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le Waleys and Walsh of Lancashire


One of the early Walsh, or Welsh, families of Lancashire included Welshmen who settled there in 1177 when Robert Banastre was expelled from Rhuddlan, North Wales by the Welsh prince Owen Gwynned. Aughton (known as 'Actun' in the 1086 Domesday Book) became a Banastre manor. The first known Thenage tenent of (Up)Litherland, near Aughton, was Richard le Waleys (d. 1221) who married to Quinidd, and the line continued to 1700 and no doubt beyond, some of whom were Rectors of Aughton in Lancashire.

The following line of Richard le Walyes was shared by a researcher, and goes something like this:

1: Richard Le Waleys, died 1221, married Quenild (who outlived Richard, and retained land in Litherland) 
2: Richard Le Waleys, Land in Whittle & Dalton, Patron of Rectory
3: John Le Waleys, son of Richard, Lord of Litherland & Welch Whittle
     Notes: About 1290 Ralph de Bickerstath filed a complaint against John de Waleys of 
     Uplitherland and others. The land in dispute was found to lie partly in Aughton and 
     partly in Bickerstaffe, Lancashire, England.
2: Robert Le Waleys, guardian to John Le Waleys (son of Richard)
3: Thomas Le Waleys, son of Robert, Rector 1303-17
4: Henry Le Waleys, son of Thomas, Rector Aughton,   In 1292 lands to Gilbert 1301 to Standish
4: Richard Le Waleys, son of Thomas married Maud, daughter of Robert de Bold
5: Richard Walsh, son of Richard, died pre 1372						
6: Eleanor, daughter of Richard Walsh, died pre 1381, married Thomas de Formby [son of Adam Banastre?]
6: Maud, daughter of Richard Walsh, married Roger de Bradshagh (son of Richard from Pennington)
7: Richard de Bradshagh, son of Roger and Maud (main lands pass away from Walshs)

A: Gilbert Le Waleys, married Joan  (son of Thomas, rector in 1303?)
B: John and Richard, sons of Gilbert and Joan
C: Henry, descendant of Gilbert?
      Notes: In 1328 Henry, son of John le Waleies, chaplain, to grant messuages and land in 
      Standish and Langtree to a chaplain at the altar of the Blessed Virgin in the parish church 
      of St. Wilfrid, Standish, retaining land in Aughton, Lancashire. 
D: Emma, wife or descendant of Henry?
E: Ralph de Freckleton, desendant of Henry and/or Emma?
F: Joan, daughter of Ralph, married William de Huddleston. In 1408 Joan claimed 
   property and granted them to Roger Walsh. 
     Notes: Freckleton Hall was no doubt passed on to the various Freckletons until about 1427, 
     when Joan, daughter of a Ralph de Freckleton carried it to her husband, William Muddleston. 
     This seems to be the last direct Freckleton connection with the Manor. The manor did pass 
     to various families and the last recorded occupier appears to be the Sharples family in 1618.

1: Roger Walsh held Walsh Hall in 1408
    Notes: In Aston's 1808 Gazetteer of Lancashire, Welch Hall is described as 1 mile northwest 
    of Aughton. Welch Whittle (a hamlet) is described as 1 mile east-northeast of Standish.  In 
    another gazetteer of Lancashire it is described as Walsh Hall, or Welch Hall, and located 
    2 miles northeast of Ormskirk.  Welch Whittle is also termed Welsh Whittle. Walshaw and 
    Walshaw Hall are also listed in the gazetteer.
2: Robert Walsh, son of Roger.
3: Gilbert Walsh, died 1506, son of Robert Walsh, married Joan in 1464.
3: Thomas, Edmund and Henry, other sons of Robert Walsh.
4: Robert Walsh, son of Gilbert,  born 1506 and died 1523-29.
4: Gilbert Walsh, son of Gilbert, died 1555.								
4: Robert Walsh, son of Gilbert, died 1571, married Ellen Toxleth.
4: Thomas Walsh, son of Gilbert, died 1594, Curate in 1554.				
5: Thomas Walsh, son of Thomas, died June 1614.
6: Robert Walsh, son of Thomas, born 1586, Churchwarden in 1628, lived until restoration 1660.
7: Thomas Walsh, son of Robert, died 1694. Walshs appear to have been conformists.Thomas active
   against Parliament. 1653 lands sold for treason,1666 had 4 hearths, 8 in Aughton.			
8: Children of Thomas: Robert, Mary, Katherine, Margaret, Susan, Ann, and Jane.		

Notes and Records:

Among a small number of witnesses in a charter dated 1190-1194, to Henry son of Warine de Lancaster of Uplitherland and others lands, granted to his father Warine, include the name Radulfo Walensi (Ralph or Ranulf le Waleys). [source: The Lancashire Pipe rolls of 31 Henry I., A. D. 1130, and of the reigns of Henry II., A. D. 1155-1189; Richard I., A. D. 1189-1199; and King John, A. D. 1199-1216; 1902]

Ricardo Walensi was a witness in the Lancashire foundation grant of the Priory of Burscough, including the church of Ormskirk, dated between 1189-1196. [source: The Lancashire Pipe rolls of 31 Henry I., A. D. 1130, and of the reigns of Henry II., A. D. 1155-1189; Richard I., A. D. 1189-1199; and King John, A. D. 1199-1216; 1902]

Listed in a transcription of a charter from Testa de Nevill, dated before 1196, is a Richard le Waleys, lord of Aughton, and Up Litherland. [source: The Lancashire Pipe rolls of 31 Henry I., A. D. 1130, and of the reigns of Henry II., A. D. 1155-1189; Richard I., A. D. 1189-1199; and King John, A. D. 1199-1216; 1902]

In a grant dated between 1190-1216, is a grant in frankalmoign from Richard [de Orell to the canons of Cockersand] of portion of his land in Dalton, to wit, the eastern moiety of Lithurst, with these bounds, from land of Richard le Waleys, called Lithurst, to land of St. Nicholas [of Burscough]... [source: Remains, Historical and Literary, Connected with the Palatine Counties of Lancaster and Chester; v. 2 v. 43; 1900]

Henry II gave to Warine de Lancaster, amongst other Manors, Uplitter-land, which Henry (de Lea) Fitz Warine remitted to King John. In the latter reign (1199-1216), John, son of Simon, son of Mabilla de Acton (Aughton), granted to Richard Wallensis, Lord of Litherland, his curtilege in the town of Acton, and Richard le Walais, probably the the same Lord, granted land in the Manor of Acton, and also within his Manor of Litherland. [source: Notitia Cestriensis, by Chetham Society, v. 2; v. 21, 1850]

In a Lancshire grant of 1205 of the barony of Penworthan, among the witnesses were Gilbert fitz Reinfrid followed by Roberto Walensi. [source: [source: The Lancashire Pipe rolls of 31 Henry I., A. D. 1130...]

In the Great Inquest (Survey) of the County of Lancaster in 1212, Richard le Waleys (Walensis), is returned holding one carucate in the vill of Litherland of the King for 10 shillings. (Testa ii., f. 814). He died between 1217 and 1221, and in the latter year, Richard his son fined 40s. for his relief (Fine Roll, 6 Henry III., m. 9). Quenild, the widow of Richard le Waleys, was of the King's donation at this time, and he land was valued at half a mark (Testa ii., f. 662). [source: Publications; by the Record Society of Lancashire and Cheshire; v. 39; 1899; p.64]
Additional notes regarding the above Inquest are appended in "Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids". This is Uplitherland. Richard le Waelys, or his father, had been a retainer, as it is supposed, of Robert Banastre, who was one of the knights whom Henry II. retained at Presatyn Castle, co. Flint, for its defence. Upon the capture of the castle by the Welsh in or about 1176, numerous families of loyal Welshmen migrated into Lancashire with Robert Banastre. It is not unlikely that Richard le Waleys, or his father, obtained Uplitherland in marriages, for in and long before the year 1176 it was held by Warein de Lancaster, the king's falconer, and subsequently by his son Henry until about the year 1207. The adjoining vill of Aughton (Acton) appears to have escaped the notice of this inquest. It was held by Richard le Waleys with the advowson of the church, but another family held two-thirds of the township under Richard.

Also in the Great Inquest (Survey) of the County of Lancaster in 1212, Warrais de Cham holds in Maideneton the fourth part of one knight, which was Robert le Waleys' (Walensis). [source: Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids, v. 48, 1903]

Welsh Whittle in the parish of Standish, was part of 5 carucates of land given to Ranulph de Marsey. The predecessor of Richard le Waleis, or Welsh, had been enfeoffed of this estate, which thereupon acquired the name Welsh Whittle, to distinguish it from Whittle-le-Woods. In 4 Henry III. (1220-21) Adam Arbalaster (Balistarius) sued Richard le Waleis (Walensis) for 4 oxgangs of land in Withull (Welsh Whittle). Richard puts in his place his son, Robert. In 5 Henry III. Richard le Waleis gave half a mark for license to concord by the surety of Robert de Liuerlande. [source: Publications; by the Record Society of Lancashire and Cheshire; v. 39; 1899; p.43]

Welch Whittle was in the possession of Gilbert fitz Reinfred temp. King John, upon whose death, in 1220, it descended to William de Lancaster, his son, who in 1221 was called to warrant this estate (consisting of four oxgangs) to Richard le Waleys, who had been enfeoffed by Roger de Leicester. This was in answer to a suit brought against the said Richard by Adam le Arbalaster, and Alice his wife, widow of the said Roger de Leicester (Cf. Final Concord, 5 Henry III, No. 6). Evidently le Waleys had given the place its distinguishing appelative. [source: Remains, historical and literary, connected with the palatine counties of Lancashire and Chester, v. 40, 1898]

Among the witnesses of a Lancashire grant by Gilbert fitz Reinfred to Reiner de Stiveton, dated 1216-1220, was a Stephano de Wellen(si). [source: The Lancashire Pipe rolls of 31 Henry I., A. D. 1130, and of the reigns of Henry II., A. D. 1155-1189; Richard I., A. D. 1189-1199; and King John, A. D. 1199-1216, publ. in 1902]

A Richard Walensis died in 1221. Between 1216-1224, to the sheriff of Lancaster, Richard Walensis has made fine with the king by 40s. for his relief of the land formerly of Richard Walensis, his father, whose heir he is, when Richard ought to hold of the king, for which he has terms at the exchequer. [source: Calendar of the Fine Rolls of the Reign of Henry III: 1-8 Henry III, 1216-1224]

Richard le Waleys of Up-Litherland, who died in 1221, had two sons, (1) Richard, who was fined 40s. for his relief, and had livery of his father's lands 6th November 1221, and was probably father of John le Waleys (of Lithirlond in 1283); and (2) Ranulf le Waleys, who had lands in Dalton, parish of Wigan, Ranulf was father of Richerit de Dalton, who had a son, Adam de Dalton, also called "de Acton". (Registers of Cockersand and Burscough). [source: Publications; by the Record Society of Lancashire and Cheshire; v. 39; 1899; p.161]

Quenilda, who was the wife of Richard le Waleys, is of the gift of the King, And her land is worth half a mark. [source: Testa de Nevill, MS. Vol. II]

In a grant dated between 1201-1233, Richard le Waleys, with the consent of Ranulf his brother, granted to God and St. Mary of Cockersand, a portion of his land in Dalton. [source: Remains, historical and literary, connected with the palatine counties of Lancaster and Chester; v. 43; 1900]

In 1219, Thomas le Waleis, plaintiff, by Richard le Waleis put in his place, and William le Butiller, tenant of two oxgangs of land with appurtenances in (land in) Bruches. An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them. William granted to Thomas the moiety of the said two oxgangs. [source: Final concords of the county of Lancaster By William Farrer]

In a grant dated between 1212-1242, Richard le Waleys and Eleanor his wife grant to the canons of Cockersand two acres of land in Hindley. [source: Remains, historical and literary, connected with the palatine counties of Lancaster and Chester; v. 43; 1900]

Between 1220-26, from the Cockersand Chartulary, Thomas le Waleys (Walense) and Adam his brother were witnesses to a grant of lands in Kirkby Lonsdale. [source: Remains, Historical and Literary, Connected with the Palatine Counties of Lancaster and Chester, v. 3; v. 56, 1905]

Between 1220-1251 occurs Robert, son of Richard Waleys, who granted to God and the Abbey of St. Mary of Cockersand, &c., one seillon in the townfield of Hoole. "And we will take nothing from it but prayers and alms." [source: Remains, historical and literary, connected with the palatine counties of Lancaster and Chester, v. 40, 1898]

In 1221, Richard le Waleys was a tenant of four oxgangs of land with appurtences in Withull (Walsh Whittle). Adam le Arbalaster and Alice his wife quit-claimed to Richard. [source: Final concords of the county of Lancaster By William Farrer]

Richard Waleys of Litherland succeeded his father Richard who died in 1221. His nephew Richerit son of Ranulph amde four grants to Cockersand which are dated by Farrer between 1231 and 1245. [An edition of the cartulary of Burscough Priory]

In a grant dated between 1222-1250, Richard le Waleys of Litherland granted to the canons of Cockersand a portion of his land in Aughton. A Henry le Waleys released that land to the brethren at his writing. [source: Remains, historical and literary, connected with the palatine counties of Lancaster and Chester; v. 43; 1900]

In a grant dated between 1231-1245, Richerith, son of Ranulf le Waleys, grant to St. Mary of Cockersand a portion of his land in Dalton, called Madin-ridding, which they have by the grant of Richard le Waleys. Among the witnesses was Ranulf le Waleys. [source: Remains, historical and literary, connected with the palatine counties of Lancaster and Chester; v. 43; 1900]

At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. (18th May, 1235), Richard Waleys (Walensis), Blethin de Acton and Madoc de Acton, were acknowledged for the advowson of the church of Acton (Aughton). Note: this may suggest that Bleddyn de Acton, father of Madoc de Acton (aka le Waleys), may have been a brother of Richard le Waleys, who died in 1221. [source: Publications; by the Record Society of Lancashire and Cheshire; v. 39; 1899; p.65]

In 1242-43, Robert (de Wythull) son of Richard (le Waleys?) holds a 10th part of a knight in Longeton of the fee of the Earl of Lincoln. [source: Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids]

In 1246, William de Lancaster enfeoffed John le Waleys of 22 acres of land worth 22s. yearly. [source: Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids]

In 30-31 Henry III. (1246-48) is a Writ of Utrum between Robert Blundel parson of Hacton (Aughton) church versus Maddock son of Lewel and Quenilda late wife of Richard le Waleys regarding 2 oxgangs in Hacton. [source: A Calendar of the Lancashire Assize Rolls; v. 47; 1904]

Among the named in a list of sureties fined, in 30-31 Henry III. (circa 1247), includes a Roger le Waleys (Walensis) of Litherlaund. [source: A Calendar of the Lancashire Assize Rolls; v. 47; 1904]

In 1250 is a deed of John Walens' de Lytherlond to Madoc, of land near the Regia Via (King's Highway). [source: Gleanings Towards the Annals of Aughton, Near Ormskirk]

In a grant to the prior and canon of Burscough, dated 1258-66, the witnesses included Robert Walensis, and John Walensis, of Litherland. [source: Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, v. 36, 1875]

Between 1260-72, both John Walensis, and Richard son of Robert Walensis (as well as Madoc de Actona) are witnesses to a grant to the prior and brethren of St. Nicholas of Burscough. [source: Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, v. 50-64, 1889]

In a grant deated between 1264-1280, by Margery, widow of Robert chaplain of Burscough, in all her right in the land of Garston (Gerstan), among the witnesses included John Walensis, Madocus de Acton, Simon and Richard le Waleys. [source: Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, v. 36, 1875]

In 1279 Robert le Waleys is mentioned as a tenant of the manor of Kertmel. He received a quit-claim of the tenement from Robert de Prees. [source: Final concords of the county of Lancaster By William Farrer]

In 9 Edward I (1280-81), an assise of mort d'ancestor was arraigned by William son of Robert le Waleys against the prior of Cartmel ("Kertemel"), touching land a a moiety of a mesuage in Broughton (Lanc.) [source: Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, v. 50-64, 1889]

In 1282, Richard le Waleys and Madoc de Acton were among those involved in an extent of lands in the vill of Acton (Aughton) held by the late Guy, son of Madoc, son of Blevin le Waleys. [source: Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids]

In 1282, John le Waleys was in dispute with Randle de la More touching a messuage and eleven acres in the land in Aghton (Aughton). [source: Final concords of the county of Lancaster By William Farrer]

In 1283 is a dispute between John le Waleys of Lithirlond and John & Mabil Waynepayn touching a messuage and fifteen acres of land in Dalton. John and Mabil acknowledged the tenement to be the right of John le Waleys, and quit-claimed it to him. [source: Final concords of the county of Lancaster By William Farrer]

Circa 1286, John Walens of Litherland, Robert Walens, and Madoc de Acton were among the witnesses of a grant in the vill of Scaresbrec. [source: Scarisbrick Charters, from Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire]

In the 1298 extent of lands and tenements which belonged to Edmund, the King's brother, Earl of Lancaster, John le Waleys (Walensis) holds Uplytherlond, rendering 10s. yearly at the said term. [source: Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids]

John Waleys of Litherland survived into the fourteenth century by had been succeeded by his son Richard the confirmor by 1303. [source: An edition of the cartulary of Burscough Priory]

In 1314, a Sir Thomas le Waleys was receiver of the late Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, in an accounting rendered at Pontefract of the rental of the latter's lands in Lonsdale and Amounderness (co. Lancashire). [source: Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids: 1310-1333]

In 1316 is a grant of John, son of Symon, son of Mable, to Richard Walens' of 10 acres of land in the territory of Litherland extending by the field called 'Le Mahonets' field. [source: Gleanings Towards the Annals of Aughton, Near Ormskirk]

In the reign of Edward II (1307-1327), the advowson of the Church of the Manor of Aghton was held by Richard le Walays and his heirs by Mabill his wife. [source: Gleanings Towards the Annals of Aughton, Near Ormskirk]

Circa 1320-22, Richard Walsh held the advowson of the church of Aughton, and the hamlet of Up-Litherland by service of 10s. for all services (Birch Feodary). [source: Publications; by the Record Society of Lancashire and Cheshire; v. 39; 1899; p.64]

Robert le Waleys, of the Cross of Lathom, near Ormskirk, Co. Lancs, temp. Henry III, is mentioned as great-grandfather of Robert of the Cross of Lathom in a suit of 1321 (VCH, iii. 255, n.6). [Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire]

In the 15th Edward II (1321-22), Richard le Walays held the manor of Litherland juxta Halsall, a third part of the Manor of Aghton juxta Bykerstath, and the advowson of the Church of Aghton, which in the year 1371, were held by Roger de Bradshaigh, and Mabilla, his wife. The Bradshaighs continued in possession until the 4th Edward VI (circa 1551), when William Bradshaw conveyed the Manors of Aghton and Uplitherland to James Scarisbrick, until the 17th of Elizabeth when they passed to Barthlomew Hesketh. [source: Notitia Cestriensis, by Chetham Society, v. 2; v. 21, 1850]

In 1323, Roger le Waleys and Agnes his wife hold certain tenements in Little Laton of the heirs of Richard le Botyller. [source; Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids: 1310-1333]

In 1328 Henry, son of John le Waleies, chaplain, to grant messuages and land in Standisch (Standish) and Longtre (Langtree) to a chaplain at the altar of the Blessed Virgin in the parish church of St. Wilfrid, Standish, retaining land in Aughton, Lancashire. Henry has lands and tenements in Aghton (Aughton), to wit, 100a. of land (in Walshdroft) which are held of the Abbot of Cockersand. [source: Lancashire Inquests, Extents, and Feudal Aids: 1310-1333]

In November 1332, Henry le Waleys, rector of Standish Church, further enriches the Chantry by delivering to Master Simon, son of Thomas le Waleys, chaplain, six oxen, and four cows, woth a hundred shillings, as an increased provision to him and his successors, the chaplains of the Chantry of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Standish Church. [source: Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire]
Note: This Henry seems to be the same Henry, son of John le Waleys, chaplain, who had license in 1327-28 to alienate the messuages and lands with appurtenances that he earlier granted in "Standissh and Longetre" to the Chantry at Standissh, and the one who at the same time nominates himself to choose the next chaplain and after his death Richard le Waleys and his heirs are to have the presenatation (of a new chaplain). By March 1337-38 it is probable Richard le Waleys was dead because Henry le Waleys, to the exclusion of Richard, appointed John de Standish patron of the Chantry.

In 1353, Richard le Walsche and John le Walsche both appear as witnesses in a grant by Thomas, son of Walter de Aghton, to Richard de Lythrlond of a certain meadow called le Platte Meadow in the Villa de Aghton. [Annals of Southport and District - A Chronological History of North Meols, by E. Bland]

In 1362, Henry le Walsh (corrupted from le Walays) was parson of the church Aghton [source: 32nd Report of the Deputy Keeper of Records, p. 342].

In 1369, John, son of Richard de Walsh, was presented as rector of Aughton. [source: The medieval earthworks of the Hundred of West Derby]

In 1369, John le Walsch and Gilbert le Walsch are cited with tenements in Eukeston, Lanc., held from William de Molyneux of Seston. The latter William also held a manor in Down Litherland. [source: Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire]

According to Baines' History of Lancashire, the manor of Litherland, and one-third part of the Manor of Aughton, &c., with the advowson of the church, passed, in 1371, into the family of Bradshagh.

John son of Richard le Waleys was rector of Aughton between 1369-82. [source: Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, v. 124, 1973]

In 1418, Mabilla, widow of Roger Bradeshagh, settles upon her son Richard the manor of Up Litherland and all rents, &c., except a windmill (aka Aughton Moss Mill) in the said manor. [source: Gleanings Towards the Annals of Aughton, Near Ormskirk]

Elizabeth, who appears to have been contracted in marriage to, and in fact to have married, Gilbert Walsh of Aughton, co. Lanc., for on 22 Dec. 1528 Gilbert Walsh, gent., and others were bound to Thomas Grimshaw in 40 pounds to perform covenants. [source: Remains, historical and literary, connected with the palatine counties of Lancaster and Chester, 1926]

In 1562, John Walshe was Sergeant at Law, Queens Judge at Lancaster.

In 1575, Bertholomew Hesketh was Lord of the Manor of Aughton and Uplitherland, havng obtained it from the Scarisbricks in that year. [source: Gleanings Towards the Annals of Aughton, Near Ormskirk; 1893]

In 1591, Thomas Walshe de Aughton, Gentleman, was in a suit respecting Lydiate Manor, the Hall (Walsh Hall), &c. He was buried in 1593. Walsh Hall, the ancient seat of the family, is now but a name; the ivy-covered porch being the only remnant still standing. [source: Gleanings Towards the Annals of Aughton, Near Ormskirk; 1893]

Walsh Hall, the ancient seat of the powerful family of Waleys, still exists, and was formerly in the lordship of Up-litherland, but is now included in Aughton. [source: Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, v. 32, 1880]

Thomas Walsh died at Aughton 10 June, 1614, and Robert Walsh, his son and next heir, is aged at the time of taking this Inquisition 28 years and more. [source: Lancashire inquisitions returned into the Chancery of the Duchy of Lancaster, v. 16, 1888]

Petition of Frances wife of Thomas Walsh of Aughton, in the behalf of [Robert] Walsh, son of the said Thomas, which showed that Robert Walsh of Aughton and Thomas Walsh (petitioner's husband) by Indenture tripartite dated 15 January 1638-39, in consideration of a marriage before that time solemnized between the said Thomas Walshe and petitioner, and for other valuable considerations, did set out as a jointure for petitioner part of the capital messuage in Aughton with several parcels of land, etc., and all his other messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments (after his death) to his son Thomas during his life, with remainder to the heirs, etc., as by the deed appeared. [source: The Royalist Composition Papers, v. 4, 1898]

Robert Walshe, of Walshe Hall, a quaint edifice in Aughton formerly surrounded by a moat, was son of Thomas Walshe, of the same, by Frances, daughter of Richard Molyneux, of New Hall, in West Derby, co. Lancaster. [source: Publications of the Catholic Record Society, v. 6, 1909, p. 135]

From the list of Wills in the Probate Court at Chester, are the names Richard Walsh of Aughton (1661), Robert Walsh of Aughton, Lancaster (1669), and Gabriel Welsh of Aughton (1674). [source: An index to the wills and inventories now preserved in the Court of probate, at Chester, v. 15, 1887]

Robert Walsh of Aughton, gentleman, 16 Apr. 1719. [source: The registers of estates of Lancashire papists, 1717-1788]


A Possible Connection to an earlier Welsh Prince?:

By his marriage with Alice, daughter of Richard fitz Gilbert, Cadwaladr (ap Gruffydd ap Cynan) had become a landowner in Lancashire and Shropshire (about the middle of the 12th century), and we have a charter by which he made donation of lands between Mersey and Ribble to the Church (dated 1142-1153). [partial source: The age of Owain Gwynedd By Paul Barbier]
NOTE: Aughton in Lancashire was located between the rivers Mersey and Ribble (an area of perhaps 500 square miles), as was perhaps Uplitherland? Cadwaladr (ap Gruffydd ap Cynan) is noted with sons named Richard and Ralph, among others, some descendants of whom who were referred to as 'le Waleys.' [partial source: Walsh 1170-1690, J. C. Walsh]




Aughton and Ormskirk marriages in the IGI :
A John Walshe married Jane Woodhouse October 13, 1546 at Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire.
A Gilbert Walsh of Aughton married Elizabeth Grimshaw [dau. of Thomas] in the middle 1500's. 
A William Walshe married Elizabeth Haughton May 22 1569 at Ormskrik, Lancahire. 
A Robert Walshe of Aughton, born abt 1551, married Margaret ? about 1576. 
A John Weltche, born abt 1556, married Elizabeth Prescott Aug 31 1581 at Ormskirk, Lancashire. 
A Thomas Walshe married Mary Moorecroft April 27, 1584 at Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire.
A Thomas Walshe [chr: 10/28/1577] married Elizabeth Byttrell May 17, 1590 at Aughton. Lancashire. 
A John Walsh married Anne Johnson July 27, 1620 at Ormskrik, Lancashire.


Aughton and Ormskirk baptisms and births in the IGI :
Elizabeth WALSHE - daughter of Robert
    Gender: F Christening: 10 Aug 1574 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Thomas WALSHE - son of Robert Walshe and Margaret, died 1614.
    Gender: M Christening: 28 Oct 1577 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Jane WALSHE - daughter of Robert
    Gender: F Christening: 3 Jun 1580 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Margaret WALSHE - daughter of Robert
    Gender: F Christening: 9 Oct 1589 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Margaret WALSHE - daughter of Gilbert Walshe and Anne Tasker
    Gender: F Christening: 26 Oct 1589 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Eleanor WALSHE - daughter of Thomas
    Gender: F Christening: 18 Jul 1590 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
John WALSH - husband of Anne Johnson
    Gender: M Birth: Abt. 1595 Of Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Anne WALCHE - daughter of Gilbert
    Gender: F. Christening: 7 Apr 1596 Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Gilbert WALSHE - son of Thomas
    Gender: M Christening: 6 Aug 1596 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Henry WALSHE - son of Thomas
    Gender: M Christening: 29 Mar 1598 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Roger WALSHE - son of Gilbert
    Gender: M. Christening: 12 Aug 1599 Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Lawrence WALSHE - son of Robert
    Gender: M Christening: 13 Jul 1600 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Elizabeth WALCHE - daughter of Thomas
    Gender: F Christening: 13 Apr 1601 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Fardinando WALSHE - son of Thomas
    Gender: M Christening: 24 Aug 1603 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Mary WALCH - daughter of Thomas
    Gender: F Christening: 8 Dec 1607 Aughton By Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Robert WALSH - son of John Walsh and Anne Johnson
    Gender: M Birth: 17 Feb 1620 Of Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Robert WALSH - son of John
    Gender: M. Christening: 17 Feb 1621 Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Edward WALSH - son of John Walsh and Anne Johnson
    Gender: M Birth: 26 Dec 1622 Of Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Thomas WALSH - son of Richard
    Gender: M. Christening: 16 Feb 1626 Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
John WALSH - son of James
    Gender: M. Christening: 27 Aug 1627 Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Elizabeth WALSH - son of John
    Gender: F. Christening: 22 Oct 1627 Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
Mary WALSH - son of John
    Gender: F. Christening: Jul 1631 Ormskirk, Lancashire, England



The preceding article was compiled by Dennis J. Walsh, 2009


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