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Joseph Coady

M, #2875, b. 1797
  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012
  • Birth*: Joseph was born in 1797 at Ireland.1

Citations

  1. [S117] Anne M. Coady, "Coady - Coady, Anne M., January 13, 1997," e-mail to Donald J. MacFarlane, January 13, 1997.

Peter Coady

M, #2876, b. 1801, d. 23 November 1831
  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Citations

  1. [S117] Anne M. Coady, "Coady - Coady, Anne M., January 13, 1997," e-mail to Donald J. MacFarlane, January 13, 1997.

Janet MacLeod [of Arnisdale]

F, #2878, b. circa 1700
  • Relationship: 4th great-grandmother of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 30 Nov 2014
  • Married Name: As of 1723,her married name was MacDonell [of Arnisdale].

Citations

  1. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.
  2. [S118] Charles Fraser-MackIntosh F.S.A Scot., Antiquarian Notes.

Donald MacLeod [of Arnisdale]1

M, #2881
  • Relationship: 5th great-grandfather of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 21 Oct 2012

Family:

Citations

  1. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.

Ragnhilde Olafsdotter

F, #2882, b. circa 1120
  • Relationship: 20th great-grandmother of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 10 Oct 2013
  • Married Name: As of circa 1140,her married name was MacFergus.

Citations

  1. [S711] Donald Gregory, History of the Western Highlands & Isles of Scotland from A.D. 1493 to A.D. 1625, page 7.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p14698.htm#i146971
  3. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  4. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  5. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.
  6. [S711] Donald Gregory, History of the Western Highlands & Isles of Scotland from A.D. 1493 to A.D. 1625, page 7, 12.
  7. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p14697.htm#i146969

Olaf Godfreysson King of Man & the Isles1

M, #2883, b. circa 1090

  • Relationship: 21st great-grandfather of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015
  • Name Variation: As of circa 1100, Olaf Godfreysson King of Man & the Isles was also known as Olave the Red So called in Highland tradtion.4
  • Name Variation: As of circa 1100, Olaf Godfreysson King of Man & the Isles was also known as Bitling or Klining So called by Norse writers because of his diminutive stature.4
  • Biography*: His reign was peaceful; but he conducted himself so as to preserve his kingdom from aggression.

    Ancestry

    Olaf was a younger son of Godred Crovan, founder of the Crovan dynasty which ruled the Isle of Man and parts of the Hebrides until the mid 13th century. The ancestry of Godred is uncertain. The Chronicle of Mann describes him in Latin as filius Haraldi nigri de ysland, and it is possible that "ysland" may refer to Iceland. Within the Annals of Tigernach, he is given the Gaelic patronymic mac mic Arailt, which may mean that he was a son, or nephew, of Ivar Haraldsson, King of Dublin (d. 1054). Ivar was a grandson of the celebrated Olaf Cuaran, King of Dublin, King of Northumbria (d. 981), a second generation Uí Ímair dynast. Godred died in 1095, after ruling the Kingdom of the Isles for over 15 years. A period of confusion followed Godred's death before Olaf took control of the kingdom.

    Part of Olaf's youth was spent at the court of Henry I, King of England.

    Reign

    According to the Chronicle of Mann, Olaf reigned for 40 years. The chronicle states that he was a peaceful monarch, and that that "all the kings of Ireland and Scotland as confederates in such a way that no one dared disturb the kingdom of the Isles during his lifetime".

    Little is known of the ecclesiastical history of the Kingdom of the Isles until Olaf's appointment of Wimund as Bishop of the Isles, in 1134. One of the most important ecclesiastical events in the history of the kingdom was the foundation of Rushen Abbey, in 1134, with a grant of lands from Olaf to the Abbot of Furness. Another key ecclesiastical event was the foundation of the Archbishopric of Nidaros, a metropolitan see centred in Norway. In time this archbishopric, founded in 1152/53, incorporated 11 bishoprics within and outwith Norway. One of these bishoprics encompassed the domain of the Kingdom of the Isles, and was created by a papal decree in 1154. This bishopric mirrored the political reality of the Kingdom of the Isles, due to its similar geographical boundaries and its subjection to Norway; it also further to strengthened the link between the Kingdom of the Isles and Norway. The original grant of Olaf's gave the English Cistercian house of Furness the right to elect a Bishop of the Isles, and several of the early Abbots of Rushen held that position.

    During the whole of the Scandinavian period the isles remained nominally under the suzerainty of the kings of Norway, but the Norwegians only occasionally asserted it with any vigour.

    Family

    Olaf is known to have married Ingebjorg, daughter of Hakon Paulsson, Earl of Orkney; and Affreca, daughter of Fergus, Lord of Galloway. The Chronicle of Mann states that it was by Affreca that Olaf had his son and successor Godred. The chronicle also records that Olaf had several concubines, and by them had sons Ragnvald, Lagman, and Harald. Olaf is also stated to have had many daughters by his concubines; one of whom married Somerled, Lord of Argyll.4,2

Family: Ingebiorg (?) b. c 1100

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2457.htm#i24565
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaf_I_Godredsson
  3. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  4. [S711] Donald Gregory, History of the Western Highlands & Isles of Scotland from A.D. 1493 to A.D. 1625, page 7.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p14698.htm#i146971

Gillebride MacFergus Thane of Argyll

M, #2884, b. circa 1070
  • Relationship: 21st great-grandfather of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 30 Nov 2014
  • Birth*: Gillebride was born circa 1070.2

Citations

  1. [S711] Donald Gregory, History of the Western Highlands & Isles of Scotland from A.D. 1493 to A.D. 1625, page 10.
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.

Elizabeth MacFergus Countess of Ross

F, #2885, b. circa 1110
  • Relationship: 20th great-grandaunt of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012
  • Married Name: As of circa 1130,her married name was MacEth Countess of Ross.

Family: Malcolm MacEth Earl of Ross b. c 1100

Citations

  1. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.

Godfrey Crovan King of the Pale1

M, #2886, b. circa 1040
  • Relationship: 22nd great-grandfather of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2015
  • Birth*: Godfrey was born circa 1040 at Norway.2,1
  • Name Variation: As of circa 1100, Godfrey Crovan King of the Pale was also known as Godred Crovan.3
  • Biography*: Godred (Godfrey) was a leader of the Norwegians under Harold Hardrada, King of Norway, at the Battle of Stanford Bridge, where the latter was defeated and slain by Harold, King of England. Escaping from England, Godred seems to have fled to the Isles, where he gradually formed a party strong enough to enable him to expel Fingal from the Isle of Man. But his conquests were not confined to the Isles; he likewise subjugated Dublin) which had for nearly two centuries been the seat of a principality, formed by the Scandinavian Vikings) and a great part of Leinster. He was, besides, very successful in a war against the Scots, whose King, at this time, was Malcolm III, commonly called Malcolm Canmor.

    Godred Crovan (Old Irish: Gofraid mac meic Arailt, Gofraid Méranech; Guðrøðr; Manx: Gorree Crovan) (died 1095) was a Norse-Gael ruler of Dublin, and King of Mann and the Isles in the second half of the 11th century. Godred's epithet Crovan may mean "white hand" (Middle Irish: crobh bhan). In Manx folklore he is known as King Orry.

    Ancestry and early life

    The notice of Godred's death in the Annals of Tigernach calls him Gofraid mac meic Aralt or Godred, son of Harald's son. As a result, it has been suggested that Godred was a son, or nephew, of the Norse-Gael king Ímar mac Arailt (or Ivar Haraldsson) who ruled Dublin from 1038 to 1046, who was in turn a nephew of Sigtrygg Silkbeard and grandson of Amlaíb Cuarán This would make Godred a dynast of the Uí Ímair. The Chronicles of Mann call Godred the son of Harald the Black of Ysland, variously interpreted as Islay, Ireland or Iceland, and make him a survivor of Harald Hardraade's defeat at the Battle of Stamford Bridge on 25 September 1066. They say that he took refuge with his kinsman Godred Sigtryggsson, then King of Mann and the Isles. Irish annals record that Godred was subject to the Irish King of Dublin, Murchad son of Diarmait mac Maíl na mBó of the Uí Cheinnselaig. Godred Sigtryggsson and Murchad both died in 1070 and the rule of the Isle of Man passed to Godred's son Fingal.

    Invasions of the Isle of Man

    Battle of Skyhill
    In 1079, the Chronicles of Mann say that Godred invaded the Isle of Man three times:

    “In the year 1056 [1079], Godred Crovan collected a number of ships and came to Mann; he gave battle to the natives but was defeated, and forced to fly. Again he assembled an army and a fleet, came to Mann, encountered the Manxmen, was defeated and put to fight. A third time he collected a numerous body of followers, came by night to the port called Ramsey, and concealed 300 men in a wood, on the sloping brow of a hill called Sky Hill. At daylight the men of Mann drew up in order of battle, and, with a mighty rush, encountered Godred. During the heat of the contest the 300 men, rising from the ambuscade in the rear, threw the Manxmen into disorder, and compelled them to fly.”

    Conquest and loss of Dublin

    The Chronicles say, and Irish sources agree, that Godred then took Dublin although the date is unknown. In 1087 the Annals of Ulster record that "the grandsons of Ragnall" were killed on an expedition to the Isle of Man. In 1094 Godred was driven out of Dublin by Muircheartach Ua Briain. He died the following year, "of pestilence" according the Annals of the Four Masters, on Islay. According to tradition a standing stone at Carragh Bhàn just north of Loch Finlaggan marks his grave. An alternative location for his burial is the Clach Goraidh Crobhan stone near Kintra.

    Issue and legacy

    Godred left three known sons, Lagmann, Olaf and Harald. Harald was blinded by Lagmann and disappears from the record, but the descendants of Lagmann and Olaf ruled the Kingdom of the Isles until the rise of Somerled and his sons, and ruled the Isle of Man until the end of the kingdom 1265 and its annexation by Alexander III, King of Scots. Even as late as 1275 Godred son of the last King of Mann tried to seize the island.
    "King Orry" is remembered in song and he gave his name to the Milky Way, which was known as raad mooar ree Gorry (the great track of King Gorry) in the Manx language.1,4

Citations

  1. [S711] Donald Gregory, History of the Western Highlands & Isles of Scotland from A.D. 1493 to A.D. 1625, page 6.
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  3. [S711] Donald Gregory, History of the Western Highlands & Isles of Scotland from A.D. 1493 to A.D. 1625, page 7.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godred_Crovan
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaf_I_Godredsson

(?) MacMahon

F, #2887
  • Last Edited: 11 Mar 1997

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.

Gillecolm Mac Somerled

M, #2888, b. before 1140
  • Relationship: 19th great-granduncle of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012
  • Birth*: Gillecolm was born before 1140 at Ireland.1,2

Family:

Citations

  1. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  2. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  3. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.

Malcolm MacEth Earl of Ross

M, #2889, b. circa 1100
  • Relationship: 25th great-granduncle of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.

Ethelred of Dunkeld (?) Earl of Fife1

M, #2890, b. after 1071
  • Relationship: 26th great-grandfather of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015
  • Birth*: Ethelred was born after 1071 at Scotland.2,3
  • Biography*: Ethelred (Edelred mac Maíl Coluim or Æþelræd Margotsson) was the son of King Máel Coluim III and his wife Margaret, the third oldest of the latter and the probable sixth oldest of the former. He took his name, almost certainly, from Margaret's great-grandfather King Æþelræd Unræd, or Ethelred the Unready.

    Ethelred had a multicultural upbringing in the pious household of his Gaelic father and Anglo-Hungarian mother. He had an ecclesiastical career and avoided a political career, perhaps because of some disability, being passed over for the succession. His career probably brought him the prestigious abbacy of Dunkeld, however he died as a cluniac monk in Somerset. He is often thought to have held the office Mormaer of Fife, but this is almost certainly a mistake. The source is a notitia of a grant to the Céli Dé monks of Loch Leven, contained within the Register of the Priory of St Andrews, which says:
    Edelradus vir venerandae memoriae filius Malcolmi Regis Scotiae, Abbas de Dunkeldense et insuper Comes de Fyf.

    Translated, this is "Ethelred" or "Edelred, man of venerable memory, son of King Máel Coluim of Scotland, Abbot of Dunkeld and also Mormaer of Fife". However, the same notitia records a number of witnesses, among whom are the brothers of Ethelred, David and Alexander; after the last two comes Constantinus Comes de Fyf, i.e. Causantín, the actual Mormaer of Fife. The contradiction has been explained by Bannerman. He argues that the translator of Register of the Priory of St Andrews (a collection of Latin translations of earlier Gaelic documents) had been thrown off by the use of a singular Gaelic verb for a joint grant (i.e. where the verb had two subjects), common in Gaelic charters. As a result, the translator omitted the Mormaer. At any rate, it is clear that Ethelred was never a Mormaer of Fife, since Causantín is attested in other sources.4

Family:

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p57107.htm#i571067
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10216.htm#i102153
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethelred_of_Scotland

Saint Margaret (?) Queen of the Scots1

F, #2892, b. 1045, d. 16 November 1093

St. Margaret of Scotland
  • Relationship: 24th great-grandmother of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015
  • Biography*: Early life
    Margaret was the daughter of the English prince, Edward the Exile and granddaughter of Edmund Ironside, king of England. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016, Canute had the infant Edward exiled to the continent. He was taken first to the court of the Swedish king, Olof Skötkonung, and then to Kiev. As an adult, he travelled to Hungary, where in 1046 he supported Andrew I's successful bid for the throne. The provenance of Margaret's mother, Agatha, is disputed, but Margaret was born in Hungary around 1045. Her brother Edgar the Ætheling and her sister Cristina were also born in Hungary around this time. Margaret grew up in a very religious environment in the Hungarian court. Andrew I of Hungary was known as "Andrew the Catholic" for his extreme aversion to pagans, and great loyalty to Rome, which probably could have induced Margaret to follow a pious life.

    Return to England
    Still a child, she came to England with the rest of her family when her father, Edward, was recalled in 1057 as a possible successor to her great-uncle, the childless Edward the Confessor. Her father died soon after the family's arrival in England, but Margaret continued to reside at the English court where her brother, Edgar Ætheling, was considered a possible successor to the English throne. When the Confessor died in January 1066, Harold Godwinson was selected as king, Edgar perhaps being considered still too young. After Harold's defeat at the battle of Hastings later that year, Edgar was proclaimed King of England, but when the Normans advanced on London, the Witenagemot presented Edgar to William the Conqueror who took him to Normandy before returning him to England in 1068, when Edgar, Margaret, Cristina and their mother Agatha fled north to Northumbria.

    Journey to Scotland
    According to tradition, the widowed Agatha decided to leave Northumbria with her children and return to the continent. However, a storm drove their ship north to Scotland, where they sought the protection of King Malcolm III. The spot where they are said to have landed is known today as St. Margaret's Hope, near the village of North Queensferry. Margaret's arrival in Scotland in 1068, after the failed revolt of the Northumbrian earls, has been heavily romanticized, though Symeon of Durham implied that her first meeting with Malcolm 3rd may not have been until 1070, after William the Conqueror's harrying of the north.

    Malcolm was probably a widower, and was no doubt attracted by the prospect of marrying one of the few remaining members of the Anglo-Saxon royal family. The marriage of Malcolm and Margaret took place some time before the end of 1070. Malcolm followed it with several invasions of Northumberland, probably in support of the claims of his brother-in-law Edgar. These, however, had little result beyond the devastation of the province.

    Family
    Margaret and Malcolm had eight children, six sons and two daughters:
    Edward, killed 1093.
    Edmund of Scotland
    Ethelred, abbot of Dunkeld
    King Edgar of Scotland
    King Alexander I of Scotland
    King David I of Scotland
    Edith of Scotland, also called Matilda, married King Henry I of England
    Mary of Scotland, married Eustace 3rd of Boulogne

    Religious life
    Margaret's biographer Turgot, Bishop of St. Andrews, credits her with having a civilizing influence on her husband Malcolm by reading him stories from the Bible. She instigated religious reform, striving to make the worship and practices of the Church in Scotland conform to those of Rome. She was considered an exemplar of the "just ruler", and influenced her husband and children, especially her youngest son, later David I, also to be just and holy rulers. She attended to charitable works, serving orphans and the poor every day before she ate, and washing the feet of the poor in imitation of Christ. She rose at midnight every night to attend church services. She invited the Benedictine order to establish a monastery at Dunfermline in Fife and established ferries at Queensferry and North Berwick to assist pilgrims journeying from south of the Forth Estuary to St. Andrews in Fife. A cave on the banks of the Tower Burn in Dunfermline was used by her as a place of devotion and prayer. St Margaret's Cave, now covered beneath a municipal car park, is open to the public

    Death
    Her husband, Malcolm III, and their eldest son, Edward, were killed in a fight against the English at the Battle of Alnwick on 13 November 1093. Her son Edmund was left with the task of telling his mother of their deaths. Margaret was ill, and she died on 16 November 1093, three days after the deaths of her husband and eldest son.

    Sainthood
    Saint Margaret was canonised in 1250 by Pope Innocent IV in recognition of her personal holiness, fidelity to the Church, work for religious reform, and charity. On 19 June 1250, after her canonisation, her remains were moved to Dunfermline Abbey. The Roman Catholic Church formerly marked the feast of Saint Margaret of Scotland on 10 June, because the feast of "Saint Gertrude, Virgin" was already celebrated on 16 November, but in Scotland, she was venerated on 16 November, the day of her death. In the revision of the Roman Catholic calendar of saints in 1969, 16 November became free and the Church transferred her feast day to 16 November. However, some traditionalist Catholics continue to celebrate her feast day on 10 June. She is also venerated as a saint in the Anglican Church.3,7

Family: Malcolm III 'Canmore' (?) King of the Scots b. c 1031, d. 13 Nov 1093

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10216.htm#i102157
  2. [S283] Nigel Tranter, David the Prince.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10216.htm#i102154
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10216.htm#i102157
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10216.htm#i102154
  5. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10216.htm#i102153
  7. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Margaret_of_Scotland
  8. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  9. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_of_Scotland
  10. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10204.htm#i102034

Donald MacEth

M, #2893, b. circa 1125
  • Relationship: 1st cousin 21 times removed of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012
  • Birth*: Donald was born circa 1125.1

Citations

  1. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.

Ingebiorg (?)

F, #2894, b. circa 1100
  • Relationship: 21st great-grandmother of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 23 Nov 2014
  • Married Name: Her married name was Godfreysson.

Citations

  1. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaf_I_Godredsson

Hakon Paulsson Earl of Orkney1

M, #2895, b. circa 1050
  • Relationship: 22nd great-grandfather of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015
  • Birth*: Hakon was born circa 1050 at Norway.2,1
  • Biography*: He was the grandson of Thorfinn Ravenfeeder the Mighty, half-brother to King MacBeth.

    Haakon Paulsson (Old Norse: Hákon Pálsson) was a Norwegian Jarl (1105–1123) and jointly ruled the Earldom of Orkney together with his cousin Magnus Erlendsson.
    His father was Paul Thorfinnsson, the son of Thorfinn Sigurdsson and Ingibiorg Finnsdottir. His father and his uncle, Erlend Thorfinnsson, had ruled together as Earls of Orkney. King Magnus III of Norway took possession of the Orkney islands in 1098, deposing both Erlend and Paul. Haakon Paulsson was chosen to become regent on behalf of the Norwegian prince, the future King Sigurd I of Norway, who made Haakon an earl in 1105.

    According to the Orkneyinga Saga, his cousin Magnus Erlendsson was initially rejected by the Norwegians rulers because of his religious convictions. Magnus was obliged to take refuge in Scotland, but returned to Orkney in 1105 and disputed the succession of Haakon. Having failed to reach an agreement, Magnus sought help from King Eystein II of Norway who granted him the joint earldom of Orkney.

    Magnus and Haakon ruled jointly from 1105 until 1114. Their followers then had fallen out and the two sides met at the Thing assembly on the Orkney mainland, ready to do battle. Peace was negotiated and the Earls arranged to meet each other on the island of Egilsay, each bringing only two ships. Magnus arrived with his two ships, but Haakon turned up with eight ships. Magnus took refuge in the island's church overnight, but the following day he was captured and offered to go into exile or prison. An assembly of chieftains insisted that one earl must die. Haakon killed Magnus on the island of Egilsay in April 1116. This led to the "martyrdom" of Magnus and the construction of St Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall.2,1

Family:

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hakon_Paulsson
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.

Dougal Mac Somerled

M, #2896, b. circa 1140
  • Relationship: 20th great-grandfather of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 14 Mar 2015
  • Name Variation: Dougal Mac Somerled was also known as Dugall.
  • Biography*: Dubgall mac Somairle (Modern Dubhghall mac Somhairle; Anglicized: "Dugald" or "Dougal, Somerled's son") was a 12th-century Scottish nobleman. The son of Somairle mac Gille Brigte, regulus of Argyll, Dubgall is the eponymous progenitor of Clan MacDougall (Clann Dubhghaill, literally "Children of Dougal" or "Dubgall").

    According to the Chronicles of Mann, in 1155 he accompanied his father Somairle in an expedition against Goraidh mac Amhlaibh, King of Mann and the Isles. In 1175, he was one of the Scottish magnates accompanying King William the Lion to York, as William was required to swear fealty to Henry II. In the same year, he and his chaplain Stephan made a pilgrimage to St Cuthbert at Durham, donating two gold rings to the Cathedral Priory. The Chronicles of Mann alleged that the men of the Isles chose Dubgall to be their King, but this may have been a later concoction, and Dubgall is never given a title in any contemporary source. It has been suggested that he was the founder of the bishopric of Argyll, though more likely this took place under his brother Ragnall mac Somairle.

    It is not known when Dubgall died. Dubgall is not mentioned again after 1175, but may have lived long afterwards, perhaps even into the 13th century. He appears to have had the following sons,
    Amlaib mac Dubgaill (Olaf)
    Donnchad mac Dubgaill (Donnchadh of Argyll or Duncan)
    Ragnall mac Dubgaill (Ranald or Ronald)
    Dubgall "Screech" mac Dubgaill (Dougal or Dugald)
    Somairle mac Dubgaill (Somerled or Sorley)
    Gille Escoib mac Dubgaill (Uspak and Haakon)
    The last is uncertain. Gille Escoib appears in Hákonar saga Hákonarsonar (Haakon's Saga), which renders his name "Uspak", as a son of Dubgall upon whom is conferred the royal name Haakon; "Uspak" enjoyed a successful career, but it is not entirely certain that the Dubgall referred as his father is Dubgall mac Somairle.2,4

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  3. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubgall_mac_Somairle

Anna Mac Somerled

F, #2897, b. circa 1141
  • Relationship: 19th great-grandaunt of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.

Joseph Aksten

M, #2904, b. circa 1920, d. before 1997
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012
  • Birth*: Joseph was born circa 1920.1
  • Death*: Joseph died before 1997.1

Citations

  1. [S121] Letter, Blanche MacFarlane to Donald MacFarlane, March 28, 1997.

John Peter MacFarlane

M, #2917, b. 29 October 1870
  • Relationship: 2nd cousin 2 times removed of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 30 Jul 2014
  • Biography*: John Peter was alive at the time of his father's death in 1895.4

Citations

  1. [S123] St. Ann's RC Church, Church Records, from 1865 St. Ann's Parish Vitals.
  2. [S587] Unknown author, Guysborough County Families in the 1871 Census.
  3. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Birth registration
    Year 1870
    Book 1808
    Page 101
    Number 279.
  4. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.

David Alexander MacFarlane

M, #2918, b. 1876
  • Relationship: 2nd cousin 2 times removed of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 23 Mar 2015
  • Name Variation: David Alexander MacFarlane was also known as Alexander MacFarlane.4
  • Religion*: He was Roman Catholic.4
  • Name Variation: As of 1891, David Alexander MacFarlane was also known as Alexander McFarlan.4
  • Biography*: The 1881 Census lists Alexander as going to school. David was alive at the time of his father's death in 1895.6,3

Citations

  1. [S123] St. Ann's RC Church, Church Records, from 1865 St. Ann's Parish Vitals.
  2. [S515] 1891 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.
  3. [S339] 1881 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.
  4. [S515] 1891 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA, Subdistrict q, family 073.
  5. [S427] CBGHA, online www.cbgha.org, 2015-02
    St. Thomas Cemetery
    Salmon River Lake
    Guysborough County
    Nova Scotia, Canada.
  6. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.

William Edward MacFarlane

M, #2919, b. 10 May 1878
  • Relationship: 2nd cousin 2 times removed of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 30 Jul 2014
  • Religion*: He was Roman Catholic.4
  • Name Variation: As of 1891, William Edward MacFarlane was also known as William McFarlan.2
  • Biography*: William was alive at the time of his father's death in 1895.5

Citations

  1. [S123] St. Ann's RC Church, Church Records, from 1865 St. Ann's Parish Vitals.
  2. [S515] 1891 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA, Subdistrict q, family 073.
  3. [S339] 1881 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.
  4. [S515] 1891 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.
  5. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.

Angus Vincent MacFarlane

M, #2920, b. 7 December 1880
  • Relationship: 2nd cousin 2 times removed of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 30 Jul 2014
  • Religion*: He was Roman Catholic.2
  • Name Variation: As of 1891, Angus Vincent MacFarlane was also known as Angus McFarlan.2
  • Biography*: Angus was alive at the time of his father's death in 1895.4

Citations

  1. [S123] St. Ann's RC Church, Church Records, from 1865 St. Ann's Parish Vitals.
  2. [S515] 1891 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA, Subdistrict q, family 073.
  3. [S339] 1881 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.
  4. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.

Ann Elizabeth MacFarlane

F, #2921, b. 27 November 1884
  • Relationship: 2nd cousin 2 times removed of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 30 Jul 2014
  • Religion*: She was Roman Catholic.2
  • Name Variation: As of 1891, Ann Elizabeth MacFarlane was also known as Ann McFarlan.2
  • Biography*: Ann was alive at the time of her father's death in 1895.3

Citations

  1. [S123] St. Ann's RC Church, Church Records, from 1865 St. Ann's Parish Vitals.
  2. [S515] 1891 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA, Subdistrict q, family 073.
  3. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.

John Leo MacFarlane

M, #2922, b. 10 February 1887
  • Relationship: 2nd cousin 2 times removed of Donald James MacFarlane
  • Last Edited: 30 Jul 2014
  • Religion*: He was Roman Catholic.2
  • Biography*: John Leo was alive at the time of his father's death in 1895.3

Citations

  1. [S123] St. Ann's RC Church, Church Records, from 1865 St. Ann's Parish Vitals.
  2. [S515] 1891 Canada Federal Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA, Subdistrict q, family 073.
  3. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.

Christy Cameron

F, #2923, b. circa 1795, d. before 20 February 1896
  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012
  • Name Variation: Christy Cameron was also known as Christy Mh'or.
  • Married Name: As of circa 1820,her married name was MacDonald.
  • Biography*: Christy was the eldest of the family. She was six years old when she immigrated with her parents.

    She and Allan had a family of ten sons and one daughter. Although her husband died quite young she was determined to give them all a fair share of schooling, such as was then available, and this under difficulties, for the tuition fee was £1 ($4.00), for every scholar. It is related of them, when yet all at home, they formed themselves into a debating club, discussing appropriate subjects, one evening in English, another in Gaelic. They were naturally clever, mentally and physically, and inclined to improve themselves.2

Family: Allan MacDonald b. c 1800

Citations

  1. [S231] The Camerons, October 23, 1913.
  2. [S134] Drummer on Foot, June 19, 1913.
  3. [S228] South River, Descendants of Ewan & Margaret Cameron, October 30, 1913.
  4. [S261] Dr. Raymond A. MacLean, History of Antigonish, Volume 1.
  5. [S262] Dr. Raymond A. MacLean, History of Antigonish, Volume 2.
  6. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Dougald Cameron, Esq., February 20, 1896.

Donald Cameron

M, #2924, b. before 1801, d. before 20 February 1896
  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012
  • Residence*: He lived at Springfield, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.3
  • Name-Gaelic: Donald Cameron was also known in Gaelic as Cul Na Camshronach.3
  • Biography*: Donald lived at Springfield, Antigonish County.
    Christy McGillivary was Donald's first wife, his second was Janet Boyd and his third Mary Power.8,2

Family 1: Christy MacGillivray [An Uillt] b. c 1805

Family 2: Janet Boyd b. c 1810

Family 3: Mary Power b. c 1820

Citations

  1. [S231] The Camerons, October 23, 1913.
  2. [S228] South River, Descendants of Ewan & Margaret Cameron, October 30, 1913.
  3. [S679] Allan J. GILLIS (5174), "Descendants of Hugh Boyd # 0390."
  4. [S133] DOF - July 24, 1913, Boyd Settlement, July 24, 1913, Page 16.
  5. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Laughlin Cameron, page 260.
  6. [S228] South River, Descendants of Ewan & Margaret Cameron, October 30, 1913, page 48.
  7. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Dougald Cameron, Esq., February 20, 1896.
  8. [S262] Dr. Raymond A. MacLean, History of Antigonish, Volume 2.
  9. [S135] DOF - July 3, 1913, Frasers Mills, July 3, 1913.
  10. [S227] South River, The McGillivarys (Bridge), October 02, 1913.

Catherine Cameron

F, #2925, b. before 1801, d. before 20 February 1896
  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012
  • Residence*: She and Allan MacGillivray [An Uillt] lived at East Bay, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada.5
  • Married Name: Her married name was MacGillivray.
  • Biography*: Catherine and Allan moved to East Bay after their marriage.3

Citations

  1. [S231] The Camerons, October 23, 1913.
  2. [S136] DOF - August 7, 1913, Dunmore, August 7, 1913.
  3. [S262] Dr. Raymond A. MacLean, History of Antigonish, Volume 2.
  4. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Dougald Cameron, Esq., February 20, 1896.
  5. [S228] South River, Descendants of Ewan & Margaret Cameron, October 30, 1913, page 49.

John Cameron

M, #2928, b. after 1801, d. before 20 February 1896
  • Last Edited: 2 Dec 2013

Family: Catherine MacDonald b. c 1805

Citations

  1. [S231] The Camerons, October 23, 1913.
  2. [S680] DOF - November 6, 1913 The Cameronst, July 31, 1913, page 51.
  3. [S262] Dr. Raymond A. MacLean, History of Antigonish, Volume 2.
  4. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Ann Cameron, page 242.
  5. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Ann Cameron, page 244.
  6. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Lauchlin Cameron, page 261.
  7. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Death Registration
    Year 1937
    Book 139
    Page 717.
  8. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage registration for Janet Cameron & Allan McGillvray
    Registration Year 1869
    Book 1803
    Page 20
    Number 32.
  9. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage registration for Catherine McLellan & Lauchlan Cameron
    Registration Year 1869
    Book 1803
    Page 23
    Number 94.
  10. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Dougald Cameron, Esq., February 20, 1896.
  11. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage registration of Catherine Cameron & Angus McGillivray
    Year: 1872
    Book: 1803
    Page: 37
    Number: 49.