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The West Klickitat News, Bingen, WA., August 21, 1936, page 4

NON YOUNG IS EARLY PIONEER OF KLICKITAT

     Mr. Non Young, one of the earliest settlers in Klickitat, told some interesting stories of what really took place here.
     Mr. Young came to Klickitat by hiking over the hill from the Columbia river, carrying a hundred pound pack sack on his back. He came here with Ed Wright later of Hood River, now dead.
     Klickitat at that time was nothing but an Indian camp. The main camps, however, were at Wahkiacus and at the Skookum Wallihee place south of the town. The Indians usually stopped at the site now called Klickitat on their way to and from camp to camp. Another of the main camps was at Lyle and Major Creek. The name of the Indian chief at that time was Joe. His last name is not known.
     The Western Pine and Lumber company came to Klickitat in 1909, which was bought out by the J. Neils Lumber company in 1922. After the Neils lumber company came to Klickitat the townsite was laid out.

INDIAN TROUBLESOME

     There was some trouble with Indians during the time Mr. Young first came here. Mr. Wright and he homesteaded some land. The Indians, thinking they had claim to it as much as the two whites began prowling about the house night and causing a general nightly trouble. They finally did force the whites to leave the property, but they soon came back and remained. Mr. Young has an original Indian bow he found in the Klickitat area. Its age is unknown.

BOTTLING WORKS EARLY

     The bottling works at the mineral springs was installed here in 1911 by Mr. Robinson and has been built since that time to quite a plant. A story on the plant is in another column on this page.
     Mr. Young was in the cavalry in the Spanish American war, and displayed a cavalry sword he carried during his enlistment. He now lives in the town of Klickitat, and is an ardent photographer, having taken several fine pictures of the town of Klickitat and the cliffs surrounding the town.

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©  Jeffrey L. Elmer