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Announcements

Updated 17-Jul-2004


PE03257A.gif (4096 bytes)   Posted here are announcements concerning family reunions and gatherings, books and research projects in progress and other news of interest to McWh*rter genealogy researchers.

Anyone wishing to post news for other researchers should drop me a line. Alan D. McWhirter at a.mcwhirter@att.net

3-Volume Set Available - Descendants of David McWhorter (1741-1786) and Mary Poston.
.

Free copies - McWh*rter Genealogy Newsletter.

new3.gif (144 bytes)   Archaeology at New Philadelphia, Pike co., IL
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new3.gif (144 bytes)   McWhorter Reunion - Gadsden, Alabama (25-Sep-2004)
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To post an announcement on this page -
Contact Alan D. McWhirter!


3-Volume McWhorter Set
Now available from Heritage Books

http://www.heritagebooks.com

Descendants of David McWhirter & Mary Posten
– Patricia Lynn Petitt

Volume 1

  The McWhorters originally came from the lowlands of Scotland. "Some immigrated to America directly from Scotland and others, more circuitously, from Scotland by way of North Ireland along with the thousands of other Scotch-Irish settlers." Hugh and Jean McWhirter (believed to be the immigrant ancestors of David McWhirter) emigrated from County Armagh to New Castle, DE, in 1735. One of their sons, possibly John McWhirter of Marsh Creek, PA, was the father of David McWhirter. Volume I offers background history on the McWhorter family, complete with information on David (b. c1741 in PA) and Mary McWhirter (the progenitors of the family), Bible records, deeds, wills, newspaper obituaries, photos, genealogies and biographical sketches. The descendants of John McWhorter (son of David and Mary) and his wife, Elizabeth Willson, can be found in this volume. A fullname index is provided for each chapter of genealogy. This massive 3-volume set is enhanced by numerous photographs of descendants and significant places, and it is a MUST for anyone researching McWhirter/McWhorter genealogy. Dr. Pettit is a member of The Society of Lees of Virginia, The Fairfax Historical Society, and the Historic Centreville Society. Volume I 2002, 313 pp., illus., 8.5x11, cloth, $52.00 #P2131

Volume 2

   Volume II is devoted to the children of David and Mary McWhirter; the family of Hugh and Jean McWhorter of New Castle; with additional documentation, Bible records and photos. This massive 3-volume set is enhanced by numerous photographs of descendants and significant places, and it is a MUST for anyone researching McWhirter/McWhorter genealogy. Dr. Pettit is a member of The Society of Lees of Virginia, The Fairfax Historical Society, and the Historic Centreville Society. Volume II 2002, 380 pp., illus., 8.5x11, cloth, $48.00 #P2132

Volume 3

   Volume III contains over 300 McWhorter letters (written between 1830 and 1999) that the author has transcribed, footnoted, and referenced to descendants. This volume also includes facsimile reprints of original documents that were kept with the letters, such as Civil War orders, Civil War furlough papers, medical degrees (from the early 1800s), Patent records for soap (1800s), and much more! This massive 3-volume set is enhanced by numerous photographs of descendants and significant places, and it is a MUST for anyone researching McWhirter/McWhorter genealogy. Dr. Pettit is a member of The Society of Lees of Virginia, The Fairfax Historical Society, and the Historic Centreville Society. Volume III 2002, 528 pp., illus., 8.5x11, cloth, $70.00 #P2133.


Free to a good home ...

A complimentary copy of a recent issue of the MCWH*RTER GENEALOGY NEWSLETTER will be sent upon request to anyone who is interested.
Simply e-mail a.mcwhirter@att.net and request a copy.
Be sure to leave a name and mailing address!

Subscriptions to the newsletter are $10/year for four issues.
Subscription requests should be sent to
(and checks made payable to)
Alan D. McWhirter, 223 Wood Pond Road, Cheshire, CT 06410.


Archaeology at New Philadelphia,
Pike co., IL

   I am writing in search of anyone interested in the descendant families of Free Frank and Lucy McWorter, founders of the town of New Philadelphia, in Hadley Township, Pike County, Illinois, in 1836. I am working with a group of historians and archaeologists from the University of Maryland, the Illinois State Museum, the University of Illinois, and the New Philadelphia Association, to research the social history of this town and its past residents as part of our national heritage. We have recently obtained funding from the National Science Foundation as part of our efforts, and we will be engaged in a multi-year project of historical studies, oral history interviews, and archaeological investigations.

   If you are interested in this project, and recovering the national memory of this historic town and its founders, please contact us. We seek your input, as a member of the community who may have an interest in this effort, to talk with us about the types of questions you would like to have addressed through such research, and your thoughts and preferences on potential ways to honor the heritage of New Philadelphia.

   The story of New Philadelphia is both compelling and unique. In 1836, Frank McWorter, an African American who was born into slavery and later purchased his own freedom, acquired 42 acres of land in the sparsely populated area of Pike County, situated in the rolling hills bounded by the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. He incorporated a town, subdivided the property, and sold lots. He encouraged other families of African American and European heritage to move to the town and create a racially integrated community in the decades before and after the Civil War. New Philadelphia likely served as a stopping place for the "Underground Railroad" of enslaved African Americans who were fleeing northward from the oppression of southern plantations. The history of New Philadelphia serves as a rare example of an integrated early farming community on thenation's Midwestern frontier. The town's population reached its peak of about 170 people after the Civil War, a size comparable to many Pike County communities today. However, by the end of the century corporate politics resulted in the death knell for the settlement: regional transportation investors routed a new railroad line to bypass the town. Many of New Philadelphia's residents eventually moved away and, by the early twentieth century, only a few families remained.

   You can learn more about the history of New Philadelphia, and details concerning upcoming phases of our multi-year research efforts by following the related web page links you will find at: http://www.heritage.umd.edu

   Thank you very much for your time and consideration,

   Christopher Fennell,   Historical Archaeologist


new3.gif (144 bytes)   McWhorter Reunion   new3.gif (144 bytes)
Noccolulla Falls Pavillion,
Gadsden, Alabama

25-September-2004

Descendants of Moses McWhorter,
originally of Lancaster co., Pennsylvania
and his sons Henry, George, William and Aaron.


"Any McWhorter that is interested is welcome, or any related line."

Contact:

Bill Campbell, 709 Little Rock Ct., Sheffield, AL 35660

(256-383-0500)

or

Kathryn Martinson, 1112 Appalachee Dr., SE, Huntsville, AL 35801 (256-883-2665)


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