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The Mt. Adams Sun, Bingen, WA., May 7, 1964, page 6
Includes a photograph titled:
THE LAST RUN - "Old Number Seven", last Shay logging locomotive in the Pacific Northwest, made her final run at Klickitat last Saturday, May 2, for the St. Regis Paper Company. Of all the steam locomotives that crashed through the woods in the heyday of logging, the Shay was the loggers' favorite. She could go anywhere tracks could be laid. Her geared underpinning gave her the power to climb the side of the cliff where other locomotives could not venture. St. Regis has replaced the Shay with diesel trucks to supply its pine sawmill at Klickitat. But the Shay will always be remembered as the symbol of the most colorful era in the logging industry.

LAST RUN OF OLD "NUMBER SEVEN" ENDS COLORFUL ERA IN LOGGING

     Klickitat (May 2) A colorful era in logging history came to an end here today when St. Regis Paper Company terminated operation of its Shay locomotives - the last steam logging railroad in the Pacific Northwest.
     "Old Number Seven" and it's 70-ton running mate, Number Five, which have been hauling logs for the past quarter of a century from timber lands near Mt. Adams to the J. Neils sawmill at Klickitat have been replaced by diesel logging trucks.
     At today's brief ceremonies, company officials, state dignitaries and railroad executives paid their last respects by taking a final ride behind the colorful old locomotive.
     William H. Haselton, St. Regis vice president and Northwest manager, sadly committed the 35-year-old Shays to history. He told the group one Shay had been sold to a Midwest firm. The other will go on permanent display - probably at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma.

Puffer Bellies

     Steam railroad logging reached its peak of around the turn of the century. Although there were other steam logging locomotives in the woods, the Shay was always the loggers' favorite puffer belly.
     It has geared underpinning which gives power to all the right hand wheels on the locomotive and tender. It could climb grades and switchbacks which other locomotives could not negotiate. As loggers followed the timber up steep mountainsides, the old Shays chugged right along with the fallers and buckers.
     Speed was never a characteristic of the Shay. One old logger drawled, "The Shay could do 13 miles an hour if the grade was with her . . . maybe a little faster off the edge of the cliff."
     Another old timber beast said, "The Shay sounds like 100 miles an hour and looks like hesitation mixed with uncertainty."

Last Shays

     The Shay endured at Klickitat because of the unusual terrain. St. Regis pine sawmill is located at the base of the rock-walled Klickitat Canyon. The company's timber sources are on a plateau above the canyon.
     The Shay excelled in climbing the steep tortuous canyon to collect a trainload of logs and ease them back down the cliff to the mill. But new road construction finally made the Shays obsolete.
     "Old Number Seven" was one of the most photographed locomotives in the country. Thousands of railroad fans have visited Klickitat to ride and photograph her.
     The Shay's pictures have appeared in newspapers throughout the country and in many magazines including the "Face of America" series in the Saturday Evening Post.
     Other railroad buffs have tape recorded her sounds as she clawed up the steep railroad grades at Klickitat.
     St. Regis has filmed in color and sound a 16 mm motion picture of the Shay which will be available for public viewing.
     Meanwhile, at Klickitat, old timers will miss the sound of her whistle and bell echoing thru the canyon.
     Those sounds were the symbol of a logging era which today passed into history.


The Enterprise, White Salmon, WA., May 7, 1964, page 1
Includes photograph

LOGGING ERA END FOR OLD SHAY ENGINE

      A colorful era in logging history ended Saturday in Klickitat, south-central Washington lumber town. St. Regis Paper Company terminated operation of it's Shay locomotives - the last steam logging railroad in the Pacific Northwest. "Old Number Seven" and it's 70-ton running mate, Number Five, which have been hauling logs for the past quarter of a century from timberlands near Mt. Adams to the pine sawmill of the company's J. Neils Operations at Klickitat have been replaced by diesel logging trucks.
     At Saturdays ceremonies, company officials, state dignitaries and railroad executives paid their last respects by taking a final ride behind the colorful old locomotive.
     William R. Haselton, St. Regis vice president and Northwest manager, sadly committed the 35-year-old Shays to history. He told the group one Shay has been sold to a Midwest firm. The other will go on permanent display - probably at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma.
     Steam railroad logging reached its peak in that turbulent and boisterous era about the turn of the century. Although there were other steam logging locomotives in the woods, the Shay was always the loggers' favorite. It was credited with doing more for the industry than any other puffer belly.
     It has geared underpinning which gives power to all the right hand wheels on the locomotive and tender. It could grades and switchbacks which other locomotives could not negotiate. As loggers followed the timber up steep mountainsides, the old Shays chugged right along with the fallers and buckers.
     Speed was never a distinguishing characteristic of the Shay. One old logger drawled, "The Shay could do 13 miles an hour if the grade was with her . . . maybe a little faster off the edge of the cliff."
     Another old timer beast said, "The Shay sounds like 100 miles an hour and looks like hesitation mixed with uncertainty."
     The Shay endured at Klickitat because of the unusual terrain. St. Regis' pine sawmill is located at the base of the rock-walled Klickitat Canyon. The are on a plateau above the canyon. The Shays excelled in climbing the steep tortuous canyon to collect a trainload of logs and ease them back down the cliff to the mill. But new road construction finally made the Shays obsolete.
     "Old Number Seven" was one of the most photographed locomotives in the country.  Through the years of her operation, thousands upon thousands of railroad fans have visited Klickitat to ride and photograph her. The Shay's picture has appeared in newspapers throughout the country and in many magazines including the "Face of America" series in the Saturday Evening Post. Other railroad buffs have tape recorded her sounds as she clawed up the steep railroad grades at Klickitat.
     St. Regis has filmed in color and sound a 16 mm motion picture of the Shay which will be available for public viewing later this spring.
     Meanwhile, at Klickitat, old timers will miss the sound of her whistle and bell echoing thru the canyon. Those sounds were the symbol of a logging era which today passed into history.

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©  Jeffrey L. Elmer