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Descendants of JOHN LEE

Generation No. 1

1. JOHN1 LEE was born 1566, and died 1597.

Notes

A Weaver of Worcester

Child of JOHN LEE is:

2. i. JOHN2 LEE, b. 1590, England; d. February 23, 1629/30, Worchester, Worchestershire, England.

Generation No. 2

2. JOHN2 LEE (JOHN1) was born 1590 in England, and died February 23, 1629/30 in Worchester, Worchestershire, England. He married JANE HANCOCK Bef 1616, daughter of EDWARD HANCOCK.

Notes

This came from the book, "Shaping a Nation Stories of the Lees", by Ludwell Lee Montague.

In 1988 William Thorndale (National Genealogical Society Quarterly, 76-4, pp 253-267) established, apparently beyond question, the parentage of the emigrant, Col. Richard Lee, which had been sought off and on for more than two hundred years. He had been christened 22 March 1617/8 at St. Martins Parish in the city of Worcester, the son of John Lee (sometimes Lees or Leys) (1590-1629/30), a member of the Clothiers' Company (i.e., manufacturers of woolen cloth) and Jane Hancock, his wife.

Subsequently, Thomas Woodcock, Somerset Herald at the College of Arms, was engaged by David Halle (Genealogist of the Society of the Lees of Virginia at the time) to try to find further confirmation of this deduction. Although failing in this, Mr. Woodcock did develop the strong probability that this John Lee (1590-1629/30) was the son of an earlier John Lees (ca.1566-1597), weaver, of Worcester. Mr. Thorndale generously supplied evidence to establish this parentage with certainty, and Dr. Neil Thompson then further confirmed it.

Col. Montague's understanding of Col. Richard Lee's English origin was based in part on heraldic considerations, but also in greater part on accepting, as had the Lee Society and the College of Arms for many years, the authenticity of the so-called "Cobbs Hall Bible record," now long known to have been a 1920's fabrication. His remarks about Col. Richard Lee's English origin and connection with a John Lee of London must now be disregarded in view of these more recent discoveries.

Children of JOHN LEE and JANE HANCOCK are:

i. THOMAS3 LEE.

ii. JOHN LEE, b. September 1616.

3. iii. RICHARD LEE , (THE FOUNDER), b. 1608, Shorpshire, England; d. March 1, 1663/64, Cobb's Hall, Dividing Creek VA.

Generation No. 3

3. RICHARD3 LEE , (THE FOUNDER) (JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1608 in Shorpshire, England, and died March 1, 1663/64 in Cobb's Hall, Dividing Creek VA. He married ANNE CONSTABLE 1641 in Jamestown, VA, daughter of FRANCIS CONSTABLE.

Notes

- Col. Richard Lee

- 2nd oldest in his family

- Born - Coton Hall in manor of Nordley Regis, England

- Came to America From England by 1636 (York Co Records by Fleet, Voli,p92 - Thomas Davis of Warwicksquack Co, later became Isle os Wight 1637, to Ambrose Meador and John White of Pagan Shore, 50, 18 Jul 1636. Wit Thomas Holt and Richard Lee).

Richard was from Shropshire, a county bordering Wales and Located about 100 miles northwest of London. Christened 3/22/1618. After his cousin John brought him down from Shroshire to learn the ways of London, Richard sailed for Virginia. This was shortly after his mothers death and 21st birthday.

Richard arrived in VA about 1639. He began life in the colony as clerk of the quarter court, within the Secretary of state's office. His close affiliation with Sir William explains Richard Lee's progress as a public figure. He was a member of the House of Burgesses, high Sheriff, Colonel in the militia, secretary of state and was named in 1651 to the Council of State.

Richard not only profitted from his public office but also by trading with the Indians for fur and skins. He moved from one triumph to another, taking care that his early land patents designated him as "gentleman". At the end of his life he held high office & owned about 15,000 productive acres in VA & MD. His plantation was called Paradise. He also had many slaves and much livestock.

Richard made survival & prosperity his concerns, which bequeathed comfort, power, and wealth to his children and grandchildren. On his death he was one of the wealthiest and most influential citizens of Virginia.

This came from the book, "Shaping a Nation Stories of the Lees", by Ludwell Lee Montague.

Richard Lee came to Virginia before November 26, 1636, in company with the new governor, Sir Francis Wiatt, to be clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown. Not long thereafter he married the Governor's ward, Anne Constable. Subsequently he was Attorney General and colonial Secretary of State under Sir William Berkeley. In addition to these occupations, he was, from his first arrival in Virginia, actively engaged in the Indian trade, trading for furs as a factor for his cousin, John Lee of London.

Richard Lee's first home in Virginia was on leased land near Gloucester Point. He was driven from it by the Great Massacre of 1644. He and his trading shallops were actively employed in the ensuing military operations against the Indians on York River, but he still found time for Indian trade. Unable to deal with the York River tribves, be sought our those of the Northern Neck, who were still at peace with the English.

Although Richard Lee had been steadily patenting land since 1642, he did not become a planter until 1652 when , a Secretary of State, he negotiated the capitulation of Virginia to the Commonwealth of England and then retired from public office. Thereafter he spent almost as much time in London as in Virginia. He was not only developing his plantations in Gloucester County, but also operation as a London merchant trading in Virginia.

It has been supposed the Richard Lee established his residence on Dividing Creek in 1651, but the supposition is contradicted by the evidence which has subsequently come to light. Considering the dates at which he is known to have been at Jamestown, in Gloucester, or in London, he cannot have settled here until the spring of 1656. His tenth and last child, Charles Lee, was born here in May of that year. The original Lee home here until the spring of 1656. His tenth and last child, Charles Lee, was born here in May of that year. The original Lee home here stood near were you turned from the Cobbs Hall lane into the woods surrounding the graveyard.

Richard Lee had been in residence here only two years when he again returned, alone, to London. There he purchased an estate in suburban Stratford, with the intention of making it his home. His purposes seem to have been the better management of his mercantile business in London and the better education of his children.

In the fall of 1659 Richard Lee returned from London to put his affairs in Virginia in charge of a steward and to move his family to their new home at Stratford. The notes left by this steward, John Gibbon, show that the Indians were then still a conspicuous feature of the local scene. The future herald was much impressed by Indian royalty: not only the neighboring King of Wicomico, but also the King of Chicacoan, who came to visit the Lees on Dividing Creek, the King of Chiskiak, who lived near Lee's Paradise plantation in Gloucester, and the famous Queen of Pamunkey, met in the course of an introduction to the fur trade on York River.

In February 1661, after five years in residence on Dividing Creek, the Lee family moved, bag and baggage, to its new home in England. Three years later, Richard Lee returned, accompanied only by his eldest son, John, to have a look at his Virginia plantations. Apparently he contracted a fatal illness on shipboard, for he reached Dividing Creek a dying man. He was buried here, in the garden of his last Virginia home.

In accordance with his will, Richard Lee's family returned to Virginia. His widow lived here with her second husband, Edmund Lister, and the younger children. Eventually the youngest, Charles Lee, inherited this place. It was his son, Charles, who abandoned the original Lee home and built the first Cobbs Hall, about 1720. However, the Cobbs Hall family continued to use the only burying ground in the garden of the older home. In 1761 Leeanna Lee caused an enclosing wall to be erected. She was not only the widow of Charles Lee III, but was herself a great-granddaughter of Richard Lee and Anna Constable. The wall you see before you was built where the foundations of her wall were found.

Children of RICHARD LEE and ANNE CONSTABLE are:

i. JOHN C4 LEE, b. 1643, VA; d. 1673.

4. ii. RICHARD LEE , (THE SCHOLAR), b. 1647; d. March 12, 1713/14, buried at Mt. Pleasant, Westmoreland Co., VA.

iii. FRANCIS LEE, b. 1648, VA; d. 1714.

5. iv. WILLIAM C LEE, b. 1651, VA; d. 1696.

6. v. HANCOCK LEE, b. 1653, Dividing Creek, Northumberland, VA; d. May 25, 1709, Ditchley, Northumberland Co, VA..

7. vi. ELIZABETH LEE, b. 1654; d. Unknown.

vii. ANNE LEE, b. 1654, VA; d. 1701; m. THOMAS YOUELL.

8. viii. CHARLES C LEE, b. May 21, 1656, Cobbs Hall, Northumberland, VA; d. 1700, Northampton Co, VA.

Generation No. 4

4. RICHARD4 LEE , (THE SCHOLAR) (RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1647, and died March 12, 1713/14 in buried at Mt. Pleasant, Westmoreland Co., VA. He married LAETITIA CORBIN ABT 1674, daughter of HENRY CORBIN and ALICE ELTONHEAD.

Notes

Richard Lee was known as "The Scholar". He was a student in England, presumably at Oxford, in the year 1664. In 1673, he became head of the Lee clan and owner of John's Machodoc Creek property in Westmoreland County, after his father's death.

Wife was 10 years his junior.

After he married, Richard was elected by his neighbors to the House of Burgesses. In 1676, he was named to the highest governing body in VA, the Council of State (State Senate). He found himself tested after arriving in Jamestown when nothing less than civil war broke out, led by Nathaniel Bacon. There was much controversy between Bacon and Richard especially when Bacon had imprisoned the Scholar.

In the 1670's, Virgina began a transformation which persons like Richard the Scholar feared would corrupt society. His fight against progress may explain why Richard disappointed his descendants.

Richard Lee is the most misunderstood and underappreciated member of the Lee clan. Many of Richard's descendents (in his opinion) nearly ruined their lives by pursuing money. Richard spent most of his life in study. He was at least as courageous as his father although his family did not see this. He was also known for his honesty.

Richard's epitaph was appropriately understood. It noted whenever Richard Lee had served in office, "he was a zealous promoter of the public good." It went on to note that he was very skillfull in the Greek and Latin languages and other parts of polite learning.

- Col. Richard Lee (2.Col.2, 1John1) b. 1647, "Paraadise", Gloucester Co, Va, m. 1694, Laetitia Corbin, b. 1657 (daughter of Henry Corbin and Alice Eltonhead) d. 2 Oct 1706, Westmoreland Co, VA buried: Mt Pleasand Westmoreland, VA. Col. died 12 Mar 1714 "Mt Pleasant", Westmoreland, VA, buried: Mt Pleasant. Tombstone reads: "heare lieth the body of Richard Lee, Esq., born in VA, son or Richard Lee, gentleman, descended of an ancient family of Morton-Regis in Shrpshire...He quietly resigned his soul to God whom he always devoutly worshipped, on the 12th day of Mar, in the year 1714, in the 68th year of his age". He was educated at Oxford, member of Governor's Council, House of Burgesses 1677. He recieved the plantation "Paradise" in his father's will.

Children of RICHARD LEE and LAETITIA CORBIN are:

i. JOHN5 LEE, b. 1670, VA; d. 1671.

9. ii. RICHARD LEE, b. 1679; d. 1718, London, Eng..

10. iii. PHILIP C LEE, b. 1681, Westmoreland Co, VA; d. April 1744, Charlotte Co, MD.

11. iv. ANN LEE, b. 1683, "Mt Pleasant", VA; d. January 12, 1731/32, "Eagle's Nest", King George Co., VA.

12. v. THOMAS LEE, b. 1690, Mt Pleasant, VA; d. November 14, 1750, "Stratford", VA.

13. vi. HENRY LEE I, b. 1691; d. August 25, 1747, "Lee Hall".

5. WILLIAM C4 LEE (RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1651 in VA, and died 1696.

Child of WILLIAM LEE is:

14. i. MARY5 LEE.

6. HANCOCK4 LEE (RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1653 in Dividing Creek, Northumberland, VA, and died May 25, 1709 in Ditchley, Northumberland Co, VA.. He married (1) MARY KENDALL 1675 in Northampton Co, VA. He married (2) SARAH ALLERTON 1709 in VA, daughter of ISAAC ALLERTON and ELIZABETH WILLOUGHBY.

Children of HANCOCK LEE and MARY KENDALL are:

15. i. ANNA5 LEE, b. January 5, 1680/81; d. Aft 1754.

ii. WILLIAM LEE, b. ABT 1682; d. Aft 1706.

16. iii. RICHARD LEE, b. August 18, 1691, Lancaster Co., VA; d. 1740.

Children of HANCOCK LEE and SARAH ALLERTON are:

iv. ALLERTON NEWTON5 LEE, b. 1691.

v. ISAAC LEE, b. 1707; d. 1727, England.

vi. JOHN LEE, b. 1709; d. August 11, 1789.

17. vii. ELIZABETH LEE, b. 1709, Northampton Co, VA.

18. viii. HANCOCK LEE, b. 1709; d. 1789, Warrenton, Fauquier Co, VA.

7. ELIZABETH4 LEE (RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1654, and died Unknown. She married (1) LEONARD HOWSON. She married (2) JOHN TURBERVILLE.

Notes

Twin of Anne

Child of ELIZABETH LEE and JOHN TURBERVILLE is:

19. i. GEORGE5 TURBERVILLE, b. ABT 1694, "Hickory Hill", Westmoreland Co., VA; d. 1742, "Hickory Hill", Westmoreland Co., VA.

8. CHARLES C4 LEE (RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born May 21, 1656 in Cobbs Hall, Northumberland, VA, and died 1700 in Northampton Co, VA. He married ELIZABETH MEDSTAND 1678, daughter of THOMAS MEDSTAND.

Children of CHARLES LEE and ELIZABETH MEDSTAND are:

20. i. THOMAS5 LEE, b. ABT 1679; d. Aft June 11, 1735, Lancaster Co., VA.

ii. ELIZABETH LEE, b. Bef July 1679; m. JOHN HOWSON.

iii. LEANNA LEE, b. Bef July 1679; m. WILLIAM JONES, 1707.

21. iv. CHARLES LEE, b. July 16, 1684, Cobbs Hall, Northumberland, VA; d. 1740, Northumberland, VA.

Generation No. 5

9. RICHARD5 LEE (RICHARD4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1679, and died 1718 in London, Eng.. He married MARTHA SILK.

Children of RICHARD LEE and MARTHA SILK are:

i. GEORGE6 LEE, b. August 18, 1714, London, England; d. November 19, 1761, "Mt Pleasant", Westmoreland, VA; m. (1) JUDITH WORMELEY, September 30, 1738; m. (2) ANNE FAIRFAX WASHINGTON, December 16, 1752.

ii. MARTHA LEE, b. 1716, London, England; d. November 1751; m. (1) GEORGE TURBERVILLE, 1718; m. (2) WILLIAM "WAR BILLY" FITZHUGH, March 28, 1740.

iii. LETTICE LEE, b. 1715; d. January 15, 1768; m. JOHN CORBIN, September 1, 1737, St. Paul's Parish.

10. PHILIP C5 LEE (RICHARD4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1681 in Westmoreland Co, VA, and died April 1744 in Charlotte Co, MD. He married (1) SARAH BROOKE, daughter of THOMAS BROOKE. He married (2) ELIZABETH SEWELL.

Children of PHILIP LEE and SARAH BROOKE are:

i. RICHARD6 LEE, b. 1708; d. ABT 1788; m. GRACE ASHTON.

ii. FRANCIS LEE, d. 1749, Cecil Co, MD; m. ELIZABETH HOLLYDAY.

iii. PHILIP LEE, m. BRIDGETT PHILIP.

iv. THOMAS LEE, d. September 1749; m. CHRISTINA SIM.

v. ARTHUR LEE, b. July 17, 1760; m. CHARITY HANSON.

vi. SARAH LEE, m. WILLIAM POTTS.

vii. ELEANOR LEE, d. April 22, 1759; m. PHILIP RICHARD FENDALL.

viii. HANNAH LEE, m. (1) DANIEL BOWIE; m. (2) JOSEPH SPRIGG.

ix. LETTICE LEE, m. (1) JAMES WARDROPP; m. (2) ADAM THOMPSON.

Children of PHILIP LEE and ELIZABETH SEWELL are:

x. ELIZABETH6 LEE, b. 1730; d. September 19, 1752.

xi. ALICE LEE, m. THOMAS CLARK.

xii. HANCOCK LEE, d. October 1759.

xiii. JOHN LEE, b. MD; m. SUSANNAH SMITH.

xiv. CORBIN LEE, d. 1773; m. ELINOR (MNU) LEE.

xv. GEORGE LEE, m. REBECCA HANSON.

xvi. MARGARET LEE, m. (FNU) SYMER.

11. ANN5 LEE (RICHARD4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1683 in "Mt Pleasant", VA, and died January 12, 1731/32 in "Eagle's Nest", King George Co., VA. She married (1) DANIEL MCCARTHY. She married (2) WILLIAM FITZHUGH 1699, son of WILLIAM FITZHUGH and SARAH TUCKER.

Children of ANN LEE and WILLIAM FITZHUGH are:

i. HENRY6 FITZHUGH, b. 1706; m. LUCY CARTER, July 28, 1730.

ii. LETTICE FITZHUGH, b. July 15, 1707; d. February 10, 1731/32, buried "Hickory Hill Cem."; m. GEORGE TURBERVILLE, March 16, 1726/27.

iii. SARAH FITZHUGH, b. Bef 1707; d. October 1743, buried Bruton Church, Williamsburg, VA; m. EDWARD BARRADALL, January 5, 1735/36.

12. THOMAS5 LEE (RICHARD4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1690 in Mt Pleasant, VA, and died November 14, 1750 in "Stratford", VA. He married HANNAH HARRISON LUDWELL May 1722 in Green Spring, daughter of PHILIP LUDWELL and HANNAH HARRISON.

Notes

Founder of the Ohio Company, a member of the governing Council of the colony, & acting governor of Virginia. In 1717, he purchased 1433 acres for Stratford Hall Plantation and, in the late 1730's, began building the brick Georgian Great House. A successful tobacco planter and land speculator, he owned more than 16,000 acres in VA and MD. In 1732, Thomas was named to His Majest's Council. President and Commander in Chief of the colony. Owned "Machodoc" estate.

Estate was known as Machodoc which was set on fire by imigrant felons from England who had been sternly treated by Thomas as a magistrate. Later he built Stratford starting in1738. It was 4800 acres at Thomas & Hannah's death.

Thomas was the son of Richard the Scholar. By the manner in which he combined materialist & political zeal, he would be a reincarnation of his grandfather, Richard the Founder.

While many familys suffered from a continuing depression in tobacco prices, Thomas was not limited to the modest agricultural revenue from lands his father bequeathed him, but drew a measure of wealth through the navel office and the Proprietary.

"President" Thomas Lee

Thomas, the fifth son of Richard Lee and Laetitia Corbin, his wife, was born at "Mt. Pleasant," in Westmoreland county, in 1690; died at "Stratford," in same county, on the 14th of November, 1750. Of his early days his son has written: "Thomas, the fourth son, though with none but a common Virginia Education, yet having strong natural parts, long after he was a man, he learned the Languages without any assistance but his own genius, and became a tolerable adept in Greek and Latin..... This Thomas, by his Industry and Parts, acquired a considerable Fortune; for, being a younger Brother, with many children, his Paternal Estate was very Small. He was also appointed of the Council, and though he had very few acquaintances in England, he was so well known by reputation that upon his receiving a loss by fire, the late Queen Caroline sent him over a bountiful present out of her own Privy Purse. Upon the late Sir William Gooch's being recalled, who had been Governor of Virginia, he became President and Commander in Chief over the Colony, in which station he continued for some time, 'til the King thought proper to appoint him Governor of the Colony, but he dyed in 1750 before his commission got over to him."

That Thomas Lee possessed "strong natural parts" seems well attested by the important positions confided to him during en epoch in which the Colony was strong in men of marked ability. Besides being for many years a member of the House of Burgesses, a member of the Council and later its president, he became after the death of John Robinson, on the 5th of September, 1749, the acting Governor of the Colony, and held that position until his death. He served also upon various commissions for arranging boundaries, for making treaties with the Indians, and held other similar positons of trust and responsibility.

In May, 1744, Thomas Lee and William Beverley were appointed by the Governor his commissioners to treat with the Iroquois Indians for the settlement of lands west of the Alleghany Mountains.

Though Thomas Lee may have been a person of some influence in his day, he is known rather for his many distinguished sons than for his own individual merit. For it has seldom fallen to the lot of any man to rear six sons who took an active and patriotic part in the service of their country, at least four of whom were distinguished for their unselfish patriotism during the Revolutionary struggle.

Thomas Lee was married, in May, 1722, to Hannah, second daughter of Colonel Philip Ludwell, of Greenspring, James City county, an associate of the Council. She was born at "Rich Neck," in Bruton parish, James City county, the 5th of December, 1701; died at Stratford, 25th of January, 1749, and was buried in the old family burying-ground, called the "Burnt House Fields," at Mt. Pleasant. Her tombstone is now to be seen at Stratford, whither it was removed for preservation, probably by General Henry Lee, who built the new vault at that place.

Where Thomas Lee lived during the first years of his married life is a matter of some doubt. It seems most probable that his first home was at "Mt. Pleasand," and that the loss by fire, of which his son William wrote, was the destruction of the mansion. It is certain that the house at "Mt. Pleasant" was burned early in the last century, but there is no evidence of a fire ever having occurred at stratford. If Queen Caroline gave Thomas Lee a "bountiful present out of her own privy purse," while she was Queen, she must have given it between 1727 and 1737, as she became a Queen in the former year and died in the latter. As Princess of Wales, she would hardly have possessed sufficient means to make a large present. It seems, therefore, highly probable that the Stratford house was erected about 1725-30, hardly later, as it is said that all of Thomas Lee's sons were born in that mansion.

An old mansion has been declared to be a history in itself; its rooms being the chapters; its stories, volumes; its furniture, illustrations, and its inmates the characters. Such a mansion is certainly an illustration of the customs, habits, and mode of life of the period in which it was built and inhabited. And this thought seems to be applicable to Stratford for many reasons. Since it was erected upon the banks of the historic Potomac, American history has been made, and some prominent actors in that history were born under its roof. At the time of its building, the American Colonies were few in number, and weak in strength, hardly able to defend their homes from the marauding Indian. Spotswood and his daring followers had only recently crossed "the Great Mountains," and looked upon the beautiful valley of Virginia. The imagination of to-day can hardly realize venture, and the suggestion of such an idea seems a joke. "Early in his administration," writes Howe, "Spotswood, at the head of a troop of horse, effected a passage over the Blue Ridge, which had previously been considered an impenetrable barrier to the ambition of the whites, and discovered the beautiful valley which lies beyond. In commemoration of the event, he received from the king the honor of knighthood, and was presented with a miniature golden horse-shoe, on which was inscribed the motto, Sic jurat transcendere montes -- Thus he swears to cross the mountains." Since that time a new nation has been born and grown to manhood; from infantile dimension, a narrow strip of inhabited land, hugging the Atlantic as if afraid to loosen its hold on the mother country, its habitation have extednded from ocean to ocean, from the great lakes to the gulf. The war of the Revolution, whith its heroes and patriots, has come and gone. All these changes has Stratford witnessed, yet it remains to-day solid and strong, a monument of the past age in which it was erected, and had it no other claim to distinction, it might surely rank as one of America's historic mansions. But it possesses much greater claims that mere age; as the birthplace of two signers of the Declaration of Independence, and of two others who represented their country at the courts of Europe, during the earlier years of the struggle, it is hallowed by memories which no other mansion in America can share. There, too, on the 19th of Janurary, 1807, was born Robert Edward Lee, an event well worthy of being the last act in the great drama, of which stratford has been the stage.

Stratford house, with its solid walls and massive, rough-hewn timbers, seems rather to represent strength and solidity than elegance or comfort. Its large rooms, with numerous doors and windows, heated only by the large open fireplaces, would to-day scarcely be considered habitable. Nor would the modern housewife care to have her kitchen placed out in the yard some fifty or sixty feet from her dining room. The house was built in the shape of the letter H, the cross line being a large hall room of some twenty-five by thirty feet, serving as the connecting link between the two wings; these wings are about thirty feet wide by sixty deep. The house contains some eighteen large rooms, exclusive of the hall. The ceiling is very high, dome shaped, the walls are panelled in oak, with book cases set in them; back and front are doors, leading into the garden, flanked on either side by windows, as shown in the illustration. On the other two sides of this hall, between the book cases, are two doors, opening into the wings. Outside, at the four corners of the house, are four out-houses, used as storehouses, office, kitchen, and such like purposes. At the corner of the house was the kitchen, with its immense fireplace, which by actual measurement was found to be twelve feet wide, six high, and five deep, evidently capable of roasting a fair-sized ox. Lying on the grass, there is seen a large, old fashioned shell or cannon ball, which tradition says was once fired at the house by the English warship. In recent years it has served the more useful purpose of a hitching block for horses.

The portions of the stable yet remaining show it to have been very large; the kitchen garden was surronded by the usual brick wall, much remaining at the present time. At the foot of the kitchen garden are the remains of the large brick burial vault, of which Bishop Meade wrote; "I have been assured by Mrs. Eliza Turner, who was there at the time, that it was built by General Henry Lee. The cemetery (vault) is much larger than any other in the Northern Neck, consisting of several apartments or alcoves for different branches of the family. Instead of an arch over them there is a brick house, perhaps twenty feet square, covered in. A floor covers the cemetery. In the center is a trap door, through which you descend by a ladder to the apartments below." This brick house having fallen into ruin, a late proprietor of Stratford had it torn down and the bricks heaped up into a mound, which, covered with earth and surmounted by the tombstone of Thomas Lee, would serve as a fitting mark for the unknown dead reposing underneath.

There has been some uncertainty as to the burial place of both Thomas Lee and his son, Richard Henry; the former has always been thought to have been buried at Old Pope's Creek church, and the latter at Chantilly. But an examination of their wills and other data proves most conclusively that both of them were buried in "the Old Burnt House Fields," at "Mt. Pleasant." It requires no proof to show that Richard Lee and Laetitia Corbin, his wife, were buried at this place, as their tombstone is still to be seen there. Thomas Lee's wife died about a year before her husband, and of course had been duly buried; in his will he desired to be "buried between my Late Dearest wife and my Honoured Mother, and that the bricks on the side next my wife may be moved and my coffin placed as near hers as it possible, without moving or disturbing the remains of my Mother." This request proves his wife had been buried very near the grave of his mother. There can be no doubt that Thomas Lee was buried, as he desired, beside his wife, for one slab covered the two graves.

No one can well doubt that the "family burying place" was in the old Burnt House Fields, at "Mt. Pleasant." This was the "one acre where my Hon'd Father is Buryed" that Thomas Lee, in his will, desired should not "be disposed of upon any pretense whatsoever." It was the "family burying place at the burnt House, as it is called," where Richard Henry Lee desired to be buried.

Thomas and Hannah (Ludwell) Lee had the following issue; names and dates were copied from the family Bible of Richard Henry Lee, who stated he had copied from that of his father at Stratford:

i, Richard, born 17 June, 1723; died unmarried, before his father.

ii, Philip Ludwell

iii, Hannah, born 6 February, 1728; married Gawin Corbin (who died prior to 1760) and left a daughter, Martha, who married George Richard Turberville. Philip Ludwell Lee, writing to his brother William, under date of 31 May, 1769, said; "Tomorrow Patty Corbin and George Turnberville are to be married." They had two sons: Gawin Corbin and Richard Lee; the latter married his cousin, Henrietta, daughter of Richard Henry Lee, and left issue

iv, John, born 28 March, 1729, and died the same day.

v, Lucy, born 26 September, 1750, and died unmarried.

vi, Thomas Ludwell

vii, Richard Henry

viii, Francis Lightfoot

ix, Alice, born the 4th of June, 1736, at Stratford; died at Philadelphia, on the 25th of March, 1817; married at London, in 1760, Dr. William Shippen, Jr., and had several children, only two of whom lived to marry. They were: I. Anne Hume, born in 1763; died at Philadelphia, the 23rd of August, 1841, 78 years; she married, on the 11th of March, 1781, Col. Henry Beekman Livingston, son of Robert R. Livingston, Sr., of Clermont, NY; they had a daughter, Margaret Beekman, who died unmarried. 2. Thomas Lee Shippen, born in 1765; died near Charleston, S.C., on the 4th of February, 1798; he married, at "Nesting," VA, on the 10th of March, 1791, Mrs. Elizabeth (Farley) Bennister, the widow of John Bannister, Jr., of Virginia.

x, William

xi, Arthur

Children of THOMAS LEE and HANNAH LUDWELL are:

i. RICHARD6 LEE, b. June 17, 1723.

ii. PHILIP LUDWELL LEE, b. February 24, 1726/27, Stratford, VA; d. February 21, 1775; m. (1) ELIZABETH STEPTOE; m. (2) P R FENDALL.

iii. HANNAH LUDWELL LEE, b. February 6, 1727/28; d. 1782; m. (1) GAWIN CORBIN; m. (2) RICHARD LINGAN HALL.

iv. JOHN LEE, b. March 28, 1729; d. March 28, 1729.

v. THOMAS LUDWELL LEE, b. December 13, 1730; d. April 13, 1778; m. MARY AYLETT.

vi. RICHARD HENRY LEE, b. January 20, 1731/32, Stratford Westmorland County VA; d. June 19, 1794, Chantilly, VA buried Burnt House burying ground; m. (1) ANNE AYLETT, December 3, 1759; m. (2) ANNE GASKINS, July 1768.

vii. FRANCIS LIGHTFOOT LEE, b. October 14, 1734, Stratford Hall, VA; d. 1797; m. REBECCA PLATER TAYLOE, April 21, 1769.

viii. ALICE LEE, b. June 4, 1736, "Stratford"; d. March 25, 1817, Philadelphia; m. WILLIAM SHIPPEN , JR, April 3, 1760, London England.

ix. WILLIAM LEE, b. August 31, 1739, Stratford, VA; d. June 27, 1795, Green Spring; m. HANNAH PHILLIPAS LUDWELL, March 7, 1769, St. Clement Dane's, Middlesex Co, VA.

x. ARTHUR LEE, b. December 21, 1740, Stratford Hall, VA; d. December 12, 1792, "Lansdown", Middlesex Co., VA..

xi. LUCY LEE, b. September 26, 1750.

13. HENRY5 LEE I (RICHARD4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1691, and died August 25, 1747 in "Lee Hall". He married MARY BLAND 1724 in Prince William Co, VA, daughter of RICHARD BLAND and ELIZABETH RANDOLPH.

Notes

PARTIALLY FROM: The Lees of Virginia, by Paul C. Nagle, Published by Oxford University Press 1990

This marriage founded what is known as the Leesylvania Line of Lees.

Built estate named Lee Hall.

Henry Lee I held nearly every local office except that of burgess, which would have taken him away from his wife and children. He was a "homebody".

"Lee Hall", Westmoreland Co., VA. Served as a Lt. Col. of Westmoreland Militia.

Children of HENRY LEE and MARY BLAND are:

i. JOHN6 LEE, b. 1724, Leesylvania, Westmoreland, VA; d. 1767, Cabin Point, Westmoreland Co., VA; m. MARY SMITH, December 20, 1749.

ii. RICHARD "SQUIRE" LEE, b. 1726, Leesylvania, Westmoreland, VA; d. 1795, Westmoreland Co, VA; m. SARAH BLAND POYTHRESE, 1786, Westmoreland Co, VA.

iii. HENRY LEE II, b. 1729, Lee Hall Leesylvania, Westmoreland; d. October 1, 1787, Leesylvania, Westmoreland, VA; m. LUCY GRYMES, December 1, 1753, Green Spring on James River.

iv. LAETICIA LEE, b. 1730, Leesylvania, Westmoreland, VA; d. 1788, Lancaster Co., VA; m. WILLIAM BALL, ABT 1746.

v. ANNE LEE, b. 1732, Westmoreland Co, VA; d. January 12, 1731/32.

vi. LETTICE LEE, b. ABT 1730; d. 1789.

14. MARY5 LEE (WILLIAM C4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1). She married (FNU) HEATH.

Child of MARY LEE and (fnu) HEATH is:

i. THOMAS6 HEATH, m. WINIFRED JONES.

15. ANNA5 LEE (HANCOCK4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born January 5, 1680/81, and died Aft 1754. She married (1) WILLIAM ARMISTEAD, son of JOHN ARMISTEAD and JUDITH BOWLES. She married (2) WILLIAM EUSTACE.

Children of ANNA LEE and WILLIAM ARMISTEAD are:

i. JOHN6 ARMISTEAD, m. (1) SUSANNA MERIWETHER; m. (2) ELIZABETH GILL.

ii. JUDITH ARMISTEAD, m. GEORGE DUDLEY.

iii. MARTHA ARMISTEAD, m. (1) LEWIS BURWELL; m. (2) DUDLEY DIGGGES.

iv. MARY ARMISTEAD, b. 1696; d. 1775; m. (1) JAMES BURWELL; m. (2) PHILIP LIGHTFOOT.

v. ANNE ARMISTEAD, b. April 4, 1725; m. ANTHONY WALKE.

vi. JOYCE ARMISTEAD, m. MORDECAI BOOTH.

vii. FRANCES ARMISTEAD.

Children of ANNA LEE and WILLIAM EUSTACE are:

viii. WILLIAM6 EUSTACE, m. ANNIE GASKINS.

ix. SARAH EUSTACE, m. THOMAS GASKINS V.

x. JOHN EUSTACE.

xi. ISAAC EUSTACE.

xii. HANCOCK EUSTACE, d. Stafford Co., VA; m. HANNAH LEE TURBERVILLE.

xiii. (FNU) ESTUTACE, m. (FNU) CARR.

xiv. (FNU) ESTUTACE, m. (FNU) BEALE.

xv. MS. EUSTACE, m. (FNU) LEE.

xvi. ANN EUSTACE, m. JOHN GASKINS.

16. RICHARD5 LEE (HANCOCK4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born August 18, 1691 in Lancaster Co., VA, and died 1740. He married JUDITH STEPTOE, daughter of ANTHONY STEPTOE and LUCY STEPHENS.

Notes

Died of Ditchley in 1740

Children of RICHARD LEE and JUDITH STEPTOE are:

i. KENDALL6 LEE, b. 1727; d. February 14, 1780, Northumberland Co, VA; m. BETTY HEALE, July 9, 1749, Lancaster Co., VA.

ii. ELIZABETH LEE, b. 1731, VA; d. 1753; m. PETER CONWAY.

iii. MARY LEE, b. 1722; d. March 4, 1743/44, Cobbs Hall, Northumberland Co, VA; m. (1) CHARLES LEE; m. (2) CHARLES COBBS.

iv. JUDITH LEE, b. 1723; d. March 24, 1791; m. DAVID PETER GALLOWAY, ABT 1745.

v. ANNE LEE, m. (1) EDWARD KERR; m. (2) EDWARD SHORE.

vi. STEPHAN LEE, b. 1715; d. 1791; m. (1) ANN MURPHY; m. (2) JAME MATTISON; m. (3) SARAH CRABB MCGRUDER.

vii. LETTICE LEE, b. ABT 1732; d. November 17, 1811, White Chapel, Lancaster Co, VA; m. JAMES BALL.

viii. THOMAS LEE, b. 1729; d. 1816; m. MARY GRIFFIN.

17. ELIZABETH5 LEE (HANCOCK4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1709 in Northampton Co, VA. She married (1) SWAN JONES. She married (2) ZACHARY TAYLOR, son of JAMES TAYLOR and MARTHA THOMPSON.

Children of ELIZABETH LEE and ZACHARY TAYLOR are:

i. ZACHARY6 TAYLOR, m. ALICE CHEW.

ii. HANCOCK TAYLOR, d. 1774, Kentucky buried in Taylor's Fork, Silver Creek.

iii. RICHARD TAYLOR, b. April 3, 1744, Lexington, KY; d. January 19, 1829, Louisville, KY; m. SARAH DABNEY STROTHER, August 20, 1779.

iv. ELIZABETH TAYLOR, m. THOMAS BELL.

18. HANCOCK5 LEE (HANCOCK4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born 1709, and died 1789 in Warrenton, Fauquier Co, VA. He married MARY WILLIS 1733 in Spottsylvania Courthouse, daughter of HENRY WILLIS and MILDRED WASHINGTON.

Children of HANCOCK LEE and MARY WILLIS are:

i. JOHN6 LEE, m. LAETITIA ATWELL.

ii. RICHARD LEE.

iii. JOHN HANCOCK LEE, m. ELIZABETH BELL.

iv. MARY WILLIS LEE, d. March 14, 1798, buried in Montpelier, Orange Co., VA; m. AMBROSE MADISON.

v. SAMUEL LEE, b. May 26, 1763; d. 1844; m. OLIVE WILLIS.

vi. WILLIS LEE, d. 1776; m. MARY RICHARDS.

vii. HANCOCK LEE, b. 1740; d. 1819; m. WINIFRED BEALE.

19. GEORGE5 TURBERVILLE (ELIZABETH4 LEE, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born ABT 1694 in "Hickory Hill", Westmoreland Co., VA, and died 1742 in "Hickory Hill", Westmoreland Co., VA. He married (1) ELIZABETH ASHTON, daughter of HENRY ASHTON and ELIZABETH HARDIDGE. He married (2) MARTHA LEE 1718, daughter of RICHARD LEE and MARTHA SILK. He married (3) LETTICE FITZHUGH March 16, 1726/27, daughter of WILLIAM FITZHUGH and ANN LEE.

Notes

George Turberville, Maj.

Was of "Hickory Hill", Westmoreland, VA. Was a Justice in 1720, Sheriff in 1722-23, Clerk in 1726-42. Also of "Pecatone"

Child of GEORGE TURBERVILLE and ELIZABETH ASHTON is:

i. ELIZABETH6 TURBERVILLE, b. January 12, 1718/19; d. died young.

Children of GEORGE TURBERVILLE and MARTHA LEE are:

ii. JOHN6 TURBERVILLE, b. September 14, 1737; d. July 14, 1799, "Hickory Hill", Westmoreland Co, VA; m. (1) MARTHA CORBIN, 1759, VA; m. (2) ANN BALLANTINE, December 19, 1792.

iii. GEORGE RICHARD TURBERVILLE, b. 1742, CA; d. January 29, 1793, Hickory Hill; m. MARTHA "PATTY" CORBIN, June 1, 1769.

iv. LETITIA TURBERVILLE, m. GOWRY WAUGH, 1760.

20. THOMAS5 LEE (CHARLES C4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born ABT 1679, and died Aft June 11, 1735 in Lancaster Co., VA.

Notes

Justice for Lancaster Co, 1712; Sheriff 1714

Children of THOMAS LEE are:

i. WILLIAM6 LEE, d. January 13, 1734/35.

ii. THOMAS LEE, d. 1759.

iii. RICHARD LEE.

iv. CHARLES LEE, d. 1792; m. JOANNAH MORGAN, May 7, 1753.

v. JOHN LEE.

vi. ELIZABETH LEE.

21. CHARLES5 LEE (CHARLES C4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born July 16, 1684 in Cobbs Hall, Northumberland, VA, and died 1740 in Northumberland, VA. He married ELIZABETH PINCKARD November 8, 1721 in Lancaster Co VA.

Notes

of Cobbs Hall

Children of CHARLES LEE and ELIZABETH PINCKARD are:

i. CHARLES6 LEE, b. November 2, 1722, "Cobb's Hall"; d. March 1785; m. MARY LEE.

ii. ELIZABETH LEE.

iii. MARGARET LEE.

iv. ANN LEE.
v. LUCY LEE.
vi. JUDITH LEE.