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The Hood River Glacier, Hood River, OR., March 28, 1902, page 3

DROWNING OF JOHN EGAN

     John Egan, a young man living with his parents at White Salmon, was drowned Monday night under the following circumstances: Ed Fewel, Jas. Dark and John Egan crossed the Columbia in a sailboat from Hood River about 1 o'clock Tuesday morning. When the boat arrived within eight or ten feet of the landing at White Salmon, Ed Fewel left the tiller and went to the bow of the boat to keep it from striking the rocks, and at the same time asked Egan to take the tiller. Fewel noticing the boat was swinging round in the current, looked back and saw Egan in the water. He had fallen overboard upstream. Fewel threw a rope to Egan, but the latter failed to catch it. He then threw an oar, but the unfortunate man also failed to catch the oar. In the moonlight Fewel could see Egan drifting for about one hundred feet from the boat. He was swimming and trying to make the shore against the strong current that flows out at that point. Ira Rowland and Fewel then started down the stream in a boat, looking for Egan. They went as far as Underwood landing, but their search was unavailing. On their way back they picked up the oar that had been thrown to Egan.
     The accident has cast a gloom over the White Salmon community, more especially on account of the condition of the boy's father, who is very ill, and is hardly able to bear this additional burden in his weakened state. John G. Egan was the eldest son of John P. and Margaret Egan, and was 21 years of age. He was born on the White Salmon homestead, as were the other children of Mr. and Mrs. Egan. He was a member of the White Salmon assembly of the United Artisans, and carried an insurance policy in that order.


The Klickitat County Agriculturist, Goldendale, WA., April 5, 1902, page 3
“The Week’s Record”
this was a poor copy and difficult to read

            John Egan, aged 21 years, son of John P. Egan of White Salmon, was drowned on March 24th in the Columbia river near the landing at White Salmon.  He and two companions were in the boat and were getting ready to tie up at the landing, when young Egan fell overboard.  He was not able to grab a rope thrown to him and was last seen about ____ feet from the boat.  The Hood River Glacier says that the accident has cast a gloom over the White Salmon community, more especially on account of the condition of the boy’s father, who is very ill, and is hardly able to bear this additional burden in his weakened state. John _. Egan was the oldest son of John P. Egan and Margaret Egan, and was 21 years of age.  He was born on the White Salmon homestead, as were the other children of Mr. and Mrs. Egan.  He was a member of the White Salmon assembly of United Artisans, and carried an insurance policy in that order.