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Walshe and Welsh of Leicestershire
       



Waleys and Walshe of Wanlip, Leicester

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The manor of Wanlip passed, either by purchase or by an heiress, from the family of L'Abbe to that of Walsshe [usually spelt Waleys in the early records]. This is reflected by a fine levied in the year 1248, by which fine one knight's fee in Wanlip (aka Anlep or Onlep) and Shoby (aka Shoulby or Sywalby) was declared to be the right of a certain Agnes who had been the wife of Roger le Waleys [possibly Agnes was an heiress of Abbe] and this fee was entailed on Agnes' son William le Waleys and his issue. Sir Thomas Walsshe, the builder of Wanlip church, was the great grandson of William le Waleys. [source: Reports and papers of the architectural and archaeological societies of the counties of Lincoln and Northampton; v. 3, 1919]

In another version.... The family of Welsh was of great antiquity in Leicestershire. Roger de Waleys married the daughter and heir of Henry de Wanlip, which after this marriage, became the seat of the Welshes. Roger's son Sir William Waleys, Knight, flourished there in the late 13th century. His descendant, Richard Welsh, married 11 Hen. 6 (1433) Eleanor, daughter and coheiress of Alan Waldeive, The Waldieves held a seat near Mereden called Aspath-hall, which divolved to the Welsh family and became known as Welsh Hall (or Walsh Hall). Sir Thomas Welsh, son of Richard and Eleanora, married Margery, daughter and coheir of Sir Richard Bryon. Helen, the daughter of Sir Thomas, married Sir William Lyttleton, whose daughter Joan was wedded to Sir John Aston of Haywood, and brought Tixall and Wanlip in to the Aston family. Sir Thomas Welsh died in 1403. [source: A Topographical and Historical Description of the Parish of Tixall, 1817]

Sir John Walshe of Anlep, by his wife Alicia, had a son Sir Thomas Walshe who was born before the year 1346. Sir Thomas, or his wife, built Wanlip church, in the chancel of which they are burled. In the 1379 tax return of Leicesterhire he is referred to as Thomas Walsche, knight, lord of Wanlip. An inscription on their tomb mentions Thomas Walssh (Walshe, Walsch, Walsh, Welsh), Knight, Lord of Anlep (Wanlip), Leicestershire, and his wife dame Katrine (dated 1393). This was at the church of St. Nicholas, Wanlip, in Leicestershire. Katherine, wife of Sir Thomas, made her Will in 1408, naming four sons; Sir William, John, Thomas and Richard.
The arms of Sir Thomas (in Wanlip Church) are described as 'Gules, two bars Argent, over all a bend of the last'; although the blazon of 'Gules, two bars gemels, and a bend Argent' is also noted for the same family (some say the latter was wrongly identified with 'gemels' by Dugdale).
He is likely the Sir Thomas Walsh, Knight, listed as a member of Parliament for Leicester at different times during the period of 1370 to 1393. And also the Sir Thomas Walsh, Steward of Leicester, who in 1393 held tenements in Wanlip, Cropston, Syston, Thorpe Parva (juxta Narborough, or by Barkby), and Bromkinsthorpe.

The children of Sir Thomas and Katherine included:
- Thomas; who died without issue. His heir was his brother Richard, and/or Richard's son Thomas.
- Sir William. In many accounts he married Mary, daughter and coheiress of Richard Bryon of Clayton, co. Lancaster. Their daughter Elyn (Ellen), widow of Thomas Fielding, esq., secondly married (in 1469) Sir William Lyttleton, knight. William and Elyn Lyttleton had an only daughter, Joan (died 1507), who married Sir John Aston, of Heywood, co. Stafford.
- John
- Richard, married 11 Hen. 6 (1432-33) Eleanor, daughter and coheiress of Alan Waldeive, The Waldieves held a seat near Mereden called Aspath-hall, which divolved to the Welsh family and became known as Welsh Hall. Their children included Elizabeth who married Sir Thomas Malory of Newbold Revel ; and Sir Thomas, who married Margery, daughter and coheir of Sir Richard Burin (Bryon). The daughters and coheirs of the latter Sir Thomas are said to include Elizabeth (married Ralph Shirley of Staunton Harold), Margaret (married John Pulteney of Miserton), and Ellen (Helena) who married Sir William Lyttleton of Frankley, Worcestershire.
- Margaret, who married Sir Thomas de Gresley
- Elizabeth, who married Thomas Boyvill.

The Walsh family's caput at Wanlip was preserved by agreement between the husbands of coheirs. Ralph Shirley III, husband of Elizabeth Walsh, received Wanlip, while William Littleton, husband of Elizabeth's sister, Ellen, was compensated by grants of lands of equal value. (L.R.O. 26D 53/243). [source: A Gentry Community, by Eric Acheson]

Records of the Borough of Leicester:
- circa 1211, Rob. de Anlep (Wanlip) appears as a witness.
- circa 1240, Robert son of Roger de Anlep appears as a witness.
- in 1264-65, Will. Waleys is listed as one of the bailiffs or reeves of Leicester.
- in 1270, Will. le Waleys appears in a list of names summoned by the Gild.
- circa 1281-82, Sir William le Waleys de Anlep (Domino Willelmo Walensi de Anlep) appears as a witness on an assessment of tenants.
- in a list of Guild entries dated 1299-1300 is a Will. de Anelep.
- circa 1307-09, in a list of tallage assessed, the names of Will. de Onleph and Joh. de Onlep appear (each with 6d.)
- in 1309-10, the name Ric. de Anlep appears.
- in 1318, in a list of tallage assessed, the names Ric. Galeys and Joh. Galeys appear.
- in an undated list of receipts (perhaps mid 14th century) is a Joh. Walssh domino de Anlep (lord of Wanlip).
- circa 1369, William Wallensis became a pledge for Amicia widow of Will. Baldwin to pay debt to John Pellet.
- in 1372, the name Will. de Anlep appears in a list of receipts

Wanlip Records  
  • - The arms of Wallis, Welch, or Welsh of Wanlip, Leic., 7 Edward I (1278-79) are Gules, two bars and a bend, Argent. [source: The British Herald, or Cabinet of Armorial Bearings of the Nobility & Gentry of Great Britain & Ireland
  • - William the Welshman (le Waleys) was rector of Wanlip (Anlep'). [source: The rolls and register of Bishop Oliver Sutton: 1280-1299]
  • - Sir William Walley of Wanlip was a witness at an inquisition taken at Leicester in 1281. [source: The Gentleman's magazine, v. 190, 1851]
  • - In July 1282, Sir William Walensis de Anlep, knight, witnessed a grant of land to the Mayor and Community of the borough of Leicester. [source: Records of the borough of Leicester, v. 1 - 1899]
  • - Sir John le Waleys, aka Sir John Walssh, was sheriff of Leicester in the 1340's. He would seem to be the Sir John Waleys, knight, was was among the arrayers of men-at-arms for co. Leicester who accompanied King Edward III on his expedition to Calais in the 1340s. [source: The Fourteenth-Century Sheriff, by Richard Gorski ; and Crécy and Calais, by George Wrottesley]
  • - John Waleys was a member of parliament for the county of Leicester in 1341 and in 1346. In 1347, Roger Waleys was MP for Lesicester. [source: A topographical history of the county of Leicester]
  • - Sir John Walsh (died before 1350?) of Wanlip married Alice, daughter and coheir of Henry Cliff. [source: The House of Commons, 1386-1421]
  • - The arms of John Walshe of Onlep, co. Leicester, are described as "Gules, three bars gemel Argent, over all a bendlet of the last." [source: An alphabetical dictionary of coats of arms belonging to families in Great Britain and Ireland, v. 2, 1874]
  • - Sir Thomas le Walsh was sheriff of Leicester in the latter 1370s. [source: The Fourteenth-Century Sheriff, by Richard Gorski]
  • - Thomas Walsh is listed as a member of parliament for the county of Leicester in the following years: 1370, 1378, 1380, 1382, 1384, 1386-87, 1389-90, and 1393-96. [source: A topographical history of the county of Leicester]
  • - In 1377-78, Sir Thomas Walsh, lord of Onlep, is mentioned, among others, in an enfeoffment of (unnamed) lands and tenements in the counties of Nottingham and Huntington. In 1393 is a grant of the same lands by Thomas Walsh, knight, and others, to John of Wydmerpole. In the latter record, the seal of 'Walsche' was mentioned as 'two gimel bars with a baston, S..." [source: The Ancestor, v. 10, 1904]
  • - In the Surrey Roll of Arms, temp. Richard II (1377-1399), Thomas Walshe bore, "Gules, two gemelles surmounted of a bendlet all Argent."
  • - In 1392, Thomas le Walsh, knight, Steward of our honour of Leicester, is mentioned in a grant made by John of Gaunt, son of the King of England. [source: Records of the Borough of Leicester: 1327-1509, v. 2, 1901]
  • - In 1393 Thomas Walsh had grants of free warren in Wanlip, Syston (Sydeston), Thorpe Parva, and in Cropston (Croptone). By 1395 William Zouch held a 1/2 fee in Cropston per the heirs of Thomas Walsh. [source: A topographical history of the county of Leicester]
  • - In a 1405 inquisition, Thomas Walsh, knight, now deceased, had been granted in June, 17 Richard II (1394-95), a third part of lands in Pakyngton and Ardern. The grant was made by Thomas Boyville, lord of Stokefaston, and the other parts were granted to Thomas de Gresley, the Nevilles, and to the parson of the church of Onlep. [source: Calendar of the Patent Rolls, nos. 1401-1405, 1905]
  • - In 1428, Richard Walshe held a third part of a knight's fee in Onlep, formerly held by Thomas Walshe. [source: Inquisitions and Assessments Relating to Feudal Aids: Kent-Norfolk]
  • - In 1409 it was alleged that Isabel, relict of John Walssh, and others had disseised Robert Abbot, Agnes his wife, and John Overy of a manor at Burton, which Isabel was holding in dower. In 1440 Thomas Walssh of Wanlip, brother of Isabel's husband John, was holding a manor at Burton Overy. [The Victoria history of the county of Leicester, v. 5, 1964]
  • - In 1449, Thomas Walssh, son of Richard Walssh of Wanlep co. Leycestre 'gentilman,' to John Byron knight and Nicholas Byron esquire. Bond in 1,000 marks payable on Easter next day. Dated 14 January 27 Henry VI. Condition that neither the said Thomas nor any person by his assent or procuration shall vex, disturb, put out, sue or implead the said John or Nicholl or Rauf, Nicholl's brother, or any of the issue male of the said Nicholl or Rauf or feoffees to their use of or for lands whereof they are seised, or whereof any other person is siesed to their use. [source: Calendar of the close rolls, v. 5, 1933]
  • On 27 December 1449, Malory's brother-in-law Thomas Walsh of Wanlip contracted to marry Harcourt's sister-in-law Margert Byron. (P.R.O. KB27/754 m. 61d.) [source: The Life and Times of Sir Thomas Malory]
  • - In 1456-57, Thomas Walsh was sheriff of Leicestershire and Warwickshire. Thomas Walsh died in 1463 holding the manor of Burton Overy as well as property in Wanlip. [source: A topographical history of the county of Leicester, by John Curtis]
  • - Thomas Boyville married Elizabeth Walsh. Boyville held the manor of Ilston-on-the-Hill, only 2 miles from the Walsh manor of Burton Overy.
    John Pulteney, who came from Miserton in the far south of the county, married Margaret, daughter of Thomas Walsh from Wanlip, north of Leicester. [source: A Gentry Community, by Eric Acheson]
  • - Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Thomas Walsh, of Wanlip, in Leicestershire, married Ralph Shirley. They only had a daughter, Anne, heir to her mother, who married Sir Thomas Pultney, of Miserton, in co. Leic., Knight, ancestor of the late Earl of Bath. [source: Collins's Peerage of England]
  • - In 33 Henry VI (1454-55) is a grant from Thomas Walssh the younger to Ralah Cromwell lord Cromwell, his heirs and assigns. Quitclaim of the manor of Thrussyngton, co. Leycester, and every rent issuing therefrom, and warrenty against the abbot of St. Peter Westminster and his successors. [source: Calendar of the close rolls, v. 6, 1949]
  • - Memorandum of acknowledgment, 10 May (1456?). Thomas Walssh of Onelep' co. Leycestre esquire, cousin and heir of Thomas Walssh son and heir of Thomas Walssh knight, namely son of Richard brother of Thomas the son, to William bishop of Winchester, William Grey bishop of Ely... [source: Calendar of the close rolls, v. 6, 1949]
  • - Thomas Walssh, esquire, was elected Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicester in November 1456. [source: Lists and Indexes, no. 8, 1897]
  • - A pedigree for Walsh of Wanlip, Leicester appears in Collections for a History of Staffordshire (v.1, 1898). The origin of the pedigreee is noted to be from Nichols' Leic. iii, 1100, corrected by the Will of Lady Margaret Walsh, dated 1421. The pedigree begins with Roger le Walsh and his wife Maud:
    (1) Roger le Walsh, married Maud, dau. and coheir of Henry de Anlep, and had a son ...
    (2) Sir William le Walsh, married unknown wife, and had 3 sons ... [occ. 1281]
    (3) William le Walsh, clerk. Sir Roger le Walsh, died without issue. Robert le Walshe, married Elizabeth, and had a son ...
    (4) Sir John le Walsh, occ. 1320-46, married unknown wife, and had a son ...
    (5) Sir Thomas le Walsh, occ. 1392; died bef. 1421, married and Katharine (Will dated 1421), and had the following children ...
    (6a) Sir William le Walsh, occ. 1421, died without issue
    (6b) John le Walsh, married Isabella (Grey) and died without issue
    (6c) Thomas, occ. 1421, and insane 1439
    (6d) Margaret, married Sir Thomas de Gresley
    (6e) Elizabeth, married Sir John Boyvill bef. 1422
    (6f) Richard le Walsh, , occ. 1421-50, married Elinor Waldiefe, who had dau. Katherine, occ. 1421

  • - A continuation of the above tree is suggested from various sources and genealogical records:
    (6f) Richard le Walsh, married Elinor Waldiefe, who had dau. Katherine, occ. 1421.
    (7a) Sir Thomas Walshe, sheriff of Leicestershire in 1456, married Margaret Bryon
    (8a) Elizabeth Walshe, married Ralph Shirley III of Staunton Harold, Leicestershire
    (8b) Helen, married first John Fielding and second William Lyttleton of Frankley, Worcestershire (the latter marriage in question)
    (8c) Margaret, married Sir John Poultney of Miserton, Leicestershire
    (7b) Elizabeth Walshe, married Sir Thomas Malory of Newbold Revel, Warwickshire
    (7c) John Walshe
    (7d) Katherine (suggested by pedigree above)


    Waleys of Bromkinsthorpe, Leicester

    Danett's Hall here was originally called 'Walsh Hall.' Here the Waleys or Walsh family, early became great landlords holding of the Earl. In the reign of Edward I (1272-1307) it belonged to Thomas Walsh, and in 1279 Thomas Danett held it. An inquest of 1279 records that the abbot of Leicester, William le Waleys, and Simon Danet were the tenants in Bromkinsthorpe, where there were 31 virgates of land. An inquest of 24 Edward I (1295-96), give the free tenants in the West Fields (of or near Bromkinsthorpe) one carucate, in fee of the Honour, being held of William le Waleys, and by him of the Earl. [source: Records of the Borough of Leicester : 1103-1327]


    Waleys of Swithland, Leicester

  • - In the The visitation of the county of Leicester in the year 1619, is a short pedigree beginning with Rob'tus Walleis de Switheland of circa 1270, miles cui Rogerus Quincy. He had a son Johannes Walleis, miles de Swithland, whose daughter Elizabeth married Will'mus Walcott.
  • - In 1255 Roger de Quincy granted lands in Swithland to Robert le Waleys. Among the early deeds is a "Record of a Chapel" built by Robert Waleys, Lord of the Manor of Swithland.
  • - Swithland Hall: A fine gravel walk leads from the Hall, through a shrubbery, to the Church (St. Leonard), which was probably founded before the reign of Edward III., when Robert de Waleys, who then owned the manor, gained permission to erect a chapel within his jurisdiction. It is an ancient structure with a tower and six bells. [source: History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Leicestershire and Rutland, ed. 2, 1863]
  • - In 1314, occurs a grant from Edward II to Oliver le Waleys, son of Robert, of free warren in Swytheland and Dalby-on-the-Woulds. In 1315-16 is a grant, at the instance of Roger de Brabanzon, to Oliver le Waleys, and his heirs, of free warren in all their demesne lands of Dalby on the Wolds, and Swythelound, co. Leicester. In the same year Oilverus le Waleys &c. are mentioned with lands in Swythelond, Cropston, and Bradegate. About 1323-1326, an Oliver le Waleys (Walleis) was Sheriff of Leicester. And in 1327 is a discharge from Oliver le Waleys to the Parson of East Bridgford, for the Manor and Court of Swithland, with the view of franklpeedge, and with the Park of Querndon, which he holds of me.
  • - Circa 1322, Oliver le Waleys requests delivery of his lands, tenements, goods and chattels, taken into the King's hand by the Sheriff of Leicestershire, as he never went against his allegiance to the King, but during the rebellion was in the King's service in the garrison of Nottingham castle, in the retinue of John de Segrave. [source: Parliamentary Petition 8828, The National Archives, Kew]
  • - In 1337, John Waleys of Swythelond acknowledges that he owes to Robert de Knaresbirgh, 10l.; to be levied, in default of payment, of his lands and chattels in co. Leicester.
  • - In 1339 is a conveyance of land in Baddesley (a series of field names cited) made to John Waleys of Swethelond and Agnes his wife, and to Thomas de Stoke of Baddesley Clynton. A reversion failing heirs to John and Agnes Waleys was granted to Thomas son of Nicholas Wace and Margaret his wife (who was the daughter of Oliver Waleys), and failing such then the lands were to revert to the right heirs of Agnes. There is some possibility that Agnes was a daughter and heiress of Stoke. [source: Baddesley Cinton, Its Manor, Church and Hall]
  • - In 1344, a John Waleys was escheator of Warwick and Leicester. [source: Calendar of the Close Rolls]
  • - In 1343-44, John Walleis was sheriff of Leicester. [source: A topographical history of the county of Leicester]
  • - In 1346 John de Wayleis was assessed 2s. for a twentieth part of a knights' fee in Swithland, parcel of the honour of Winton.
  • - In 1352, a John Waleys was sheriff of Nottingham. At the same time a John Waleys was escheator of Nottingham & Derby. In 1352, John Waleys, knight, was granted the manor of Thurmeton, Nottingham, by the prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, in exchange for the manor of Dalby (on-the-Woulds), co. Leicester. [source: Calendar of the Patent Rolls]
  • - In 26 Edward III (1352-53), John Waleys, knight, granted the manor of Dalby to the prior and brethren of the hospital of St. John of Jeruslaem in England in exchange for the manor of Thrumpton, co. Nottingham, retaining the manor of Swithland (Leic.).
  • - In 1362 occurs a grant from Sir John Waleys, Knight, to Nicholas Waleys, his brother, of the manor of Swithland and Brounshay. In 1371 the heirs of John Waleys held 27 vigrates of land in Swithland, which in 1387 Sir John de Walcote held; he having married Elizabeth, the daughter and sole heiress of Sir John Waleys. [source: The history and antiquities of Charnwood Forest]


    Additonal Leicester Records

  • - In 1244, a Roger Walensis was among the witnesses of a grant to the nuns of St. Mary of Longeley near Bredon (Leic.). [source: A descriptive catalogue of ancient deeds in the Public Record Office, v. 1, 1890]
  • - In 8 Edward I (1279-80), Roger (or Robert?) le Waleys and Radulph de Hengham were appointed to take the assise of novel disseisin touching a common pasture in Medbourne, co. Leic. [Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, v. 49, 1888]
  • - Circa .?. is a grant by Roger Walensis, with Maud his daughter, and Avizia her mother, to Nuneaton prioriy of a mansura in Leicester, with notification that Avizia has given to the priory, with herself, [source: Documents illustrative of the social and economic history of the Danelaw, v. 5, 1920]
  • - Members of Parliament for Leicester in 1341 and 1346 included John Waleys, and in 1347 Roger Waleys.
  • - Richard Walsh had been a tax collector for Leicestershire in 1422. His son, Thomas, rose to Sheriff in 1456 and was appointed to commissions of the peace and of array between 1456 and 1460. (Lists and Indexes, IX, p.145; C.P.R. 1452-61, p. 660). [source: A Gentry Community, by Eric Acheson]
  • - On 14 January, 27 Henry VI, Thomas Walssh, son of Richard Walssh of Wanlep, co. Leycestre 'gentilman,' to John Bryon knight and Nicholas Bryon esquire. Bond in 1,000 marks payable on Easter day next. Condition, that neither the said Thomas nor any person by his assent or procuration shall vex, disturb, put out, sue or implead the said John or Nicholl... [source: Calendar of the close rolls, v. 5, 1933]
  • - Indenture made 21 December 27 Henry VI (1448-49) between John Byron knight and Nichole Byron on the one part and Richard Walssh and Thomas Walssh his son and heir apparent on the other part, witnessing that Richard granted to John the marriage of Thomas to be wedded to Margerie the daughter of Richard Bryon before the utas of Purification next, and that Thomas granted that he would take her to wife before then ; also Richard granted that within a month after the said utas he would make an estate by indenture of lands of the yearly value of 20 marks to Thomas and Margerie and to the heirs and assigns of Thomas... [source: Calendar of the close rolls, v. 5, 1933]

    There are various coats of arms attributed to the family of Wanlip, including "gules, two bars and a bend argent," and "barry of five, gules and argent, a bend of the last," both cited temp. 7 Edward I. Another is "gules two bars gemel and a bendlet argent."
    The arms of John Walshe of Onlep, co. Leicester, are described as "Gules, three bars gemel Argent, over all a bendlet of the last." [source: An alphabetical dictionary of coats of arms belonging to families in Great Britain and Ireland, v. 2, 1874]
    For the family of 'Welsh of Upton', co. Leicester the arms are "Argent, on a saltire engrailed Sable, five annulets of the field." [source: An alphabetical dictionary of coats of arms belonging to families in Great Britain and Ireland; v. 2; 1874; Papworth, et al]


    The preceding article was compiled by Dennis J. Walsh, © 2009
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