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le Waleys, Walsch, Walshe
of Llandough, Glamorganshire, Wales
and of Langridge and Hutton in co. Somerset




Forward
  • - In Domesday Langridge manor (co. Somerset), with many others, was held of the Bishop of Coutances, by one Azelin or Ascelin. Before long it became the possession of the family of Walsh or le Walles, who also owned Hutton, near Weston-super-Mare. When Robert FitzHamon conquered Glamorgan, c. 1100, the head of the family seems to have been a follower, as they acquired considerables property there, including Llandough. Here they built a castle, of which some portions still remain, forming part of the present manor-house. Robert Walsh, of Langridge, remembered the Church of Llandough in his will, made 1427. The momumental brass of Gwenlliam Walsh still exists. She was the widow of Walter Morton, Constable of Cardiff Castle, 9 Henry V (abt 1422). [source: Proceedings, by Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, v. 60, 1915]
  • - The Walensis or le Waleys, later Walshe, family was of Glamorganshire descent, and was long seated at Llandough Castle, near St. Mary Church in the Vale of Glamorgan. The castle was described as a 14th century castle with a curtain wall still remaining today, and located at Ordinance Survey Point SS995730.
  • - Walensis or le Waleys of Llandough were descended from men holding of the Earl of Gloucester in 1166. [source: The Development of Welsh Heraldry, v. 1, p. 258]
  • - Families holding single or fractional knights' fees in the Shire Fee (of Glamorgan) in 1166 included: ... Walensis (Llandough). [source: Red Book of the Exchequer, i. 289-91]
  • - The site (of Llandough Castle) lies in the parish of St. Mary Church which was part of the medieval fee of Llandough, held from the early-12th century by the Walsh family (Liber Niger and Liber Rubeus (1166), when the son of Richard Walsh was holder). [source: An Inventory of the ancient monuments in Glamorgan, p. 105]
  • - The family of Wallensis, or le Walsh, whose name speaks their foreign origin, were early settlers at Llandough by Cowbridge, where they built the Castle, and lie buried in the church there. Some of that name found their way to Ireland with the Normans. The name Walsh can therefore claim local association (in Wales). [source: Walsh 1170-1690, J.C. Walsh]
  • - The Parish of Llandough (West) comprises the manor of that name, which at the end of the twelfth century was held by Adam le Walsh (Genealogies of Morgan and Glamorgan, 470). In A.D. 1262 it was valued at £10, and belonged to another Adam le Walsh ( Cartæ et Munimenta de Galmorgan. i. 108). [source: Notes on churches in the Diocese of Llandaff, v. 1-3, 1906]
  • - At the time of the Domesday Survey (1086) Langridge, Somersetshire, was endowed to the Bishop of Coutances. Adam Walensis of Langridge was a witness about 1210, 1225, and again 1230, to land grants made to the Hospital of St. John Baptist at Bath, Somerset. In 1225, Adam le Waleis made good on his claim to a free tenement in Langerig, formerly held by Walter, son of Ralph [S.R.S., XI, 337].
  • - Hutton in Somerset was held by the Church of Glastonbury under Edward the Confessor, and by the Bishop of Coutances, in France, at the time of the Domesday Survey. "Its next principal possessors were the family of le Waleys or Walsh, who held the manor of the Clares, Earls of Gloucester." [source: Walsh 1170-1690, J.C. Walsh]


    Records
  • - By Liber Niger, ca. 1165-66, the son of Richard Walensis (filius Ricardi Walensis) holds one knight's fee (place not named) under William, Earl of Gloucester, and this Richard is the first I know of, and there is little doubt that the fee was Llandough by Cowbridge, which probably included St. Mary Church. This was at the same date that Willelmus de Nerbertone held 4 knights' fees, and Willelmus de Cardi held 1/2 fee. [source: The Normans in Glamorgan, Gower and Kidweli, by Lewis D. Nicholl, 1936]
  • - By Liber Rubeus, ca. 1165-66, Ricardus Walensis (Walsh) held 1 knight's fee at Llandough. This was at the same date in which Milo de Cogan held 2 fees at Cogan, Robertus Norrensis (Norreys) held a fee at Penllin, Lucas Pincerna Regis (Butler) held a fee at St. Donats(?), Robertus de Constantino held a fee at Cosmeston, and Willelmus de Cardi held 1/2 fee at Llantrithyd. [source: Glamorgan, Cardiff Naturalists' Society, 1925]
  • - Among the witnesses of a grant by William, Earl of Gloucester, to his son Robert, circa 1170, of land in Margan (Glamorgan) was Engelram Walensis. [source: Cartæ et alia munimenta quæ ad dominium de Glamorgan pertinent, v. 3, pt. 1, 1891]
  • - Ricardo Walens (Richard Walensis) is mentioned as a witness in a Glamorgan charter dated 1193, entitled "Carta Comitis de Moreton Monsaterio de Margan". This deals with a confirmation by John, Earl of Moreton, afterwards King, to Margam Abbey. Other witnesses included William de Braose and Hamo de Valoines. [source: Cartæ et alia munimenta quæ ad dominium de Glamorgan]
  • - A Richard Walensis was witness to an early grant to the Abbey of Margam, made by Wenllian, or Wenthlian, son of Morgan ap Caradoc (and brother of Leisan ap Morgan). [source: A history of Margam Abbey : derived from the original documents in the British Museum]
  • - A Henrico Walensi is mentioned in a Glamorgan charter of 1196-1205, and in another of 1196-1218. [source: Cartæ et alia munimenta quæ ad dominium de Glamorgan]
  • - In 1205, a Richard Waleis was witness to a charter of confirmation by Morgan, son of Cradoc, to Margam Abbey, regarding a meadow in the march of Avene. In the same timeframe, a Richard Waleis witnesses a charter whereby Roger, son of Wian, confirms by a deed to the Abbey, with assent of Morgan [son of Caradoc] his lord, and of Kenewrech his brother, ten acres of land given to the Abbey by Robert Wian his brother. And agin in the same timframe Richard lw Waleis appears as a witness with Roger, son of Wian, and Kenewrech his brother, in a charter by Res Coh, another of the numerous under-tenants of Morgan, son of Caradoc. [source: A history of Margam Abbey : derived from the original documents in the British Museum]
  • - The name of Adam Walensis occurs, as a witness to various Somerset grants, from circa 1198 to 1230, and onwards. In a 1230 grant to the Hospital of St. John Baptist at Bath, he is called Adam Walensis of Langridge. [source: Medieval Deeds of Bath and District, v. 73, 1974)
  • - In 1225, Adam le Waleis made good on his claim to a free tenement in Langerig (in Somerset), formerly held by Walter, son of Ralph [source: S.R.S., XI, 337].
  • - Adam Walensis was a juror in a Glamorgan charter dated May 1249, between the Abbey and Convent of Neth and Leysanum ab Morgan. Among the other jurors included Ricardus Pincerna, Thomas de Nerebert, Willielmus Flandrensis, Rogerus de Regni, Robertus de Cantelupo, Cradoc ab Meuroc, Grifit ab Reis, Cradoc ab Madoc, and others. [source: Cartæ et alia munimenta quæ ad dominium de Glamorgan]
  • - Prior to about 1249 is a grant in free alms by Adam Walensis, son of Richard Walensis of Langridge (Langerugge), with the consent of Adam Walensis, his son and heir, to the brothers of the Hospital of St. John Baptist in Bath, of all his land in Kingesfeld, with his entire meadow of Ylesford; and of a messuage with a curtilage at Lansdown (Lantesdune) which Nicholas de Montibus held of him. [source: Medieval Deeds of Bath and District, v. 73, 1974]
  • - In 1249, Sir Adam Walensis, knight, was a witness to a recovery of land to the Abbey of Margam against Owen Creic and Morgan his brother, sons of Morgan ab Cadwathlan (Cadwalan). Cadewathlan was the brother of Leisan ap Morgan. [source: A history of Margam Abbey : derived from the original documents in the British Museum]
  • - Circa 1250 is mention of the land of Adam le Waleys belonging to the manor of Hocton (Hutton). [source: Somersetshire pleas (civil and criminal)]
  • - In 1256 Adam Waleys, of Glamorgan, was one of the attendants with Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, on a mission to Frankfort, Germany, at the election of the King of the Romans. [Archaeologia Cambrensis, 1883]
  • - In 1259, Paganus Fitz-John (of the Payne family) brought a successful action against Adam le Waleys, owner of Hutton Manor, and recovered his father's lands in Ladewell, which his powerful neighbor had seized [source; Patent Rolls, 43 Henry III, 13d.] In the Hundred Rolls of 1272, 1 Edward I, is an allusion to three landowners of the time, including Adam le Waleys, Lord of Hucton (Hutton).
  • - Circa 1262, Adam Walensis held the military fee at Landochhe (Llandough), Glamorgan, according to the Extenta Comitatus de Glamorgan (Extent of the County of Glamorgan). He is listed among the primary jurors at that extent. [source: Cartæ et alia munimenta quæ ad dominium de Glamorgan, v. 1, 1885]
  • - The Walensis or le Waleys family, holding the fee at Llandough in 1262, were descended from men holding of the Earl of Gloucester in 1166. [source: The development of Welsh heraldry, by Michael Powell Siddons]
  • - In 1285-86, an Adam le Waleis de Chuluetone is mentioned in the Rot. Pip. for co. Somerset, 15 Edward I.
  • - Circa 1297? (or before), Adam le Walsh was lord of Llandough and, according to local genealogists, he had married Margaret, dau. and heir of Thomas Bosnaber. Their children are said to have included Robert and Beatrice (married Aaron ap Howell vachan). [source: Genealogy of Morgan and Glamorgan, by George T. Clark, 1886, p. 470]
    - Another reference is to a Sir Simon (or Sir Adam) Walsh, Knight, of Llandough by Cowbridge, who married Elizabeth Bawson (or de Baiocis) of Brigan. Some claim it was their daughter, Bettine, who married Aaron ap Howell vachan, their son Sir Thomas ap Aaron, of Brigan, knighted in 1338. [source: Archaeologia Cambrensis, 1868; and, The Archaeological journal, v.29, 1872]
  • - Adam le Waleis of Langridge and Hutton was succeeded by John le Waleys, who, in 1293, presented John Golde to the Rectory of Langridge. [source: Proceedings, by the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, v. 60, 1915]
  • - The arms of a Sir John de Walleys, a baron of 23 Edward I (1294-95), is cited as "ermine a bend gules." [source: Sir George Carew's scroll of arms 1588]
  • John Walsh (I) seems to have succeeded at Llandough by 1289, when when he attested an exchange between Earl Gilbert (II) and Neath Abbey. He appears in 1296/7, and on 3 August 1299, he attended the county court to hear a case of usurpation, appending to the record of the proceedings his heraldic seal. [source: The Later Castles: From 1217 to the Present, by Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, 2000]
  • - Sir John le Waleys, in a 1299 charter regarding the Abbey of Margam taken at the County Court of Glamorgan, sealed with "Ermine, a bend." [sources: The Development of Welsh heraldry, v.1, 1991; and also, A History of Margam Abbey]
  • - In the preambulation of the Forest of Mendip made May 10th, 26 Edward I. (1298), Hutton was the estate of John Waleys. [The History and Antiquities of Somersetshire; by William Phelps, v. 2, pts. 7-8, 1839]
  • - John le Waleys was lord of Langridge manor, 26 Edward I (1297-98), and is mentioned again in 1303 when he held Langridge of Thomas de Gournay for half a knight's fee, and he held Hutton and Elborough of John de Appedam for two knights' fees. [Feudal Aids, IV., 311, 312].
  • - Sir John le Waleys, knight, was a witness at a 1302 Glamorgan inquisition of John de Bonevyle of Bonevyleston, co. Glamorgan. [source: Cartæ et alia munimenta quæ ad dominium de Glamorgan, v. 1, 1885]
  • Circa 1302, Sir John Walensis, knight, was among those who attested to a charter whereby Maurice Ysaac, of Landoch, co. Glamorgan, confirms in perpetual almoign to the monks of Margam, all his marsh called Coganesmor. [source: A history of Margam Abbey : derived from the original documents in the British Museum]
  • - In 31 Edward I (1302-03), is a case between Nicholas son of Ralph de Hull, and Matilda his wife, querents, and Adam de Waleys, deforciant, for the manor of Tykenham. Nicholas acknowledged the right of Adam as by his gift; for this Adam granted the said manor to Nicholas and Matilda. [source: Somerset Fines, VI, 155.]
  • - In 1304-05, Adam le Walshe to retain a messuage and land in Hill (Hulle), Gloucester, acquired by Nicholas son of Ralph, who retains land in Hill and Nymsfield (Gloucester) and in Tickenham (Somerset). [source: Lists and Indexes, no. 17, 1904]
  • - In 1304-05 (33 Edward I), an Adam le Walshe died(?) seized of lands in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire. [source: Journal of the British Archaeological Association, v. 13, 1857]
  • - In 1305 John le Waleys, senior., conceded the manor and advowson of Hutton to Joan, dau. of John St. Lo (Sancto Laudo), for her life [Pedes finium, co. Somerset]. In 2 Edward II (1308-1309), he was John son of Adam le Waleys, who was in dispute with John son of John le Waleys, over the manor of Hutton, juxta Banwell, and the advowson of the church, which Joan, daughter of John de St. Lo, holds for the term of her life, by the concession or gift of John, son of Adam. In a grant of the same time John, son of Adam le Waleys, granted the manor of Hutton to John, son of John le Waleys, who if he should die without heirs, the remainder should go entirely to Christina, his sister. A Sir John de Waleys, of Somerset, at the first Dunstable tournament of 1308, bore the arms of "Ermine, a bend gules."
  • - About 1308-09, is a pardon, upon fine, to Adam le Waleys for acquiring in fee, without the late king's licence, from Nicholas son of Ralph del Hulle, housebote and heybote in two parks belonging to the latter's manor of Hulle, held in chief, and also common of pasture there. [source: Calendar of the Patent Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office: 1307-1313]
  • - From the Court of Chancery, dated 2 Edward II (ca. 1308-09) , we find "Adam le Waleys to retain house-boot, hedge-boot, and common of pasture in the manor of Hill (Gloucester) and two parks there, acquired by him from Nicholas son of Ralph de Hulle."
  • - The manor at Langridge in Somerset was held by Adam le Waleys (Walish) in 7 Edward II (1313-14) "and for several reigns after," who was likely the same as the Adam, lord of Hutton in 7 Edward II (1313-14) who held it by a knight's fee and a quarter (of then deceased Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester).
    In 8 Edward II (1314-15), Adam 'le Walsh' held the manor and advowson of the church of 'Langerugg' by service of one-half knight's fee, and Adam 'le Walesch' held the manor of Hutton, Somerset, by service of one and one-quarter knight's fee. In the same year Adam le Waleys and Joan his wife were in dispute with Robert de Melewych for the manor of Hotton and the advowson of the church there. [source: Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem]
    In 1314-1315, a transfer (of the manor of Hutton) was made to one Robert de Melewych, and at Michaelmas, 1315, Robert re-transferred to Adam le Waleys (and his wife Joan), with the condition that if Adam died without a child or children, the manor was to go to the right heirs of Adam. [source: Proceedings, by Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, v. 30-32, 1885]
  • In 8 Edward II (1314-15), Adam le Waleis held 1 knights fee for Landoghe and Sayntemariechurche, co. Glamorgan [source: Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, v.5, 1908]. Adam also held a fee at West Orchard (St. Athan), Glamorgan, of William, Earl of Gloucester. [source: The Normans in Glamorgan, Gower and Kidweli]
  • The Note-book of Tristram Risdon (publ. 1897), describes the arms of Adam Walleis as "ermine, a bend gules." This is listed under Milites de Comitatu Somersetie tempor Regis Edwardi Secundi.
  • - In 1314-15, Adam le Waleis to grant two-thirds of a messuage and land in Hill by Berkeley, Gloucester, and his reversion in the third part, now held in dower by Isabel le Waleis, to William Martel, retaining the manor of Landoz (sic), Wales. [source: Lists and Indexes, no. 17, 1904]
  • - Circa 1314-15, Adam le Walshe held 1/2 knight's fee for the manor and the advowson of the church of Langerugg, Somerset [source: Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, v. 5, 1908]
  • - Adam le Waleis was a witness of a 1317 charter of William de Berkerole taken at East Orchard. [source: Cartæ et alia munimenta quæ ad dominium de Glamorgan]
  • - An Adam le Walsh was lord of Llandough and St. Mary in 1320. In the same year, Adam le Walsh and Henry de Umfreville received a warrant for provisioning the Castle of Caerphilly. In 1322, a William le Walsh was among the men appointed to raise 1,000 footmen in the land of Glamorgan, to be with the King at Coventry. Adam le Walsh, lord of Llandough, was ordered by Edward II in 1326 to bring 400 men to Cardiff Castle to his assistance.
    - In 1325 Adam le Galeys complained that John son of Joan de Sancto Laudo, and others, broke his houses at Huttone, co. Somerset, and carried away his goods and deeds. [source: Calendar of the patent rolls]
  • - An Adam le Waleys, of Langridge is again mentioned in 1 Edward III (1327-28). A seal of the latter Adam remains, attached to a document, and indicates his arms as "Ermine, a bend gules."
  • - In 1 Edward III (1327-28), an Adam le Galeys paid 8s. for tenements in Langerigge, the largest for any tenant there. An Adam le Walshe paid 12d. for a tenement of the manor of Staple and Corilond in the hundred of Abbedik. [source: Kirby's Quest for Somerset, Exchequer Lay Subsidies]
  • - After Adam, the manor of Langridge was held by Robert le Walish or Walshe. [source: Journal of the British Archaeological Association, 1857]
  • - A Robert le Walsh of Llandough, living in 1327, bore "ermine a bend gules." He married Ann, dau. of Robert German and had children Adam and Sybil (married Robert de St. Mary Church of co. Pembroke). In I Edward III (1327-29), Robertus Wale held a fee at Tykenham, Somerset. In 1346 a Roberto Wallys, armigeris, is mentioned in a charter of Hugh le Despenser.
  • - In March 1330 is a request to the keeper of the land of Glaumorgan (Wales), and an order to assign to Margaret, late the wife of Adam le Galeys of Glaumorgan, her dower of the lands that Adam acquired to him and Joan his first wife, and to the heirs of their bodies, so that the lands should revert to Adam's right heirs in case they died without an heir of their bodies, as Margaret has besought the king to cause dower of the said lands to be assigned ot her. [source: Calendar of the Close Rolls, 1898]
    Also in 1330 is a commitment to Margaret late the wife of Adam le Galeys of Glamorgan of the wardship of two parts of the lands late of the said Adam in the land of Glamorgan, in the king's hand for certain causes, to hold until the lawful age of the heir, rendering yearly the extent thereof. [source: Calendar of the Fine Rolls, v. 4, 1913]
  • - In 1338-39, Robert de Walsh, de Landogh, grants to John, his brother, land, etc., in Milwich (co. Stafford), as free as Sir Rob. de Grendon, his grandfather (by marriage?), formerly held them. [source: Collections for a History of Staffordshire]
  • - A moiety of a knight's fee at Langerugg (Somerset) was held by the heir of Robert le Welsh. At the same time a knight's fee in Landogh and Seyntmarichirche (Glamorgan) was held by John son of Robert le Welsh. Date? [source: Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, v. 9, 1973]
  • - John Walish was patron of Hutton in 1342. In 1346 John de Walish held two knight's fees in Hutton and Elborough, Somerset, which John le Waleys once held, as well as half a fee in Langridge formerly held by William le Waleys (the name William may be an error?). John Walshe of Langridge and John Walshe of Hutton are also mentioned in 23 Edward III (1349-50). The Hutton fee was held of Hugh le Despenser. [source: Proceedings, by the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, v.60, 1915]
  • - John Walsh (II) was lord of Llandough by 1349, when it was valued at £30. He is described as the son of Robert, possibly the Robert Walsh noticed by Clark without documentation as lord of the fee in 1326. [source: The Later Castles: From 1217 to the Present, by Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, 2000]
  • - In 1376, is a release by Robert Walsch son and heir of John Walsch, to Sir Hugh, earl of Stafford, of his right to lands, tenements, rents, &c., called 'Geryngshalgh,' lately called 'Grendoneshalle' in Melewich (Milwich) co. Stafford, and also of other lands, all formerly his father's. [source: A descriptive catalogue of ancient deeds]
  • - In 1394-95, a third of the manor of Langerigg, or Langridge, co. Somerset, was held by William Walssh (Walsh), who had married Alice, widow of Peter de Bratton (died 1383). William and Alice had held various lands formerly belonging to Peter, many of which were granted to Peter's son Thomas after he came of age. [source: The history of the part of West Somerset]
  • - About 1397, a Robert Walsh was a witness of a Kenfig charter in Glamorgan. Another Robert is noted circa 1417 and again circa 1423. He is described as Robert of Llandough by Cowbridge. [source: Index to 'Archaeologia Cambrensis,' 1846-1900]
  • In 1404 Roger Walssche made a dedication to the church of the Blessed Mary at Hutton (S.R.S. 1, 17). [source: Proceedings, by Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, v. 51. 1906]
  • - A Roger Walssche of Hutton made a will on 25, Jan., 1404, his will proven at the Prerogative Court of Canterbury 24 May 1405. The only relative mentioned is his wife Alice. [partial source: Proceedings, by Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, v. 60, 1915]
  • - In the Subsidy Roll, 13 Hen. IV (1411-12), another Roger Walsh holds the manor of Hutton and lands in Langridge and elsewhere. As Roger Walssh, gentleman, of Hotton, Somerset, he made his will 11 November 1425 (proved 26 Nov. 1425-26). He desired to be buried in the chancel of the parish church of Hutton "Where I am a parishioner." No relatives are mentioned.

    At this point the manor of Hutton seems to have descended to heiresses, to the families of Sambroke, Dodesham and Payne. Roger's sister Agnes married Walter Coker of Worle who died before 1419, and secondly married Thomas Sambrooke. Roger's niece, also named Agnes, married Richard Payn in 1419. Roger Walsh's niece Joan married William Dodesham of Cannington. [partial source: Proceedings, by Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, v. 60, 1915 ; ibid., v. 123-125, 1980]
    In 1428, the two knights' fees for Hutton and Elborough were held by Thomas Sambroke, Richard Payn, and John Stodeley, "que Johannes le Walssh quondam tenuit ibidem." [source: Inquisitions and Assessments Relating to Feudal Aids]

    - A daughter of 'Walles of Woolavington' married William Doddesham, junior (who died in 1470), and her arms are described as "ermine a bend sable." William (junior) was a son of William Doddesham, senior (who died in 1480) and his wife Joan (who died in 1472). Elinor, the daughter of William (junior), married Richard Gilbert of Woolavington. [source: The visitations of the county of Somerset, in the years 1531 and 1573].
    - The wife of William Dodesham was named Joan, and she is described as kinswoman and coheiress of Roger Walsh, late lord of Hutton, Somerset. [The register of Thomas Beckington, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 1443-1465]
    - In 1430, William Dodesham, junior, and Joan his wife, held a fourth part of the manor of Hutton, co. Somerset, granted to them by William Dodesham, senior. [source: Pedes finium for the county of Somerset]
    - The arms of Waleys, or Walsh, of Hutton, Somerset, are cited in Collinson's History of Somerset as "ermine a bend sable."
    - The arms impaling Walleys, alias Walsh, impaling Payn are described as ermine, a bend sable. [Stained glass in Somerset, 1250-1830; by Christopher Woodforde].
    - A daughter of John Waleys (Walleys) of Worle, Somerset, married Robert Coker of Bower, Sheriff of Somserset and Dorset, 1 Henry VI (1422-23). The arms for this John Waleys (Wallis) are described as "ermine, a bend sable." [Notes & queries for Somerset and Dorset, v.7, 1901]
    John Walleys of Worle is cited of the family that owned the manor of Woollavington, Somerset. [source: Collections for a Parochial History of Wraxall]
    - A daughter of 'Walles of Woolavington' married William Doddesham (who died in 1470), and her arms are described as "ermine a bend sable." [source: The visitations of the county of Somerset, in the years 1531 and 1573]. The wife of William Dodesham was named Joan, and she is described as kinswoman and coheiress of Roger Walsh, late lord of Hutton, Somerset. [The register of Thomas Beckington, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 1443-1465]

  • - The last of the name at Langridge was Robert Walshe (of Langryge, Somerset and Llandaff, Wales) who made his will on the 6 May, 1427, which was proven in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury the same year. In his will he legacies to his widow Elizabeth, as well as to the Cathedral of Llandaff and to Llanddough. In the Subsidy Roll of 1428 Robert's name is entered as holding a half a fee in Langridge which John de Walsh formerly held.
  • - Robert le Walsh is noted in the genealogies, of Llandaugh, and his daughter Joan (Johanna) married John Stodlegh (Stodley).
  • - West Orchard, a fief of the lordship of St. Athan, held by the family of Walsh until the death of Robert le Walsh c. 1427, when it passed to his two daughters(?). [source: Publications, by South Wales and Monmouth Record Society, nos. 2-3, 1950]
  • - In 1427 "the manor of Llandough and St. Mary Church," with the advowson of the chuches, was confirmed to Elizabeth, widow of Robert Walsh (le Walsshe), late lord thereof. Elizabeth Walsh answered for Llandough in the Beauchamp Survey of 1429, and when she died in 1441 the manor descended to an heiress.
  • - At Llandough Church is a monumental brass of Gwenllian (or Wenllian) Walsh (ob. 1427), sister of Robert, the last Walsh lord [source: The Later Castles: From 1217 to the Present, by Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, 2000]. She is described as the wife of Walter Moreton, constable of Cardiff Caste.
  • - The le Waleys (Walsh) family of Llandough in Glamorgan, Wales are described bearing the arms, "ermine, a bend gules," as suggested in the Visitations by the heralds in Wales. The arms, "ermine a bend gules," were also held by the "le Waleys" family of co. Somerset (above).
  • - Parts of the old manor house of Langridge built by the family were there until recently (1800's), as well as a tomb of Robert Walsh of 1427, and his wife Elizabeth Walshe (Walsche) of 1441. A brass that commemorates Elizabeth Walshe, a lady who died 20 April 1441, sits at St Mary Magdalene Church, Langridge. Robert Walsh left no direct heir, and, subject to his widow's jointure, Llandough and Langridge passed to Alice the daughter of Robert's aunt Johanna, who had married John Stodley, of Wiltshire. Alice, and her husband Thomas Cryklade, presented to Langridge Rectory in 1443 and 1454, and died shortly after, as in 1458 the guardian of their son John made the presentation. Alice Cryklade left three daughters, who eventually became co-heirs of her property. Elizabeth married Drew Sanborne, Christian, the second daughter married Thomas Waldron, and Eleanor, the youngest daughter, married Thomas Hall. [source: Proceedings; by the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, v. 60, 1915]
  • - A Chancery record dated 19 Henry VI (abt 1441) cites Robert Criklade versus Walter Morton, esq., regarding the manor of Llandough and St. Mary. [source: Lists and Indexes, no. 12, v. 1, 1901]
  • - The manor of Llandough and St. Mary Church, and a moiety of the manor of West Orchard, were quitclaimed by Alice (ne'e Stoodley), cousin and heir of Robert le Walsshe, to Sir William Herbert in 1456. [source: Visitations by the heralds in Wales, v. 14, 1996]
  • - Circa 1456, Alice, widow of Thomas Criklade, quit-claimed the manors of Landough and St. Mary Church and the moiety of the manor of West Orchard to Sir William Herbert, knight. [sourrce: Cartae et alia munimenta quae ad dominium de Glamorgancia perinent, v.1, 1910]
  • - In Archaeologia Cambrensis (publ. 1903), the first carved shield on the south door of Gileston Church were the arms of "(Ermine) a bend (gules), a mullet (smalll and centered) for difference," probably those of the Walsh family (of Glamorganshire), who held half the manor of West Orchard in St. Athan, adjacent to Gileston, and also the Lordship of St. Mary Church, near Cowbridge. Elizabeth Welsh, heiress of the elder line, married John de Anne (Van), temp. Henry VI., and so conveyed those manors with Llandough Castle to the Anne (alias de Aune or Van) family, by whom they were subsequently sold. Their son, Payn Van, sold Llandough and St. Mary Church to Sir William ap Thomas (Herbert) of Raglan in 1444, and in 1456, Alice Criklade quit-claimed her interest in the fee to Sir William Herbert, finally ending the last Walsh claim.
  • - On the chancel floor (at Llandough) is part of an ancient memorial brass (one of the very few in the county) to Bettina Walsh (or Welsh) who married John de Anne (or Van) and was a great granddaughter of Stephen Bauzan (Bawson), a famous soldier referred to under Llansannor. [source: Glamorgan: its history and topography]


    The preceding article was compiled by Dennis J. Walsh, © 2009


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