Search billions of records on Ancestry.com

Index: Home | Early Walsh History | Walsh Surname Origins | Place Names | Walsh Arms

Timeline - Walsh, Brenagh, Welsh, le Waleys, Walensis, et. al.
Walsh Family History Series
For additional context, refer to Walsh in the Early Irish Counties, as well as Walsh of England


  • Toward the end of Stephen's reign (mid 12th century), Robert le Waleis sold all his land in Wrabethona (Wrabton, in Yoxford) and Peasenhall, co. Suffolk, to Sibton Abbey.
  • In 1166, the son of Richard Walensis (filius Ricardi Walensis) holds one knight's fee (at Llandough, Glamorgan, Wales) under William, Earl of Gloucester. Llandough would be held by the family until the death of Robert Walshe in 1427.
  • In 1166, Robert Waleys (Walenois) and Thomas de Campo Florida (de Chamfloyre) each held a knight's fee, of William de Mohun (in Somserset?).
  • In 1166 Henry le Waleys held three knights' fees of the Honor of Pontefract of Henry de Lacy (in Sibthorpe and Elston, &c.), co. Yorkshire.
  • Richard le Waleys held in Shropshire of William (II) fitz Alan in 1166. He is said to be the ancestor of Sir William (Waleys) Wallace, the Scottish hero.
  • In 1169, a Welshman referred to as 'Walynus' was said to accompany Maurice FitzGerald on his expedition into Ireland. Walynus was claimed to be an ancestor of the Walshs in Kilkenny, in Dublin, in Mayo and in Kildare. [source: Genealogy of Lawrence Walsh, publ. 1588]
  • In 1174, Philip of Wales, the would-be progenitor of the Walsh of the Mountain families, was cited by Giraldus Cambrensis as a hero in a naval battle. Walsh genealogical statements claim this Philip was granted, by Henry II, the lands of Bally-Kilgavan in Queen's County, of Castle Hoel in County Kilkenny, and Grealaghbeg in County Tipperary.
  • In 1175, David Walesis, aka David Welsh, is described by Giraldus Cambrensis as a young soldier 'willing to risk his own life to win honour' at the river crossing during an attack on Limerick, in company with Meyler FitzHenry and Raymond le Gros. Walsh family lore claims this David Welsh was created Baron of John's Cross, Co. Kerry, and of Carrickmaine. Co. Dublin, by Henry II.
  • In 2 Richard I (1190-91), Richard 'Walsh' held a fee at Winterbourn, Gloucestershire. He is cited as Richard le Waleys, one of the household knights of King John (1199-1216).
  • In 1193 David Walensis was a witness of a grant by Prince John to Peter Pippard of the land of Ohegeni near the land of Uriel, by the service of twelve knights. [Uriel was an area around counties Monaghan and Louth].
  • The records of Selborne Priory (co. Hampshire) provide a glimpse of an early Walensis family, starting with Henry Walensis of Theddene who is mentioned in a document dated 1194.
  • Richard Waleys held three (four?) knights' fees of the Archbishop of Canterbury for Glynde and Buxted in Sussex, and at Thanington and Lossenham in Kent, according to a late twelfth century list of knights of the archbishop.
  • In 1199, when Meyler Fitz-Henry was Viceroy, there was a series of grants where Maurice Fitz Philip (son of the first Philip Walsh in Ireland?) was granted lands of the value of five knights' fees in the Cantred of Fontimel. This was in the territory near Kilmallock, a district afterwards known as Clangibbon, in Cork, Limerick and Tipperary, in which there were Walshs for the rest of the period.
  • There is a tradition that it was by his marriage with Eleanor, daughter of Sir William [Walsh] of Kilmurry that Desmond (the FitzGerald Earl of Desmond) got his first lands in Kerry. The ancestor of the Earls of Desmond, John Fitz Thomas, acquired from Henry II large grants in Kerry, which were augmented by Prince John in 1199. However, it has been noted John married a daughter of Thomas FitzAnthony [sometimes surnamed Walsh] named Margery.
  • Between 1199-1216, John, son of Simon, son of Mabilla de Acton (Aughton), granted to Richard Wallensis, Lord of Litherland, his curtilege in the town of Acton, co. Lancashire.
  • Between 1200-1210 Philip Walensis and Robert Walensis were witnesses of a grant of the whole theodum in Chlenmoneth in Helyocaruel [Ely O'Carroll] and the vill of Clonfertemelo, from Willam de Breusa to Adam de Hereford.
  • From 1204 to 1209 Robert le Waleys was sheriff of York in England.
  • In 1207 when Meyler Fitz-Henry was preparing to subdue Kerry, he himself claimed several cantreds including Eoghenacht Lochlein (Killarney) and Ackmikerry. A grant was made to Maurice, Aeneas (Eynon) Fitz-Philip, Henry Fitz-Philip and Audeonus (Owen) Fitz-Philip, brother (all sons of Philip Walsh?). This grant was made in the cantred in which Dunlehoth is situated. It is probable that Dunlehoth was "Dun Loich" (Dunloe) in County Kerry where Meyler called the sons of his friend Philip. In that case the grant would have included the land from Dunloe toward Killorglin, (now the barony of Dunkerron). This is likely since Dunloe Castle was built in 1215, and the other Walsh castles, Kilmurry, Kilcusneen, etc., are in Meyler's lands in Ackmikerry, County Kerry.
  • In 1208, "David Breathnach (aka Walsh), Bishop of Waterford, was slain by O'Faelan of the Desies".
  • In 1210 Ricardus Walensis is cited with gifts from King John, whom he accompanied to Ireland in that year [from Yorkshire?].
  • In 1211-1212, John Walshe was holding half a fee in Shelsley, Worcestershire, England. This area later became known as Shelsley-Walsh.
  • In 1211-1212, Richard le Waleys (Wallensis) held a knight's fee in Winterbourne, Gloucester.
  • In 1210-12 Godfrey le Waleys appears as a tenant of Glynde in Sussex (1 1/12 knight's fee), in Thanington (1 knight's fee) and Tarring (1/4 knight's fee).
  • Henry Le Waleys (of Yorkshire) was Steward of John de Lacy in 1216-18.
  • In 1218 Nicholas Walsh was Sheriff of the city of Limerick.
  • In 1229 there was a Philip le Waleys named to an important arbitration at Knockainey in Limerick.
  • In 1229, Walter le Waleis was pardoned by the King for 3 1/2 marks exacted for prest of Ireland, made to him in the time of King John. Taken at Woodstock according to the Close Rolls of 14 Henry III (page 1, m. 21). (source: C.D.I. 1171-1251, v. 1, 1875 ]
  • In 1229 William Walensis tried to get hisWaterford grant confirmed. Richard de Burgh tried to keep him out of it, but when Hubert de Burgh was overthrown in London and Maurice Fitzgerald became Viceroy (of Ireland), William got his lands. [source: Walsh 1170-1690, p. 65]
  • Circa 1230 Philip and Clement Walensis were witnesses of a grant of a carucate in his tenement of Okerle [Cluain ui Cearbhaill, O'Carrolls' plain near the city of Kilkenny], half a carucate in Madnegal; and half in Culdunan.
  • In 1232 a land grant in Waterford cites William Walensis who, "makes with the King a fine of 60 marks to have confirmation of a fee called Glenocher in Dessya of the gift of Thomas Fitz Anthony." (note: this was the William cited in 1229)
  • In 1233 a baronial revolt in Ireland led to the death of Richard, son of William Marshal. Among the leading feudatories of the Marshal who sided with their lord was Henry Walsh, who had to pay large fines before given back his lands.
  • Circa 1235 Adam Walensis received a grant from Richard Pincerna (Butler) and his wife Mabel (de Carreu) of lands lying near Gowran, co. Kilkenny.
  • In 1236 Ralph le Waleys was granted lands in Podinton in the parish of Chickerell, Dorset, England. Ingelram le Waleys died there in 1303.
  • Circa 1238 Howel, son of John, granted to William Walensis and his heirs in free socage all his part of the water and watercourse which descends from Kedi between grantor's land of Monmeche and the said William's land in Culeneri (believed to be in Imaal, co. Wicklow).
  • In 1241 Meiler de Bermingham, 2nd Baron of Athenry and founder of the town of Athenry, purchased land from Sir Robert Breynach (Breathnach, or Walsh) for 160 marks and presented it to the Dominican friars together with another 160 marks. This became the site of the Dominican Priory of SS. Peter and Paul.
  • In the time of Henry III (1216-1272), Henry Walshe is noted in Shelsley-Walsh in Worcestershire, England. Descendants of this family included Thomas Walsh, chief baron of the exchequer, who went to Ireland in Henry VIII's time. This family had the same coat of arms as those borne by the Walshs of Ballykilcavan, in Queens County, Ireland.
  • Circa 1250 William Walensis was lord of Rathronan (near Clonmel) in the county of Tipperary.
  • About the year 1250, there was a record in St. Mary's Abbey of a charter from John Coventry to Gilbert le Waleys de Howde (Howth?) in Ostman's town, Dublin (Oxmanton); and another entry in the Chartulary mentions "Walteri, filii Roberti Walensis," who gave a parcel of land to the Abbey, situated between Dunleary and Bernemeth.
  • In 1252 Ralph Waleys, son of William, and his wife Joan, elder daughter of Thomas de Champflower, held an estate in Huish Champflower (Somerset) of Ralph's father.
  • Circa 1253 Michael Walensis (Walsh?) was then official of the church of Leighlin (on the Carlow/Kilkenny border).
  • In 1255 Roger de Quincy granted lands in Swithland (co. Leicester) to Robert le Waleys. Among the early deeds is a "Record of a Chapel" built by Robert Waleys, Lord of the Manor of Swithland.
  • In a list regarding the Dublin Guild Merchant (1256-57) include the names Roberto Walensis de Arclo, Radulfus Walensis, Nicholaus Walensis de Kildare, and Rogerus Walensis de Hauerford.
  • Circa 1262, Adam Walensis held the military fee at Landochhe (Llandough), Glamorgan.
  • When Alfred of Lincoln (Albreda de Lyncoll) died in 1264, his manor of Langeton (co. Dorset) was purchased by Ingelram le Walshe.
  • In 1271, Adam Welsh held Llanwern (Monmouthshire, Wales) under (the Pembroke lordship of) Goodrich by a tenth of a knight's fee.
  • In the latter part of the 13th century, is a grant from Ingdoyn FitzHennery Barret to John Dunheued, upon his lands in Kilmaclikin, with the lordshipp of Audoen Wallensis, Peter Barret, and of the heirs of Hennery Lugne and the land of Ardain.
    - Also, a deed of covenant, betwixt Audoen Wallensis and Gilbert, sonne of Hugh, releasing from the said Audoen to the said Gilbert 120 aces in Ballymacmoilmory.
    - Also, a deed by David Fitz Audoen Wallensis to Jamyn Dunheued FitzJohn Dunheued, uppon all his lands in Ely Okerull, videlicet, Baly and Ardar, except fower acres in Balie.
    - And also, a grant from John Fitz Eynon (Wallensis?) to Morice FitzGerald, of two carucates and dimid. in Ballidonygyn and Loghenehorny. [source: Red Book of the Earls of Kildare]
  • In 1273 Henry Le Waleys was elected mayor of London. He was elected for a second term in 1281, and again was elected in 1298 for a third term.
  • Circa 1274 Robert le Waleis, seneschal of Theobald de Verdun in Meath (had seisin 1274) in the time of Robert Ufford Justiciar (1268-70, 1276-81).
  • In September, 1276, Henry Walensis was among those Sir Ralph Pippard let to farm in his lordship (Vines) (in Ireland).
  • In 1277, Henry and Robert le Waleys were jurors in Wexford at an inquisition to ascertain the extent of the property of Roger Bygod, earl of Norfolk.
  • In 1278 Ingelram le Waleys claimed grant of the manor at Langton Matravers, Dorset, England.
  • In 1278 William le Waleys was bailiff (sheriff) of Gilbert de Clare in Somerset, and the lands of Gilbert Walsh near Midleton in Cork were held from Gilbert de Clare, as disclosed by the inquisition held after the death of his wife, Isabel de Clare.
  • In 1279 in the Rotuli Hundredorum of Cambridge is the name of Rose la Walesche.
  • In 1280 Gilbert Walsh was evidently the head of a family in the mountains to which Desmond had been driven by the McCarthys. Gilbert was fighting against them, in company with the Barrys, in support of the FitzGeralds. And yet when the war was over and Donal Og McCarthy was in trouble Gilbert was bondsman for him. Gilbert, for his services to the Desmonds; was made sheriff of Cork, and there is at Walshtown and Ballybrannagh, near Midleton, the reminder of his having been owner of the large property of Roskellar.
  • In 9 Edward I (1280-81), Stephen Waleys (father, as it is presumed, of Richard) was questioned by what right he claimed to have free-warren in Bilton and Helaw, co. Yorkshire, he defended the same, by producing the charter of Henry II.
  • In 1281 John Walsh is listed as Sheriff in Limerick.
  • In 1281 Gilbert Walsh was active in County Kerry.
  • In 1282 and for several years afterwards "Griffin Walens," son of Richard, was provost of the Manor of Old Ross, Wexford. Griffin was still Provost in 1287. In 1288, his son, Henry FitzGriffin, was Provost of the Burgh at New Ross. In 1311 John "de Wallia" was provost of New Ross.
  • In October 1282-83 a grant was made to Stephen le Waleys, and his heirs, of free warren in all his demesne lands in Burghwaleys, Neuton Waleys, Hauleye (Healaugh), Cotingeleye, and Dunnesford, co. Yorkshire, and in Cokerynton co. Lincolnshire.
  • In 1284, Richard le Waleys held one knight's fee in Cotes (near Cirencester), co. Gloucester.
  • In November 1287 (15 Edward I), Henry le Waleys held half a knight's fee in Sheldesleye, Worcestershire.
  • In 1288 Sir Stephen Waleys [Walleis] claimed that "his ancestors were seised from the time of King John" of lands at Sibthorpe in Nottinghamshire.
  • In 1292 Sir Stephen Howell, knight, was a witness of a grant of the manor of Knocktopher from Edmund, son of Milo le Bret to Sir Walter de la Haye. (Stephen cited by Eric St. John Brooks as a possible ancestor of Walsh of the Mountain).
  • Nicholas le Waleys died in 1292 seised of the manor of Huish Champflower and the 1/4 fee in (Poditon) West Chickerelle.
  • By 1293, Adam le Waleis of Langridge and Hutton (co. Somerset) had been succeeded by John le Waleys.
  • In 1296 Nicholas Walsh is listed as Sheriff in Limerick.
  • In 1297 John le Waleys was lord of a manor in Hutton, Somersetshire, England.
  • In June, 1297 William Walensis granted to Theobald, Butler of Ireland, and his heirs, 16 marks yearly rent out of two knight's fees called Athkincon [Aghancon] and a moiety of a theodum in Corryn, and Moydale. Among the witneses was Philip son of Audoen, knight.
  • In 1298 John le Walshe is listed in the tenant record of Betley, Staffordshire, whose relative holdings were valued at 2 s. 9d.
  • John le Waleys was lord of Langridge manor, 26 Edward I (1297-98), and is mentioned again in 1303 when he held Langridge of Thomas de Gournay for half a knight's fee, and he held Hutton and Elborough of John de Appedam for two knights' fees.
  • In 1300 an Inquisition was taken at Roscommon, in the 29th year of Edward I, by writ of the same by among others Thomas Walsh (Walensis).
  • About 1300, there is listed at Adgo (evidently Athgoe, near the Wicklow/Dublin border), Ricardus Walensis and Thomas le Waleys as tenants of St. Mary's Abbey, Dublin.
  • Circa 1300? David Valensis of Grellan was a witness of a grant of a messuage in the vill of Carrek mc Griffyn (Carrick-on-Suir).
  • In 1301 Thomas Walsh (Walensis) was among those at an Inquisition taken at Roscommon.
  • In 1302, Walter le Waleys held a quarter of a fee in Waketon, Norfolk.
  • In 1303 Adam le Walshe to retain a messuage and land in Hill acquired of Nicholas son of Ralph, who retains land in Hill and Nymphsfield (Gloucester) and in Tickenham (Somerset). Chancery records.
  • In 1303 John le Waleys is cited as holding one knights' fee in Cotes (Coates), Gloucester.
  • In 1305 Hugh Walensis (Walsh) as a witness of the le Bret grant to Walter de lay Haye in the whole manor of Knocktopher.
  • Circa 1305 Walter Bretenach [Bretnach] was a witness of a grant of two carucates of land in the tenement of Nowan in Pollardiston.
  • In inquisitions held in 1305 at Tristle Dermot is mention of a Richard le Waleys, "Knight of the County of Tipperary"
  • An inquisition in 1306, at which Henry le Waleys was a juror, found that Robert le Waleys held at Balitankan (Ballyrankin, Kilrush parish, Scarawalsh, Wexford) for a quarter of one knight's fee.
  • In 1308 Adam le Waleys to retain house-boot, hedge-boot, and common of pasture in the manor of Hill and two parks there, acquired by him from Nicholas son of Ralph de Hulle. Gloucestershire. Chancery records.
  • In 1308 Simon le Waleys to grant land in Gransden to the prior and convent of Repton, in exchange for other land there, retaining land in Gransden. Hunt. Chancery records.
  • William le Waleys of Shelton was lord and patron of The Capital Manor (afterwards calles Barrets), and in 1308, Margaret relict of Walter le Waleys held the fee at Shelton, co. Norfolk.
  • In 1309-10, Richard le Waleys was among the principal divers men in Ireland to be at (the Parliament of) Kilkenny by invitation of John Wogan, justiciar of Ireland, regarding difficult matters concerning us and the state of our land. [Statute rolls of the Parliament of Ireland]
  • In 1310, Waterford, Robert le Waleys, a Briton, was charged with the murder of John, the son of Ivor MacGillemory.
  • Circa 1310 Mabath Walensis was a witness of a grant in the tenement of Aghaviller (co. Kilkenny).
  • In 1312 William de Walsh held the sixth of a Knight's fee from John de Hastings in Warwickshire.
  • In 5 Edward II (1312-13), John le Waleys of Podyton held 3 parts of a knight's fee in Podyton and Estchykerel (co. Dorset).
  • In 1314, occurs a grant from Edward II to Oliver le Waleys, son of Robert, of free warren in Swytheland and Dalby-on-the-Woods. co. Leicester.
  • In 8 Edward II (1314-15), Adam 'le Walsh' held the manor and advowson of the church of 'Langerugg' (co. Somerset) by service of one-half knight's fee, and Adam 'le Walesch' held the manor of Hutton, Somerset, by service of one and one-quarter knight's fee.
  • In 8 Edward II (1314-15), Adam le Waleis held 1 knights fee for Landoghe and Sayntemariechurche, co. Glamorgan, Wales.
  • In 1314-15, Adam le Waleis to grant two-thirds of a messuage and land in Hill by Berkeley, Gloucester, and his reversion in the third part, now held in dower by Isabel la Waleis, to William Martel, retaining the manor of Landoz (Wales).
  • In 1315 John le Walshe of Chickerel to grant the manor of Langton to John son of John le Walshe of Chickerel, Isabel his wife, and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder to the heirs of the grantor, who retains land in Chickerel and Stock Gaylard. Dorset. Chancery records.
  • In 1318 Sir Richard Walsh seems to have been settled near Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. It was in 1318 a Sir Richard Waleys lead an armed band against the Scots seems to have been near Clonmel.
  • Circa 1321, Richard Walsh held the advowson of the church of Aughton, and the hamlet of Up-Litherland by service of 10s. (co. Lancashire).
  • In April 1321, Mabilla Walensis, widow of Philip Bendevyl, granted land in or near Carrickmacgriffyn [later called Carrick-on-Suir in Co. Tipperary].
  • Richard Waleys, of Yorksire, had summons to parliament as a Baron, 15 May 1321.
  • On December 24, 1321, Sir Richard le Waleys, knight, was a witness of a quit-claim, given at Cashel, to Herbert de Marisco of land in 'le Milleton' in the tenement of Clogher [co. Tipperary]. William Wallensis was a witness of a Clogher grant in 1337.
  • In 1321-22, William le Walsse was lord of Lanwaryn (Llanwern) and Dynas (Dinham), in Monmouthshire, Wales.
  • In 1332, is license for John le Walshe of Chykerel (co. Dorset) to grant to Roger son of John le Walshe of Chykerel and Joan his wife, in fee tail, the manor of Langeton, held in chief.
  • In 1323 a Richard le Waleys was one of fourteen of the principal men of Ireland who were called upon by the King to apprehend Roger Mortimer if he went to Ireland.
  • In 1325, cited in the Estreats of Co. Kilkenny for that year is Adam son of Wm. Walensis, by pledge of Matthew de Baa and Philip Corre. Additionally is cited John son of Adam Walsh (Walensis).
  • In 1326-27, Richard Waleys held three-fourths of a knight's fee in Helawe and Folifait, co. Yorkshire.
  • In 1327 there is a record that King Edward III, in his first year, cancelled a fine of 2,000 marks imposed by Edward II on Richard (Le Waleys) "to save his life and have his lands" again because he was of the quarrel of Thomas, late Earl of Lancaster.
  • In the 1327 Subsidy Rolls of Suffolk is listed John le Walche, who was taxed at the rate of four shillings in the pound on his land, and two shillings and eight pence in the pound on his goods.
  • In March, 1327 William son of Richard Walsh was a witness placing William, son of David le Poer in full seisin of a third of Richard le Poer's manor of Islanybrike [Oilean Ui Bhric].
  • In 1328 Henry, son of John le Waleies, chaplain, to grant messuages and land in Standish and Langtree to a chaplain at the altar of the Blessed Virgin in the parish church of St. Wilfrid, Standish, retaining land in Aughton, Lancashire. [chancery records].
  • In 1329 William le Walshe of Quedgeley, Gloucestershire, held Dinham, Chepstow, by half a Welsh knight's fee.
  • In 1329 Simon le Waleys was rector of the Parish Church of St Giles, Pitchcott, county of Buckingham, England.
  • In 1331 William the Walysshe was bailiff (sheriff) of Dublin.
  • In 1332, Stephen son of Richard le Waleys (son of Stephen), of Yorkshire, received a charter similar to that of Stephen of October 1282-83.
  • In 1333 John Walsh was noted at Cathanger, Somerset, where his descendants later became prominent.
  • In June 1333, Sir William Walche was a witness of a grant of the vills of Leauvghyll, Balyesk, Roskonelle, Castellemarge, Cnokaneredirre in Odogh in county Kilkenny.
  • John le Waleys alias Walsch of Putton (West Chickerelle, Dorset) died in 1333 holding lands in West Chickerelle, and leaving his son Nicholas (aged 25 or more).
  • In December, 1333 William Walsche was among the jurors at an inquisition held at Athenry.
  • In 1335 Caterina Walche, widow of John Whyte, granted their lands in the burgage of Clonmel (co. Tipperary).
  • In 1338 John, William, Simon and David le Waleys were at places near Nenagh (Cork) in 12 Edward III (12th year of King Edward III's reign). "Rathbregnath" (Castle Brenagh) is mentioned in the inquisitions of the same year.
  • In February 1338 John Walche was a witness at Knocktopher of a land grant there.
  • Nicholas le Walissh of Podynton, Dorset died 13 Edward III (1339-40).
  • In 1343 John Waleys was noted as sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire.
  • In 1343 William le Walsche was among the jurors at an inquisition held at Kilkenny (city) regarding the cantreds held in Ulster of the late Sir William de Burgh, Earl of Ulster.
  • In 1348 Augustine le Waleys of Uxbridge and Maud his wife to settle the manor of Latton, Essex, with the advowson of the priory there, on themselves and their heirs. [Chancery records].
  • In 1349 Philip le Waleys held by the fourth part of a knight's fee at Bicken-Stoke in Somersetshire, England.
  • In 1349 Walter Waleys, canon of Salisbury, to grant rent in his manor of Bradpole, payable by John Parys and Florence his wife during the life of the said Florence, to the abbess and convent of Tarrant, retaining the manor of Litton, Dorset. [Chancery records].
  • On April 23, 1350, an Elias fitz Robert Walsh was among the electors of Walter Harold as head of his sept in the vicinity of south County Dublin.
  • Circa 1350 Paul le Botiller quit-claims to Adam Walensis, chaplain, all his rights in the manor of Tyberwolik (Paulstown, co. Kilkenny).
  • In 1351 The prior and brethren of St. John of Jerusalem in England to grant the manor of Thrumpton (Nottinghamshire) to John Waleys, in exchange for his manor of Dalby (Leic.), retaining the manors of Ossington and Winkbourne (Notts.). [Chancery records].
  • In 1352-53 John Waleys, knight, to grant the manor of Dalby to the prior and brethren of the hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England in exchange for the manor of Thrumpton (Nottinghamshire), retaining the manor of Swithland (Leicestershire). [Chancery records].
  • In 1355 Walter Waleys was lord of Litton, Somerset, England.
  • In 1356 Thomas Walleys was one of about twenty in "the Cross of Tipperary," who selected Andrew Hackett as sheriff, "the Cross" being a section held by the King outside "the County."
  • In 1356 Matthew Walshe was among the jurors at an inquisition held at Kilkenny (city) of a grant of land in Knocktopher.
  • In 1358 Philip Walsh was a juror in Wexford among those called to allot a dowry to Roesia Meyler.
  • Circa 1358 among the Pleas of Assizes held at Clonmel, co. Tipperary are listed Thomas Walshe of Rathronan, Robert Walshe, and Thomas & John Walensis 'filius Episcopi'.
  • In 1360 Robert Walsh was bailiff (sheriff) of Dublin. He was probably one of the signers (Robert Waleys) of a protest to send representatives from Ireland to the Parliament or Council of the King in England as required by writ. It is probably the original Sinn Fein declaration emanating from the Anglo-Irish.
  • In 1361, David Walsh was running ships capable of carrying twenty casks of wine from New Ross to the king at Liverpool and Chester.
  • In August 1361 Oliver son of Howell fitz Stephen (Howell) gave seisin of all his lordships of Lotheran (near Knocktopher, co. Kilkenny) to Sir Raymond son of Robert Wallys, chaplain.
  • In October 1362 John Brechnoc is noted with land in the town of Carrickmagriffin (Carrick-on-Suir).
  • In 1366, Conor O'Conor, Lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra (Co. Kerry), was slain in his 58th year by the Walshes of Kerry.
  • In 1368, "Richard le Walshe, Master of the Hospital, at Waterford city... were amongst the slain".
  • In 1368 Richard, Henry and David Walsh were in court in New Ross, Wexford, and the jury found that "David did not insult Richard Neville on the Saturday next before the feast of St. John the Baptist."
  • In March 1369 Walter Walshe, chaplain, grants the manors of Moreton Carrigroghan more and Doundrynan. Given at Carrigroghan.
  • Circa 1370 Laurence Walche was witness of a grant in and around the tenement of Rosse, co. Wexford.
  • In March 1373 Walter son of Walter fitz Oliver [Howel] quit-claims to Geoffrey son of Thomas son of Nicholas Howell Walshe all his right in all lands and tenements of the town of Melagh and Saundrestoun, and in a carucate of land, three acres of meadow and seven of wood in Kyldresse (in county Kilkenny).
  • Roger Walshe, lord of Langton in Purbyke (co. Dorset) made a grant by charter of 47 Edward III (1373).
  • In 1375 Ralph Waleys to retain a messuage, land, and rent in Slimbridge acquired for life from Thomas de Berkele, lord Berkeley. Gloucestershire. [Chancery records].
  • Roger le Walsh, owner of the manors of Langton Wallis in Purbeck, Stock Coilard (Gaylard), and East Chickerel (co. Dorset), died 31 Oct. 1375.
  • In 1376, in the records of the exchequer, is a release by John Payn of Brustol and Christina his wife, to Sir Hugh, earl of Stafford, of their right to lands called 'Gerynghalgh', lately called 'Grendoneshalle' in Melewych co. Staffordshire, the property of her late husband, John Walshe, and to other lands also her late husband's: Friday the morrow of the Circumcision, A.D. 1376, and 50 Edward III.
  • Circa 1378-1379 Thomas Walsh is listed among the Rental of the chief rent of Balyclerthan.
  • In June 1381, James, Earl of Ormond grants to William Walsh of Hayistoun fifty-two acres of land, meadow, and pasture near Hayistoun in the tenement of Balscadan.
  • In 1382-83, Richard, son and heir of John Walssh, a minor and heir of Sheldesleye Walsshe, Worcester.
  • In February 1384 Richard Walsh is listed as Treasurer of the Liberty of Tipperary.
  • On Wednesday, St. Andrew's day (30 Nov., 1384), John Walsh of Grimsby, Lincolnshire (descended from the noble family of St. Walerie) fought in a duel at Westminster with Martlet de Villeneuve
  • In 1388 we find Richard Walsh, chaplain, receiving grants of land in Aghaviller, Knocktopher and Ida, all in Co. Kilkenny.
  • In October 1388 Andrew Walshe was a witness of a land grant in Jerpoint and Gowlan..., co. Kilkenny.
  • In January 1389, listed among Fines taken before the seneschal of the Liberty of Tipperary, at Bowlek..., include Thomas Walsh 'filius episcopi', Thomas Walsh of Typeraght, and John son of Walter Walsh.
  • In 1392, Thomas le Walsh, knight, Steward of our honour of Leicester, is mentioned in a grant made by John of Gaunt, son of the King of England.
  • Circa 1392-99, Hugh Waleys held one knight's fee at Est Raddon, Devonshire.
  • In April 1394 John Duffe Walsh and John son of Philip Walsh were among the witnesses of a grant of free navigation of the river called Blackwater, in the lands of Kylmaboygh (Kilmacow, co. Kilkenny).
  • In 1396, in the reign of Richard II, John Walsh of Grimsby is cited as Sheriff of Lincoln.
  • In 1398, and after, Nicholas Walsh was Sheriff in Limerick.
  • In January 1399 the Earl of Ormond appointed Richard Walsche his Escheator and Keeper of the market and measures of the Liberty for the term of his life.
  • Circa 1399 is noted Philip Walche of Carryg (perhaps Carrickmacgriffin).
  • In November 1401 Geoffrey Walsch is noted with rental of lands in and near Callan, co. Kilkenny.
  • Circa 1403 David son of Thomas Walsh was a juror at the inquisition at Clonmel, co. Tipperary.
  • In May 1403 Meryk (Maurice) Walsch and David Walsch son of Gornok Walsch receive grants of land in Cowlraynagh, Balyanyr and Cowlyshill (Coulsyll) in the tenement of Ballyduff (parish of Inistioge, Co. Kilkenny). In 1409 they received further grants there, and a messuage at Inistyok. In 1411 they received a parcel of land in Ballycaksufte (Ballycocksost).
  • In February 1404, Henry Bretnagh and Philip Walshe were among the jurors at an inquisition held at Clonmel, co, Tipperary.
  • In June 1404, Thomas Bretnagh and Shane Walsch were among the jurors at an inquisition held at Clonmel, co, Tipperary.
  • Thomas Walsh was a sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1404.
  • In 1406 John Walsh and David Walsh of Carrickmayne gave to Henry Fitz Adam Walsh "all the lands of Carrickmayne, Ballyroe, and Annodan, in tail male, to be held of the chief lords of fee for services due and customary, remainder to Maurice Walsh and his heirs male, remainder to the right heirs of the said Henry Walsh."
  • About 1406, in the Dublin area, appears Harry [Henry?] Walshe, "Captayne of the Walshe men" and with him "James Came of Kylgobbene and Connor Came of Kylternane," places the Walshs afterwards owned and defended in the border wars.
  • In 1407 William Walsh received a grant from the Crown for lands at Balally, County Dublin.
  • In 1407 William Walsh, father of Henry, was residing on the lands of Carrickmines on a part of them called Symondstown.
  • In 1411 James Walsh was a juror in the inquisition, where it was found that among those who were tenants of Thomas Mowbray was "Walsh of Polrankan" (St. Michaels' Parish, Forth. Co. Wexford).
  • In November 1411, listed in the Rental of James le Botiller, Earl of Ormond, of the barony of Knocktopher, include William Walsche, as well as Robert Walsh for 'le Knokyngawr'. For the same month, in the Rental of James le Botiller, Earl of Ormond, from Grannagh and Overk, include Robert Walsche and William Walsche.
  • In 1412 the King appointed John Walsh, Thomas Waleys and others to prevent the export of grain "from Bray head to the Nanny water," an area southeast of Dublin.
  • In April 1412 listed among the Rental of the Earl of Ormond of Melagh and Leynagheston include Geoffrey Walsche, Jonoc Bretnaghe, Walter Bretnaghe. Thomas Walsche is listed for rent at Carrickmagriffin.
  • In 1416 and 1417 Sir Philip Walsch and Sir Richard Walsch, chaplains, are listed among land transactions in and near Thurles, co. Tipperary.
  • In 1417 Maurice Walsh and William Walsh were among those from Dublin County who joined in memorial to the King in praise of the vigor with which Talbot, Lord Furnival, repelled the incursions of the O'Byrnes and O'Tooles (amongst others) upon the borders of the Pale.
  • In June 1418 David Walsh (Valensis) is listed as a burgess of Ross in a quit-claim of a messuage there.
  • In November 1419 Richard son of Philip Walsh is listed among the jurors of an inquisition taken at Corbaliesford, regarding parcels of royal service divided between the Barony of Knocktopher and the Newtown of Jerpoint. [Ormond Deeds]
  • In 1421 John Walsh was at Rathronan, just back of Clonmel, and in 1642 the family was still there, for "Captain James Walsh, son and heir of Daniel Walsh of Rathronan, with others, " was acused by Judah Sherman, of Ballingarry, parish of Lismore, of driving away his cattle." Confiscation presumably followed the allegations, a sign of the times.
  • In 1421 the King committed to Thomas Walsh the custody of the manor of Ward while "in the King's hand." (One half went to a Birmingham and the other to St. Lawrence of Howth.)
  • In January 1421 Adam Walshe is listed among the jurors at an inquisition taken at Ballaghagh in county Cork.
  • In 1422, Wexford, "the King desired to grant to Edward Ferrers certain privileges at 12 pounds a year, out of which "Thomas Walleys, by color of a commission as receiver or appropriator, receives 10 marks by the name of his fee."
  • In April, 1426 listed in the Rental of the lordship of the Earl of Ormond in counties Kilkenny and Tipperary include David Walsch, Thomas Beg and Shane Bretanagh, Walter Walsch, William More Walsch, and another David Walsch. Aditionally are listed William Walsch for the farm of Cloggagh, and William Walsch of Polrothane.
  • In December 1426 Edmund fitzThomas Botiller, knight, gives and grants to, among others, John Walsh, all his messuages lands and rents in Schanbogh in county Kilkenny.
  • In October 1427, in a quit-claim given at Cashel, Sir Richard Walshe, chaplain, is granted all right in all messuages, etc., and in the castle of Hoddeston.
  • In 1428, Richard Walshe held a third part of a knight's fee in Onlep, Leiscester, formerly held by Thomas Walshe.
  • On August 12, 1428 Richard son of Geoffrey Walsh took the oaths of Richard Prout and Richard Fyll in the Monastery of the B.V.M. of Jerpoint, to appear before the court of Knocktopher.
  • In March 1429 the townland of Morgheston is granted to David Walshe and John Frankleyn by the Earl of Ormond.
  • In December 1429 Margareta Braynok, daughter of Richard Braynok, gives and grants to Nicholas son of Walter Braynok of Rathgoll, chaplain, a messuage called Condownyestoun (parish of Aghaviller, co. Kilkenny) with thirty acres of land in the lordship of Rathgoll.
  • In the April, 1432 Rental of James, Earl of Ormond, in counties Kilkenny and Tipperary, are listed William Philpotesson Walsch for the farm of Cloyagh, David Walsch, Schane Bretenagh, William More Walsch, Walter Walsch, and William Walsch of Polrothane.
  • In September 4, 1432, at the Court of County Tipperary, among the free tenants of Iffa include Walter son of Richard fitz Tancard Walsh; and Milo Walsch.
  • In October 1433 John Walsche is listed as a merchant of Youghal, co. Cork.
  • In May 1434 John son of Richard son of John Walsh received a grant of a messuage in the town of Cashel.
  • In November 1434, in the Rental of the Earl of Ormond in counties Kilkenny and Tipperary, under the tenement of Grennagh includes William Walsch for the farm of Clogagh (and under that entry the farm of Clonasse, and under that the farm of the lords' mill there); also John Walsch, smith; Thomas Walsch; and David Walsch. Under the place name Carrickmagriffin is listed Robert Walsh for the farm of Monybrytayne.
  • In December 1434 The Earl of Ormond granted to Annota [Annora?] Walshe, and Robert Walshe, her son the custody of his castle at Carrik.
  • In August 1435 John son of David Walsch is listed as a burgess of Rosponte (Rosbercon, co. Kilkenny).
  • In January 1439 is listed Philip Walsch of Dengynmoyr, as bailiff to place Patrick son of Fulc de la Freyne in full seisin of lands in the parish of Mayne and in the tenement of Donmoyr (northern co. Kilkenny).
  • In 1439 Williame Waleys, merchant, born at Lancaster, now dwelling at Drogheda, ireland, owner of the (ship) George of Welles. v. Thomas Gyll, of Dartmouth, owner of the (ship) Christofer of Dertemouth.: Injury to his ship off the Start, 21 Jan.
  • In 1440 Thomas Waleys of Ireland was named in indentures of war between Sir James of Ormond (perhaps later James the 5th Earl), son of the Earl of Ormond, and others so named with Thomas.
  • In February 1440 John son of William More Walsh held lands in in Hopekynestoun near Meydlagh (in or near Tullahought, co. Kilkenny).
  • In 1441 "Henry Walsh, who was captain at Carrickmones", allowed by the Crown ten marks [a large sum in those days] for protecting the liegemen, and probably it was by him that the Castle of Carrickmines was erected in the form in which it stood for the next two centuries.
  • In February 1442 Leticia Braynok, lately wife of Robert Talbot, was involved in placing Walter Shirlok in full seisin of the manor of Dunnovir in county Kilkenny.
  • In November 1442 Henry son of Tancard Walsch, burgess of Clonmel [co. Tipperary], granted three messuages in the town.
  • In February 1446 William Walsch, chaplain, gives and grants to Nicholas son of David Hynberye the manor of Owenyn, the manor of Henberyeston and the manor of Fanyneston [in co. Kilkenny].
    In 1449 is record of a grant, in the chancery, by Hugh Walsshe of Dunstaple, and Joan his wife, daughter of the late William Smyth of the same, butcher, to Thomas Bygood, John Cundas, William Tirryngton, Hugh Brekenok (Walssh?), Thomas Waleys, of the same, and John Skynner of Wypsenade, of lands &c. in Wypsenade and Eyton: Bedfordshire.
  • In Arpil 1450 William Walshe and his wife Margaret Prendergast are noted granting a meesuage in the town of Ross, co. Wexford.
  • In March 1456 Nicholas Braynock, chaplain, was granted land in Cautouneston in the lordship of Rathgeyll.
  • In 1456-57, Thomas Walsh was sheriff of Leicestershire and Warwickshire. Thomas Walsh died in 1463 holding the manor of Burton Overy as well as property in Wanlip, co. Leicester.
  • In March 1459 Margaret, daughter and heir of William Brahynoc, grants to Elicia Brahynoc, her daughter, and her heirs for ever all her lands, messuages, etc., in the lordship of Condineston (Aghaviller parish, co. Kilkenny), and two acres of land in Gorthemore in county Tipperary.
  • In April 1465 Margaret Prendergast (widow of William Walshe) grants a messuage in the town of Ross to Thomas Don alias Walsch.
  • Between 1476 and 1484 Thomas Walshe is listed among the Rentals and accounts of the manors of Turvey, Rush and Balscadden, Co. Dublin.
  • In 1482 Morris Walsh was occupant of the castle and lands at Kilgobbin, County Dublin. In 1509 Morris' son Pierce is noted at Kilgobbin.
  • In July 1482 Richard, son of Adam Walch is listed as a burgess of Cashel, and a former reeve of the town.
  • By charter indented, 3 October, 10 Henry VII (1494-95), Robert Walshe gave the manors of Felton, Lyllesdon and Wrantage (near Currey Mallet), and land in Stowey, to Thomas Walshe, his son, and Margaret, wife of the said Thomas, and the heirs of Thomas
  • In October 1501 at an inquisition taken at Inistioge, regarding the villa of Rosse, jurors included William Bretnagh of Rosbaucon, gentleman, and Robert Walsh of Inystiok.
  • In February 1504 William Brennagh, alias Walsh fitzJames, is granted in mortgage a half part of all lands of Androwislande of Caslanneholl (Castlehale) in Ossory diocese.
  • In 1509 Sir John Walshe of Little Sodbury Manor, Gloucestershire, was noted as a famous warrior who had been knighted as the king's champion at the coronation of Henry VIII.
  • Tynte's Castle in Youghal, County Cork, is the only remaining fortified house within that town. What is known is that the castle was erected in the 15th century as a fortified residence of the Cambro-Norman Walshe family. It remained as part of the estate of this merchant family until they forfeited it in 1584 and acquired by the town Corporation. The Walshe's sided with the Earl of Desmond during his unsuccessful rebellion against English power in Munster in the mid 16th century. Subsequently the Castle passed to the Corporation of Youghal; who in turn leased it to Sir Robert Tynte of Somerset, England.
  • In 1518, before an inquisition at New Ross, Henry Walsh and others complained that Richard Walsh, junior, Patrick Walsh, Robert Walsh, (and many others) "came from Waterford with many Spaniards, Frenchman, Bretons and Irish, riotously, with a fleet of boats and ships, in piratical or warlike fashion, variously armed," on the 20th of May of that year, and did much damage.
  • In 1527 John Walsh fitz Lawrence is cited as sovereign, or chief magistrate, of Kilkenny city.
  • In 1529 Peter Walsh is cited as sovereign, or chief magistrate, of Kilkenny city.
  • In April 1532 Patrick Walshe is listed as mayor of Waterford.
  • In 1538 John Walsh is cited as sovereign, or chief magistrate, of Kilkenny city.
  • On August 15, 1546, Henry Walsh had a patent granted by Henry VIII for establishment of Holy Ghost hospital at Greyfriars, Waterford City. Patrick Walsh founded the hospital in 1545.
  • In 1546 Thomas Walsh was then in possession of three houses and eighty-one acres in Balally, County Dublin, besides the castle. He died there in this year and was succeeded by his son John.
  • In 1550 we find a James Walsh appointed constable of King John's castle at Dungarvan with the service of eight gunners.
  • About 1550, Sir Patrick Walsh, a Knight, is found at Waterford City.
  • From 1551 to 1579, Patrick Walshe was Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. His son the Rt. Reverend Nicholas Walsh of Waterford was Bishop of Ossory (died 1585) and is remembered as the man who introduced Irish type to the native printing press in connexion with his unfinished translation into Irish of the New Testament.
  • In 1578 a John Walsh died siesed of 300 acres at Kilgoban and Jamestown, County Dublin.
  • In 1588 a pedigree of the "Walshes of Tirawley, County Mayo, from whom most of the Walshes of Mayo seem to spring", was compiled by one Lawrence Walsh. The actual pedgree deals with a Walsh family in northern co. Kilkdare. Lawrence claimed that they were descended from one Walynus, a native of Wales who came to Ireland (with Maurice Fitzgerald) in 1169 (to 1175) with his brother Barrett from whom, Edward MacLysaght claims, the bearers of the surname Barrett (frequently found in Tirawley) descend.
  • By 1591, those using ships calling at New Ross, Wexford were Robert Walsh of Waterford, with a consignment of shoes, etc.; Edmund Walsh of Waterford with a consignment of hardware; and Richard Walsh of New Ross with a load of furnishings. The good ship Ann Synott also brought for Judge Walsh (Sir Nicholas) a chest and a barrel, containing clothes for himself (six suits), cloth for his wife, "1.2 cwt. of cheese" and "12 cwt. of black sope."
  • In 1592, one Henry Walsh is cited as the mayor of Cork city.
  • In July 1596 Nicholas Walsh (of Clonmore) is listed as second justice of the Chief Place in Ireland.
  • In 1602 the last entry in Hore is that of a pardon for Tibbot Walshe Fitz John of Kilgoban (Kilgibbon, Clonmore parish, Shelmalire, Co. Wexford?).
  • In 1610, Walter Walsh was Dean of Kildare.
  • In 1614, Sir Robert Walsh, Knight, is found in Waterford City.
  • In 1634, Sir James Walsh, a member of Parliament, was from Waterford City.
  • In 1640 Oliver Walsh purchased Ballykilcavan, located in Queens County (Laois).
  • In 1641 James Walsh was seized of the castle and lands at Balally, County Dublin, as well as of those of Edmondstown, near Rathfarnham.
  • About 1642, Nicholas Walsh of Tralee (Kerry) was mentioned in the Royal Declaration of Thanks, issued by Charles II after his Restoration, as having specially befriended the King. Nevertheless his lands, which had been confiscated, were not restored.
  • In 1650, the notorius John Walsh was Legal Adviser to Cromwell and Agent to the Duke of Ormond. He was one of the only Walshs left alive in Clonmel, County Tipperary, after the siege by Cromwell's soldiers in 1650.
  • Circa 1653 James Walsh of Rathronan had his lands confiscated under Cromwell.
  • About 1660 among the families who lost their estates in the time of Cromwell were the Walshs of Moortown. This family, which once owned the Moortown area, was for long prominent in local affairs. Peter Walsh, a supporter of the Ormondist party during the time of the Confederation of Kilkenny, was born between 1608 and 1618 in Moortown, County Kildare.
  • In the King James Army List of 1689 is included a reference to "Walsh of Ballinvoher", a parish in Co. Kerry outside Tralee.
  • About 1690 John Walsh's lands at Cuillinaghmore (Co. Kerry) were confiscated.
  • In 1691, Robert Walsh, papist, had his property at Ballygunner, County Waterford confiscated.
  • In 1769 the "Note and Synopsis of the Genealogy of Walsh (or Wallis)" was presented by William Hawkins, Ulster King at Arms, to the Austrian Counts Wallis, a family of the Walshs of Carrickmines, County Dublin.
  • Dated February 24, 1775, the Baronetage of Ireland in the time of George III cites Johnson-Walsh of Ballykilcavan, Cp. Leix.
  • In the 1870's, a Sir Allen Walsh, of Ballykilcavan, Stradbally, owned 3,131 acres in the area.

    The preceding article was compiled by Dennis J. Walsh, 2009



  • Walsh Surname - Origins of the Walsh Surname.
  • Walsh Surname - Walsh History in Ireland.
  • Calendar of Ormond Deeds - 13th to 15th century Walsh extracts.
  • Walsh Arms - Variations on Walsh Coats of Arms.
  • Wales - Exploring Walsh Connections in Wales.
  • England - Early Walshs in England.
  • France - The French Connection.
  • Possible Pedigrees - of Walsh of the Mountain.
  • Biographies - Short Bio's on notable Walshs, plus links to online Bios.
  • Place Names - Historical place-names of the family of Walsh.
  • Walsh of Kilkenny - Historical Perspective
  • Confiscations - of Walsh land holdings in Ireland at the time of Cromwell.
  • Lament of John MacWalter - Irish caoine about Walsh of the Mountain.


  • Share some of your Walsh History, send information to the Dennis Walsh

    Walsh through the Centuries - A Timeline

    Wednesday, 28-Oct-2009 20:45:45 MDT
    visitors