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The Descendants of Abraham Avery
and
Rebecca Stevens

Text

Patrick Frances7 Cassidy

Order of battle for the American airborne landings in Normandy The Order of battle for the American airborne landings in Normandy is a list of the units immediately available for combat on the Cotentin Peninsula between June 6, 1944, and June 15, 1944, during the American airborne landings in Normandy during World War II.

101st Airborne Division, 502d Parachute Infantry Regiment: Col. George Van Horn Moseley, Jr. (WIA 6 June 44), Lt Col. John H. Michaelis, 1st Battalion: Lt Col. Patrick F. Cassidy

Military Times Hall of Valor Patrick F. Cassidy, Home of record: Oregon, Distinguished Service Cross, Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry) Patrick F. Cassidy (ASN: 0-351262), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving as Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, 502d Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, in action against enemy forces on 11 June 1944, in France.

Lieutenant Colonel Cassidy's battalion was committed to the assault of Carentan.  To accomplish the mission it was necessary to cross a narrow bridge.  When the battalion was held up at the bridge, Lieutenant Colonel Cassidy came up to the bridge and despite intense machine gun and mortar fire directed a movement across.  He then led his battalion in an assault up a narrow causeway, continually exposing himself to heavy enemy fire. When his artillery liaison officer became a casualty, he, through his command radio net, directed artillery fire upon a German machine gun nest that was holding up the advance.

Lieutenant Colonel Cassidy's outstanding leadership, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 101st Airborne Division, and the United States Army.

General Orders: Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 31 (July 1, 1944), Action Date: 11-Jun-44, Service: Army, Rank: Lieutenant Colonel, Company: Commanding Officer, Battalion: 1st Battalion, Regiment: 502d Infantry Regiment, Division: 101st Airborne Division

LTC Patrick Cassidy was original 1st battalion commander of the 502 PIR.  Naturally known as "Hopalong" to his troops, Cassidy's men took the German artillery garrison at objective XYZ in Normandy, and established roadblocks along exits 3 and 4 at Foucarville and St Germain de Varreville.  S.L.A. Marshall later wrote that Cassidy's battalion did "the one best job for America on D-Day."

Cassidy was later EXO of the 502 Regiment, his former battalion being commanded by LTC Thomas Sutliffe in Holland, and John Hanlon in Bastogne. This photo was made in January, 1945 near the 502's regimental C.P. at Rolle, Belgium.
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Willis F. Chapman
Arlington National Cemetery website:
Willis F. Chapman, Brigadier General, United States Air Force - He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1935.  He was a decorated command pilot with over 5000 flying hours and Group Commander in the Mediterranean Theatre in World War II and served in Hawaii and was twice assigned to Paris.

He was instrumental in development and success of Harrier Vertical Takeoff aircraft.  Wing Commander of the Air Force's first jet bomb wing.

After retirement in 1965 he became Director, Aerospace Program in Europe for LTV, Inc. and held a patent for process controlling oceanic oil spills.
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Royal4 Chapel
His occupation as a railroad bagman or baggage man probably acoounts for the difficulty in locating him in census records.  However, city directories are of some help:
Record Place Occupation Address Other

1869 Marriage Adrian, Lewanee Co. MI Railroading Spring Arbor, Jackson Co. MI bride: Ardella Downer

1873 City Directory Detroit MI Baggageman MCRR none given none

1873 City Directory Detroit MI Baggageman MCRR res Jackson MI

1880 U.S. Census Ann Arbor MI North 12th St., Ardella and Guy, but not Royal

1883 City Directory Jackson MI Baggageman 529 State none

1897 City Directory Chicago IL Baggage 1901 N. Whipple separate listing for son Guy at same address

1900 U.S. Census Chicago IL Baggageman 1901 N. Whipple with wife Adella; son Guy and his family

1910 City Directory Detroit MI Baggageman rooms 186 Howard none mentioned

1910 U.S. Census Chicago IL 3919 N 44th Ct. Adella, married, in household of son Guy, no mention of Royal

1913 Death record Chicago IL Retired R.R. Baggageman 1919 Kenneth Ave
resided in city 20 years
married, informant: son Guy

Dictionary definition of "baggageman: 1) a railroad employee who is in charge of the checked baggage of passengers during the run of a train, and unloads it at the proper destination.
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Guy Martin5 Chapel
Chicago Tribune, 10 Aug 1957, [He] became blind when he was 62 and began a successful Braille greeting card business in a workshop in the rear of his home ...

[He] began to paint at 14 and by the time he lost his sight his works had been exhibited in the Art Institute of Chicago and in galleries in New York City, Boston, Philadelphia, and Denver.  After experimenting three years, he converted a laundry wringer into a Braille printing press to turn out greeting cards.
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William Cornelius Fonda
History of Calhoun County, Michigan, 1830-1877, with Illustrations Descriptive of its Scenery, Palatial Residences, Public Buildings, Fine Blocks, and Important Manufactories, L.H. Everts & Co. Philadelphia:
p.15: A large emigration came into the county in 1833-34, but the heaviest purchases were made in 1835-36. ... Colonel William C. Fonda, of Bedford, in 1854, introduced Merino sheep into this township, thoroughbreds from the celebrated flocks of Vermont.

p.16: Blooded cattle ... In 1855 Colonel Fonda introduced some fine Durhams from the John North farm, of Chester County, Pennsylvania, and later, procured some very fine Alderneys from Burton, who imported direct from Bates, of England.

p.39: The Calhoun millitia were first enrolled in October, 1836 ... commissions, as captains, were issued to Colonel Fonda, ... When the militia were brigaded, ... The lieutenants were all made captains, and the captains colonels ...

p.176: Pennfield Township - The first step towards the settlement of this township was taken in 1831 by Albert H. Smith, who, on the 10th of December of that year, entered a tract of land, a portion of which is now occupied by Colonel William C. Fonda, who took up his permanent residence thereon in the year 1836.  This constitutes a part of section 29.

p.177: The township of Pennfield is watered by Battle creek, which runs through sections 32 and 28, ... Among the prominent farmers of Pennfield are ... William C. Fonda ...

p.194: Bedford Township ... First Improved stock - The first thorough-bred merinos were introduced into Bedford township (just over the Pennfield line) by Colonel William C. Fonda, in 1851.  He purchased a Vermont buck, for which he paid five hundred dollars, and had several fine sheep of this breed, which cost him from two hundred and fifty to four hundred dollars.

The first improved "short horns" were imported from Pennsylvania in 1853. They consisted of some fine Durhams, from the John North stock farm, in Chester County, and also some splendid Alderneys, which Colonel Fonda procured from John Burton, and he from the well-known breeder, Bates, of England and from Samuel Sharpless and Richard Darlington, of Chester County, Pennsylvania.  He also imported some fine Chester White hogs in 1860.

This stock furnished the surrounding country, and supplied a want long felt by stock-raisers. It did much towards the improvement of stock, and fine-graded animals are now plentiful in various parts of the country.
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Jonathan Cronkhite
Cronk, Cronkhite Family Tree 8.4-5: Little is known about Jonathan’s childhood, but it is assumed he attended the rural school on Turk’s Hill near his Perinton Township home where his father was a trustee.  He was fifteen years old when his mother passed away.  He idolized his father, Aury, and cared for him until Aury died.

Jonathan worked closely with his father as farmers and did much to help in moving from New York State to Michigan.  Jonathan’s 1864 diary states that on the Saturday morning of April 30th, Aury Cronkhite Sr., with his four young adult children, left their New York home.  They drove horses and wagon through Avon and spent the night at Stafford.  They spent Sunday night forty miles beyond Richmond and arrived at Buffalo, spending Monday night there.  Tuesday the family shipped the horses and wagon then rode the train across Canada, finding themselves on Wednesday morning in Sarnia.

From this time on the family was with relatives and looking for a farm.  On June 14th several loads of goods were drawn from the Battle Creek, Michigan railroad depot to their new home just east of the city.  On September 17, 1864, Aury bought the two hundred seventy-five acre farm in Emmett Township of Calhoun County, Michigan. ...

After living thirty-three years on the Emmett Township farm , Jonathan and Sarah moved to the William Wattles Farm as renters.  After eleven years of renting, they purchased an eighty acre farm in Burlington Township in the spring of 1908.
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William Jonathan6 Cronkhite
Cronk, Cronkhite Family Tree 9.2: William, known as “Bill,” attended rural school at the Wattles school.  During his early life he was a farmer and thresher in the local area and in the Dakotas.  He became an employee of the former Nichols & Shepherd Company before joining the Grand Trunk Railroad in 1928.  It was said that there were very few who could put a train together as quickly or better than William.  He retired from the Grand Trunk in 1942.
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Chester D. Howe
Battle Creek city directories, 1882 Battle Creek MI, p.67:
Howe Chester D, (Howe, Simons & Co.), res 33 Frelinghuysen Ave.
Howe Simons & Co. (Chester D. Howe, Ranson W. Howe, Elbert D. Simons), carpenters &
    builders, also architects, nr se corner S Jefferson & Jackson


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Edward William4 Fonda
History of Calhoun County, Michigan, 1830-1877, with Illustrations Descriptive of its Scenery, Palatial Residences, Public Buildings, Fine Blocks, and Important Manufactories, L.H. Everts & Co. Philadelphia:
p.119: The first hotel was erected by Dr. Wm. H. Delop, in 1868, and was first kept by a man named Chapman.  Edward Fonda afterwards purchased the property and conducted the business for about two years.

Battle Creek city directories, 1882 Battle Creek MI, p.274 (Athens):
Fonda Edward W., propr, Athens Hotel and general blacksmith
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Curtis Miller Sheldon
The Home Defense Committee of Columbia County, New York, Columbia County in the World War, 1924, [FHL 974.739 M2c] p.717-18: Sheldon's principal work has been that of farming, but for almost three years before he joined the army, he was proprietor of a hotel at Livingston.  He enlisted at Albany in the United States Guards on 12 Feb 1918, and on the following day, he was sworn into service at Fort Slocum, where he remained for ten days.

As a Private in Company C, 1st Battalion, United States Guard, he served at the Plattsburg Training Camp two months and in Brooklyn, New York, for two months.  At the latter place, Private Sheldon guarded the piers along the Atlantic Basin and assisted in several slacker raids.  For ten days previous to his dismissal, Sheldon was stationed at Camp Dix, and there received his honorable discharge on 10 Jan 1919.
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William Renwick Glen
Early Germans of NJ:
p.600 He first united on profession with the church of Matteawan, Dutches Co., N.Y., then under the pastoral care of the Rev. Samuel Irenaeus Prime, at the age of twenty-one.  He was afterward elected a ruling elder, was ordained to that office July 19, 1840, and retained it until licensed.

He was prepared for college at the Hudson River Seminary, at Stockport, N.Y., under the Rev. E.D. Maltbie and The Rev. Alden Scovel, and for some time pursued his studies at Burr Seminary, VT, but was never graduated from any college.  He entered Princeton Seminary in 1845, and graduated in 1848.

He was licensed by the Presbytery of North River April 21, 1847, and labored as a missionary to the coal miners of Schuylkill and adjacent counties, Pennsylvania, 1847-52.  He was ordained an evangelist by Luzerne Presbytery at Middleport, PA, December 10, 1850.  His first Pastorate was over the Tamaqua Church, PA, where he was installed June 9, 1852, and released Aug. 12, 1856.

His next charge was over German Valley Church, N.J.(Photo), where he was installed October 17, 1856, and was released Jan. 13,1868.

p.124 Rev. William R. Glenn, of the First Presbyterian Church of Tamaqua accepted a call to the German Vally Church.  He entered upon his labors here in the autumn of 1856.  Mr. Glenn is a good preacher, as all affirm, and his labors here were attended by a fair measure of success.  During the eleven years of his pastorate nine persons were added to the church by certificate and ninety boy examination.  This is the largest number received by any one pastor.

p.600-01 Next he was pastor elect at Bloomington, IL, from Jan 20, 1868, until installed July 11, 1869.  This relation (as also the church organization) was dissolved after the reunion, April 5, 1871.  He then served the church at Heyworth, IL, from April 5, 1871, until July 1, 1872.  From July 1, 1872 to Jan 1, 1873, he labored as a missionary to the feeble and vacant churches in the Presbytery of Bloomington, IL.

His last pastoral charge was at Monticello, IL, where he was installed June 10, 1873, which relation, because of a severe attack of bronchitis, was dissolved May 1, 1875.  From this time his health was delicate and manifestly declined, but to the end he was strong in faith and hope.  ... Mr. Glen was a man of a tender, true, and affectionate nature, of deep and fervent piety, prayerful, conscientious, industrious, an untiring worker, wearing himself out for Christ, always keeping in view as his great aim the salvation of souls.

History of Morris Co. NJ p.387: [German Valley Church] William R. Glen [was pastor] from 1868 to 1874 [see above, which says 1856 to 1868].  During Mr. Glen's pastorate the church edifice was enlarged and refurnished.  A large colony was also sent out to form the Presbyterian church of Lower Valley.
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Irenaeus Renwick4 Glen
Gen. Column of the "Boston Transcript" 17 Sept 1917, per Pam Miles: Was affiliated with the First English Presbyterian Church in Amwell as follows: "Church Officers & Members extracted from the history of the First English Presbyterian Church in Amwell. By Rev. John Becker Kugler A.M. Clinton N.J. 1912." Received by Mr. Upham 1865. ... On Certificate 1865 Irenaeus R. Glen, M.D.  On Certificate 1867 Mrs. Dr. Irenaeus Glen.  Elders received from Clover Hill, Irenaeus R. Glen, M.D. 1870, MV 1871.
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Charles Augustus Thorp4 Glen
City Directories:
Elizabeth, New Jersey: 1884, 1886-1889 153 De Hart place; 1890, 1891 Salem c North avenue
Newark, New Jersey: 1890-91 Glen & Rosinger, lawyers, 741 Broad, House, Salem c North avenue, Elizabeth, N J

William H. Shaw, History of Essex and Hudson Counties, New Jersey, Philadelphia, 1884, p.291: His education was obtained at Burr Burton Seminary, Manchester, Vt.  Removing to Newark, N.J., he entered, as a student-at-law, the office of Messrs. Cortlandt Parker and Anthony Q. Keasbey, and was admitted to the bar as an Attorney in 1869, and as a counselor in 1873.

He began to practice immediately after receiving his license as attorney, remaining in the office of his preceptors, and in charge of a portion of their business, until his admission as counselor.  Since that time he has been in practice for himself, and with great success, never having removed from the office in which he first established himself.
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Charles Coleman Stoddard
I Speak of the City: Poems of New York By Stephen Wolf, p.14-15: "... he worked in the field of geology, then later as an editor and advertising manager.  He was both librarian and editor for the Staten Island Historian, the journal of that borough's historical society." Followed by the poem "When Broadway was a Country Road".

He also authored at least one book: Kimono Ballads: Some Cheerful Rhymes for Loafing Times
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Charles Swain Ludlam
RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project - Pam Miles: Charles Swain Ludlam came to Bloomington, IL from New Jersey and entered the 3rd year preparatory of Illinois Wesleylan University at Bloomington in 1869, and joined Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity.  He went through college and took one year of law, graduating in 1875.  He taught Latin and possibly Greek at the college.  After his marriage to Lillian in Oct. 1875 in Springfield IL, they moved to Frankfort IN where he "took charge" of Frankfort High School.  He later taught at Brookville High School for $100.00 a month.
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William Renwick5 Ludlam
RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project - Pam Miles: He lived in Bridgeport CT for several years, around 1907-1910.  Around March of 1910 he moved back to Chicago IL.  While in Bridgeport CT he was a member of the Loyal Order of Red Men.  The organization was originally the Sons of Liberty who had ties to the Boston Tea Party.  They were originally an underground organization who patterned their ritual after the Masons.

William worked for Western Electric.  He worked at Roth Bros. & Co.  It was sold in the spring of 1929, but he continued working there until 1932.  He sold New York Life Insurance 1932-1936.  He then worked for Electro-Motive Corporation from 1936 to when he retired on 1 Jan 1952.

He liked to garden, raised flowers and vegetables.  Was handy around the house, like to remodel, did a lot of that with the home in LaGrange.  They moved there from Berwyn because of the better schools.

Was very active in the Masonic Lodge near his home.  He could walk over there and spent a lot of time with the lodge.  Was a Knight Templar, Trinity Commandry and received a beautiful sword.

Was a shy, gentle man.
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Alma Elizabeth Roth
RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project - Pam Miles: She was a wonderful seamstress, and made a lot of beautiful storybook dolls clothes for her two granddaughters.  She dressed these dolls as brides and bridesmaids.  She was a member of Eastern Star.
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Willard Norton Anderson
RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project - Pam Miles: Before his retirement he was an accounting professor at San Bernardino Valley College for 40 years, and held the position of Chairman of the Accounting and Business Data Processing Dept.  He receiced his bachelor's and master's degree from UCLA and was a certified public accountant.

He was active in the Citrus Belt Chapter of the California Society of Certified Public Accountants, serving as chairman of its membership committee since 1950.

Anderson was council treasurer and executive board member of the California Inland Empire Council, Boy Scouts of America, holder of the Silver Beaver Award from the local council, and a 62 year veteran of the scouting movement.

Anderson was organizer of the San Bernardino District Committee of the UCLA Alumni Scholarship Program and was a director of Crawford Investment Co.
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William Glen5 Roe
Tillman County Historical Society, A Diamond Jubilee History of Tillman County 1901-1976, Vol.1, p.560-61: In 1906 two eager, ambitious, and penniless young lawyers fresh out of law school, John B. Wilson from the University of Missouri, and W.G. Roe from John Marshall Law School in Chicago ... met in Anadarko, Oklahoma. ... they cast their eyes toward fairer and greener pastures.  These they found in the newly-to-be created Tillman County, of which Frederick was to be the county seat.

Upon their move there, they began a partnership in the practice of law ... At first the financial rewards were rather meager.  They could afford only one meal ticket at D.B. Pearson's boarding house for both of them. ... Coal for the potbellied stove in their sparsely furnished office was purchased one scuttle at a time, mostly on credit. ...

[W.G. Roe's] legal education was gained at night, after the day's work, which variously consisted of labor in a printing office, the Minnesota wheat fields, lawyers' offices ...

W.G. Roe "moonlighted" in various ways during his early residence in Oklahoma.  He served as editor of the Frederick Enterprise ... By virtue of adhering to his early political allegiance in Illinois, Land of Lincoln, W.G. was appointed United States Commissioner and practically all of the land in the Big Pasture was proved up by the settlers before his court.  He has often told of going home at night with every pocket full of money paid by the homesteaders and hanging his trousers on the bedpost without a worry or care.
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William3 Bevin
Averys of Groton p.341: Averys of Groton, p. 341: The business history of this family is a very unique and interesting one.  In 1830, William Bevin, the eldest son, commenced the manufacture of sleighbells, in East Hampton CT, the little town in which his parents lived.  One by one the other sons, as they became of age, engaged in the same business, all the labor of their little foundry being done by hand and horse power.  In 1837, they purchased a valuable water privilege in the town, which enabled them to increase their business very rapidly.

Later on the well-known firm of Bevin Brothers' Manufacturing Company was organized composed entirely of members of the family, and by new inventions, continually increasing facilities, energy and forethought, their business has so increased that now [1894] they probably manufacture more than half the bells that are made and sold in the United States and Canada.

All of the sons, as well as the sons-in-law and many of the grandchildren, are or have been employed in this business; and many have filled important and honorable private offices and trusts in their county and state.
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Herbert C. Wadsworth
City Directories -
Hartford 1882/1884:
Wadsworth H.C. at Hfd. F.I. h Manchester t


Hartford 1888:
Wadsworth Herbert C. clerk at Hartford Fire Insurance Co. 58 Trumbull, b. 54 Buckingham


Hartford 1889:
Wadsworth Herbert C. clerk at Hartford Fire Insurance Co. 53 Trumbull, b. 21 Spring


Hartford 1890:
Wadsworth Herbert C. at Hartford Fire Insurance Co. 53 Trumbull, l 218 Main


Hartford 1892:
Wadsworth Herbert C. at Hartford Fire Insurance Co. 53 Trumbull, l 784 Main


Hartford 1897/1902/1904:
Wadsworth Herbert C. at Hartford Fire Insurance Co. 53 Trumbull, h 60 Willard


Hartford 1906:
Wadsworth Herbert C. at Hartford Fire Insurance Co. 125 Trumbull, h 60 Willard


Hartford 1909, removals:
Wadsworth Herbert C., Atlanta GA

Atlanta (GA) Constitution 30 Jun 1924: Mr. Wadsworth was popular in the insurance field, having made numerous friends during the fifteen years of his residence here as an official of the Hartford Fire Insurance company.
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Hiram Veazey
History of Middlesex County: The manufacture of bells has been carried on at East Hampton for upwards of 80 years by numerous competitors in the business, and during this period only one man has retired from it with a competence, Hiram Veazey.  The natural inquiry suggested is whether he had been more fortunate than the others, or whether he possessed peculiar traits of character which conduced to his success, and which were lacking in his several competitors; of this the reader must judge, as it is the duty of the historian to record the facts and not to draw invidious comparisons. ...

Hiram, ... attended school until he was 19 years of age, working a portion of the time on his father's farm, and in the bell foundry of Goff & Abell, where he acquired a practical knowledge of the bell business.  He subsequently removed to New Jersey, where he worked in an iron foundry for two years.

He returned to his native village in 1839, and commenced the manufacture of bells in company with his brother.  The works at this time were operated by horse power.  He subsequently retired from the firm and purchased the business of Goff & Abell, taking a ten years' lease of the water privilege used by them.  He then formed a copartnership with Alfred B. White, and commenced the manufacture of a patent door bell, in connection with other bells, which proved a great success, and in 1882, he retired from business.

He has always taken an active part in the public affairs of his native village, and in 1855-6 he was elected to the Legislature, and was again elected in 1877; during the latter period he served as a member of the finance committee.  He has been for several years a director in the Middlesex County Bank, and of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank of Middletown; of the latter he was one of the original incorporators.  He has been for many years an active member of the Congregational Church, and in all works of benevolence and public improvement has been a liberal contributor.

He is a man of good judgment, exceedingly cautious, weighing well all the chances before embarking in any business operation.  Scrupulously honest in all his transactions, his aim through life has been, wherever expedient, to pay cash, rather than incur a liability which might be attended with any possible risk.  To these qualities he doubtless owes his success in life. ...
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Addison Edward5 Avery
Boston Daily Globe, 28 Jan 1900 The second days session of the conference of boys' department of the Y.M.C.A. of Massachusetts and Rhode Island ... At the forenoon session papers were read as follows: ... "The Christian Boy's Opportunity and Obligation," Addison Avery, Lowell, and Charles H. Tower, Dalton.

Chicago Daily Tribune, 5 Apr 1936 "For He Had Great Possessions," a religious play, will be presented by the Baptist Players of the First Baptist church of Oak Park Easter Sunday eveing in the Community house auditorium.  The dramatic story by Dorothy Clarke Wilson will be ... staged by Addison E. Avery.  Mr. Avery will be assisted by committees from the Baptist Players ...

23 Aug 1942: Summer Show of the Austin, Oak Park, and River Forest Art league ... Among the painters and sculptors exhibiting ... Addison Avery

17 Apr 1949 Medinah's Golden Chanters, a 70 voice male chorus, will present a concert of sacred and semi-classical music ... West siders who will appear include Addison E. Avery ... of Oak Park ...

24 Jun 1956 Associated with the Miehle Printing Press and Manufacturing company for 19 years, Avery also is a free lance commercial artist.  As plant patent artist for the United States government, he has portrayed new flowers, fruit, trees, and nuts originated by growers.  During the Century of Progress World fair, he did flower paintings and displayed them.

10 May 1958 A lecture on Indian artifacts will be given by Addison E. Avery of Oak Park at the meeting of the Chicago Rocks and Minerals society ... Mr. Avery's lecture will be supplanted [sic] with a display of standard stone relics and rare specimens of bone, shell and copper collected in 28 states.
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John4 Avery
Boston Daily Globe, 20 Nov 1893: Woburn, Nov 19 - An old slaughterhouse on Stoddard st. owned by Joseph Buck was destroyed by fire this afternoon.  In the building was a large quantity of leather-working machinery owned by John Avery.  The value is estimated at about $9000, partly insured.

City Directories -
Newton 1871:
Avery John, book-keeper (68 High, Boston), house Perkins, near Winthrop, W.N.

Boston 1878:
Avery John (Alexander Moseley & Co.), 47 South, house at West Newton;
Moseley Alex. & Co. (F.A. Loring and John Avery), hides and leather, 47 South

Boston 1882/1883:
Avery John (Loring & Avery), 47 South, house at West Newton;
Loring Freeman A. (Loring & Avery), 47 South, house at Winchester;
Loring & Avery (F.A. Loring and John Avery), leather, 47 South

Newton 1885:
Avery John, leather (47 South, Boston), house Perkins n. Winthrop W.N.

Newton 1897:
Avery John, leather (49 South, Boston), house Perkins near Winthrop W.N.

Newton 1899/1901:
Avery John, leather (49 South, Boston), house 45 Perkins W.N.

Newton 1903/1905/1907/1909/1911:
Avery John, leather (43 South, Boston), h 45 Perkins W.N.

Boston 1904:
Avery John (Avery & Lowry) 43 South, h at W Newton;
Avery & Lowry (John Avery, M J Lowry) leather 43 South
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Ellery Peabody
City Directories -
Newton 1885:
Peabody Ellery, bookkeeper (46 Commerce, Boston), boards at M.J. Peabody's
Peabody Mary J. widow of Ellery, house Waltham near Davis avenue

Boston 1890:
Peabody Ellery, clerk, 83 S. Market h at W. Newton

Boston 1892-93:
Peabody Ellery, salesman, 46 Commerce, h at W. Newton

Newton 1897:
Peabody Ellery, flour (46 Commerce, Boston), house Perkins near Winthrop W.N.

Newton 1899:
Peabody Ellery, flour (46 Commerce, B.), h 37 Perkins W.N.

Newton 1901/1903/1905/1907/1909:
Peabody Ellery, flour and provisions (81 S Market, Boston), house 37 Perkins W.N.

Boston 1904:
Peabody Ellery, (J W Roberts & Co) provisions 81 S Market and 46 Commerce, h at W. Newton

Newton 1911:
Peabody Ellery, flour and groceries (81 S Market, Boston), house 37 Perkins W.N.

Newton 1913/1915:
Peabody Ellery, leather (43 South, Boston), house 37 Perkins W.N.

Newton 1919:
Peabody Ellery (Harriet A), leather (43 South, Boston), house 37 Perkins W.N.

Newton 1921/1923/1925/1927:
Peabody Ellery (Harriet A), leather (43 South, Boston), h 70 Temple W.N.

Boston 1924:
Peabody Ellery, pres Ashton Valve Co 161 First Camb and pres Avery & Lowry Co 43 South, h at W. Newton

Newton 1929:
Peabody Ellery, leather (43 South, Boston), h 70 Temple W.N.

Newton 1931/1932/1934/1936:
Peabody Ellery, leather (23 South, Boston), res 15 Sewall W.N.

Newton 1938:
Peabody Ellery, (Ashton Valve Co, Camb), h 70 Temple W.N.

Newton 1940:
Peabody Ellery, pres West Newton Co-operative Bank, h 31 Fairfield (B)

Newton 1943/1945:
Peabody Ellery, pres West Newton Co-operative Bank, r 326 Fuller W.N.
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Avery Sherburne6 Peabody
City Directories -
Newton 1923:
Peabody Avery S student res 50 Temple W.N.

Newton 1925/1927/1929:
Peabody Avery S student res 70 Temple W.N.

Newton 1931/1932/1934/1936:
Peabody Avery S, clerk, res 15 Sewall W.N.

Boston 1947:
Peabody Avery S, clerk, h 124 Mt Vernon

Boston 1949:
Peabody Avery S, bookseller, 124 Mt Vernon h do

Boston 1962:
Peabody Avery S, h 108 Mt Vernon St. Apt 8

Boston 1967/1970/1971/1973:
Peabody Avery S, retd, h 108 Mt Vernon St. Apt 8
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Annie Peabody
City Directories -
Newton 1907/1909:
Mrs. John Avery, Registrar, Lucy Jackson Chapter, DAR

Newton 1913/1915:
Avery Annie P widow of John h 45 Perkins W.N.

Newton 1919/1921/1923/1925/1927/1929/1931/1932:
Avery Annie P widow of John h 15 Sewall W.N.

Newton 1934:
Avery Annie P widow of John rem to Andover
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John4 Roper
Chicago City Directories:
1862-63 clerk 12 Dearborn, h 999 Wabash av
1866 clerk J.W. Doane & Co. 49 Michigan Av, rooms 44 La Salle
1872 wholesale grocer J.W. Doane & Co. 41 Wabash Ave, h 148 Calumet Ave
1873-1876 wholesale grocer, Towle & Rober 41 Wabash Ave, h 148 Calumet Ave
1877-1880 Towle & Roper wholesale grocer 41 Wabash av, h 340 Ellis av;
1883 John Roper & Co. wholesale grocers 41 Wabash av, h 4021 Ellis av

Chicago Daily Tribune, 27 Sep 1903: For many years Mr. Roper was associated with John W. Doane in the wholesale grocery business.  He also had been a member of the Roper & Baxter Cigar company.

... came to Chicago in 1861.  He entered the employ of John W. Doane, afterward acquiring an interest in the firm.  Later he became a member of the wholesale firm of Stowell & Roper, dissolved in 1885.
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Abraham3 Avery
City Directories -
Boston 1861:
Avery Abraham (G.C. Rand & Avery), printer, 3 Cornhill, house 44 Union Park

Boston 1878:
Avery Abraham (Rand, Avery & Co.), 117 Franklin, house 44 Union Park
Avery Abraham, Director, Shawmut Insurance Company, No. 4 Post Office Square, corner Water St. Organized 1875

Boston 1882/1883:
Avery Abraham 117 Franklin, house 44 Union Park
Avery Abraham, Trustee, Franklin Savings Bank of the City of Boston, No. 20 Boylston St. Incorporated 1861

Boston 1883:
Avery Abraham, Resident Director, Provident Savings Life Assurance Society of New York

Boston 1884:
Avery Abraham h 44 Union Park
Avery Abraham, Trustee, Franklin Savings Bank of the City of Boston, No. 20 Boylston St. Incorporated 1861

Newton 1885:
Avery Abraham, Director, Newton and Watertown Gas-Light Co.

Boston 1892-93:
Avery Abraham h 44 Union Park

Averys of Groton p.367: At an early age, he attended the academy in that town, and upon leaving for college he was the one chosen from the three hundred and fifty students to deliver the valedictory addresses.  In 1844 he entered the Wesleyan University, at Middletown, Conn., of which his father was one of the founders.  Here he spent three years, leaving in 1847, with the intention of taking his last college year at Harvard and then entering the Law School, as his father intended he should do.

He soon changed these plans, however, as his desire had always been for a business life, and not a professional one.  So, giving up his college life and the study of law, a little later he joined his brother-in-law, Mr. Geo. C. Rand, in the printing and publishing business. ...

During all of Mr. Avery's business life, he invariably refused to hold any public office.  Since retiring, he has accepted a few public trusts. ...
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Annie4 Avery
City Directories -
Newton 1897:
Whidden Annie A. widow of Thomas A. [sic] house Winthrop near Perkins W.N.

Newton 1899/1901/1903/1905/1907:
Whidden Annie A. widow of Thomas A. [sic] h 61 Winthrop W.N.

Newton 1907:
Mrs. Thomas M. Whidden, Director, Lucy Jackson Chapter, DAR

Newton 1909:
Mrs. Thomas M. Whidden, Treasurer, Lucy Jackson Chapter, DAR

Newton 1909/1911/1913/1915:
Mrs. Thomas M. Whidden h 61 Winthrop W.N.
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Thomas Avery5 Whidden
City Directories -
Newton 1909/1911:
Whidden Thomas A bds 61 Winthrop W.N.

Newton 1913:
Whidden Thomas A (205 Lincoln B) bds 61 Winthrop W.N.

Newton 1915:
Whidden Thomas A removed to Boston

Boston 1918:
Whidden Thomas A 205 Lincoln bds at B'line

Boston 1924:
Whidden Thomas A 205 Lincoln res 464 Commonwealth Av

Boston 1947:
Whidden Thomas H [sic] (Marguerite M) Goodyear dept US Machy h Brookline
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Robert Avery5 Whidden
City Directories -
Newton 1909/1911:
Whidden Robert A student (at Harvard) bds 61 Winthrop W.N.

Newton 1913:
Whidden Robert A builder (70 Devonshire Boston) bds 61 Winthrop W.N.

Newton 1915:
Whidden Robert A builder (70 Devonshire Boston) h 114 Temple W.N.

Boston 1918:
Whidden Robert A USA

Newton 1919:
Whidden Robert A (Elizabeth F) USA h 114 Temple W.N.

Newton 1921:
Whidden Robert A (Elizabeth F) builder h 114 Temple W.N.

Boston 1924:
Whidden Robert A treas Whidden-Beekman Co. 100 Boylston rm 1021 h at W Newton
Whidden-Beekman Co. engineers and builders 100 Boylston rm 1021Photo

Newton 1923/1925/1927/1929/1931:
Whidden Robert A (Elizabeth F) builder (100 Boylston B) h 114 Temple West Newton

Newton 1932:
Whidden Robert A (Eliz F) constr 100 Arlington rm 707 B h 41 Exeter WN

Newton 1934:
Whidden Robert A (Eliz F) construction (100 Arlington 5th fl B) h 41 Exeter WN

Newton 1936/1938:
Whidden Robert A (Eliz F) construction (B) h 83 Bonad Rd WN

Newton 1940:
Whidden Robert A (Eliz F) pres Rand Avery Printing Co (B) and (The Whidden Co B) h 83 Bonad Rd WN

Newton 1943/1945/1948/1949/1951:
Whidden Robert A (Eliz F) pres Rand Avery Printing Co (B) h 114 Temple WN

Newton 1943/1945/1948:
Whidden Robert A, Trustee, Newton Cemetery and Crematory

Boston 1947:
Whidden Robt A pres Rand Avery-Gordon Taylor Inc h W Newton
Rand Avery-Gordon Taylor Inc, inc Maine 1882, Robert A Whidden pres, Eugene H Gordon v-pres John R Rees sec-treas, creative printing and lithography, catalogs, booklets and direct mail, 871 Commonwealth av, tel STadium 2-1300Photo
Franklin Savings Bank, Robert A Whidden, Clerk of the Corporation and a trustee

Newton 1953:
Whidden Robert A (Eliz F) chairmn Rand Avery Printing Co (B) h 114 Temple WN

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Robert G.6 Whidden
Newton Graphic, 26 Aug 1943: ... civilian pilot and instructor, who was one of five men killed in the crash of an army b-motored cargo plane ... He joined the Northeast Airlines as an airport manager and later qualified as a pilot and recently had been serving as a civilian instructor with the Army.
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Frank Kirkwood Hallock
Hallock genealogy p.305: Dr. Frank K. Hallock, A.B. Wesleyan University 1882, M.D. Columbia University 1885, is a specialist in neurology.  He was the first American to establish an institution for the medical treatment of nervous invalidism on an educational basis. ... He is Medical Director of Cromwell Hall, Cromwell Connecticut.

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation. Volume III: Frank Kirkwood Hallock, M. D., A. M., medical director and proprietor of 1355 Cromwell Hall, the health school for nervous invalids at Cromwell, Middlesex county, Connecticut, one of New England's most successful nerve specialists and one of the leading physicians in his state, ...

The influence of his mother on his moral and spiritual life was as strong and lasting as his father's was on his intellectual life and on the choice of his profession.  Other important factors in shaping his mental tendencies in youth were exerted by the reading in which he took such an intelligent and constant interest, the influence of the works of Emerson and Wordsworth being particularly strong.

As his father was a physician and army surgeon, Dr. Hallock's youth was spent almost entirely in hospitals and institutions and in a variety of localities.  He prepared for college at the Middletown high school, as his father was then assistant physician at the Connecticut Hospital for the Insane.  He graduated from high school in 1877, the year in which his father founded Cromwell Hall.

He then entered Wesleyan University in Middletown, where he received his A.B. degree in 1882 and his A.M. degree in 1885.  During the same period, from 1882 to 1885, he took the medical course at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, where he received his M.D. degree in 1885.

The next four years after he obtained his medical degree, Dr. Hallock spent in still more advanced professional study, consisting of two years of hospital service as interne of the New York Hospital, and two years of study abroad under the leading specialists of Europe.  Thus he spent eleven years in study and preliminary experience before actually settling down to the practice of his profession.

In 1889, on his return from Europe, Dr. Hallock located in Cromwell Hall as his father's assistant, being at that time in his twenty-ninth year.  In 1896 he persuaded his father to change the policy of the institution by eliminating the insane and thus limiting the admission of patients to nervous and general invalids.  The new plan proved most satisfactory, and for a number of years Cromwell Hall was the only institution of its kind in the state not receiving insane cases.

This radical change was the first step in the development of a unique institution, probably the first of its kind in this country.  In addition to the hygienic treatment afforded by the ordinary sanatorium, Cromwell Hall gives a system of outdoor living, guided by "plain-talk" psychotherapy, which is virtually an education along both mental and physical lines.  It is truly a health school.

Since his father's death, in the autumn of 1898, Dr. Hallock has been medical director and proprietor of this successful institution for the treatment of nervous invalidism.

Dr. Hallock was one of the founders of the Middlesex Hospital at Middletown.  He was secretary of that hospital from 1895 to 1907, and is still a director of the institution.  Under Governor Coffin he served as examiner in lunacy, and under Governor Roberts he served as a member of the commission to establish an epileptic colony under state control.
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Sinclair Wallace Armstrong
Providence RI City Directories -
1931/1932:
Armstrong Sinclair W (Mary H) instr B U r 304 Angell

1938/1940/1941/1942/1943/1944/1947:
Armstrong Sinclair W (Mary H) asst prof BU/Brown Univ h 89 Power

1952/1953/1956/1957/1958:
Armstrong Sinclair W (Mary H) prof BU/Brown Univ h 89 Power

1959:
Armstrong Sinclair W prof BU/Brown Univ h 89 Power

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