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The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume II
COUES, Elliott, scientist, was born in Portsmouth, N. H., Sept. 9, 1842; son of Samuel Elliot and Charlotte Haven (Ladd) Coues. His father removed his family to Washington, D. C., in 1853, and Elliott was educated at Gonzaga college by the Jesuits. After a four-years' course he entered Columbian college, where he was graduated in 1861, next serving as a medical cadet, U.S. army, in the Washington hospitals, 1862-63. He then pursued the medical course, receiving his M.D. degree in 1863. On March 30, 1864, he was appointed assistant surgeon in the U.S. army and was the next month assigned to duty in Arizona. Here his interest in natural history and scientific [p.405] research found a broad field and be pursued the study with excellent results. In 1869 he was made professor of zoology and comparative anatomy at Norwich
university, Vt., but could not hold the chair, as it interfered with his army duties. In 1873 he was appointed on the U.S. northern boundary survey commission, as surgeon and naturalist. He completed the scientific report at Washington while collaborator at the Smithsonian institution. In 1876 he was made secretary and naturalist of the U.S. surveys under Dr. F. V. Hayden and edited the reports and other publications of that survey, besides conducting zoological explorations and preparing material for his own publications. In 1877 he was made professor of anatomy in the medical department of the Columbian university. This work was suspended in 1880, when he was ordered on frontier duty in Arizona, and in November, 1881, having returned to Washington he resigned from the army, finding that the government would not further
encourage scientific investigation on the part of an officer under commission. He went back to his desk in the Smithsonian institution, resumed his chair of anatomy in the Columbian university and also accepted the chair of biology in the Virginia agricultural and mechanical college. Columbian university conferred upon him the degree of A.M. in 1862 and that of Ph.D.in 1869. He was elected a member of the National academy of sciences in 1877, was president of the American ornithologists' union for some years, and of the Psychical science congress of the World's congress auxiliary at Chicago,1893. He was elected to membership in about fifty scientific societies in America and Europe. His published works include besides several hundred monographs and minor papers in scientific periodicals: Key to North American Birds (1872);
Birds of the Northwest (1874); Field Ornithology (1874); Fur Bearing Animals (1877); Monographs of North American Rodentia (with Allen, 1877); Birds of the Colorado Valley (1878); Ornithological Bibliography (1878-80); Dictionary of North American Birds (1882); Avifauna Columbiana (with Prentiss, 1883); Biogen, a Speculation of the Origin and Nature of Life (1884); New Key to North American Birds (1884); The Dæmon of Darwin (1884); Buddhist Catechism (1885); Kuthumi (1886); Can Matter Think? (1886); A Woman in the Case (1887); Neuro-Myology (with Shute, 1887); Signs of the Times (1888); Citizen Bird (with Wright, 1897). He was in charge of the editorial departments of general biology, comparative anatomy and all branches of zoology for the Century Dictionary, 1884-91, and edited various scientific journals. He edited, with a copious critical commentary, the History of the Expedition of Lewis and Clark (1893); The Travels of Z. M. Pike (1895); the Journals of Alexander Henry and of
David Thompson (1897); the Journal of Jacob Fowler (1898); The Personal Narrative of Charles Larpenteur (1898); and wrote much on the early history of the west. He died in Baltimore, Md., Dec. 25, 1899.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IV

ESTES, Dana, publisher, was born in Gorham, Maine, March 4, 1840; son of Joseph and Maria (Edwards) Estes, and a descendant through Joseph, Robert, Samuel, Henry and Benjamin, from Richard (son of Robert Estes of Dover, England), who landed in Boston, Mass., Sept. 27, 1684, and settled at Piscataqua, Oct. 11, 1684. Dana was educated in the public schools, and was a clerk in a general store in Augusta, Maine, 1855-59. He engaged in the book business with Henry D. Degen & Son in Boston, 1859-61. He served in the Union army from April, 1861, until the second battle of Bull Run, Aug. 31, 1862, when his only brother. Albert S. Estes, was killed, and where he was disabled from further service. He reentered
the book business as a clerk in 1864, and in 1866 became a member of the firm of Degen, Estes & Co. He was subsequently connected with the house of Lee & Shepard, until 1872, when he became a partner in the firm of Estes & Lauriat, which was succeeded by Dana Estes & Co., of which he was the head in 1898. He was elected a member of the American association for the advancement of science; of the American archæcological institute and of various social and literary clubs. He received the degree of A.M. from Bowdoin college in 1898. He was married April 11, 1867, to Louise S., daughter of Peter and Mary (Filgate) Reid of England, and their sons, Frederick Reid, Dana Jr., and Philip Sydney,
became interested in the publishing business. Mr. Estes' second wife, to whom he was married Nov. 10, 1884, was Grace D., daughter of Samuel E. and Charlotte Haven (Ladd) Coues of Portsmouth, N.H. He edited Half-Hour Recreations in Popular Science, and compiled several volumes of juvenile and standard poetry.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IV
page 137
FOLSOM, Nathaniel, delegate, was born in Exeter, N.H., in 1726; son of Jonathan and Anna (Ladd), grandson of Deacon John and Abigail (Perkins), and a great-grandson of John Folsom of Hingham, England, and Hingham, Mass. He commanded a company at Fort Edward in 1755, and assisted in the capture of Baron Dieskau. As brigadier-general of the New Hampshire forces he took part in the siege of Boston during the absence of General Sullivan, in the defence of Portsmouth, previous to July, 1775, and was commissioned major-general in that year. He was a delegate to the [p.137] Continental congress, 1774-75, 1777-78 and 1779-80; a councillor in 1778; president of the New Hampshire constitutional convention in 1783, and chief justice of the court of common pleas. He died at Exeter, N.H., May 26, 1790.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IV

FOLSOM, Nathaniel Smith, clergyman, was born in Portsmouth, N.H., March 12, 1806; son of Nathaniel and Mary (Smith), grandson of Josiah and Elizabeth (Gilman), great-grandson of Jonathan and Anna (Ladd), great, great-grandson of Deacon John and Abigail (Perkins), and great, great, great-grandson of John Folsom, who was baptized in Hingham, England, in 1615, came to Hingham, Mass., in 1638, removed to Exeter, N.H., in 1650, and married Mary, daughter of Edward Gilman. He was graduated from Dartmouth in 1828, from Andover theological seminary in 1831, and was ordained to the Congregational ministry at Bedford, Mass., in 1831. He was a missionary in Liberty county, Ga., 1831-32,
pastor of a Presbyterian church at Cleveland, Ohio, 1832-33, a professor in Lane theological seminary, 1833; professor of sacred literature in the Western Reserve college, 1833-36; pastor of a Congregational church at Francestown, N.H., 1836-38; at Providence, R.I., 1838-40; and pastor of a Unitarian church at Haverhill, Mass., 1840-46. He was editor of the Christian Register, 1846-48; professor of biblical literature at Meadville theological seminary, 1849-61; and a teacher and pastor at Concord, Mass., 1862-68. He took up his residence in Boston in 1875. He received the degree of D.D. in 1879. Among his publications are: Critical and Historical lnterpretation of the Prophecies of Daniel (1842);
Translation of the Four Gospels (rev. ed., 1885). He died in Asheville, N.C., Nov. 10, 1890.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IV

FOSTER, Lafayette Sabine, senator, was born in Franklin, Conn., Nov. 22, 1806; son of Capt. Daniel and Welthea (Ladd) Foster; and a direct descendant of Miles Standish through his grandmother, Hannah Standish; and of Dr. John Sabin. His father was an officer in the Continental army and fought at Saratoga, Stillwater and White Plains. Lafayette was graduated at Brown university in 1828, honor man of his class, after having paid his own way by teaching. He continued to teach, meanwhile studying law, and while in charge of an academy at Centerville, Md., 1829-30, was admitted to the bar. He returned to Connecticut, continued his study of law under Calvin Goddard at Norwich, and was admitted to the Connecticut bar in 1831. He practised in Hampton, Conn., 1831-34, and then settled in Norwich, where, in 1835, he
edited the Republican, a Whig paper. He was a representative in the state legislature, 1839-40, 1846-48, and 1854, and was speaker during the last three terms. He was twice defeated as a Whig candidate for governor of the state; was mayor of Norwich, 1851-52, and U.S. senator, 1855-61, and 1861-67. He was president of the senate pro tempore, from March 7, 1865, to March 2, 1867, and acting vice-president of the United States from April 15, 1865, to March 2, 1867. He was a conservative Republican, opposed the repeal of the fugitive slave act and the bill granting the franchise to colored men in the District of Columbia without an educational qualification. He also opposed the repeal of the Missouri compromise and the Lecompton constitution for Kansas. He withdrew from the canvass as a nominee for senator for a
third term in 1866, returned to the practice of law, and in 1869 declined the chair of law in Yale college, but was lecturer on "Parliamentary law and legislation," 1875-80. He was state representative and speaker of the house in 1870, resigning in June of that year to take his seat as judge of the supreme court of the state. In 1872 he supported Horace Greeley for President and in 1874 was the defeated candidate for representative in congress. He was retired as supreme court judge, by age limit, in 1876, and resumed the practice of law. He was commissioner from Connecticut to settle state boundary with New York in 1878-79, and to purchase Fishers Island in 1878. He was vice-president of the American Bible society.
He gave his library to the town of Norwich and his residence for the use of the Norwich free academy. He was married in 1858 to Kate Godfrey of Southport, Conn., and his widow and four children survived him. Brown conferred on him the degree of LL.D. in 1851. He died in Norwich, Conn., Sept. 19, 1880.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IV
page 181
FRANKLIN, Christine Ladd, author, was born in Windsor, Conn., Dec. 1, 1847; daughter of Eliphalet and Augusta (Niles) Ladd; granddaughter of Henry and Hannah (Hard) Ladd of Portsmouth, N.H., and of Richard and Christiana (Griswold) Niles of Windsor, Conn., and great-granddaughter of Col. Eliphalet Ladd, who served on the staff of his cousin, Governor Gilman. She was graduated from Vassar college in 1869, and for some years she taught mathematics and science in different schools, in the meantime continuing her studies in mathematics and contributing to mathematical journals. In 1878 she was invited to study at Johns Hopkins university, and from 1879 to 1882 she remained there upon the footing of
a fellow, being the first woman to receive this honor. In 1891-92 she pursued her studies in the Universities of Göttingen and Ber[p.181] lin. In 1882 she was married to Prof. Fabian Franklin of Johns Hopkins. The degree of LL. D. was conferred upon her by Vassar in 1887. She contributed articles on mathematics, logic and psychology to the American Journal of Mathematics, the American Journal of Psychology, the Psychological Review and Mind (London). Her theory of the sensation of color was published in the Zeitschrift für Psychologie in 1892 and also in Mind in 1893. She also wrote reviews and editorials for various journals, including the Nation, and is the author of Woman's Education in the South, a contribution to Woman's Work in America.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

Web page for CHRISTINE LADD FRANKLIN

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IV
FRANKLIN, Fabian, mathematician and journalist, was born in Hungary, Jan. 18, 1853; son of Morris Joshua and Sarah (Heilprin) Franklin. He was graduated from Columbia in 1869; was a fellow of Johns Hopkins university, 1877-79, assistant, associate, associate professor and professor of mathematics at Johns Hopkins, 1879-95, and became editor of The Baltimore News in 1895. In 1882 he was married to Christine, daughter of Eliphalet Ladd of Windsor, Conn. He received the degree of Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins university in 1880. He published mathematical papers in The American Journal of Mathematics and elsewhere, and wrote editorial and other contributions to the Nation and other periodicals.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VI
JANEWAY, Thomas Leiper, clergyman, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 27, 1805; son of the Rev. Dr. Jacob Jones and Martha Gray (Leiper) Janeway. He entered the University of Pennsylvania in 1820 and was graduated valedictorian with the class of 1823. He was graduated at Princeton Theological seminary, 1827; was tutor at Allegheny seminary, 1828; pastor at Rahway, N.J., 1829-40; of the North
church, Philadelphia, Pa., 1840-54, and at Kingston, N.J., 1855-6l; corresponding secretary of the Presbyterian board of domestic missions, 1861-68, and then retired from active work, preaching occasionally as supply. He was a trustee of Lafayette college, Pa., 1847-52; declined
the presidency of Jefferson college in 1857; was trustee of Princeton Theological seminary, 1861-65, and secretary of the board, 1861-63; a director of the seminary, 1849-67, and secretary of the board of directors, 1860-64. He received the honorary degree of D.D. from the College
of New Jersey in 1850, and that of LL.D. elsewhere. He was married to Abby Blackwood, daughter of Joshua Ladd Howell, of Woodbury, N.J., and their sons were: Col. John H. Janeway, U.S.A., and Dr. Joshua Blackwood Howell Janeway. He is the author of: Memoir of Rev.Jacob J. Janeway (1861). He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 14, 1895.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VI

KNOWLTON, Marcus Perrin, jurist, was born in Wilbraham, Mass., Feb. 3, 1839; son of Merrick and Fatima (Perrin) Knowlton; grandson of Amasa and Margaret (Toplift) Knowlton; and a descendant of William Knowlton, whose father, Capt. William Knowlton, sailed from London, England, for Nova Scotia, in 1633, and died on the voyage; and his widow with three sons, John, William and Thomas, after
remaining awhile in Nova Scotia, removed to Ipswich, Mass. Marcus Perrin Knowlton prepared for college at Monson academy, Mass., and was graduated from Yale, A.B., 1860. He was admitted to the bar at Springfield, Mass., in 1869; was a representative in the general court of Massachusetts in 1878, and a state senator, 1880-81. In August, 1881, he was appointed a justice of the superior court of Massachusetts,
and in September, 1887, was made a justice of the supreme judicial court of the state. He was twice married: first, July 18, 1867, to Sophia Ritchie, who died, Feb. 18, 1886, leaving no children; and secondly, May 21, 1891, to Rose Mary Ladd, of Portland, Maine. He received the honorary degree of LL.D. from Yale university in 1895, and from Harvard university in 1900.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VI
LADD, Catherine, educator, was born in Richmond, Va., Oct. 28, 1809; daughter of James and Nancy (Collins) Strutton, and granddaughter of James and Catherine (Foulk) Collins of Philadelphia. She was educated at Richmond, Va., in the same school that Edgar Allan Poe attended in 1821 and 1822, and in 1828 she married G. W. Ladd, a painter of portraits and miniatures. She established and was principal of a
boarding school at Winnsborough, Fairfield county, S.C., 1841-61, and in 1851 through the press urged the necessity of procuring white labor and of engaging in the manufacture of cotton in South Carolina. During the progress of the civil war she nursed the sick and wounded Confederate soldiers, and at its close resumed teaching. She is said to have been the designer of the first Confederate flag. In 1880 she removed to a farm in Fairfield county, near Winnsboro, S.C., where she spent the remainder of her life. During her career as a
writer, beginning in 1828, she wrote, besides articles on art and education, numerous stories and poems for the Floral Wreath and other periodicals. She died at Buena Vista, Fairfield county, S.C., Jan. 31, 1899.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VI

LADD, George Trumbull, teacher, was born in Painesville, Ohio, Jan. 19, 1842; son of Silas Trumbull and Elizabeth (Williams) Ladd: grandson of Jesse, Jr., and Ruby (Brewster) Ladd; great grandson of Wadsworth and Jerusha Brewster, of Chatham, Conn.; a descendant of Daniel Ladd who came to New England in the Mary and John, of London, in 1633, and was one of the original settlers of Haverhill, Mass., and also a descendant of Elder William Brewster, of the Mayflower. He was graduated from Western Reserve college in 1864, and from Andover Theological seminary, in 1869; was ordained to the Congregational ministry, May 26, 1870, and was acting pastor at Edinburg, Ohio, 1869-71; and
pastor of the Spring Street church, Milwaukee, Wis., 1871-79. He was professor of mental and moral philosophy at Bowdoin college, 1879-81; lectured on church polity and systematic theology in the Andover Theological seminary, 1879-81, and was chosen professor of mental and moral philosophy at Yale in 1881. He was a lecturer in the Harvard Divinity school, in 1883, and a special lecturer on philosophy at the Doshisha, Kioto, Japan, before the students of the University at Tokio, and at the Summer school at Hakoné, Japan, in 1892. During the academical year of 1895-96, he served on the faculty of Harvard university, conducting the graduate seminary in ethics; and in the summer of 1896 he lectured on ethics and the philosophy of religion in Chicago university. He was president of the American Psychological
association in 1893. In the fall of 1899 he lectured before the Imperial Educational society, and the Imperial university of Japan. While in Japan he was decorated by the emperor with the third degree of the Order of the Rising Sun, for his services to the country, was admitted to the Imperial audience and delivered addresses before other educational institutions, and before the Noble club. The following winter he lectured in Bombay and Calcutta, the principal cities in India, and in Colombo Ceylon. The lectures in Bombay were given under the auspices of the University of Bombay, and those in Madras at the Christian college, of Madras. On the return journey through Europe he attended the International congress of
psychology as the delegate of the American Psychological [p.299] association. In the autumn of 1900, he resumed his professional work at Yale university. He was twice married, first, in December, 1869, to Cornelia A., daughter of John Tailman, of Bridgeport, Ohio, who died in October, 1898; and, secondly, in December, 1895, to Frances V., daughter of Dr. George T. Stevens, of New York city. He received the honorary degrees of D.D. in 1881 and LL.D. in 1895, from Western Reserve college, and that of LL.D. from Princeton in 1896. He is the author of: Principles of Church Polity (1881); Doctrine of Sacred Scripture (1883); Elements of Physiological Psychology(1887); Outlines of Physiological
Psychology (1890); A Translation of Lotte's Philosophical Outlines (1884-87); What is the Bible ? (1885);
Introduction to Philosophy (1890); Primer of Psychology (1894); Psychology., Descriptive and Explanatory (1894); Philosophy of Mind (1895); Philosophy of Knowledge (1897); Outlines of Descriptive Psychology (1898); Essays on Higher Education (1899); A Treaty of Reality (1899). All these books were republished in England, several were translated into Japanese and some printed in raised letters for the blind.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VI
LADD, Horatio Oliver, educator, was born in Hallowell, Maine, Aug. 31, 1839; son of Gen. Samual Greenleaf and Caroline (Vinal) Ladd; grandson of Dudley and Bethala (Hutchins) Ladd, and a descendant of Daniel Ladd, who came from London in the Mary and Jane, and was one of the first settlers of Ipswich, Mass., 1634. He was graduated from Bow(loin college in 1859; was principal of an academy at Farmington, Maine, 1859-61, and was graduated from Yale Divinity school in 1863. He was pastor of the Congregational church and professor of rhetoric and oratory at Olivet college, Olivet, Mich., 1868-69; pastor at Romeo, Mich., 1869-73; and principal of the State normal school, Plymouth,
N.H., 1873-76. In 1881 he founded the University of New Mexico, at Santa Fé, N.M., and was its president until 1889, when the territorial legislature incorporated and endowed the State University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N.M. He founded the Ramona Indian school and the U.S. Indian school at Santa Fé, New Mexico, and was appointed and confirmed by the U.S. senate as supervisor of the census of New Mexico, in 1889, which office he resigned in 1890. He was pastor of the Congregational church, Hopkinton, Mass., 1890-91. In 1891 he took orders in the Protestant Episcopal church, and was rector of Trinity church, Fishkill, N.Y., until 1896, when he accepted the rectorship of Grace church, Jamaica, Long Island, N.Y. He was married, Aug. 6, 1863, to Harriet Vaughan, daughter of John S.C. Abbott, D.D., of
Fair Haven, Conn. He is the author of: The Memorial of John S. C. Abbott (1878); The War with Mexico (1881); Ramona Days (1889); The Story of New Mexico (1891); The Fouding of the Episcopal Church in Dutchess County, N.Y. (1895), and many contributions to periodicals.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VI
LADD, William, philanthropist, was born at Exeter, N.H., May 10, 1778. He was graduated from Harvard, in 1797, and shipped on one of his father's vessels as a common seaman and soon became one of the most successful of his father's captains, subsequently commanding vessels owned jointly by himself and brothers. In 1801 he made a trip to Florida, having conceived the idea of undermining slavery by the introduction of free white laborers. This experiment was encouraged by the Spanish governor of the province, who offered a piece of land to every laborer introduced. Mr. Ladd transported a number of Dutch immigrants, who were redemptioners, from Philadelphia, but the project failed and was abandoned in 1806. He returned to Portsmouth, and once more followed the sea with much success, until the business was
stopped by the war of 1812, when he retired to Minot, Maine, and devoted himself to agricultural pursuits. He was instrumental in the organization of the American Peace society in 1828, and for several years sustained it, almost alone. Finding it difficult to collect an audience during the week, he obtained from an association of Congregational ministers in Maine a commission as a preacher of the gospel, for the purpose of facilitating his labors in the cause of peace. He edited the Friend of Peace established by Dr. Noah Worcester, and the Harbinger of Peace which succeeded it as the official organ of the society. He published an Address to the Peace Society of Maine (1824); Address to the Peace Society of Massachusetts (1825); An Essay on the Congress of Nations (1840). He died in Portsmouth, N.H., April 9, 1841.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VII
LORD, John, author and lecturer, was born at Portsmouth, N. H., Dec. 27, 1810; son of John Perkins and Sophia (Ladd) Lord; grandson of John and Mehitable (Perkins) Lord, and great-grandson of Nathan and Esther (Perkins) Lord. He was graduated from Dartmouth college, A.B., 1833, A.M., 1836, and from Andover Theological seminary in 1837, and was agent for the American Peace society, 1837-39. He was pastor at New Marlborough, Mass., 1839-40, at Stockbridge, Mass., in 1840, and at Utica, N.Y., for a short time, when he withdrew from pastoral work and devoted himself to lecturing and authorship. He resided in England, 1843-46, and lectured on the "Middle Ages" in all the large cities there. He returned to the United States in 1846, and lectured in the New England and Middle states continuously for over
forty years, during which time he was lecturer on history in Dartmouth college, 1869-76. He received the degree of LL.D. from the University of the City of New York in 1864. He is the author of: Modern History for Schools (1850); A New History of the United States for Schools (1850); The Old Roman World (1867); Ancient States and Empires (1869); Ancient History (1876); Points of History (1881 ); Life of Emma Willard (1883); Beacon Lights of History (1883-94). He died in Stamford, Conn., Dec. 15, 1894.
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VII
MacLEAN, George Edwin, educator, was born in Rockville, Conn., Aug. 31, 1850; son of Edwin W. and Julia H. (Ladd) MacLean. He was graduated at Williama college A.B., 1871, A.M., 1874, and at Yale Divinity school B.D., 1874, and was ordained by the presbytery of Columbia in 1874. He was married, May 20, 1874, to Clara S., daughter of Charles J. Taylor of Great Barrington, Mass. He was pastor at New Lebanon, N.Y., 1874-77, and of the memorial church, Troy, N.Y., 1877-81. He studied at the universities of Berlin and Leipzig, 1881-83, and received the. degree Ph.D. from Leipzig in 1883. He collected several old English manuscripts in the British Museum and at the Universities of
Cambridge and Oxford, made a tour of Europe, and returned to the United States in 1884. He was professor of the English language and literature in the University of Minnesota, 1884-94, with the exception of the year 1891, when he made a second visit to England, and studied in the British museum. He visited Paris in 1894, and made researches in the Bibliotheque Nationale, and in 1895 was elected chancellor of the University of Nebraska and president of the University senate. He directed the work of the U.S. agricultural experiment station at the University of Nebraska, and in 1889 visited England, Holland and Germany for the purpose of investigating the work done at the various agricultural stations. He was made a member of the Philologieal society of London and of the American Philological society in 1891. He received the
honorary degree of LL.D. from Willlams college in 1895. He edited Ælfrics; Angle-Saxon version of Alcuini Interrogationes Sigewulfi Presbyteri in Genesin (1833); An Old and Middle English Reader by Zupitza (1886); An Introductory Course in Old English (1891), and is the author of: A Chart of English Literatutre with References (1892); An Old and Middle English Reader with Introduction, Notes and Glossary (1893).
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume X
TAYLOR, William Ladd, artist, was born in Grafton, Mass., Dec. 10, 1854; son of William H. and Anna Maria (Darling) Taylor; grandson of Joseph and Persis (Jones) Taylor and of Daniel and Abigail (Bartlett) Darling. He attended the common schools in Worcester, Mass., and studied art in Boston, Mass., in New York city, and under Boulanger and Le Febvre in Paris, France, 1884-85. Upon his return he opened a studio in Boston, Mass., where he devoted himself especially to illustrating. He was married in September, 1888, to Mary Alice, daughter of Newton and Clymena (Williams) Fitts of Norfolk, Va. Among his noteworthy illustrations are: Pictures from Longfellow's Poems (1898); The Century in
New England (Series) (1900); The Pioneer West (Series) (1902-03).
Submittied By: Misty Flannigan
June 23,1998


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