and hardest warfare ever waged against any so-claimed religious belief in this country, where licentious free-lovers and adulterous Mormons have since wallowed in their pools of filth without molestation. They passed through the furnace of affliction, and were yet surrounded by great tribulation when they stepped out into the great future, but their descendants lived to see peace and good will to smile upon their principles so fondly cherished. They suffered much in both colonies, but Cotton says that though their persecutions were equally great here, yet they were never subjected to those cruel and sanguinary laws which the other colonies enacted. The law against heretics in general was first enforced agianst them, and then special laws were enacted against them. A fine of L5 or a whipping was the penalty for entertaingin them, and for attending their meetings one was liable to a fine of L2. At this time the laws against the people of this society were being enforced, and Henry being one of them, he could not conscientiously sit on the jury before which his own brother Arthur, who had joined the society, his brethren in the faith, and himself, were liable to be brought as transgressors of the civil laws of the colony, which were as inflexible and unalterable as those of the Medes and persians.

It may be of interest to the reader, as it has to the writer, to peruse the entries in the Plymouth Colony records in relation to the part in which Henry acted as victim in these persecutions. For this reason they are given here as they appear there.

On the 3d of June, 1657, Ralph Allen, Sr., of Sandwich, was drawn, but refused to serve on the grand jury, and at the very next session of the court, October 6th, he was brought before the jury for entertaining Quakers, fined and imprisoned; and before many weeks Henry Howland, his brother, Arthur, and his son Zoeth met the same fate. Henry entertained Nicholas Upsall, who was an earnest and courageous defender of the tenets of the sect, whom Whittier immortalizes in verse, and who visited this section in 1657. Public proclamation was made that for every hour Nicholas Upsall as entertained "a severe fine was to be exacted" from his host.

At the court of October 1657, Henry "was summonsed to appear at the next March Court to answare for intertaining Quakers meetings in his house." He appeared at the court referred to, and was fined 10s.

The Howland family was well represented in the dock of the court of March 1st, 1659, as follows: "John Smith Junir, of Plymouth, and Deborah, his wife, Goodwife Howland wife of Henery Howland, Zoeth Howland and his wife, Arthur Howland and his wife of Marshfield, hauing bene p'sented for frequently absenting themselues from publicke worship of God, were sentanced by the court each ten shillings to the collonies vse."

At the court of 1659, Oct. 6th, "William Newland and Henry Howland appeared, being summoned, and were convicted by law and sentanced by the court to bee disfranchised of theire freedome of this corporation...for theire being abettors and entertainors of Quackers." May 1st and October 2d, 1660, Henry was fined for "p'rmitting a quaker meeting in his house twise... and for entertaining a forraigne Quaker contrary to order of the court." Once, when refusing to pay his fine, his house and lands were seized by the marshal.

There is a remarkable coincidence of history in the fact that while Henry of New England was passing through these trials, there was a Henry in old England under going similar ones. It appears that in 1662 a "Henry Howland of Tewksbury, in Glocestershire, for refusing to bear Arms, or to pay toward the Charge of the Maletia had a Horse taken from him worth 4 1. 8s. The Person who took the Horse acknowledging that he did it against his Conscience, Henry Howland told him, he might then expect some judgment would follow; and it was observed, that the said Person, having ordered his Son to sell the Horse, as he was riding, the Horse ran violently with him against the Arm of a Tree, so that he died of the Blow immediately." In November, 1665, the same Henry had "three Cows and one Steer taken from him for permitting religious Meetings at his House."

Through all this persecution and suffering Henry and his "goodwife" clung to the cause thay had espoused, and died as they had lived during the sunset hours of life, triumphant in the faith.

Toward the latter part of his life he became a large possessor of real estate. In 1652 he was associated with others in a large tract of land in Dartmouth. On the 2d of April, 1659, together with twenty-six others, he bought of Wamsutta and pattapanum what was then called Assonet and is now Freetown. they gave 20 coats, 2 rugs, 2 iron pots, 2 kettles and one little kettle, 8 pairs shoes, 6 pairs stockings, 1 dozen hats, 2 dozen hatchets, and 2 yards broadcloth. At the division, in 1660, of "ye ffreeman's land att Taunton River," which was this purchase, he received for his share the sixth lot. This was afterwards inherited by his son Samuel. he was one of the grantees of Bridgewater, but probably never lived there. In 1664 he bought a large tract of land in Mettapoisett (Swanzey.)

Were the early records of Duxbury in existence, we should know more of the life of this noble man. they were probably burned in Miles Standish's house, as at the time it was destroyed by fire Alexander Standish, who lived with Miles, was clerk of the town.

It appears from Henry's will, that he owned a house in Duxbury, where he doubtless died and expected his widow would remain. It is evident, however, that he had assisted in provinding for his immediate posterity a more gongenial home than Plymouth, namely in Freetown and Dartmouth.

Roger Williams, who had already been banished form Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies, had established in rhode Island a government the charter of which guarantied that every one should be free to enjoy his own opinions, as long as they did not militate against the general goods. Into and on the borders of this land of religious liberty the Friends fled. Henry's property was near the boundary line of that state, but within the jurisdiction of Plymouth Colony. On the land he owned at Freetown his son Samuel settled probably as early as 1665, as his last appearance on the P.C.R. is in 1664. At the commencement of the Quaker persecutions at plymouth, Henry became interested in the original purchase of Dartmouth, for a Plymouth in 1652, there was assigned:

One share to Mr. Howland and one to Wm. Bassett.

He doubtless built a house on this land, the one his widow gave to their son John. He and his wife may have lived there, as his horses and cattle were there. On this purchase Zoeth settled, without doubt, as early as 1662, his name appearing on the P.C. R. for the last time in 1661, and immediately preceding that frequently. Of the other two sons, John was probably a bachelor; and it is safe to judge that Joseph lived on the old homestead at Duxbury which his father gave him, and took care of his mother after his father's death, she living in the "new Room," as she gave him all her goods and chattels.

Children of HENRY HOWLAND and MARY NEWLAND are:

9. i. SAMUEL4 HOWLAND, b. ABT 1646, Duxbury, Plymouth Co, MA; d. 1716, Freetown or Middleborough, Bristol Co, MA.

ii. ZOETH HOWLAND.

iii. JOSEPH HOWLAND.

iv. SARAH HOWLAND, b. 1645.

v. ELIZABETH HOWLAND.

vi. MARY HOWLAND.

vii. ABIGAIL HOWLAND, b. 1629, Eastham, Barnstable, MA; d. April 7, 1692, Eastham, Barnstable, MA; m. JOHN YOUNG, December 13, 1648, Plymouth MA.

viii. JOHN HOWLAND.

Generation No. 4

6. DESIRE4 HOWLAND (JOHN3, HENRY2, JOHN1) was born ABT 1625 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989), and died October 13, 1683 in Barnstable, MA (Source: Plymouth Colony Its History & People 1620-1621 by Eugene Aubrey Stratton, 1986). She married JOHN GORHAM 1643 in Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989), son of RALPH GORHAM.

Notes

Ref: "John Howland of the Mayflower", vol. 1, by Elizabeth Pearson White

Second Generation

2. Desire Howland and Captain John Gorham

Desire(2) Howland (John[1]) was born in Plymouth, Mass., about 1625 or 1626, the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland. Desire and her brother, John were listed with their parents in the Division of Cattle in Plymouth, 22 May 1627 (old style), 1 June 1627 (new style). John's birth date, 24, 2, 1627 (old style)[24 April 1627], was recorded by Judge Sewall who met John(2) Howland on the road and asked him when he was born. Therefore, Desire must have been the eldest child, born one year or eighteen months earlier than John. Desire died in Barnstable, Mass., 13 October 1683.

Desire Howland married in Plymouth, about 1643 John Gorham, who was baptized in Benefield, Northamptonshire, England, 28 January 1620/1, the son of Ralph Gorham. Capt. John Gorham was buried in Swansea, Mass, 5 February 1675/6.

The Northamptonshire branch of the Gorhams are supposed to have descended from Sir Hugh de Gorham and his wife, Margaret, daughter of Sir William l'Angevin. Sir Hugh de Gorham, in 1281, possessed the manor of Churchfield in the parish of Oundle, and land in Benefield which had belonged to his wife's father. More than three hundred years later, the baptism of "John Gorram, son of Ralph Gorram" was entered in the Benefield register.

A john Gorham, perhaps this man, was a passenger on board the Philip, bound for North America, 20 June 1635, with Richard Morgan, master. A Ralph Gorham was greanted land in Plymouth 2 October 1637 for a house and garden. On 5 March 1637/8, he complained against Frances Sprague. A year later, "Ralph Gorham the older" was presented for breaking the peace. On 1 September 1640 he complained against Ralph Smith and on 2 March 1640/1 Smith complained against Ralph Gorham. On 5 April 1640 he sued Tristram Clark and John Crab for debt. he then disappeared from Plymouth records.

On 8 March 1648 Desire's father, John Howland, sold to his "son-in-law, John Gorum," half of the lands in Marshfield that he had bought from Governor William Bradford. In 1672, Desire's mother, Elizabeth Howland, "wife of Mr. John Howland, deceased, came into court at Plymouth and acknowledged that she freely gave and surrendered rights in the lands of her late husband lying in Namasket in the township of Middleboro to Mr. John Gorum of Barnstable."

The exact date of their marriage is not known but Desire was called "Desire Gorum" in her father's will dated 29 May 1672. Additional proof that Desire Howland married John Gorham was found in a land transaction dated 16 February 1673, in which "John Gorum Senr of Barnstable" sold to George Dawson, "now resident at Barnstable," land in Middleboro formerly belonging to John Howland and Elizabeth, his wife, and given to the said John Gorum before John Howland's death. the transaction was witnessed by Joseph Laythorpe and John Thompson, and acknowledged 24 February 1673 before Thomas Hinckley, Assistant. Desire, wife of John Gorum, gave her consent 30 April 1674.

John and Desire Gorham lived in Plymouth after the birth of their first child, Desire, 2 April 1644, and then moved to marshfield. Their great-grandson, Col. John Gorham, in his "Wast Book, " recorded that "John Gorum, alias Gorham - which Son after Having Marryed With and Howland and Had Sevrall Children Went home to England and Returned Soone again to his family... Moved from Marshall to Barnstable and Settled there in ordr to begin to township Called Barnstable. Built Mills - tan fatts &c."

John Gorham's name was on a list of men able to bear arms in Plymouth in 1643. He was chosen constable in Marshfield in 1648. He was made a freeman 4 June 1650 and in 1651 he became a member of the Grand Inquest of Plymouth Colony. He and his family moved to Yearmouth, Mass., in 1652, and then went on to Barnstable where he owned a grist mill and a tannery. He was a surveyor of highways in 1654. As a captain in the militia in King Philip's War, he took part in the Narragansett fight in December 1675, where he was wounded "by having his powder horn Shot and Split against his side," He died of the resulting fever and was burned in Swansea 5 February 1676/7. His widow, Desire, survived him for more than five years, dying after her father, John Howland, but before her mother, Elizabeth Tilley. Desire was mentioned in her father's will in 1672, but not by her mother in 1686.

Desire's husband, Capt. John Gorham died intestate. On 7 March 1675, Mistress Desire Gorum (sic) and her sons, James Gorum and John Gorum, were named as administrators of the estate. The court appointed "Mr. Hinckley, Mr. Chipman and Mr. Huckins" to take care of the estate of the youngest children until they came of age. The inventory, amounting to L710-4-3, was taken 29 February 1675 and sworn to 7 March 1675. It included the dwelling house, barn, upland, meadow, tan vats, a baark mill, and two houses and tools "belonging to the taning." In the division of Capt. John Gorham's estate, dated Plymouth 7 March 1676/7, widow Desire Gorham received her dower thirds. Son Jomes received "the dwelling house he now lives in," with the barn and half of the upland. Son John Gorham received the tan vats, bark mill, tools, stock and the other half of the upland. Son Joseph was given forty acres of land next to Joseph Hallet's land, and some meadow. The rest of the estate was divided into five equal parts among the rest of the children, who were named as Jabez, Mercy, Lydia, Hannah and Shubael Gorum. Shubael was allotted L50 for the costs of his education, in addition to receiving his share of the estate. Three married daughters, Desire, Temperance and Elizabeth, had already received L40 each. If there should be an overplus, the married daughters were to share equally with the other children, except that James, the eldest son, was to have a double share.

The inventory of Desire's estate was dated 3 August 1683, more than two months before her death, 13 October 1683. On 5 March 1683/4, the Assistants of Plymouth Colony, Gov. Hinckley, Major Bradford, Deputy Gov. Mr. Freeman, Mr. Lothrop and Mr. Thacher, "with the mutual consent of the children then appearing", named as James, John and Joseph Gorham, and with the consent of the sons-in-law, agreed that the eldest son James would receive a double share, according to custom, and the rest of the children, namely John, Joseph, Jabez, Shubael, Desire, Temperance, Elizabeth, deceased, mercy, Lydia and Hannah, should have an equal portion. As Elizabeth had died, they agreed that her children, not named, "should have an equal part that did belong to their mother."

Children of DESIRE HOWLAND and JOHN GORHAM are:

i. DESIRE5 GORHAM, b. April 2, 1644, Plymouth MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. June 30, 1700, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. JOHN HAWES, October 7, 1661, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

ii. TEMPERANCE GORHAM, b. May 5, 1646, Marshfield, Plymouth, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. March 12, 1714/15; m. (1) THOMAS BAXTER; m. (2) EDWARD STURGIS , JR, 1663, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

iii. ELIZABETH GORHAM, b. April 2, 1648, Marshfield, Plymouth, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. Bef March 5, 1683/84; m. JOSEPH HALLETT, 1667 (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

iv. JAMES GORHAM, b. April 28, 1650, Marshfield, Plymouth, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. 1707, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. HANNAH HUCKINS, February 24, 1672/73, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

v. JOHN GORHAM, b. February 20, 1651/52, Marshfield, Plymouth, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. July 9, 1726, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. MARY OTIS, February 24, 1673/74, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

vi. JOSEPH GORHAM, b. February 16, 1653/54, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. July 9, 1726, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. SARAH STURGIS, 1678, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

vii. JABEZ GORHAM, b. August 3, 1656, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. 1725, Bristol, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. HANNAH GREY.

viii. MERCY GORHAM, b. January 20, 1657/58, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. 1725; m. GEORGE DENISON.

ix. LYDIA GORHAM, b. November 11, 1661, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. August 2, 1744, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); m. JOHN THACHER, January 1, 1682/83, Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

x. HANNAH GORHAM, b. November 28, 1663, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. August 16, 1751; m. JOSEPH WHELDON, December 22, 1732.

xi. SHUBAEL GORHAM, b. October 21, 1667, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989); d. 1750, Barnstable, MA; m. PUELLA HUSSEY, May 16, 1695, Island of Nantucket, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

7. JOHN4 HOWLAND (JOHN3, HENRY2, JOHN1) was born February 24, 1626/27 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989), and died Aft 1699. He married MARY LEE October 26, 1651 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co, MA (Source: Mayflower Increasings for Three Generations Mayflower Descendent. Bowan, George E., by Susan E. Roser 1989).

Child of JOHN HOWLAND and MARY LEE is:

i. ELIZABETH5 HOWLAND.

8. ARTHUR4 HOWLAND (ARTHUR3, HENRY2, JOHN1) was born Bef 1647. He married ELIZABETH PRINCE December 9, 1667.

Children of ARTHUR HOWLAND and ELIZABETH PRINCE are:

i. EBENEZER5 HOWLAND.

ii. THOMAS HOWLAND, m. MARY (LNU) HOWLAND.

iii. PRINCE HOWLAND.

iv. ARTHUR HOWLAND.

9. SAMUEL4 HOWLAND (HENRY3, HENRY2, JOHN1) was born ABT 1646 in Duxbury, Plymouth Co, MA, and died 1716 in Freetown or Middleborough, Bristol Co, MA. He married MARY SAMPSON.

Notes

Ref: Descendants of Arthur, Henry and John Howland 1885: A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, henry, and John Howland and their Descendants, of the USA and Canada, By Franklyn Howland, First Edition, New Bedford, MA: Published by the Author 1885

In 1662 Samuel was presented to the Plymouth court for breach of the sabbath in carrying a grist from mill, and was "fined ten shillinges or be whipt." we hear no more of his sabbath-breaking, and he was afterwards consistent in his life and highly respected. the same year of the occurrence of the above eqisode in his life, he was charged before the court with "discharging a fowleing peice on the body of William Howse of Sandwich, while gunning at the High Pine on the Salthouse Beach, wherby the said Howse was wounded lanquished & ymediately died." Samuel, being asked by the court by whom "hee would bee tryed, answared , by God & the countrey." the jury, after the trial returned the following written verdict, "Verbatim: Not guilty of wilfull murder; yett wee find that the said House reciued his deadly wound by Samuell Howlands gun goeing of as it lay on his shoulder." He does not appear on the P.C. R. after this date, and it is probable he soon went to Freetown and settled on his father's land, a tract called "the sixth lot." the records refer to him as one of the original proprictors of that town. he was prominent there in civil affairs, and during his life a large landholder. Among the "Names of the Select Men of y' severall Townes in y' Colony" is Samuel Howland of Freetown." he was chosen assessor of that town 24, 11, 1694.

Samuel's will was dated 15, 2, 1715, and proved 7, 5, 1716, so he must have died between these two dates.

Children of SAMUEL HOWLAND and MARY SAMPSON are:

i. JOSHUA5 HOWLAND, b. ABT 1670, Freetown or Middleborough, Bristol Co, MA (Source: A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland & their Descendants, of the USA & Canada, By Franklyn Howland, First Edition, New Bedford, MA: Published by the author 1885); d. Aft 1741; m. (1) ELIZABETH HOLLOWAY, May 12, 1709, Tauntom, Bristol Co, MA; m. (2) DOROTHY LEE, February 17, 1724/25.

ii. CONTENT HOWLAND.

iii. SAMUEL HOWLAND.

iv. ISAAC HOWLAND.

v. ABRAHAM HOWLAND.

vi. JOHN HOWLAND.

vii. GERSHOM HOWLAND.
viii. ALICE HOWLAND.
ix. MARY HOWLAND, b. 1673.