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Walsh of Rathronan
Possible Pedigrees (10)

County Tipperary, Ireland
Names Mentioned in Connection with Rathronan   (not intended to be a lineal descendant chart)

                                 William Walensis (of ca. 1250)     
                                             | 
                                 William le Waleys (of ca. 1281)      
                                             |   
                                  David le Waleys (assumed)      
                     Richard fitz William le Waleys (assumed, of Glenahiry, near Rathronan)      
                                             |   
                               Thomas fitz David Walsh (of 1343)
                                             |   
                                   (missing generations)      
                                             |   
                                   John Walsh (of 1421)
                                             |   
                                   (missing generations)      
                                             |   
                                  James Walsh (of 1537)
                                             |   
                               David fitz James Walsh (of 1548)
                                             |   
                               James fitz David Walsh (of 1601)
                               John fitz David Walsh (of 1601)
                                             |       
                                  James Walsh (of 1642)
                                             |       
                                 David Walsh (of ca. 1652)
                                             |       
                           John fitz David Walsh (of 1630 and 1662)
 
Rathronan is a parish in the barony of East Iffa and Offa, 2 1/4 miles north of Clonmel, in County Tipperary. The Walshs of Rathronan, near Clonmel, appear to have been there a very long time. The family is said to have settled near Clonmel, probably from the time of King John ; the townlands of Mooretown-Walsh, Croanwalsh, and others record their territorial importance. There are a number of entries in the early records which appear to relate to this family.

- Circa 1250 William Walensis was 'lord of Rathronan' [source: Ormond Deeds, i. 106]

- Circa 1278 William le Waleys appears in the record of inquisitions held at Clonmel [source: Walsh, 1170-1690]

- Circa 1281 is a reference to William le Waleys of Rathronan. [source: The Cambrian Journal, v. 4 - 1861]

- In 1291 Gilbert de Pembroke was fined at Waterford for the escape of David le Waleys. [source: C.D.I., v.3, Sweetman, 1879]

- Circa 1293, is mention of Agnes, widow of David le Waleys, co. Tipperary. [source: The Cambrian Journal, v. 4 - 1861]

- In the extent of lands of Thomas fitz Maurice who died in 1298, among the free tenants Robert son of Robert Purcel, 1/2 Teodum in Rathronan for 20s. royal service. Also among the free tenants included William Walensis (the Welshman) 1 Teodum at Glennocher and 1 villata at Balymorthyn. [source: C.D.I., 1293-1301]

- In 1303, Sir Richard Walensis and Odo de Barry, knights, are listed in the extent taken of the manor of Nyncheaunlef (Inch, just northwest of Thurles, co. Tipperary. [source: Red Book of Ormond]

- In an inquisition held in 1305 at Tristledermot before John Wogan, justiciar, Richard le Waleys (Richardum de Walleis), Knight, of county of Tipperary, is listed among the other magnates. [A chorographical description of West or H-Iar Connaught, 1846]

Between 1308-14, Richard le Waleys, knight, acknowledges that he owes Master David le Waleys, dean of Waterford, four marks, which he will pay him immediately, and if not, he grants that the sheriff levy of his lands, etc. Richard le Waleys, knight, acknowledges that he oews Walter Vincent, advocate, forty shillings of silver, which he will pay him immediately, and if not, he grants that the sheriff levy, etc. [source: Calendar of the Justiciary Rolls: I to VII years of Edward II. (1308-1314), v.3, 1905]

- In 1317-18, Sir Richard Waleys who lead an armed band against the Scots (at Louth, Skerries, &c.) seems to have been near Clonmel. The bond (for payment to Richard) of 255 pounds had been given by the abbot and convent of Innislounaght (two miles west of Clonmel). [source: Walsh, 1170-1690]

- In 1323 a Richard le Waleys was one of fourteen of the principal men of Ireland who were called upon by the King to apprehend Roger Mortimer if he went to Ireland. [source: Walsh, 1170-1690]

Circa 1337 (no. 40) - Richard the sonne of William le Walleis, knight, by his deede bearing date the sixt daie of May in the xith yeare of Edward the third did give and graunt unto Walter de Ma[nde]vill all his Mannor of Ballymoltyne with all his members and appurtenances what(sover), fully and as Amplye as the said Richard had the same, To have and to hold [ ] said Walter Maundevill, his heires and assignes for ever by the services due and accustomed together with all liberties and free Customes and other hereditaments to [the said] Mannor belonging with (....) against all men. [source: Analecta Hibernica, nos. 32-34 - 1985]

- In 1343 Thomas fitz David Walsh (with Walter de Maundevill) was involved in the matter of five messuages with their appurtences in Rathronan and Ballybathan (Ballybeaghan, or Ballyvaughan). [Patent Rolls, as quoted in History of Clonmel, by William P. Burke, 1907]

- In the reign of Edward III (1327-1377), John son of Richard son of William Walsh had letters of pardon and protection at Clonmel. [Illustrations, historical and genealogical, of King James's Irish Army List, v. 2, 1861]

- In 1355-56 Thomas Waleys was one of about twenty in "the Cross of Tipperary," who selected Andrew Hackett as sheriff, "the Cross" being a section held by the King outside "the County." He was likely a principal landowner in the cross. Thomas is again mentioned in 1358. [Patent Rolls]

- In 1358-59, Thomas Walshe of Rathronan is mentioned in a suit in the assizes taken at Clonmel, Tipperary. [Ormond Deeds, ii, p.40]

- In 1375, a Thomas Walshe brought suit and received from Clement Carreu, serjeant of Iffa, of the 'issues of the goods of Philip Walshe, forfeited'. Thomas Walsh de Rathronan is mentioned again in this timeframe in the issues and fines taken at Clonmel by Clement Carreu. [Ormond Deeds, ii, p.131 and 135]

- In 1381, Thomas Walsh is among the names summoned before the seneschal of the Liberty of Tipperary, by command of James, Earl of Ormond. [Ormond Deeds, ii, p.187]

- Between 1402-1404, David son of Thomas Walsh was a juror at an inquisition taken before the seneschal at Clonmel. At the same time, John Walsch was a juror at an inquisition taken before the sheriff of the Liberty of Tipperary, again taken at Clonmel. [Ormond Deeds, ii, pp.258-59]

- In 1421 John Walsh was 'of RathRonane' just back of Clonmel, who was among those called by King Henry V to be assessor for Tipperary. [source: Walsh, 1170-1690]

- In 1429, David Walshe and John Frankelyn were granted the townland of Morgheston to hold at the will of the Earl (of Ormond). They shall repair and rebuld a suitable house within the town at the cost of the Earl. [Ormond Deeds, iii, p.55]

- In a 1514 inquisition taken at Clonmel, James Walshe of Rathronan was charged with assault on William Crone on the road near Cahir. [Ormond Deeds, iv, p.16]

- In 1537, James Walys, lord of Rathronan was among the 12 jurors in a verdict of the gentlemen and commoners of the County of Tipperary. [source: State Papers, Henry VIII, Ireland, Vol. V]

- In 1542 James Walsh 'of Rathronan' was one of the "gentlemen inheritors and freeholders" of Tipperary. He was among those who, crushed beneath a load of oppressions, petitioned King Henry VIII, saying that they and their ancestors provide a retinue by which the Earls of Ormond as lords of the liberty of Tipperary right well governed and defended the said county. [source: History of Clonmel, by William P. Burke]

- Receiving pardons in April 1548 included David Walshe, of Raronan (Rathronan), horseman, son of James Walshe, of the same, kern. Pardon of Walter Walshe of Raronan, horseman. [source: Calendar of the patent and close rolls of chancery in Ireland, v. 1 - 1861]

- From 1548 to 1570, David Walsh 'of Rathronan' was a significant land holder of the manors of Knockgraffen and Kilshielan. In 1570 his lands in 'Knockgraffen and Kilshielan' were valued at 50 pounds, an individual amount exceeded only by the Butlers, James Tobin of 'the Comsie,' and James Prendergast. [sources: Calendar of the Carew manuscripts; and History of Clonmel, by William P. Burke]

- James Walsh, Esq., who married Ellen Blanchville widow of Edward Butler of Ballygurteen, was evidently comfortably established at Grealaghbeg (Greaghlaghbegg) in co. Tipperary about 1600 [Lodge: Peerage of Ireland, v. 2, 1754; and v.4, 1789]

- Among the pardons granted by Queen Elizabeth in 1601 included James Walshe fitz David, of Rathronan, co. Tipperary, gent. ; and also John Welshe fitz David, of Rathronan, yeoman ; as well as David Walshe fitz James, of Balliviles, co. Tipperary, gent. [source: Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, v. 17-21 - 1885]

- In 1630-31, John Welsh, son and heir of David W., of Rathronan, co. Tipperary, Esquire, is listed in the Gray's Inn Admission Register. [source: The Register of Admissions to Gray's Inn, 1521-1889]

- In 1640-43, John Walsh of Rathronan (of Ballibatha), a lawyer, served in the General Assembly of the Confederate Catholics. In 1643 he was provided safe conduct to make his repaire to Clonmel, by the Lord Marquess of Ormonde, and that his person, servants, and retinue, shall be safe and free from all danger. [sources: Community in early modern Ireland, by Robert Matthew Armstrong, 2006; and History of the Irish Confederation and the war in Ireland, 1641 [-1649], v. 2, 1882]

- In 1642 the family was still there, for "Captain James Walsh, son and heir of Daniel (David?) Walsh of Rathronan, with James Tobin, son and heir to Thomas Tobin of Reylregannah, a captain among the rebels, and Pierce Butler of Banshagh, son and heir to Sir Richard Butler Knight, and three hundred horsemen," was accused by Judah Sherman, of Ballingarry, parish of Lismore, of driving away his cattle." Land confiscation presumably followed the allegations, a sign of the times. [sources: Walsh, 1170-1690; and Waterford during the civil war, 1641-1653, by Thomas Fitzpatrick. 1912]

In the year 1650, David Walsh, Esq., about eighty years old, was murdered by major Morgan, now sir Anthony Morgan, in the road between Clonmel and Waterford; and one of the said David's daughters, endevouring to preserve her father, was murdered over him; and a grandchild of the said David's, seven years of age, then in the company, was murdered by the said Sir Anthony's own hands, the troopers having absolutely refused to kill him; and several other of the said David's kindred were murdered for no other cause but that his children and relations were active in defending Clonmel for his majesty against Cromwell, and for his son John Walsh, esq., his attending on the lord lieutenant in order to his majesty's service. [source: The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England: Together with an Historical View of the Affairs of Ireland, v. 7 - 1849]

- During the Cromwellian wars and confiscations, about 1650, David Walsh, whose ancestors since the first conquest held Powerstown, was mercilessly slaughtered by Major Morgan on the road to Carrick. [source: History of Clonmel, by William P. Burke]

- David Walsh, deceased, of Rathronan, Esquire, Irish Papist, who held lands in Rathronan, Croane-Walsh, Moorestown-Walsh and elsewhere. John Walsh of Ballybeaghane, Esquire, Irish Papist, who held various lands by a gift of his father David Walsh, deceased, Esquire, of Rathronane. [source: The civil survey: A. D. 1654-1656]

- At the time of the Restoration (of confiscated lands) beginning in 1660, many of the the old Tipperary genetleman returned, some from Connaught where they were transplanted, some from beyond the seas, to get back their lands. Through Ormonde's influence several were restored. Of those mentioned in 1661 included Master Walsh, heir of David Walsh, of Ballybeaghan, co Tipperary, esquire. Of the Walshes of Rathronan, John Walsh, a lawyer for Ormond, received (with the Duke of Ormond) nearly 500 acres in 1662. The vast majority, however, sank in to pauperism at home or entered military service abroad. [source: History of Clonmel, by William P. Burke]

- In 1679 John Walsh passed patent for 1,793 acres in Tipperary, to hold to him, his heirs and assigns, to the the heirs of Patrick Walsh, who was grandson of David Walsh the proprietor in 1641. [Illustrations, historical and genealogical, of King James's Irish Army, Vol. 2. by John D'Alton]

In his book, The place-names of Decies, Patrick Power describes the townlands of Kilgrant parish (bounded on the south by the Suir), including Ballinvoher, Ballyvaughan, Clonwalsh (alias Ballina), Croane (popularly called Croane-Walsh), Moorstown (Baile na Mona, or Ballinamona, popularly called Moortown-Walsh), and Powerstown. Clonwalsh guarded the mountain pass from Clonmel to Carrick-on-Suir.



County Waterford, Ireland
Names Connected with Glinocher (Glenahiry), northern co. Waterford, across the Suir near Clonmel

Kilmanahan was the capute of the lordship of Glenahiry, which had belonged (circa 1340?) to Sir Richard le Waleys of no. 40 (see below), whose relations with Desmond a year or two earlier had been far from friendly. The tuath (teodum) of Glennochar (Glenahiry) had been held in 1298 by William Walensis, perhaps Richard's father of that name, and in 1262 by the heirs of an earlier William. In subsequent times it belonged to the Geraldine descendants of Sir Thomas fitz John. [source: Analecta Hibernica, nos. 32-34 - 1985]

On September 16, 1230, the King to do nothing regarding the affairs of Walter de Ridelesford who offers 60 marks for confirmation of lands which he has of the gift of King John, or of William Walensis, who likewise offers 60 marks for the King's confirmation of the land which he has of the gift of Thomas fitz Anthony. [source: Close rolls of the reign of Henry III; and also C.D.I., v. 1, 1875]

May 16, 1232 - William Walensis makes with the King a fine of 60 marks to have confirmation of a fee called Glinocher in Dessya (barony of Glenahiry in Decies, across the Suir from Clonmel), of the gift of Thomas Fitz Anthony. Mandate to the justiciary of Ireland, that having taken from William security for the 60 marks, he cause him to hold the fee in peace. (source: C.D.I., ii, 1947, p. 289)

William Walensis is mentioned again on September 10, 1234 in connection to chapels he held of the church of Dungarvan, appointing his own chaplains in his district. (Close, 18 Hen. III, m. 6 dors.) [source: Calendar of Documents, Relating to Ireland : 1171-1251; #2165]

In 1262, the tuath (teodum) of Glennochar (Glenahiry) was held by the heirs of William Wallensis [source: Analecta Hibernica, nos. 32-34 - 1985]

In 1298, at an extent of the Desmond property, the tuath (teodum) of Glennocher (Glenahiry) had been held by William Walensis, rendering 6l. 13s. 4d. a year, and does suit. William Walensis holds one villata at Balymorthyn, renders 20s, a year, and does suit. [source: C.D.I. 1293-1301 ; and Analecta Hibernica, nos. 32-34 - 1985;]
Glyynochar - William Wallensis or his heirs hold one Theodum or 11 villate in Glennochar (inquisitions of Thomas fitz Maurice). [source: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, v. 39 - 1931]

In 1303, Sir Richard Walensis and Odo de Barry, knights, are listed in the extent taken of the manor of Nyncheaunlef (Inch, just northwest of Thurles, co. Tipperary. [source: Red Book of Ormond]

In an inquisition held in 1305 at Tristledermot before John Wogan, justiciar, Richard le Waleys (Richardum de Walleis), Knight, of county of Tipperary, is listed among the other magnates. [A chorographical description of West or H-Iar Connaught, 1846]

Between 1308-14, Richard le Waleys, knight, acknowledges that he owes Master David le Waleys, dean of Waterford, four marks, which he will pay him immediately, and if not, he grants that the sheriff levy of his lands, etc. Richard le Waleys, knight, acknowledges that he oews Walter Vincent, advocate, forty shillings of silver, which he will pay him immediately, and if not, he grants that the sheriff levy, etc. [source: Calendar of the Justiciary Rolls: I to VII years of Edward II. (1308-1314), v.3, 1905]

In 1317-18 a Sir Richard Waleys who lead an armed band against the Scots (at Louth, Skerries, &c.) seems to have been near Clonmel. The bond (for payment to Richard) of 255 pounds had been given by the abbot and convent of Innislounaght (two miles west of Clonmel). [source: Walsh, 1170-1690]

In December 1322, the Irish nobles had been summoned to meet the king in Carlisle. The lords summoned (11 in total) ... included Richard le Waleys. Their service was not needed because of the truce. [Publications, by Irish archaeological and Celtic society; and also Jacobi Grace, Kilkenniensis, Annales Hiberniae]

At the instance of Richard le Waleys, knight, and for the good service in Waterford often done and hereafter to be done by him to the King... [Calendar of the justiciary rolls, or, Proceedings in the Court of the Justiciar of Ireland, I to VII years of Edward II]

In 17 Edward II (1323-24), Sir Richard le Waleys was serving on a parliament held in Dublin. [Dignities, feudal and parliamentary, by William Betham]

In 18 Edward II (ca. 1324) Thomas fitz John, Earl of Kildare, was summoned to war in Aquitane. Others who were summoned (from Ireland) included Richard le Waleys (who is listed after Herbert de Marisco) [Calendar of the patent rolls, v. 4 - 1908]

Circa 1337 (no. 40) - Richard the sonne of William le Walleis, knight, by his deede bearing date the sixt daie of May in the xith yeare of Edward the third did give and graunt unto Walter de Ma[nde]vill all his Mannor of Ballymoltyne with all his members and appurtenances what(sover), fully and as Amplye as the said Richard had the same, To have and to hold [ ] said Walter Maundevill, his heires and assignes for ever by the services due and accustomed together with all liberties and free Customes and other hereditaments to [the said] Mannor belonging with (....) against all men. [source: Analecta Hibernica, nos. 32-34 - 1985]

Probably in 1339 Desmond produced in the justicar's court a most curious letter, which now survives only in a sadly blundered transcript. His aim was to gain official support against men who he believed to be plotting against him. The letter was from Richard le Waleys to an unnamed Waterford lord. Richard's main theme was the common threat he and the addressee faced from the earl; and he hinted darkly at the possibility of arranging Desmond's assassination. The letter includes a claim that Desmond and the bishop of Hereford were in league, ... [source: English Lordship in Ireland, 1318-1361 By Robin Frame]

In 1345-46 the justiciary of Ireland did many injuries to both churchmen and laymen; but he deprived of their possessions all the bailsmen of Maurice Earl of Desmond, whose names are William de Burgh Earl of Ulster, James Butler Earl of Ormonde, ...., Sir Richard Walles (le Waleys), ...; although in this war some of them had assisted him at their own expense; and he submitted their bodies to the king's will... [source: Jacobi Grace, Kilkenniensis, Annales Hiberniae; 1842]

In the time of Edward III (1327-1377), John son of Richard son of William Walsh had letters of pardon and protection at Clonmel. [source: Illustrations, Historical and Genealogical, of King James's Irish Army List]

The preceding article was compiled by Dennis J. Walsh, 2009



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