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Variations


Walshe, Welshe, Welsh, &c. of Gloucestershire
     



Sodbury, Gloucestershire

  • - One of the notable families of Walshe in Gloucestershire included Walshe of Sodbury, a family originally described of Olveston (or Alveston), diocese of Bristol, in Gloucester. John received the manor of Little Sodbury, about 1485-86, by right of his marriage to Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Forster. He later received the manors of Old and Chipping Sodbury as a gift of Henry VIII. In "The Visitations of the county of Somerset, in the year 1573", the first John Walshe, of Olveston, Gloucest., is described with the arms of "Azure, six mullets or, three, two, one." The same arms are also described for an Adam Welshe in "The Visitation of the County of Gloucester, Taken in the Year 1623."
  • - The arms "Azure, six mullets or, three, two, one" were also ascribed to Richard Welshe, of Pilton, co. Devon, who died in 1551. His was a wealthy merchant and landowner family of the 16th and 17th century, referred to in the records as Welsshe, Walshe (in his Will), Welshe and Welsh. [Pilton: Its Past and Its People; Margaret A. Reed; 1985]


    Quedgeley, Gloucestershire

  • - The Walsh or Welsh family held the manor of Woolstrop in Quedgeley, Gloucestershire and also at Llanwern and Dinham (Monmouthshire) in South Wales [sources: V.C.H. Gloucs., x. 218; Gloucs. Inqs. post Mortem, v, 226-7].
  • - The arms of the family 'Welsh' seated at Dinham Castle and at Llanwern down to the the early part of the 17th century, were the same as the coats of Sancto Wallerico, that is: "Ermine, a bend sable". [source: "Notes on the Ecclesiastical Remains at Runston, Sudbrook, Dinham, and Llan-bedr", by Octavius Morgan and Thomas Wakeman, 1856]


    Winterbourne, Gloucestershire

  • - Among the household knights of King John included Richard le Waleys, who received grants of royal demesne in the manor of Winterbourne, Gloucest. [Pipe Roll, 8 John, p. 9]; as well as in Upper Lambourne, Berks. [Pipe Roll, 1 John, pp. 255,256]; and also in Eastbury, Berks. [Pipe Roll, 13 John, p.199; Book of Fees, pp. 106-07; Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mordem, i., p. 857].
  • - Richard 'Walsh' held a fee at Winterbourn, 2 Richard I (1190-91), of the gift (consent) of the King. [Abstracts of records and manuscripts respecting the county of Gloucester]
  • - Ralph (son of Stephen?) had given Winterburn, co. Gloucester to Richard Le Waleis of Gloucester as far back as 1215 (R. Litt. Claus. i. 233.), if not 1207 (Abbrev. Placit., 58), subject to the life estate of his wife, Matilda de Caux, who died in 1224. Richard obtained livery (of Acklam and Leavening) in May 1225 (Excerpt. e Rot. Fin., i, 116, 128]. Eventually this fee (of Acklam and Leavening) passed to the family of Ros. [source: Early Yorkshire Charters - Volume II]
  • - Richard le Waleys (Wallensis) held a knight's fee in Winterbourne, Glouc. in 1211-12, and in right of his wife, Maud de Lanvalay (daughter and heir of Radulfi de Lanvalei) was also tenant of Eastbury (in Lambourn), Berks., in 1212. Ralph le Waleys was his son and heir. [source: Cartulary of St. Mark's Hospital, Bristol; 1959]
  • - 13 Henry III (1229). Pro Ricardo filio Willelmi de manerio de Winterburn' - Rex vice-comiti Gouc' salutem. Precipimus tibi quod de maerio de Winterburn' cum pertinentiis, quod in manum nostram cepisiti occasione mortis Ricardi Walensis et cujus custodia pertinct as Ricardum filium Willelmi filii Stephani, eo quod predictus Ricardus Walensis manerium illud de eo tenuit per servicium militare, eidem Ricardo filio Willelmi plenam seisinam habere facius. Teste ut supra. [source: Close Rolls of the Reign of Henry III]
  • - In September 1233 Sir Hubert Huse had custody of the manor of Winterbourne, Gloucest., during the minority of the heir, Ralph le Waleys [source: Exc. e Rot. Fin., i, 249].
  • - Ralph le Waleys was still a minor in 1235-6, when Winterbourne was in the custody of Hubert de Huse (Bk. Fees, 442) and was dead by 15 March, 1250.
  • - Sir Hubert Huse, who was appointed seneschal of Gascony in Sept. 1237 (Patent Rolls, 1232-47, p. 195) was probably dead by 1243, when his custody of Winterbourne was given to the widow of Richard le Waleys. [source: Cartulary of St. Mark's Hospital, Bristol]
  • - In 28 Henry III (1243-44), a Ralph Walens' was a witness of an extent of the land which was of Hugh de Kylpek in co. Glouc. Among the other witnesses included Thomas de la Hulle and Godfrey de la Hulle. [source: The Index Library, Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem, v. 30, 1903)
  • - At the Inquisition Post Mordem, dated temp. Henry III, of Matilda (aka Maud) de Lanvalay, co. Berks., Ralph son of Richard le Waleys, and son of the aforesaid Matilda, is her next heir, and aged 24 years or more. The inquisition deals with 1 carucate land and 6 marks, 4s. 8.d rent of assize, held of the king by service of 1/2 kinght's fee in Esbiri, Berkshire. [source: The Reliquary and Illustrated Archaeologist, v. 18, 1878]
  • - Ralph le Waleys. Writ to Henry de Wengham and his co-escheator in co. Berks, 15 March, 34 Henry III. His sisters, Agnes married to John de Mareys, and Juliena married to Geoffrey de Wrokeselle, are his heirs ; there is a third sister from the same mother by her last husband, named Agnes, but the jury know not whether she has any right in this inheritance ; all are of full age. Estbiri, Berkshire - 1 carcate of land and 70s. 3 1/2d. rent, held of the king in chief, and a mill and 1 acre meadow of the fee of Henry de Sewelle, held of the king in chief for 1/2 knight's fee. [source: Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem]
  • - After the death of Ralph 'le Walsh', between 1245-1250, his heirs were his two sisters, Agnes, wife of John de Mareys, and afterwards Ralph de Hadley, and Juliana, wife of Geoffrey de Wrokeshall, who had seisin of his lands on 27 May, 1250 (Excerpt. e Rot. Fin., ii. 78). As lord of Winterbourne, Ralph's lands adjoin those of St. Mark's. [sources: Cartulary of St. Mark's Hospital, Bristol; 1959]
  • - Agnes de Lanvale alias de Lanvelay - She died on the feast of St. Giles, 36 Henry III. Her sisters, Agnes, married to John de Marisco, and Juliana, married to Geoffrey de Workshale, are her heirs and of full age. Estbury, Berkshire - 1/6 knight's fee held of the king in chief ; a mill and 2 acres of land, and a pasture. [source: Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem]
  • - The wife of Geoffrey de Wroxhales (Wraxhall), Juliana, was a great heiress, daughter of Richard le Waleys, and granddaughter of Ralph de Lanvaley. Her lands lay at Estbury in Lambourn, co. Berkshire, and at Wynterburne, near Bristol. [source: Notes on the History of the Parish of North Wraxhall, Co. Wilts]
  • In April 1250, William le Waleys is described as master (magistrum) of the church of Wynterborne. [source: Cartulary of St. Mark's Hospital, Bristol, v. 21, 1959]
  • - In 1274-75, is the appointment of Henry de Montfort and Solomon de Rochester to take the assise of novel disseisin arraigned by William le Waleys against Radulph de Hadelegh, and others, touching a tenement in Wynteburn, co, Gloucester. [source: Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, v. 44, 1883]
  • - Circa 21 Edward III (1348), all demands for men-at-arms, assessed on the lands of William Waleys, in Wynterbourne, in co. Gloucester, were in the hands of Sir Thomas de Bradeston by reason of the minority of the heir of William. [source: Crécy and Calais, by George Wrottesley]


    Additional Gloucestershire References:

    In 1212 a William Wallensis is found holding a hide of land at Newton, Glouc., of the King. [source: Lyte's Book of Fees, vol. I, p. 80]

    An Adam Wallensis was benefactor of the Abbey of Gloucester in the time of Henry Foliot, 1205-1229. [source: Transactions, Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, v. 44, 1922]

    Between 1224-28, Thomas de Bredon, Abbot of Kilpeck, purchased half a meadow and half a wood of Roger Walensis, son of Roger, and then let them to him, to hold of the Priory of Kilpeck for twelve shillings annually. [source: Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club, 1892]

    In 26 Henry III (1242), Thomas le Waleis was a witness at an inquisition by command of the King of the knights' fees held in co, Glouc. of Thomas, sometime Earl of Warwick. [source: The Index Library, v. 30, 1903)

    In 30 Henry III (1245-46), Adam Walens' was a witness at an inquisition taken as to the state of the wood of Dimmoc (Glouc.) when the manor of Dimmoc was granted to Morgan de Karlium. Among the other witnesses were Godfrey de la Hull and Adam de la Hull. [source: The Index Library, v. 30, 1903)

    In 1253, William Waleys was a witness at an inquisition made before A. de Hustede, sheriff of Gloucester regarding houses on the plot given to Gwybert de Rue by King John. [source: The Index Library, v. 30, 1903)

    In 1255, Robert le Waleys was a witness at an inquisition before the sheriff of Gloucester, regarding the land which John de Kymardesley' held of the King in the said county. [source: The Index Library, v. 30, 1903)

    In 1274-75, is the appointment of Henry de Montfort and Solomon de Rochester to take the assise of novel disseisin arraigned by Felicia late wife of Adam le Waleis against William Ascelyn touching a tenement in Winchcomb ("Wynchecube"), co., Gloucester. [source: Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, v. 44, 1883]

    About 1280, John the abbot of Winchcomb grants a tenement to Adam le Waleys. [source: Landboc, by Winchcomb monastery, Winchcombe (Abbey : Gloucestershire, England), v. 2, 1903]

    In 1283, Adam le Waleys was a witness at an inquisition made at Newent regarding the forest of Dene, and among the other witnesses included William de la Hulle. [source: The Index Library, v. 30, 1903)

    In 1284, Richard le Waleys held a fee in Cotes in Glouc. He was patron of the church of Cotes in 1292. [source: Transactions - Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, v. 41-50, 1929]

    In 1286, Adam le Waleys was a witness at an inquisition made at Gloucester of the lands and tenements which Reginald son of Peter had in the hundred of Bryckwelbarowe, and in the same year Adam le Waleys of Trilleye was witness of Reginald son of Peter's manor of Sutham in co. Gloucester. [source: The Index Library, v. 30, 1903)

    Between 1280-1297, Charter of Geoffrey de Langley, knight, to John le Walleys (or Waleys) and Cecily, his wife, the entire land in the vill of Chesterton near Cirencester (Chestreton juxta Cyrencestr) in the county of Gloucester which Walter Patin once held of Sir Geoffrey de Langeleye, the grantor's father, namely the land which Richard de Bryghtwell, the father of the said Cecily, and Cecily held of the grantor's gift for the term of their lives. Richard le Waleys lord of Cotes is mentioned in the same charter. [source: The Langley Cartulary, the Dugdale Society, v. 32, 1980]

    In 1284-54, Richard le Waleys held one knight's fee in Cotes (near Cirencester), co. Gloucester. Richard le Waleys was patron of the living of Cotes (Glouc.) in 1292, holding one knight's fee. John le Waleys is cited in 1303 as holding one knights' fee in Cotes (Coates). [source: Inquisitions and assessments relating to feudal aids ; and Transactions, by the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, v.50, 1929]

    In 1304-05, Adam le Walshe to retain a messuage and land in Hill (Hulle), Gloucester, acquired by Nicholas son of Ralph, who retains land in Hill and Nymsfield (Gloucester) and in Tickenham (Somerset). [source: Lists and Indexes, no. 17, 1904]

    In 1304-05 (33 Edward I), an Adam le Walshe died seized of lands in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire. [source: Journal of the British Archaeological Association, 1857]

    From the Court of Chancery, dated 2 Edward II (ca. 1308-09) , we find "Adam le Waleys to retain house-boot, hedge-boot, and common of pasture in the manor of Hill [Gloucester] and two parks there, acquired by him from Nicholas son of Ralph de Hulle."

    In 1310-11, Walter Walleys, aged 50, testified at a hearing in Gloucester, to prove the age of John son and heir of William Bleith. Walter says John was born 3 Edward II, and knows this because he has a son Alan who was born on Jan. 1 of the same year. [source: Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem]

    In 1313, John le Waleys of Winchcomb grants to Thomas le Waleys and his wife Juliana a tenement oposite the gate of Winchcomb Abbey. [source: Landboc, by Winchcomb monastery, Winchcombe (Abbey : Gloucestershire, England), v. 2, 1903]

    In 1314-15, Adam le Waleis to grant two-thirds of a messuage and land in Hill by Berkeley, Gloucester, and his reversion in the third part, now held in dower by Isabel la Waleis, to William Martel, retaining the manor of Landoz (Wales). [source: Lists and Indexes, no. 17, 1904]

    Amice le Walsh gave a charter dated 14 Edward II (1321-22) for a messuage &c. at Oldbury, Glouc. [source: Abstracts of records and manuscripts respecting the county of Gloucester, 1807]

    In 1314, John le Waleys of Pagenhulle, acknowledges that he owes to Philip le Heyr of Colewynston 60I.; to be levied in default of payment, of his lands and chattels in the county of Gloucester. [source: Calendar of the Close Rolls]

    In 1325, John le Walssh of Husmarleye was a witness at a Gloucester inquisition, regarding the manor of Hulle (Hill). [source: The Inquisitiones post mortem for the County of Worcester].
    In 1326, John le Waleys of Husmarleye was a witness to the lease of Richard, abbot of Winchcomb, to William le Portland. [source: Landboc, by Winchcomb monastery, Winchcombe (Abbey : Gloucestershire, England), v. 2, 1903]

    The Subsidy Roll of 1327 in Gloucestershire included the names John de Walshe, William Walssh, Alice Walshe and Walssh, Nicholas le Walsshe, Robert le Walsshe, Joan Waleys, and Walter le Welshe. In the 17th and 18th centuries surnames in Gloucestershire included Welch and Wallis, among others. Pigot's directory of 1830 (Cheltenham) cites the names Welsh (of Aryle), Wells and Wallis.

    In 1330, a John le Walsh of Paganhill was indicted in King's Bench for sheltering the 'notorious robber' Thomas, son of Robert de Gloucester, who had been outlawed for the robbery at Chipping Sodbury. John le Walshe of Pagenhull is mentioned again in a 1331 dispute [source: Calendar of the Close Rolls]. The lands of John de Welshe of Pagenhull in Guphull and Pagenhull are mentioned in the Calendar of the Fine Rolls for the same time frame.
    br> In 1346 Emma, late the wife of Walter de Cirencestr (Circestre), held one knight's fee in Cotes, co. Gloucester, formerly held by John Waleys. [source: Inquisitions and assessments relating to feudal aids]

    Ralph Waleys to retain a messuage, land, and rent in Slimbridge acquired for life from Thomas de Berkele, lord Berkeley. [Glouc. 49 Edward III, Chancery]. Ralph Walsh, lord of the manor of Woolstrop in Quedgeley, and of other manors in south Wales, is described as Thomas de Berkeley's receiver in an account of 1373-74. Ralph Walsh is again mentioned with manors in Gloucestershire and South Wales in 1379-80 and in 1383-84. Ralph Walsh represented Gloucestershire in parliament in October 1383 and was selected to fill the shrievalty on December 1 next.
    The Walsh family held Woolstrop (Gloucest.) and Llanwaryn and Dynan in South Wales (V.C.H. Gloucs., x. 218; Gloucs. Inqs. post Mortem, v, 226-7).

    In 1351, is a pardon to Agnesy Wymarke, wife of Richard Felson of Shirburn, co. Gloucester, of the king's suit for the death of Philip le Walsh of Shirburn (aka Sherborne). [source: Calendar of the Patent Rolls]

    In November 1445, Richard Walssh of Whightfeld, co. Gloucester, 'yoman,' was among those fined for an assualyt on John de Aune, cornoner of co. Glouc. [source: Calendar of the Patent Rolls]

    From Burke's "General Armory", pg. 1088, comes the following description of Arms:

    WELCH of Arle House, Cheltenham, Co. Gloucester, England
    ARMS: Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Azure, on a fess engrailed between six mullets Or, a lion passant of the first (i.e., blue); 2nd, per pale Argent and Or, a chevron engrailed chequy Gules and of the second (i.e., gold), between three roses of the third, on a canton Azure, a fleur-de-lis; 3rd, Gules, a pale surmounted of two lions passant.
    CREST: An antelope's head erased billettee, holding in the mouth a cross crosslet fitchee.
    NOTES: The Welch family of Arle House, Gloucestershire are recorded in the UK National Register of Archive. A pedigree is printed printed in Heraldic illustrations, by J. and John Bernard Burke.

    WELCH of Co. Gloucester, England
    ARMS: Azure, a mullet Or.

    WELCH of Co. Gloucester, England
    ARMS: Azure, six mullets Or.


    The preceding article was compiled by Dennis J. Walsh, © 2009

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