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Oklahoma

  • Washita County, Oklahoma Cemeteries (compiled by Donney P. Sullins, April 1997) The cemeteries included in this file are for, Bessie (6), Burns Flat (5), and Canute (6)

    MABRY, Ann E., 1846 - 1931 -- Boggy Cemetery, Burns Flat, OK

    MABRY, Emmett, 1883 - 1951 -- Boggy Cemetery, Burns Flat, OK

    MAYBERRY, Ethel M., Sept. 4, 1882 - 1970

    MAYBERRY, James W., Jan. 30, 1879 - Nov. 7, 1953 -- Canute Cemetery, Section 8, Canute, OK

    MAYBERRY, Infant daughter Oct. 21, 1939 -- Canute Cemetery, Section 8, Canute, OK

    MAYBERRY, Jayo 1907 - 1957 -- Canute Cemetery (Old), Section 4, Canute, OK

    MAYBERRY, John R., 1877 - 1969; MAYBERRY, Stella 1883 - 1974 -- Canute Cemetery (Old), Section 4, Canute, OK

    MAYBERRY, Mother, Margaret, M., 1838 - 1925 -- Canute Cemetery, Section 7, Canute, OK

    MAYBERRY, Ralph E., Feb. 15, 1910 - Nov. 27, 1937 -- Canute Cemetery, Section 8, Canute, OK

  • Wagoner Co. Oklahoma -- Thomas Smith Cemetery Location: East of Tulsa, between Catoosa and Broken Arrow, 1/2 mile east of the corner of 41st St. and S. 209th E. Ave., on the north side of 41st St., across the street from the Wagoner county R.W.D. No. 4 Water Tower. Comments by transcribers are in [ ].

    Row 1: Mayberry, Milford, b. 7-12-1913, d. 10-3-1998, Age 85 [Moore's Funeral Home, Tulsa, metal marker, no stone]

    Mayberry, Norvella, d. June 17, 1998, Age 85 [funeral home marker, no stone]

    Row 4: Mayberry, Anthony, Jr., Oklahoma Cpl. 512 OM Truck Co., World War II, March 24, 1918, Oct. 16, 1965

    Maybery, Cora, November 6, 1883, January 15, 1945; Anthony, Oct. 15, 1872, Aug. 8, 1955 [both names on same stone]

    Row 8: Mayberry, Al [large poured rough cement slab, hand-written letters]

    Mayberry, Leva Mae, Apr. 7-May [?] [large, poured rough cement slab, hand-lettered]

    Mayberry, Ronnie L., Pvt. US Army Vietnam, Sept. 4, 1947, June 2, 1979

    Mayberry, Ellis, Aug. 26, 1904, July 2, 1979

    Mayberry, Richard, Born Mar. 12, 1906, Nov. 24, 1970, "Loving Remembrance of"

    Row 9: Mayberry, Ethelean, July 14, 1911, Nov. 3, 1984, "Beloved Mother", "Gone but not Forgotten"

    Mayberry, Richard, Jr., June 1, 1941, Dec. 23, 1988, "Brother"

    Row 10: Mayberry, Vernon B., Pvt. US Army, World War II, Mar. 13, 1915 - Dec. 2, 1994

  • CHOCTAW & CHICKASAW NATION. This book describes the obligation the US had in respect to intruders of the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations. Page 65: CLAREMORE, CHEROKEE NATION, IND. T., February 14, 1890.

    DEAR SIR: The authorities here refuse to grant me permits for white laborers in my employ. I am a son-in-law of M. M. Bell, who, in 1871, was declared by the power here then in authority to be citizens of this Nation. I am a citizen here and pray you to issue me permits for J. W. Blackburn and J. H. Mayberry to work for me as farmers.

    Trusting to hear for you soon, I am very truly yours, V. O. CRAWFORD.

  • WASHITA COUNTY, OK. CEMETERIES, compiled by Donney P. Sullins April 1997. The cemeteries included in this file are for, Bessie (6), Burns Flat (5), and Canute (6)

    MABRY, Ann E., 1846 - 1931 -- Boggy Cemetery, Burns Flat, OK.

    MABRY, Emmett, 1883 - 1951 -- Boggy Cemetery, Burns Flat, OK.

    MAYBERRY, Ethel M., Sept. 4, 1882 - 1970 -- Canute Cemetery, Section 8, Canute, OK.

    MAYBERRY, James W., Jan. 30, 1879 - Nov. 7, 1953 -- Canute Cemetery, Section 8, Canute, OK.

    MAYBERRY, Infant daughter Oct. 21, 1939 -- Canute Cemetery, Section 8, Canute, OK.

    MAYBERRY, Jayo 1907 - 1957 -- Canute Cemetery (Old), Section 4, Canute, OK.

    MAYBERRY, John R., 1877 - 1969 -- Canute Cemetery (Old), Section 4, Canute, OK.

    MAYBERRY, Stella 1883 - 1974 -- Canute Cemetery (Old), Section 4, Canute, OK.

    MAYBERRY, Mother, Margaret, M., 1838 - 1925 -- Canute Cemetery, Section 7, Canute, OK.

    MAYBERRY, Ralph E., Feb. 15, 1910 - Nov. 27, 1937 -- Canute Cemetery, Section 8, Canute, OK.

  • Washita CO. OK Cemeteries

    Boggy Cemetery, Burns Flat, OK.

    MABRY, Ann E. (1846 - 1931)

    MABRY, Emmett (1883 - 1951)

    Strickland (South Side) Cemetery, Cordell, OK

    MABRY, Floyd L. (US Army, World War II - 1923 - 1978)

    Canute Cemetery, Section 8, Canute, OK.

    MAYBERRY, Ethel M. (Sept. 4, 1882 - 1970)

    MAYBERRY, James W. (Jan. 30, 1879 - Nov. 7, 1953)

    MAYBERRY, Infant daughter (Oct. 21, 1939)

    MAYBERRY, Mother, Margaret, M. (1838 - 1925)

    MAYBERRY, Ralph E. (Feb. 15, 1910 - Nov. 27, 1937)

    Canute Cemetery (Old), Section 4, Canute, OK.

    MAYBERRY, Jayo (1907 - 1957)

    MAYBERRY, John R. (1877 - 1969)

    MAYBERRY, Stella (1883 - 1974)

  • PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF OKLAHOMA, Commemorating The Achievements Of Citizens Who Have Contributed To The Progress Of Oklahoma And The Development Of Its Resources. Chapman Publishing Co. Chicago 1901

    MAYBERRY Dr. F. A 976

    MAYBERRY Dr. S. N 976

  • Indian Pioneer Papers Index -- In 1936, the [Oklahoma Historical] society teamed with the history department at the University of Oklahoma to get a Works Progress Administration (WPA) writers' project grant for an interview program. The project employed more than 100 writers scattered across the state, with headquarters in Muskogee, where Grant Foreman served as project director. Asked to "call upon early settlers and (record) the story of the migration to Oklahoma and their early life here," the writers conducted more than 11,000 interviews, edited the accounts into written form, and sent them to the project director who completed the editorial process and had them typed into more than 45,000 pages. When assembled, the Indian-Pioneer Papers consisted of 112 volumes, with one set at the university, the other at the society. There are only two complete bound sets of originals.

    Volume 60 - 9 Microfiche #6016925

    MABRAY, Mary Jane Wyandotte, OK

    MABRY, E.V. Pauls Valley, OK

    Volume 61 - 8 microfiche #6016926

    MAYBERRY, Viola Muskogee, OK

  • Indian Pioneer Interviews - Lula Mabry Neighbors, Interview # 126 78; James Russell Gray Investigator, 1939.

    An Interview with Lula Nieghbors (Mrs. Frank Neighbors) Hartshorne, Oklahoma

    "I was born and raised in the Indian Territory right where the town of Calhoun is now, in Leflore County. The place was called Brazil then, when I was born in 1878, though when my father, Charles Mabry first moved there nearly ten years earlier there was only one home in the vicinity. Father was from Georgia, a state man and he had a fair education. When he saw that the Civil War was over he decided to come west where colored people were given a better chance to make a living. He came to the choctaw Nation and married my mother, a freedwoman. Father bought out the improvements on a plot of land south of Brazil Creek; an Indian named "Dead Pine" had been living on the claim. Father settled on the place and improved it still more; he fenced on one hundred acres and put in corn and foodstuff, and by 1881 he was raising some cotton. You see Mother had a right to 40 acres, being a freedwoman, and since this land was rather poor she was allowed seventy acres. (some info. left out here) There was a church for colored people, Methodist, six miles north of us and an Indian church about half way between these two churches also Methodist. Our Pastor was named Dikes, and our bishop was named Turner. One of the Indian preachers was named Simon Walker. (some info. left out here) We had some Choctaw neighbors named James; two brothers Noah and Daniel James. One of Daniel's children died and they buried it under the house; took up the floor, buried the baby and then put the floor back. And Noah had his family cemetery in front of his house, outside the yard; it is there yet. The famous stagecoach road, the one over which mail was carried from Ft. Smith to Texas ran across our claim, up by the general store run by Robert Welch at Brazil. And once when I was ten, Green McCurtain, the Choctaw Chief, stopped with us for dinner. There were two men with him; they had been to Tuskahoma, the Choctaw capital, about some government business, and were on their way to San Bois Creek where McCurtain had his home. They were traveling in a two seated hack without a top; something was broken about it and my brother Louis took them to San Bois Creek in father's wagon. Green McCurtain was a big man, a typical Indian as to face, eyes and expression, but he wore expensive clothes. He had on a big white cowboy hat, a white shirt, vest, dark trousers and shoes. I guess he could afford to dress well for people said he was rich. We bought most of our supplies at Brazil. A man named Robert Welch had a general store there. He was a white man, but he was married to a Choctaw woman named Phoebe Walker, one of their sons, Zeke, lives at Red Oak now. Jane McCurtain, widow of Jack McCurtain, put in a motel. The mine operated for about seven years and the company sank another mine. About this time the name of the town was changed to Calhoun; the name was changed right after I got married and that was in 1907. For some reason my parents never did get any revenue from the coal; there was something about the coal belonging to the Choctaw government. The forty acres where I live now was given to me after statehood; it is my claim. I hae a "right" from Mother's being a freedwoman. It is good land, and there is a good well of water and it is convenient, being only half a mile east of the Coles Chapel Colored School. Before statehood they's were lots of United States Marshals, but I only knew two: Bass Reeves and Bob Fortune. Both were Negroes. Reeves lived at Ft. Smith and Fortune lived at Wilburton. I knew of only one ferry; it was across Brazil Creek about four miles from our house. It was operated by a man named Henry Outshalow, a negro. He wasn't a native of the Territory but he had married a freedwoman. I have seen hundreds of Indians in my life, but right now I don't suppose I could give you half a dozen names. I remember Green McCurtain, Dick Locke, Jacob Jackson, Buck Shatubbi, Noah and Daniel James, Polk Macavvain, Willie Tread, and Billy Sockey.

  • Index to Oklahoma Confederate Pension Records, Available at OK. Hist. Soc.

    Anna E. Mabry......6822...21

    David Mabry..........1099....3

    Fannie Mabry........6879...17

    John J. Mabry.......4480...11

    Sarah A. Mabry.....6238...16

    John S. Maybry.....6512...20

  • Iron County, Missouri Cemeteries

    BELLEVIEW CEMETERY, Iron Co., MO; Located near Belleview, 1 mile off Hiway 21.

    MAYBERRY, David 7 May 1872 - 12 Oct 1872 s/o J & G

    Masonic Cemetery, Ironton, Iron Co., Mo.

    MAYBERRY, Eddy 16 July 1868 - 2 Aug 1868 s/o J & C

  • Mannsville, Johnston Co., OK., The Times, Thursday, June 20, 1901

    The Muldrow Press tells a good story on the town Marshall of Muldow. It says that while Marshall MABRAY was eating honey the other day he swallowed a live bee, and that the bee got in its work on his espophagus causing the catcher of criminals to fly high in the air and perform many gesticulations before the removing of the troublesome insect.

  • The Daily Oklahoman, January 10, 1948

    MABERRY RITES ARE INCOMPLETE

    Tecumseh, Jan. 9 (Special)

    Service's will be announced by Cooper's for Robert Maberry, 92, who died Thursday in his home 12 miles southwest of Tecumseh. Maberry came to Pottawatomie County from Fort Smith, in 1891. He was a retired farmer. Survivors are his wife, Josie of the home; three daughters, Mrs. Sheda Pierce of Stockton, Calif., Mrs. Mae Nottingham of Richmond, Calif., Mrs. Winnie Ingram of Henryetta; four sons, E. H. of Eloy, Ariz., J. T., R. L. and Fred, all of Macomb. 12 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
  • The Daily Oklahoman - July 6, 1940

    Judge Holds Court at Hot Dog Stand Then Orders License

    A portable hot dog stand which produces sandwiches about a foot long became the center of attention Friday when Frank P. Douglass, district judge, temporarily moved his court to Northwest Twenty-third street and Hudson avenue.

    There the court got first hand knowledge of facts involved in a controversy between the city and Mrs. John O. Maberry, 728 Northeast Seventeenth street, who sued the city in district court for a permit to operate the stand.

    A part of the first hand knowledge consisted of one hot dog for Judge Douglass; and one each for Cliff Myers, court clerk; R. R. Barry, Mrs. Maberry's attorney, and Leon Shipp, assistant municipal counselor. All said they enjoyed the court session.

    Back at the courthouse, Judge Douglass issued a writ of mandamus requiring the city to issue a permit to Mrs. Maberry.

    In her suit, Mrs. Maberry alleged she had met all sanitary requirements for operation of the stand. In a hearing Friday, C. E. Clifford, city chemist, testified he refused a permit because of sanitary requirements and the "nature of such unstable devices."

    The city entered a demurrer to Mrs. Maberry's petition, claiming there was not sufficient evidence in the suit to support the action. Shipp said the traveling stand "is something new and we wanted a court test on it." Judge Douglass overruled the demurrer.

  • Oklahoma Pioneer History Project

    In 1936, the [Oklahoma Historical] society teamed with the history department at the University of Oklahoma to get a Works Progress Administration (WPA) writers' project grant for an interview program. The project employed more than 100 writers scattered across the state, with headquarters in Muskogee, where Grant Foreman served as project director. Asked to "call upon early settlers and (record) the story of the migration to Oklahoma and their early life here," the writers conducted more than 11,000 interviews, edited the accounts into written form, and sent them to the project director who completed the editorial process and had them typed into more than 45,000 pages. When assembled, the Indian-Pioneer Papers consisted of 112 volumes, with one set at the university, the other at the society. There are only two complete bound sets of originals.

    Volume 60 - 9 Microfiche #6016925

    NAME ADDRESS

    MABRAY, Mary Jane Wyandotte, OK

    MABRY, E. V. Pauls Valley, OK

    Volume 61 - 8 microfiche #6016926

    MAYBERRY, Viola Muskogee, OK








  • August 2014